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  • Percentages and percentage changes. Many students need a refresher and some practice at doing what seems too simple to bother with, calculating percentages and percentage changes. Don’t be afraid to start with this pre-elasticity warm up. Just toss out some numbers. Suppose that the campus bookstore increases the price of an economics text from $70 to $80. What is the percentage increase in price? Suppose the campus computer store lowers the price of an iMac from $1500 to $1000. What is the percentage decrease in price? Next, tell them the prices have moved in the opposite directions: The campus book store cuts the price of an economics text from $80 to $70. What is the percentage decrease in price? And the campus computer store now raises the price of an iMac from $1000 to $1500. What is the percentage increase in price? You’re now all set to get the students using the average of the original and new price to calculate percentages that are independent of the direction of change. Many students have a hard time remembering whether quantity or price goes in the numerator of the elasticity formulas. Have the students create their own mnemonic. Suggest McDonald’s Q uarter P ounder™ hamburgers. It’s silly, but it works, reminding the student that Q (quantity) appears before P (price) in the ratio of percentage changes. For practice at calculating the price elasticity of demand, bring out your demand schedule for Coke (or other drink) that you sold in class when you covered demand. Get the students to calculate the price elasticity of demand at various points along that demand curve.
  • Elasticity and slope along a linear demand curve. You can provide solid intuition on why the elasticity of demand falls as we move down a linear demand curve. Point out first that as the quantity increases, the percentage change in quantity decreases for equal changes in quantity. Do two calculations, one at a small quantity and one at a large quantity. Then point out that this same reasoning applies to the price. As the price falls, the percentage change in price increases for equal changes in price. Again, do two calculations, one at a high price and one at a low price. Now put the two together. As we move downward along the demand curve, the percentage change in quantity is getting smaller and the percentage change in price is getting larger, so the elasticity—the ratio of the percentage change in quantity to the percentage change in price—is getting smaller.
  • Encourage your students to use the total revenue test (total expenditure) to check whether their demand for some item the price of which has changed, is elastic or inelastic.
  • Fuel for thought: Getting some intuition on what determines whether demand is inelastic or elastic The demand for gasoline and junk food in general. Students love their cars and junk food, and they know that the demand for both in general is inelastic because there are no good substitutes for personal transportation and a quick snack. The demand for Joe’s quick-mart gasoline. Ask your students if Joe’s quick-mart (substitute your actual local one) convenience store would lose much business and total revenues if he raised the price of gasoline more than a penny or two compared to the other three gas stations at a street intersection. When the students conclude he’d lose much of his gasoline sales ask them to reconcile this large quantity decrease to a small increase in price (elastic demand) with the fact that they earlier stated that demand for gasoline is very inelastic. They will recognize that gasoline from other corner stations is a very good substitute for Joe’s gasoline. The demand for Joe’s quick-mart junk food. After students recognize that abundant substitute availability keeps elasticity high, ask the students why Joe’s junk food (and all quick-mart stores’ junk food) is priced so much higher than the near-by grocery store’s junk food. Students will conclude that “convenience” stores are well named. Most people aren’t willing to wait in the grocery store check-out line behind the frazzled mother of three screaming kids, each hanging on the over-loaded basket that will take 15 minutes of coupon validating and price checking to check out. The grocery store is not a good substitute for people on the go looking for a fast snack and a quick gas fill.
  • Emphasize the information content in the algebraic sign of the cross elasticity and the income elasticity and contrast this situation with the price elasticity for which we focus only on the magnitude and not the sign.
  • The unit elastic demand curve is a good one to use to emphasize that elasticity and slope are not equal. Have the students calculate the elasticity of supply on two linear demand curves that passes through the origin, one with a slope of 0.5 and the other with a slope of 2. They’ll get the message.
