Dr. Sara Diaz
WGST 202: Gender, Difference, and Power
Gonzaga University
Globalization and
Immigration
Push-Pull Factors
Push Factors Pull Factors
Economic Globalization has created
economic voids as a result of
diminished lo...
Remittances USD 2010/2011
Remittances US Aid % of GDP
Mexico 23.5 Billion 5.6 Billion 2%
Philippines 22.8 Billion 122.7 Mi...
Feminization of Migration
• Increasing number of women who, because of
low-wage and dangerous work in their home
countries...
Remittances → Care Crisis
• Remember: Choices vs Options
• “The labor of women from poorer nations
‘serves as the infrastr...
Patel – Shilling Love
• How is Patel’s experience a legacy of
“empire”? Of migration?
• How could we use Hartman & Barajas...
Response Question
What is the relationship between
globalization and immigration?
Globalization Everyday
• Option A:
• Pick an item you have with you. Where did it come from? Whose
hands have touched it? ...
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WGST 202 Day 23 Immigration

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  • http://www.tageswoche.ch/+besxb
    http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/BX.TRF.PWKR.DT.GD.ZS
  • The Philippines were first colonized by Spain. Filipinos sought help from US to gain independence from Spain, Instead, the Treaty of Paris (1898), which ended the Spanish-American War, granted US control over the Philippines (as well as Puerto Rico and Guam). So, they had really fought just to change their colonizer. During WWII the Philippines were occupied by Japan. Full independence gained in 1946. Important to keep this history of colonization and occupation in mind when we think about the Philippines.
  • WGST 202 Day 23 Immigration

    1. 1. Dr. Sara Diaz WGST 202: Gender, Difference, and Power Gonzaga University Globalization and Immigration
    2. 2. Push-Pull Factors Push Factors Pull Factors Economic Globalization has created economic voids as a result of diminished local economies The presence of industrial zones including agriculture, service work, natural resource extraction Political Wars, ethnic conflicts, political instability and political persecution Political tolerance (or the perception of it) Environmental Both globalization and militarism cause environmental devastation. Global climate change is increasing the frequency and magnitude of weather related natural disasters. Stable, temperate, resource rich environments with low levels of pollution
    3. 3. Remittances USD 2010/2011 Remittances US Aid % of GDP Mexico 23.5 Billion 5.6 Billion 2% Philippines 22.8 Billion 122.7 Million 10.3% India 63 Billion 5.4 Billion 3.4% China 61.4 Billion 1.1 Billion 0.6%
    4. 4. Feminization of Migration • Increasing number of women who, because of low-wage and dangerous work in their home countries migrate to other nations in search of employment. • Women workers send "remittances" back to family. • Philippines-export women to work as essentially indentured servants, the women send money back, and their families can use that money in the local economy.
    5. 5. Remittances → Care Crisis • Remember: Choices vs Options • “The labor of women from poorer nations ‘serves as the infrastructure on which First World economic expansion depends.’” • Who cares for upper middle class women’s children while they pursue their careers? • Parreñas – Care Crisis • History Philippine Occupation/Colonization • Restructuring of family formations • Effects?
    6. 6. Patel – Shilling Love • How is Patel’s experience a legacy of “empire”? Of migration? • How could we use Hartman & Barajas- Roman’s definitions of environmental/reproduction justice to understand the experiences Patel outlines in her poem? • Connections to the bell hooks piece?
    7. 7. Response Question What is the relationship between globalization and immigration?
    8. 8. Globalization Everyday • Option A: • Pick an item you have with you. Where did it come from? Whose hands have touched it? What exploitations are embedded in it? IMAGINE. How could you resist or undermine those exploitations. • Write a poem, collectively, about how we can resist the exploitation embedded in the products we consume. • Option B: • Identify the forces of globalization on our campus. Where does Gonzaga fit in the system of global capital? What resources do we take for granted here that might be causing human and environmental suffering elsewhere? How does it make you feel? • Write a poem, collectively, about the impact of Gonzaga’s global economic/environmental footprint, designed to encourage action on the part of your classmates.
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