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Using web 2
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Using web 2

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What is Web 2.0? What are the ideals it is based on? What are popular web 2.0 tools? What are weaknesses and challenges? How are web 2.0 tools integrated in schools? How do we create a strategic plan …

What is Web 2.0? What are the ideals it is based on? What are popular web 2.0 tools? What are weaknesses and challenges? How are web 2.0 tools integrated in schools? How do we create a strategic plan for our school's web 2.0 use?

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  • In this presentation we will go over what web 2.0 is and how it could be integrated into education, and we’ll end with a brainstorm that will help us figure out how to best integrate web 2.0 into this school.
  • Starting with the basics: what is web 2.0?
  • What is Web 2.0? Simply put, it’s online collaboration. The internet has allowed us to communicate and interact with media in ways we’ve never seen before.
  • The internet is no longer an information dump. Rather, data is tailored to the user’s needs and wants.
  • Web 2.0 strategies focus on the following ideas. Social networking allows people to create communities online. This includes your popular web-based communities, as well as course management software and listservs. The new information model doesn’t require people to seek information; rather, you can select which data comes to you, and you can customize when and how you receive your information. Rich content utilizes multiple media like video, audio, hyperlinks, and text to provide and individualize the information your user would be interested in. More data is stored online and in formats that will show up on laptops, tablets, and phones. Linked data allows you to create relationships between information elements and locate data using those relationships. Free data is the opposite of proprietary data; in the new model, information is not “owned” but rather should be shared openly and with as little cost to the user as possible.
  • Web 2.0 strategies focus on the following ideas. Collaboration allows web 2.0 users to create content in a cooperative effort. Collaboration trusts users to add valuable content that can inform decisions and opinions. It allows for improvement and correction. It also allows for a string of conversation to develop, for data to evolve and repeat, and for creating cultural icons subject to mutation, adaptation and crossover. Social networking allows people to create communities online. This includes your popular web-based communities, as well as course management software and listservs. The new information model doesn’t require people to seek information; rather, you can select which data comes to you, and you can customize when and how you receive your information. Rich content utilizes multiple media like video, audio, hyperlinks, and text to provide and individualize the information your user would be interested in. More data is stored online and in formats that will show up on laptops, tablets, and phones. Linked data allows you to create relationships between information elements and locate data using those relationships. Free data is the opposite of proprietary data; in the new model, information is not “owned” but rather should be shared openly and with as little cost to the user as possible.
  • Web 2.0 strategies focus on the following ideas. Collaboration allows web 2.0 users to create content in a cooperative effort. Collaboration trusts users to add valuable content that can inform decisions and opinions. It allows for improvement and correction. It also allows for a string of conversation to develop, for data to evolve and repeat, and for creating cultural icons subject to mutation, adaptation and crossover. Social networking allows people to create communities online. This includes your popular web-based communities, as well as course management software and listservs. The new information model doesn’t require people to seek information; rather, you can select which data comes to you, and you can customize when and how you receive your information. Rich content utilizes multiple media like video, audio, hyperlinks, and text to provide and individualize the information your user would be interested in. More data is stored online and in formats that will show up on laptops, tablets, and phones. Linked data allows you to create relationships between information elements and locate data using those relationships. Free data is the opposite of proprietary data; in the new model, information is not “owned” but rather should be shared openly and with as little cost to the user as possible.
  • Web 2.0 strategies focus on the following ideas. Collaboration allows web 2.0 users to create content in a cooperative effort. Collaboration trusts users to add valuable content that can inform decisions and opinions. It allows for improvement and correction. It also allows for a string of conversation to develop, for data to evolve and repeat, and for creating cultural icons subject to mutation, adaptation and crossover. Social networking allows people to create communities online. This includes your popular web-based communities, as well as course management software and listservs. The new information model doesn’t require people to seek information; rather, you can select which data comes to you, and you can customize when and how you receive your information. Rich content utilizes multiple media like video, audio, hyperlinks, and text to provide and individualize the information your user would be interested in. More data is stored online and in formats that will show up on laptops, tablets, and phones. Linked data allows you to create relationships between information elements and locate data using those relationships. Free data is the opposite of proprietary data; in the new model, information is not “owned” but rather should be shared openly and with as little cost to the user as possible.