  • Transcript

    • 1. E AST Y L ICIT 4 CH T R AP E
    • 2. ObjectivesAfter studying this chapter, you will be able to  Define, calculate, and explain the factors that influence the price elasticity of demand Define, calculate, and explain the factors that influence the cross elasticity of demand and the income elasticity of demand Define, calculate, and explain the factors that influence the elasticity of supply
    • 3. Tough Times in the Recording IndustryMore and more people are illegally downloading musicrather than paying $12 for a CD.CD producers are loosing revenue and some of them aretrying to combat the problem by slashing the price of aCD.Will this strategy work?Can lower priced CDs beat illegal downloads, bringgreater revenue to the recording industry and artists, andhelp to promote the social interest?The concept of elasticity helps to answer these questions.
    • 4. Price Elasticity of DemandIn Figure 4.1a, a change insupply brings a smallincrease in the quantitydemanded and a large fallin price.
    • 5. Price Elasticity of DemandIn Figure 4.1b, a change insupply brings a largeincrease in the quantitydemanded and a small fallin price.
    • 6. Price Elasticity of DemandThe contrast between thetwo outcomes in Figure 4.1highlights the need for ameasure of theresponsiveness of thequantity demanded to aprice change.
    • 7. Price Elasticity of DemandThe price elasticity of demand is a units-free measureof the responsiveness of the quantity demanded of agood to a change in its price when all other influenceson buyers’ plans remain the same.Calculating ElasticityThe price elasticity of demand is calculated by using theformula: Percentage change in quantity demanded Percentage change in price
    • 8. Price Elasticity of DemandTo calculate the price elasticity of demand:We express the change in price as a percentage of theaverage price—the average of the initial and new price,and we express the change in the quantity demanded as apercentage of the average quantity demanded—theaverage of the initial and new quantity.
    • 9. Price Elasticity of DemandFigure 4.2 calculates theprice elasticity of demandfor pizza.The price initially is $20.50and the quantitydemanded is 9 pizzas anhour.
    • 10. Price Elasticity of DemandThe price falls to $19.50and the quantitydemanded increases to 11pizzas an hour.The price falls by $1 andthe quantity demandedincreases by 2 pizzas anhour.
    • 11. Price Elasticity of DemandThe average price is $20and the average quantitydemanded is 10 pizzas anhour.
    • 12. Price Elasticity of DemandThe percentage change inquantity demanded, %∆Q,is calculated as ∆Q/Qave,which is 2/10 = 1/5.The percentage change inprice, %∆P, is calculatedas ∆P/Pave, which is $1/$20= 1/20.
    • 13. Price Elasticity of DemandThe price elasticity ofdemand is (1/5)/(1/20) =20/5 = 4.
    • 14. Price Elasticity of DemandBy using the average price and average quantity, we getthe same elasticity value regardless of whether the pricerises or falls.The ratio of two proportionate changes is the same as theratio of two percentage changes.The measure is units free because it is a ratio of twopercentage changes and the percentages cancel out.Changing the units of measurement of price or quantityleave the elasticity value the same.
    • 15. Price Elasticity of DemandThe formula yields a negative value, because price andquantity move in opposite directions. But it is themagnitude, or absolute value, of the measure that revealshow responsive the quantity change has been to a pricechange.
    • 16. Price Elasticity of DemandInelastic and Elastic DemandDemand can be inelastic, unit elastic, or elastic, and canrange from zero to infinity.If the quantity demanded doesn’t change when the pricechanges, the price elasticity of demand is zero and thegood as a perfectly inelastic demand.
    • 17. Price Elasticity of DemandFigure 4.3a illustrates thecase of a good that has aperfectly inelastic demandand that has a verticaldemand curve.
    • 18. Price Elasticity of DemandIf the percentage changein the quantity demandedequals the percentagechange in price, the priceelasticity of demandequals 1 and the good hasunit elastic demand.Figure 4.3b illustrates thiscase—a demand curvewith ever declining slope.(Note that the demandcurve is not linear.)
    • 19. Price Elasticity of DemandBetween the two previous cases, the percentage changein the quantity demanded is smaller than the percentagechange in price so that the price elasticity of demand isless than 1 and the good has inelastic demand.If the percentage change in the quantity demanded isinfinitely large when the price barely changes, the priceelasticity of demand is infinite and the good has perfectlyelastic demand.
