School Focussed Youth ServiceGlen Eira, Port Phillip & StonningtonNeeds Analysis 2011      School Focused Youth Services  ...
SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-2012Acknowledgements:Thanks are extended to all the young people who took the time to par...
SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-2012Table of Contents1. Visual Summary 1.1   Key Themes…………………………………………………….…………………………………...
SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-2012Visual SummaryThis diagram shows the summarised findings of the Youth, Schools and Se...
SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-20122. Introduction  2.1 The SFYS ProgramSchool Focused Youth Services (SFYS) is a state ...
SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-2012  2.4 MethodologyThe 2011-2012 SFYS Needs Analysis utilises data collected from surve...
SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-20123.2 Glen EiraGeneral Information      Covers an area of about 38 square kilometres   ...
SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-20124. Needs Analysis: Survey Results 4.1 School Survey FindingsAll primary and secondary...
SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-20124.2 Service Survey FindingsServices that provide support to young people and their fa...
SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-20124.3 Schools & Services Visual Summary                 SCHOOLS                        ...
SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-20124.4 Youth Survey FindingsIssues of General Concern Below is a list of the 2011 top 10...
SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-2012The finding that ‘health and fitness’ is a broad issue of concern for young people ha...
SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-2012this involves issues which impact on specific cohorts of youth and not just the gener...
SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-2012Table: 2011 Top 10 Concerns for Females and MalesRank               Issue- Females   ...
SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-2012There were 161 qualitative responses from youth in regards to the question. These res...
SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-20124.5 Comparison to 2006-2007 Needs AnalysisThe 2006-2007 Needs Analysis found that the...
SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-20124.5 Overall Data Interpretation    There are approximately 21, 143 young people aged ...
SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-20125. Recommendations                                        What is working well?   The...
SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-2012                                    Recommendations for partnerships          1.    P...
SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-20126. BibliographyDEECD (2010) Adolescent Community Profile: City of Stonnington. Compil...
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Needs analysis report 2011 2012

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School Focussed Youth Service
Glen Eira, Port Phillip & Stonnington

Needs Analysis 2011

Current and emerging trends in wellbeing issues for
Young people in Glen Eira, Stonnington and Port Phillip

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Needs analysis report 2011 2012

  1. 1. School Focussed Youth ServiceGlen Eira, Port Phillip & StonningtonNeeds Analysis 2011 School Focused Youth Services Kate Fennessy, SFYS CoordinatorCurrent and emerging trends in wellbeing issues for Glen Eira, Port Phillip and StonningtonYoung people in Glen Eira, Stonnington and Port Phillip School Focused Youth Service Coordinator Stonnington Youth Services
  2. 2. SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-2012Acknowledgements:Thanks are extended to all the young people who took the time to participate in the Youth Surveys and YouthForum. Your openness to identifying issues of concern, and your brave comments are what have made thisdocument meaningful, and given us a great insight into how schools and services can better support you.Thanks also to those schools and services who took the time out of their increasingly busy schedules tocomplete the Schools and Service surveys, sharing your experiences and wealth of knowledge of the youthsector.And finally, to acknowledge Kate Fennessey in her role as the previous SFYS Coordinator for her fantasticwork in starting this Needs Analysis, doing the 2010 surveys and Youth Forum, collating and analyzing the2010 data and writing parts of the document. 1