  • Web 2.0 strategies focus on the following ideas. Collaboration allows web 2.0 users to create content in a cooperative effort. Collaboration trusts users to add valuable content that can inform decisions and opinions. It allows for improvement and correction. It also allows for a string of conversation to develop, for data to evolve and repeat, and for creating cultural icons subject to mutation, adaptation and crossover. Social networking allows people to create communities online. This includes your popular web-based communities, as well as course management software and listservs. The new information model doesn’t require people to seek information; rather, you can select which data comes to you, and you can customize when and how you receive your information. Rich content utilizes multiple media like video, audio, hyperlinks, and text to provide and individualize the information your user would be interested in. More data is stored online and in formats that will show up on laptops, tablets, and phones. Linked data allows you to create relationships between information elements and locate data using those relationships. Free data is the opposite of proprietary data; in the new model, information is not “owned” but rather should be shared openly and with as little cost to the user as possible.
  • Web 2.0 strategies focus on the following ideas. Collaboration allows web 2.0 users to create content in a cooperative effort. Collaboration trusts users to add valuable content that can inform decisions and opinions. It allows for improvement and correction. It also allows for a string of conversation to develop, for data to evolve and repeat, and for creating cultural icons subject to mutation, adaptation and crossover. Social networking allows people to create communities online. This includes your popular web-based communities, as well as course management software and listservs. The new information model doesn’t require people to seek information; rather, you can select which data comes to you, and you can customize when and how you receive your information. Rich content utilizes multiple media like video, audio, hyperlinks, and text to provide and individualize the information your user would be interested in. More data is stored online and in formats that will show up on laptops, tablets, and phones. Linked data allows you to create relationships between information elements and locate data using those relationships. Free data is the opposite of proprietary data; in the new model, information is not “owned” but rather should be shared openly and with as little cost to the user as possible.
  • Web 2.0 strategies focus on the following ideas. Collaboration allows web 2.0 users to create content in a cooperative effort. Collaboration trusts users to add valuable content that can inform decisions and opinions. It allows for improvement and correction. It also allows for a string of conversation to develop, for data to evolve and repeat, and for creating cultural icons subject to mutation, adaptation and crossover. Social networking allows people to create communities online. This includes your popular web-based communities, as well as course management software and listservs. The new information model doesn’t require people to seek information; rather, you can select which data comes to you, and you can customize when and how you receive your information. Rich content utilizes multiple media like video, audio, hyperlinks, and text to provide and individualize the information your user would be interested in. More data is stored online and in formats that will show up on laptops, tablets, and phones. Linked data allows you to create relationships between information elements and locate data using those relationships. Free data is the opposite of proprietary data; in the new model, information is not “owned” but rather should be shared openly and with as little cost to the user as possible.
  • Nothing’s perfect, including web 2.0 tools. Based off of what I’ve told you, what weaknesses and challenges can you think of?
  • Privacy: we’re talking the world-wide web. That means without privacy controls, your information is accessible to everyone. There is already a vast amount of information about you online. Let’s try googling your name.Security: Web 2.0 tools are meant to share information, but can also share much more than that. Viruses, Trojans, and other malware are easily spread using these technologies. Be aware of what links you click on and what apps you allow to access your data. Don’t click on advertisements, and don’t download or accept anything without reading the fine print or running your virus scanner.Lack of authority: There is no editor validating the sources on a wiki; there is no librarian telling you which websites are authoritative, and which are not. Information appears, disappears, and changes depending on the author and the time you access it. Web 2.0 allows you to share information—even misinformation.Misuse 1: organizations don’t have the systems or the culture to support use of Web 2.0 technologies. Be very aware of how you are going to utilize Web 2.0 and make sure that your stakeholders are on board; otherwise, you have wasted money, time, and effort. Moreover, too much technology at once will overwhelm everyone. Experimentation is great, if you have the resources. Pilot your programs, evaluate them, and share your results so that others can learn from your experiences. Misuse 2: If you have to post your cat pictures and your political rants, save it for your personal blog or Facebook account.
