E-BOOKS IN THE      CATALOG:    Sarah Haight                  Sanabria    WORKFLOW      Electronic                  Resour...
E-BOOKS IN THE CATALOG What happens to our processes when the majority of new  records enter our catalog via bulk load?
STATISTICS At SMU Central University Libraries, we currently have:   821,576 records in the catalog for electronic monog...
WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR CATALOGS &     CATALOGING DEPARTMENTS? Broad considerations: Issues that apply to all records in ...
QUALIT Y & SUSTAINABILIT Y What are your standards for bibliographic quality?   Can you articulate them in a way that ap...
STAFFING How will your workflows change as a larger proportion of the  materials added to your collection are electronic?...
ONGOING MAINTENANCE E-books have a more complicated life cycle than print books Facilitate their maintenance through tho...
HELP THE RECORDS ANSWER YOUR              QUESTIONS What will you want to know from the records?   What do your collecti...
SPECIAL QUALIT Y CONSIDERATIONS FOR              E-BOOKS Unique identifiers Authorities Applying limits Test load
TOOLS Before you load:   MarcEdit   Loading script/profile   Reports created by MarcEdit or vendors After you load:  ...
RESOURCES FOR BULK LOADING F i n n , M a r y. “ B a t c h - l o a d a u t h o r i t y c o n t r o l c l e a n u p u s i n...
QUESTIONS? Thank you! Contact:   Sarah Haight Sanabria   shaight@smu.edu   214-768-3646
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E-books in the catalog

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Talk from ALA Midwinter 2012, about what happens to the catalog and the cataloging department when batch loading becomes the main way records enter the catalog.

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  • Impact of large sets of e-book records on the catalog.
  • E-books becoming a large part of the cat workflow @ many institutions.Much of lit of e-books is focused on processes specific to them.SLIDEI’m going to start by stepping further back to look at what happens to the catalog and to our local cataloging processes when e-book records that are bulk loaded start to become a significant portion of the catalog. We load more annually in bulk than through copy and original cataloging. There comes a point when enough of them are loaded to change the character of the DB as a whole.
  • It’s very feasible that in the next 5 years or so, we’ll have more e-books than print ones in the cat..The collection is changing, and I expect that the way people use the collection and the catalog will change too.
  • These changes raise two kinds of issues I’d like to discuss:Issues that affect the entire catalog and our departments as a whole; and,Issues that pertain to e-book records, especially issues to think about before they are loaded into the DB.
  • We all have an idea of what a high-quality record looks like. Most of us probably have a field-by-field guide in our dept. policies saying what is and isn’t OK. SLIDEI think it’s important to think about those standards in terms of whether our quality standards can apply to records loaded in bulk. [Caveat] Remember, more records are entering the catalog in bulk than are being individually examined. Caveat: Original cataloging. This applies to copy and bulk loading.But are we asking copy catalogers to check fields and make edits in a way that isn’t possible to batch edit records? If so, why? SLIDEIt’s important to have our discussion of quality framed in terms of what can be done to records in bulk because if you have workflows based on manual intervention, they may quickly become unsustainable when you have just loaded hundreds of thousands of records into the DB, and when those records may be rapidly coming and going out of your database. Series authority work-We kept up series authority work after LC abandoned it.-Had copy catalogers check series on items cataloged; moving untraced series to traced if that was our local practice; imported records or sent for original series authority work if needed-Now, we receive records in bulk from a variety of sources, including LC records with untraced series.-It doesn’t make sense on the one hand to have copy catalogers spending time keeping the series authority file up-to-date, if there’s no feasible way for us to do that same work on tens of thousands of records entering the catalog in bulk. -Even if we could, the records are now coming into and out of the DB because a vendor is managing it – we could do authority work, but it could get overlaid next month. This is pointless work, Sisyphean. -We are now looking at ways to move away from that practice because it’s becoming unsustainable. I think we need to create quality criteria that apply to materials that enter the catalog in all ways, but that are very informed by the possibilities and limitations of bulk loading and of editing records in large batches.
  • Do you have staff who can help with loading or cleanup processes? Digitization or metadata? Describing special collections? Great opportunity to think about where you want to be as a dept. What expertise does your department have? What role do you want to play within the institution? Ex.: Converting copy catalogers to metadata creationSLIDEWhat can your staff do that no one else can? Can you have a vendor do the rest? Ex.: Vendor for e-book MARC records, implementing shelf-ready processing, etc.
  • E-books can need continual care and feeding, so it pays to think in advance about how you can facilitate that during the course of the record editing and bulk loading process.Think through the lifecycle of the records in the catalog. It pays to think about how you would call up the set of records in the future and edit them to make that possible. I.e., all the URLs change; you lose access to a packageImportant not just to think about these things, but to document loading and editing procedures! You can create the most efficient ways to retrieve records, but if no one knows, they will be stuck if you are gone. Put the documentation in a public place, maybe with other cataloging documentation.
  • Think not just about what you might need to do to the records, but also what you want to know from them. Ex.: Subject codes in DDA records so we can retrieve/delete selectively in the future.
  • If we create quality guidelines that apply to all the copy cataloged and bulk loaded items, we might make the mistake of basing them on copy cataloging, because it’s most familiar. I’d like to highlight a few areas you might want to give additional attention to, that are especially important for records that are bulk loaded. Unique IDs: overlay riskNaming schemeAuthorities: When was the last time they were updated? Do you want to do anything about it? We will send to authorities vendor because the name and subject authority files are very important to us. Limits: How will you call up the set in the OPAC/discovery layer? A broader question: In your catalog, can you limit to e-books in general? This is useful for students/faculty conducting research offsite, or studying abroad.Test load: More of a workflow consideration than a quality consideration. If you have a test database, load a sample of the records in it before you load them into the production catalog. Can save you lots of grief! You will find overlay problems, display issues, other things that weren’t apparent during the examination and editing process. If you make any changes to the records, test load them again. It’s repetitive, but it’s easier to correct problems before the production load than to explain the problem or why you might need to remove those records.
  • Finally, I’d like to touch briefly on some of the tools that are available to improve a set of records before loading them into your database.
  • E-books in the catalog