    • 20. Price Elasticity of DemandFigure 4.3c illustrates thecase of perfectly elasticdemand—a horizontaldemand curve.If the percentage changein the quantity demandedis greater than thepercentage change inprice, the price elasticity ofdemand is greater than 1and the good has elasticdemand.
    • 21. Price Elasticity of DemandElasticity Along aStraight-Line DemandCurve Figure 4.4 shows how demand becomes less elastic as the price falls along a linear demand curve.
    • 22. Price Elasticity of DemandAt prices above the mid-point of the demand curve,demand is elastic.At prices below the mid-point of the demand curve,demand is inelastic.
    • 23. Price Elasticity of DemandFor example, if the pricefalls from $25 to $15, thequantity demandedincreases from 0 to 20pizzas an hour.The average price is $20and the average quantity is10.The price elasticity ofdemand is (20/10)/(10/20),which equals 4.
    • 24. Price Elasticity of DemandIf the price falls from $10to $0, the quantitydemanded increases from30 to 50 pizzas an hour.The average price is $5and the average quantity is40.The price elasticity ofdemand is (20/40)/(10/5),which equals 1/4.
    • 25. Price Elasticity of DemandIf the price falls from $15to $10, the quantitydemanded increases from20 to 30 pizzas an hour.The average price is$12.50 and the averagequantity is 25.The price elasticity ofdemand is (10/25)/(5/12.5),which equals 1.
    • 26. Price Elasticity of DemandTotal Revenue and ElasticityThe total revenue from the sale of good or service equalsthe price of the good multiplied by the quantity sold.When the price changes, total revenue also changes.But a rise in price doesn’t always increase total revenue.
    • 27. Price Elasticity of DemandThe change in total revenue due to a change in price depends n the elasticity of demand: If demand is elastic, a 1 percent price cut increases the quantity sold by more than 1 percent, and total revenue increases. If demand is inelastic, a 1 percent price cut decreases the quantity sold by more than 1 percent, and total revenues decreases. If demand is unitary elastic, a 1 percent price cut increases the quantity sold by 1 percent, and total revenue remains unchanged.
    • 28. Price Elasticity of DemandThe total revenue test is a method of estimating the price elasticity of demand by observing the change in total revenue that results from a price change (when all other influences on the quantity sold remain the same). If a price cut increases total revenue, demand is elastic. If a price cut decreases total revenue, demand is inelastic. If a price cut leaves total revenue unchanged, demand is unit elastic.
    • 29. Price Elasticity of DemandFigure 4.5 shows therelationship betweenelasticity of demand forpizzas and the totalrevenue from pizzas.In part a (shown here),as the price falls from$25 to $12.50, demandis elastic, and totalrevenue increases.
    • 30. Price Elasticity of DemandAt $12.50, demand isunit elastic and totalrevenue stopsincreasing.As the price falls from$12.50 to zero, demandis inelastic, and totalrevenue decreases.
    • 31. Price Elasticity of DemandIn part b (shown here), asthe quantity increasesfrom zero to 25, demandis elastic, and totalrevenue increases.At 25, demand is unitelastic, and total revenue isat its maximum.As the quantity increasesfrom 25 to 50, demand isinelastic, and totalrevenue decreases.
    • 32. Price Elasticity of DemandYour Expenditure and Your Elasticity  If your demand is elastic, a 1 percent price cut increases the quantity you buy by more than 1 percent and your expenditure on the item increases. If your demand is inelastic, a 1 percent price cut increases the quantity you buy by less than 1 percent and your expenditure on the item decreases. If your demand is unit elastic, a 1 percent price cut increases the quantity you buy by 1 percent and your expenditure on the item does not change.
    • 33. Price Elasticity of DemandThe Factors That Influence the Elasticity of DemandThe elasticity of demand for a good depends on: The closeness of substitutes The proportion of income spent on the good The time elapsed since a price change
    • 34. Price Elasticity of DemandThe closeness of substitutesThe closer the substitutes for a good or service, the moreelastic are the demand for it.Necessities, such as food or housing, generally haveinelastic demand.Luxuries, such as exotic vacations, generally have elasticdemand.The proportion of income spent on the good.The greater the proportion of income consumers spent ona good, the larger is its elasticity of demand.