  • Privacy: we’re talking the world-wide web. That means without privacy controls, your information is accessible to everyone. There is already a vast amount of information about you online. Let’s try googling your name.Security: Web 2.0 tools are meant to share information, but can also share much more than that. Viruses, Trojans, and other malware are easily spread using these technologies. Be aware of what links you click on and what apps you allow to access your data. Don’t click on advertisements, and don’t download or accept anything without reading the fine print or running your virus scanner.Lack of authority: There is no editor validating the sources on a wiki; there is no librarian telling you which websites are authoritative, and which are not. Information appears, disappears, and changes depending on the author and the time you access it. Web 2.0 allows you to share information—even misinformation.Misuse 1: organizations don’t have the systems or the culture to support use of Web 2.0 technologies. Be very aware of how you are going to utilize Web 2.0 and make sure that your stakeholders are on board; otherwise, you have wasted money, time, and effort. Moreover, too much technology at once will overwhelm everyone. Experimentation is great, if you have the resources. Pilot your programs, evaluate them, and share your results so that others can learn from your experiences. Misuse 2: If you have to post your cat pictures and your political rants, save it for your personal blog or Facebook account.
  • Privacy: we’re talking the world-wide web. That means without privacy controls, your information is accessible to everyone. There is already a vast amount of information about you online. Let’s try googling your name.Security: Web 2.0 tools are meant to share information, but can also share much more than that. Viruses, Trojans, and other malware are easily spread using these technologies. Be aware of what links you click on and what apps you allow to access your data. Don’t click on advertisements, and don’t download or accept anything without reading the fine print or running your virus scanner.Lack of authority: There is no editor validating the sources on a wiki; there is no librarian telling you which websites are authoritative, and which are not. Information appears, disappears, and changes depending on the author and the time you access it. Web 2.0 allows you to share information—even misinformation.Misuse 1: organizations don’t have the systems or the culture to support use of Web 2.0 technologies. Be very aware of how you are going to utilize Web 2.0 and make sure that your stakeholders are on board; otherwise, you have wasted money, time, and effort. Moreover, too much technology at once will overwhelm everyone. Experimentation is great, if you have the resources. Pilot your programs, evaluate them, and share your results so that others can learn from your experiences. Misuse 2: If you have to post your cat pictures and your political rants, save it for your personal blog or Facebook account.
  • Privacy: we’re talking the world-wide web. That means without privacy controls, your information is accessible to everyone. There is already a vast amount of information about you online. Let’s try googling your name.Security: Web 2.0 tools are meant to share information, but can also share much more than that. Viruses, Trojans, and other malware are easily spread using these technologies. Be aware of what links you click on and what apps you allow to access your data. Don’t click on advertisements, and don’t download or accept anything without reading the fine print or running your virus scanner.Lack of authority: There is no editor validating the sources on a wiki; there is no librarian telling you which websites are authoritative, and which are not. Information appears, disappears, and changes depending on the author and the time you access it. Web 2.0 allows you to share information—even misinformation.Misuse 1: organizations don’t have the systems or the culture to support use of Web 2.0 technologies. Be very aware of how you are going to utilize Web 2.0 and make sure that your stakeholders are on board; otherwise, you have wasted money, time, and effort. Moreover, too much technology at once will overwhelm everyone. Experimentation is great, if you have the resources. Pilot your programs, evaluate them, and share your results so that others can learn from your experiences. Misuse 2: If you have to post your cat pictures and your political rants, save it for your personal blog or Facebook account.
  • Which are you familiar with?
  • Blogs are similar to journals, but with enriched content and the ability for people to provide comments, like what you say, and link to what you say. You have an archive of posts that allows you to easily access earlier entries. Microblogs, like blogs, allow you to post short statements to share with the people you want to share with. They also allow you to follow the posts of people or organizations you care about.