  3. 3. SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-2012Table of Contents1. Visual Summary 1.1 Key Themes…………………………………………………….………………………………….. 3 1.2 Emerging Trends…………………………………….………………………….……………….. 3 1.3 Summary of Findings……………………………………………………………….…………… 3 1.4 Recommendations…………………………………………………………….…………………. 32. Introduction 2.1 The SFYS Program…………………………………………………………………….…………... 4 2.2 The SFYS Needs Analysis…………………………………………………………..…………... 4 2.3 Aims and Intended Audience……………………………………………………………….. 4 2.4 Methodology……………………………………………………………………………………….. 53. Local Youth Profiles 3.1 Stonnington……………………………………………………………………………….…………. 5 3.2 Glen Eira…………………………………………………………………………………….…………. 6 3.3 Port Phillip………………………………………………………………………………….………... 64. Needs Analysis Findings 4.1 School Survey Findings……………………………………………………………….……….. 7 4.2 Service Survey Findings…………………………………………………………………..…… 8 4.3 Schools and Services Visual Summary…………………………………………………… 9 4.4 Youth Survey Findings……………………………………………………..……………….…... 10 4.5 Comparison to 2006-2007 Needs Analysis……………………………………………. 14 4.6 Overall Data Interpretation…………………………………………………………………... 155. Recommendations 5.1 What is working well? ………………………………………………………………………….. 17 5.2 Recommendations for the Service Sector and Schools…………………………. 17 5.3 Recommendations for Partnerships.…….………………………………..….…………. 18 5.4 Recommendations for Youth Participation……………………………………………. 186. Bibliography 197. Appendices 19 2
  4. 4. SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-2012Visual SummaryThis diagram shows the summarised findings of the Youth, Schools and Service surveys inconjunction with VCAMS data and an analysis of the youth service sector. Key Themes Emerging Issues Mental health and wellbeing issues remain the most Schools and services are seeing anxiety emerging prominent issues for young people. as a key issue impacting on young people. This is Young people are most concerned about illicit likely linked to increased experiences of pressure to drugs, smoking and alcohol. perform well at school, as well as young people Schools and services are most concerned about the experiencing multiple life stressors. impact of anxiety and depression on young people. Increased pressure to do well at school is from both There is increased pressure to perform well at parents and from young people also pressuring school from both parents and youth themselves. themselves. Specific youth cohorts are highly impacted by Grief and loss is an issue being reported as an racism and bullying. emerging concern for young people. Young people are concerned about health and Racism is becoming an increasing high-level fitness but lack recreational options. concern for some young people. There is high educational engagement across all 3 Young people are more concerned about the impact LGAs due to availability of alternative education of smoking than they were 5 years ago. pathways and engagement services Concerns about parenting appear to have Young people want more access to services and diminished, as have body image concerns overall information. (but body image issues still rates high for females) Summary of findings Recommendations The DEECD Adolescent Community Profiles show Strategies to inform youth on resources and support that most young people have unhealthy lifestyle services available to promote wellbeing and behaviours over multiple indicators. address current issues. Young people are concerned about these unhealthy Develop a resource guide for services, schools and lifestyle behaviours such as drugs and alcohol, young people. smoking, and lack of exercise. Continue investing in alternative education Young people are experiencing multiple stressors, pathways and innovative engagement programs for which has an impact on them, and often results in youth at risk. reactive behaviours. Increase opportunities for fitness and recreational Girls are generally more concerned than boys activities for young people and makes these overall about youth issues. affordable and accessible. Overall the majority of young people are at least Ensure schools have an early intervention and moderately concerned about multiple issues which prevention approach to youth mental health issues. impact on their health and wellbeing. Promote a youth participation culture in the sector Schools, services and young people mostly agree Enhance partnerships between schools and the on what they are concerned about. service sector with a focus on making services more Young people are positive about services they have accessible to young people through schools. accessed but want more information on issues and Ensure municipal health campaigns include a focus how to access services that are available. on youth for issues such as smoking and alcohol. 3