    • 35. Price Elasticity of DemandThe time elapsed since a price changeThe more time consumers have to adjust to a pricechange, or the longer that a good can be stored withoutlosing its value, the more elastic is the demand for thatgood.
    • 36. Price Elasticity of DemandTable 4.1 (page 87) showsestimates of the priceelasticity of demand forvarious goods andservices.Figure 4.6 shows how theelasticity of demand forfood varies with theproportion of income spenton food in differentcountries.
    • 37. More Elasticities of DemandCross Elasticity of DemandThe cross elasticity of demand is a measure of theresponsiveness of demand for a good to a change in theprice of a substitute or a compliment, other thingsremaining the same.The formula for calculating the cross elasticity is: Percentage change in quantity demanded Percentage change in price of substitute or complement
    • 38. More Elasticities of DemandThe cross elasticity of demand for a substitute is positive.The cross elasticity of demand for a complement isnegative.
    • 39. More Elasticities of DemandFigure 4.7 shows theincrease in the quantity ofpizza demanded when theprice of burger (asubstitute for pizza) rises.The figure also shows thedecrease in the quantity ofpizza demanded when theprice of a soft drink (acomplement of pizza)rises.
    • 40. More Elasticities of DemandIncome Elasticity of DemandThe income elasticity of demand measures how thequantity demanded of a good responds to a change inincome, other things equal.The formula for calculating the income elasticity ofdemand is: Percentage change in quantity demanded Percentage change in income
    • 41. More Elasticities of DemandIf the income elasticity of demand is greater than 1,demand is income elastic and the good is a normal good.If the income elasticity of demand is greater than zero butless than 1, demand is income inelastic and the good is anormal good.If the income elasticity of demand is less than zero(negative) the good is an inferior good.
    • 42. More Elasticities of DemandTable 4.2 (page 91) showsestimates of incomeelasticity of demand forvarious goods andservices.Figure 4.8 shows estimatesof the income elasticity forfood in different countries.A higher average income isassociated with a lowerincome elasticity ofdemand for food.
    • 43. Price Elasticity of SupplyIn Figure 4.9a, a change indemand brings a smallincrease in the quantitysupplied and a large rise inprice.
    • 44. Price Elasticity of SupplyIn Figure 4.9b, a change indemand brings a largeincrease in the quantitysupplied and a small risein price.
    • 45. Price Elasticity of SupplyThe contrast between thetwo outcomes in Figure 4.9highlights the need for ameasure of theresponsiveness of thequantity supplied to a pricechange.
    • 46. Elasticity of SupplyThe elasticity of supply measures the responsiveness ofthe quantity supplied to a change in the price of a goodwhen all other influences on selling plans remain thesame.Calculating the Elasticity of SupplyThe elasticity of supply is calculated by using the formula: Percentage change in quantity supplied Percentage change in price
    • 47. Elasticity of SupplyFigure 4.10 on the next slide shows three cases of theelasticity of supply.Supply is perfectly inelastic if the supply curve is verticaland the elasticity of supply is 0.Supply is unit elastic if the supply curve is linear andpasses through the origin. (Note that slope is irrelevant.)Supply is perfectly elastic if the supply curve is horizontaland the elasticity of supply is infinite.
    • 48. Elasticity of Supply
    • 49. Elasticity of SupplyThe Factors That Influence the Elasticity of SupplyThe elasticity of supply depends onResource substitution possibilitiesThe easier it is to substitute among the resources used toproduce a good or service, the greater is its elasticity ofsupply.The time frame for supply decisionsThe more time that passes after a price change, thegreater is the elasticity of supply.
    • 50. Elasticity of SupplyThe time frame for supply decisionsThe more time that passes after a price change, thegreater is the elasticity of supply.Momentary supply is perfectly inelastic. The quantitysupplied immediately following a price change is constant.Short-run supply is somewhat elastic.Long-run supply is the most elastic.Table 4.3 (page 95) provides a glossary of the all elasticitymeasures.
    • 51. T EE H ND