  • A wiki is an online space that allows users to contribute content. Wikipedia is the most famous example. Others include services like wikispaces, which allows you to create your own wiki.
  • Folksonomies capitalize on the principal of linked data. This social network site, 43 things, allows you to post your goals online. The words you use to define your goals are compared to the site’s lexicon, and then the site will connect you to users who have similar goals.
  • Hash tags allow you to search for user data related to specific information.
  • Tag clouds group the most frequently discussed terms and organizes them by size: the larger the word, the more frequently it is used. This is a Flickr tag cloud.
  • Podcasts are audio/video files, often in episodes or series. You can think of them as a series of lessons on a topic, an audio-visual blog, or even entertainment shorts.
  • Widgets and apps filter data to select the information you want and display it in the way you want, where you want it. Sometimes apps are purely for entertainment—think of Words with Friends. Other apps are incredibly useful for processing, evaluating, and viewing data, like the app that will tell you when the bus will arrive or where the nearest gas station is. Pretty handy.
  • RSS means really simple syndication. Syndication is the ability to provide updates about your content on other platforms. So RSS feeds allow users to track sites with frequently published content and visit only the ones that have updates.
  • A mash-up is a platform that aggregates data from different sources into one site or application. Google Maps is the most famous example; also check out the interactive population map from Census 2010.
  • We’ve gone over what web 2.0 is and some of the tools that make the ideas into practice. Now let’s talk about how web 2.0 is integrated into education.
  • There are many, many levels of integration, and these are just some of the popular ideas.
  • What is right for you?
  • We’ve gone over the above – lets talk about you.
  • Transcript

    • 1. SCHOOLS AND WEB 2.0
    • 2. SCHOOLS AND WEB 2.0WHAT IS WEB 2.0HOW IS WEB 2.0 INTEGRATED INTO EDUCATION?BRAINSTORM
    • 3. WHAT IS IT?SCHOOLS AND WEB 2.0
    • 4. WHAT IS WEB 2.0?
    • 5. WHAT IS WEB 2.0? “The internet is all about the user.”-- Bergman et al., Web 2.0 and Education, University of Illinois,Urbana-Champaign, 2007(http://wik.ed.uiuc.edu/index.php/Web_2.0_and_Education)
    • 6. WHAT IS WEB 2.0? Values CollaborationCollaboration allows web 2.0 users tocreate content in a cooperative effort.-Trusts users- think of wikis, memes, discussionboards www.wikipedia.org
    • 7. WHAT IS WEB 2.0? ValuesSocial NetworkingSocial networking allows people tocreate communities online. Thisincludes your popular web-basedcommunities, as well as coursemanagement software and listservs.
    • 8. WHAT IS WEB 2.0? Values Customization Rich ContentThe new information model doesn’trequire people to seek information;rather, you can select which datacomes to you, and you can customizewhen and how you receive yourinformation. Rich content utilizesmultiple media like video, audio,hyperlinks, and text to provide andindividualize the information your userwould be interested in. iGoogle homepage
    • 9. WHAT IS WEB 2.0? Values SeamlessnessMore data is stored online and informats that will show up on laptops,tablets, and phones. http://www.20thingsilearned.com/en- US/cloud-computing
    • 10. WHAT IS WEB 2.0? Values Linked DataLinked data allows you to createrelationships between informationelements and locate data using thoserelationships.
    • 11. WHAT IS WEB 2.0? Values “Free” DataIn the open source model, information isnot “owned” but rather should be sharedopenly and with as little cost to the user aspossible. The code is made openlyavailable so others may customize it totheir liking.