  5. 5. SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-20122. Introduction 2.1 The SFYS ProgramSchool Focused Youth Services (SFYS) is a state government initiative that was originally established in 1998 as part ofthe Suicide Prevention Taskforce. In the last twelve years, the program has developed a focus on all young peopleaged 10-18yrs at risk of disengagement from education, and is now administered by the Department of Education andEarly Childhood Development (DEECD), in partnership with the Catholic Education Office (CEO) and the Association ofIndependent Schools Victoria (AISV).In the Inner South, School Focused Youth Services (SFYS) is a partnership between the cities of Glen Eira, Port Phillipand Stonnington, and DEECD. The SFYS Coordinator is based at Stonnington Youth Services.The primary aim of SFYS is to strengthen the connection between services and schools, and to develop an integratedcommunity response for young people who are at risk. Establishing and enhancing relationships and partnerships is anintegral part of the SFYS role, and the coordinator works across the education, health, welfare, community andgovernment sectors to improve service responsiveness for youth across the three municipalities.The SFYS program also administers annual brokerage funds of $50, 000, which support local partnership initiatives thatenhance the school-service connection and wellbeing of young people at risk in the education system. Supporting theSFYS Coordinator with the brokerage process is the Local Advisory Group (LAG), consisting of a representation ofworkers from the youth services and education sectors. 2.2 The SFYS Needs AnalysisThe Needs Analysis is part of the service agreement with DEECD, and provides strategic focus for SFYS, particularly inregards to developing priorities for the expenditure of brokerage. The Needs Analysis will inform the development ofthe SFYS Strategic Plan for 2011 – 2012, and it is hoped will also become a point of reference for local government,community agencies and schools in developing their plans and policies in regards to their localised understanding ofissues impacting on youth wellbeing.The process of developing the Needs Analysis also ensures that SFYS is connected to young people, schools andservices, and has an up-to-date understanding of the current and emerging well-being issues for young people, bothfrom quantitative data sources and from local sources, including youth participation.The previous Needs Analysis document was produced in 2006 in conjunction with Stonnington Youth Services, andprevious to that in 2003. This Needs Analysis includes for the first time direct consultation with young people, inpartnership with the Stonnington Youth Council (SYC) and the Student Representative Council (SRC) from BentleighCollege, in addition to youth surveys across the three municipalities. 2.3 Aims and Intended Audience The core aims of the Needs Analysis are: To ensure that SFYS for Glen Eira, Port Phillip and Stonnington continues to address current and emerging local trends in regards to young people’s well-being and educational engagement. To identify key themes and priorities for young people living or accessing education in the municipalities of Glen Eira, Port Phillip and Stonnington. To develop the SFYS Strategic Plan for 2011 – 2012 with support from the SFYS Local Advisory Group. To provide a succinct and easy to read analysis of local youth needs- as such the report presents summarised findings with comprehensive data presented in the appendices. To be a useful resource for schools and services when determining priorities and strategies; in particular the addition of the Youth Issues section which highlights the youth voice. 4
  6. 6. SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-2012 2.4 MethodologyThe 2011-2012 SFYS Needs Analysis utilises data collected from surveys targeting youth, schools and the service sectorconducted in 2010 and 2011. The three 2010 surveys were all online surveys, developed with the support of theCorporate and Community Planning Department at Stonnington Council. The youth survey was developed inconsultation with the Stonnington Youth Council and Bentleigh Secondary’s Student Representative Council. The 2011surveys were abbreviated versions of the 2010 surveys intended to assess whether issues affecting youth had changedin both type and severity over the past 12 months.The 2010 Youth Survey was followed up with a Youth Forum held on July 22, 2010. Secondary school students fromnine local schools participated and the qualitative data has also been included in this report. See Appendix 1 for moreinformation on surveys and methodology.There are several limitations with the data collected from the survey, including the paucity of response from schoolsand services. The consistency amongst responses that were received is, however, a good indication that the data hassome capacity to demonstrate the main issues concerning schools and services. Youth survey data has been analysedas a whole to give a snapshot across the municipalities, and as such no multivariate analyses have been done.3. Local Youth Profiles 3.1 Stonnington General Information Covers an area of just over 25 square kilometres Population now over 99,000 (2010) 27% born overseas 52% of households are families; 31% are lone person households 1,239 dwellings are government housing (3%) th SEIFA index: 1,088 (4 highest in Victoria) 15% of households are low-income; 37% high income Youth Demographics 6 157 residents are aged 10-17years old 18 Primary Schools (8 government, 9 private, and 1 specialist) 9 Secondary Schools (8 private and 1 government- select entry) Youth Health & Wellbeing Eat Recommended daily fruit and vegetables 18.1% Do 60+ minutes of exercise daily 12.3% Complete Yr 12 or equivalent 96.8% Report being bullied 34.5% Report high psychological distress 11.6% Report high emotional wellbeing 75.0% Quality of life satisfaction 82.7% 5