    1. 1. E-BOOKS IN THE CATALOG: Sarah Haight Sanabria WORKFLOW Electronic Resources CatalogerCONSIDERATIONS Southern Methodist University
    2. 2. E-BOOKS IN THE CATALOG What happens to our processes when the majority of new records enter our catalog via bulk load?
    3. 3. STATISTICS At SMU Central University Libraries, we currently have:  821,576 records in the catalog for electronic monographic content  733,902 records in the catalog for the main circulating locations in our main, science, and arts libraries (over 3 million volumes in total collection)
    4. 4. WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR CATALOGS & CATALOGING DEPARTMENTS? Broad considerations: Issues that apply to all records in the catalog Specific e-book considerations
    5. 5. QUALIT Y & SUSTAINABILIT Y What are your standards for bibliographic quality?  Can you articulate them in a way that applies to both individually cataloged and bulk loaded items? Examine workflows in terms of bulk loading as the main way materials enter the catalog  Are copy catalogers asked to do things to records that cannot be done to records in bulk? Can you sustain those workflows if you load 300,000 records into the database?  Ex.: Series control
    6. 6. STAFFING How will your workflows change as a larger proportion of the materials added to your collection are electronic?  What new processes need staff time?  What old processes can be abandoned?  Take a fresh look at what vendors can do.
    7. 7. ONGOING MAINTENANCE E-books have a more complicated life cycle than print books Facilitate their maintenance through thoughtful editing Document bulk loading and editing procedures
    8. 8. HELP THE RECORDS ANSWER YOUR QUESTIONS What will you want to know from the records?  What do your collection development or systems colleagues want to know? Can you modify the records so you can answer these questions?
    9. 9. SPECIAL QUALIT Y CONSIDERATIONS FOR E-BOOKS Unique identifiers Authorities Applying limits Test load
    10. 10. TOOLS Before you load:  MarcEdit  Loading script/profile  Reports created by MarcEdit or vendors After you load:  Global editing capabilities of your ILS  Correction of individual records using reports
    11. 11. RESOURCES FOR BULK LOADING F i n n , M a r y. “ B a t c h - l o a d a u t h o r i t y c o n t r o l c l e a n u p u s i n g M a r c E d i t a n d LT I , ” Te c h n i c a l s e r v i c e s quarterly 26, 2009: 44-50. Martin, Kristin E. and Kavita Mundle. “Cataloging e-books and vendor records: a case study at the University of Illinois at Chicago,” Librar y resources & technical ser vices 54(4), Oct. 2010: 2 2 7 - 2 37. Martin, Kristin E. et al. “ Consortial cataloging guidelines for electronic resources: I -Share sur vey and recommendations,” Cataloging & classif ication quar terly 49, 2011: 361 -386. Mugridge, Rebecca L. and Jef f Edmunds. “Using batchloading to improve access to electronic and microform collections,” Libr ar y resources & technical ser vices 53(1), Jan. 2009: 53 -61 . Mundle, Kavita. “Integration of electronic books into librar y catalogs: the UIC experience,” T h e a c q u i s i t i o n s l i b r a r i a n 1 9 ( 3 / 4 ) , 2 0 0 7: 3 8 9 - 4 07. Preston, Carrie A . “Cooperative e -book cataloging in the OhioLINK librar y consor tium,” C a t a l o g i n g & c l a s s i f i c a t i o n q u a r t e r l y 4 9 , 2 0 1 1 : 2 5 7 - 276 . Sanchez, Elaine et al. “Cleanup of NetLibrary cataloging records: a methodical front -end p r o c e s s , ” Te c h n i c a l s e r v i c e s q u a r t e r l y 2 3 ( 4 ) , 2 0 0 6 : 5 1 - 71 . Wu, Annie and Anne M. Mitchell. “Mass management of e -book catalog records: approaches, c h a l l e n g e s , s o l u t i o n s , ” L i b r a r y r e s o u r c e s & t e c h n i c a l s e r v i c e s 5 4 ( 3 ) , J u l y 2 0 1 0 : 1 6 4 - 174 .
    12. 12. QUESTIONS? Thank you! Contact:  Sarah Haight Sanabria  shaight@smu.edu  214-768-3646
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