    • 12. WHAT IS WEB 2.0? Values CollaborationSocial Networking Customization Rich Content Seamlessness Linked Data “Free” Data
    • 13. WEAKNESSES AND CHALLENGES SCHOOLS AND WEB 2.0
    • 14. WEAKNESSES AND CHALLENGES• Privacy we’re talking the world-wide web. That means without privacy controls, your information is accessible to everyone.• Security• Lack of authority• Misuse
    • 15. WEAKNESSES AND CHALLENGES• Privacy Web 2.0 tools are meant to share information, but can also share much more than that. Viruses, Trojans, and other• Security malware are easily spread using these technologies. Be aware of what links you click on and what apps you allow to access your data. Don’t click on advertisements,• Lack of authority and don’t download or accept anything without reading the fine print or running your virus scanner.• Misuse
    • 16. WEAKNESSES AND CHALLENGES• Privacy There is no editor validating the sources on a wiki; there is no librarian telling you which websites are• Security authoritative, and which are not. Information appears, disappears, and changes depending on the author and the time you access it. Web 2.0 allows• Lack of authority you to share information—even misinformation.• Misuse
    • 17. WEAKNESSES AND CHALLENGES Misuse 1: organizations don’t have the systems or• Privacy the culture to support use of Web 2.0 technologies. Be very aware of how you are going to utilize Web 2.0 and make sure that your stakeholders are on• Security board; otherwise, you have wasted money, time, and effort. Moreover, too much technology at once will overwhelm everyone. Experimentation is great, if you have the resources. Pilot your programs,• Lack of authority evaluate them, and share your results so that others can learn from your experiences. Misuse 2: If you have to post your cat pictures and• Misuse your political rants, save it for your personal blog or Facebook account.
    • 18. TOOLS OF THE TRADE SCHOOLS AND WEB 2.0
    • 19. TOOLS OF THE TRADEBlogs and microblogsWikisFolksonomies: hash tags, tag cloudsPodcastsWidgets / AppsRSS FeedsMashups
    • 20. TOOLS OF THE TRADE Blogs and microblogs Blogs are similar to journals, but with enriched content and the ability for people to provide comments, like what you say, and link to what you say. You have an archive of posts that allows you to easily access earlier entries. Microblogs, like blogs, allow you to post short statements to share with the people you want to share with. They also allow you to follow the Twitter posts of people or organizations you care about.
    • 21. TOOLS OF THE TRADE Wikis A wiki is an online space that allows users to contribute content. Wikipedia is the most famous example. Others include services like wikispaces, which allows you to create your own wiki.
    • 22. TOOLS OF THE TRADE Folksonomies Folksonomies capitalize on the principal of linked data. This social network site, 43 things, allows you to post your goals online. The words you use to define your goals are compared to the site’s lexicon, and then the site will connect you to users who have similar goals.
    • 23. TOOLS OF THE TRADE Folksonomies: Hash Tags Hash tags allow you to search for user data related to specific information.
    • 24. TOOLS OF THE TRADEFolksonomies: Tag Clouds Tag clouds group the most frequently discussed terms and organizes them by size: the larger the word, the more frequently it is used. This is a Flickr tag cloud showing the most frequently used tags in photos.
    • 25. TOOLS OF THE TRADE Podcasts Podcasts are audio/video files, often in episodes or series. You can think of them as a series of lessons on a topic, an audio- visual blog, or even entertainment shorts.
    • 26. TOOLS OF THE TRADE Widgets / Apps Widgets and apps filter data to select the information you want and display it in the way you want, where you want it. Sometimes apps are purely for entertainment—think of Words with Friends. Other apps are incredibly useful for processing, evaluating, and viewing data, like the app that will tell you when the bus will arrive or where the nearest gas station is. Pretty handy.
    • 27. TOOLS OF THE TRADE RSS Feeds RSS means really simple syndication. Syndication is the ability to provide updates about your content on other platforms. So RSS feeds allow users to track sites with frequently published content and visit only the ones that have updates.
    • 28. TOOLS OF THE TRADE Mash-upsA mash-up is a platform thataggregates data fromdifferent sources into onesite or application. GoogleMaps is the most famousexample; also check out theinteractive population mapfrom Census 2010.
    • 29. TOOLS OF THE TRADE COURSE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (CMS) A course management system will integrate features like class lists, discussion boards, course reserves, study guides, etc. Open Source software like Word Press and Drupal, or proprietary software like Blackboard achieve these results. Make sure if you select a CMS that the software provides the serviceshttps://elms.umd.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp you need (or that you can integrate it) in the format you need (some run on different code or OS).