  7. 7. SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-20123.2 Glen EiraGeneral Information Covers an area of about 38 square kilometres Population now over 136,000 (2010) 32% born overseas 62% of households are families; 28% are lone person households 437 dwellings are government housing (0.9%) th SEIFA index: 1,071 (6 highest in Victoria) 17% of households are low-income; 29% high incomeYouth Demographics 11 544 residents are aged 10-17years old 29 Primary Schools (12 government, 16 private, and 1 specialist) 16 Secondary Schools (11 private, 4 government, and 1 specialist)Youth Health & Wellbeing 17.3% Eat Recommended daily fruit and vegetables Do 60+ minutes of exercise daily 6.7% Complete Yr 12 or equivalent 93.6% Report being bullied 35.2% Report high psychological distress 14.9% Report high emotional wellbeing 55.7% Quality of life satisfaction 74.5%3.3 Port PhillipGeneral Information Covers an area of about 21 square kilometres Population now about 96,000 (2010) 27% born overseas 42% of households are families; 35% are lone person households 1,981 dwellings are government housing (4.5%) th SEIFA index: 1,064 (7 highest in Victoria) 16% of households are low-income; 34% high incomeYouth Demographics 3442 residents are aged 10-17years old 10 Primary Schools (5 government, and 5 private) 6 Secondary Schools (2 private, 2 government, and 2 specialist)Youth Health & Wellbeing Eat Recommended daily fruit and vegetables 20.4% Do 60+ minutes of exercise daily 9.8% Complete Yr 12 or equivalent 87.6% Report being bullied 38.6% Report high psychological distress 11.4% Report high emotional wellbeing 58.7% Quality of life satisfaction 73.9% 6
  8. 8. SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-20124. Needs Analysis: Survey Results 4.1 School Survey FindingsAll primary and secondary schools across Stonnington, Port Phillip and Glen Eira were invited to participate in the 2010and 2011 Schools Survey. Below is the list of schools’ top 10 issues of concern for 2010 and 2011:Table: Issue Ranking – SchoolsRank 2010 (n=57) Rank 2011 (n=10)1 Anxiety 1 Anxiety2 Body image 2 Alcohol3 Pressure to do well at school 3 Depression4 Depression 3 Family Conflict/Breakdown5 Parental expectation 3 Poor parenting of students6 Cyber-bullying 4 Self-esteem7 Alcohol 5 Self-harm and suicide8 Self-esteem 6 Pressure to do well at school9 Peer pressure 6 Family with mental health issues10 Family breakdown 6 Cyber-bullyingNote: these results should be considered an estimation as the number of responses was not adequate to quantify the data.Issues of student anxiety are reported as the main concern for teachers in both 2010 and 2011, and this finding isconsistent with SFYS discussions with school teachers and welfare staff regarding concerns. Anxiety is a stress basedreaction to negatively perceived life circumstances, and it appears that schools are seeing students experiencing highlevels of stress across the three municipalities. The other main issues of concern for schools are also mentalhealth/wellbeing related. These can be grouped into 3 main categories:Stressors: body image, parental expectation, pressure to well at school, cyber-bullying, poor parenting, peer pressureand family breakdown.Impacts: anxiety, depression, self-esteemReactions: alcohol, self-harm and suicideThe schools data is relatively consistent across 2010 and 2011, with 7 issues being in the top 10 both years. ‘Poorparenting’, ‘self-harm’ and ‘suicide’, and ‘family with mental health issues’ feature more strongly in 2011 than 2010,however it is difficult to draw conclusions from this data due to inadequate responses.School staff were also asked to report, qualitatively, on where they felt there were ‘gaps’ in the service system and inwhich areas they would like more information support. The responses showed that schools mainly have goodrelationships with generalist and mainstream services, but little relationship with specialist services. Schools wantmore support and information on most areas of student wellbeing, with a particular focus on mental health. Mostimportantly, was the consistent response from schools for better service coordination and access to up to dateinformation on resources and services available, with support for the continuation of the SFYS Weekly Newsflash andnewsletters. 7