    • 30. SCHOOLS AND WEB 2.0WHAT IS WEB 2.0 HOW IS WEB 2.0 INTEGRATED INTO EDUCATION?BRAINSTORM
    • 31. INTEGRATIONSCHOOLS AND WEB 2.0
    • 32. INTEGRATION USING WEB 2.0 is NOT the objective.WEB 2.0 is merely a TOOL that can facilitate meeting your objective.
    • 33. Train the staff in Web 2.0 techniques, provide examples of how each subject area uses tools to enhance student learning, or how INTEGRATION administration can benefit from tools. It is up to the individual to decide whether to use Web 2.0 or not. Have students learn Web 2.0 techniques and tools that will enhance their learning and helpStaff Training them understand benefits and dangers.Student Training Select a grade or a class to serve as a pilot program for integrating Web 2.0 techniques.Class Pilot Teachers, students, parents, and administrators will be required to utilize WebGroup Project 2.0 tools in some way for this class or grade.Whole-School Select a project (ex. Recycling Club, Green School, President’s Day) that will utilize Web 2.0 technologies. The whole school is on board! Every teacher, administrator, student, and parent utilizes Web 2.0 tools. They are woven into the curriculum and daily life of the school.
    • 34. INTEGRATION Consider:What are your parents and teachers able and willing to contribute? Do your students have thenecessary technologies available at home?Do you have the personnel and the budget to support integration?
    • 35. INTEGRATION EXAMPLESEric Sheninger. Best Practices in Social Networking. http://www.slideshare.net/Esheninger/best-practices-in-social-networkingA school principal shares how social networking can help your school communicate with stakeholders.Brian Benzinger. Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0. http://www.solutionwatch.com/512/back-to-school-with-the-class-of-web-20-part-1/A compilation of Web 2.0 tools organized by category.Kerry Turner. Successful use of Web 2.0 in the classroom. http://kerryturner.wordpress.com/kerry-turner/successful-use-of-web-2o-in-the-classroom/A blog that shares successful use of Web 2.0 techniques in school.Mr. Crosby. Collaborative Class Blog. Blogmeister. http://classblogmeister.com/blog.php?blogger_id=65078A 6th grade class piloting a 1:1 computer use program and Web 2.0 tools; this is their blog.Kathy Schrock. Bloomin’ Apps. http://www.schrockguide.net/bloomin-apps.htmlA revision of Bloom’s taxonomy with related software applications.Kathy Schrock. Kathy Schrock’s guide for educators.http://school.discoveryeducation.com/schrockguide/edtools.htmlA list of useful web 2.0 tools for your school.
    • 36. INTEGRATION EXAMPLESTop 25 Web 2.0 Apps to Improve a Students or Professors Productivity. http://oedb.org/library/beginning-online-learning/top-25-web20-productivity-appsA list of useful applications for the classroom.20 Things I learned about browsers and the web. http://www.20thingsilearned.com/en-US/homeOpen Source Web Applications for Libraries. Karen A. Coombs & Amanda J. Hollister.http://www.amazon.com/Open-Source-Web-Applications-Libraries/dp/1573874000Reference and Information Services in the 21st Century. Kay Ann Cassell, Uma Hiremath.http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1555707408/ref=oh_details_o06_s00_i00
    • 37. SCHOOLS AND WEB 2.0WHAT IS WEB 2.0 HOW IS WEB 2.0 INTEGRATED INTO EDUCATION? BRAINSTORM
    • 38. YOUR TURN!SCHOOLS AND WEB 2.0
    • 39. YOUR TURNBrainstorm: Work with a partner. Select aproject that you work on. List thestakeholders involved, which web 2.0tools would help make that project moreefficient, and challenges you might face.
    • 40. YOUR TURNFor strategic planning: • Why do we want to use Web 2.0? • How do we want to use Web 2.0? • What systems and technologies will we have to support the use of Web 2.0? • Are there any restrictions on our use? • Who is responsible for what?
    • 41. YOUR TURN • How will we evaluate success? • How will we document and share our successes and challenges with others?

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