  9. 9. SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-20124.2 Service Survey FindingsServices that provide support to young people and their families across Glen Eira, Port Phillip and Stonningston wereinvited to participate in the Services Survey. Below is the list of services’ top 10 issues of concern for 2010 and 2011:Table: Issue Ranking – ServicesRank 2010 (n=11) Rank 2011 (n=18)1 Anxiety 1 Anxiety1 Self-esteem 1 Pressure to do well at school1 Depression 2 Self-esteem1 Social skills 3 Family Conflict/Breakdown1 Body Image 4 Social Skills1 Bullying 5 Bullying 5 Cyber-bullying 6 Anger Management 6 Depression 6 Poor parenting of studentsNote: these results should be considered an estimation of services concerns as the number of responses was not adequate toquantify the data.Services, like schools, are also seeing anxiety as a prominent issue for young people across the municipalities ofStonnnington, Glen Eira and Port Phillip. While it is acknowledged that services tend to see a cohort of youth who arenot representative of the general population of young people across the region, there is some consistency betweenthe concerns schools and services have for young people. Services are also seeing a combination of stressors, impactsand reactions in their main concerns for young people.One notable area of difference between schools and services is the result across both 2010 and 2011 of social skillsbeing seen as an area of high concern for services, but not for schools. While conclusions cannot be drawn from thedata, it is worth hypothesising whether competence in social skills is a protective factor for young people in managinglife stressors, with those youth lacking in social skills being more likely to require support services. Research showsthat emotional intelligence, of which social skills is a component, is corrleated with positive wellbeing outcomes. Ifhaving high competence in social skills is a protective factor for young people this is possibly an area where schools canimplement some early intervention and prevention strategies to help increase social skills.Services were also requested to provide qualitative responses regarding their perceptions of service gaps across theregion. The majority of responses focussed on barriers to accessing support such as cost and waitlist times. There werealso concerns about suitable supports for youth who aren’t suited to mainstream services or education. A number ofservices commented on the need for better integration between the Youth and Family Services sectors given thepriominence of family issues, such as poor parenting and family conflict/violence, impacting on youth wellbeing.Services were supportive of the SFYS Newsletters and SFYS Weekly Newsflash and felt this was a good method todisseminate relevant information to schools and support services. 8
  10. 10. SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-20124.3 Schools & Services Visual Summary SCHOOLS SERVICES Main Concerns Main Concerns Anxiety Anxiety Pressure to do well at school Pressure to do well at school Depression Depression Self-esteem Self-esteem Family breakdown Family breakdown Cyber-bullying Bullying Alcohol Social Skills Why might this be so? Why might this be so?Schools are seeing young people under large Services are also seeing the impact multiple lifeamounts of stress from various sources. stressors are having on young people. Their concerns for young people are very similar toAnxiety, which can most easily be described as schools’ concerns.‘fear regarding the future’, is an impact from lifestressors and circumstances. Anxiety can be a The one main area of difference is that servicesresult of stressors such as pressure to do well at are concerned about the impact that lack ofschool, family breakdown and bullying. These social skills has on young people, whereasstressors can also result in depression and low schools are more concerned about alcohol use.self-esteem. Services see a specific cohort of young people,In society a lot of people use alcohol to manage and it is possible that they see young peopletheir stress and anxiety. It seems likely young experiencing exacerbated issues due to a lack ofpeople are following this role-modeling and using social skills. Social skills (a part of emotionalalcohol, both a coping mechanism for general intelligence) are a strong protective mechanismstress, as a social activity, and also possibly as a for preventing mental health and socialway of managing social anxiety. difficulties. Qualitative Responses Qualitative Responses More support and information on most Services are concerned about the impact areas of student wellbeing is required. service waitlists and cost of service has on young people Schools are well linked to mainstream but not specialist services Better integration of the Youth Services and Family Services sectors are required The biggest need for schools is service sector coordination and access to resources and SFYS Newsletter and SFYS Weekly Newsflash information available. are useful tools for disseminating information. 9
  11. 11. SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-20124.4 Youth Survey FindingsIssues of General Concern Below is a list of the 2011 top 10 issues of concern young people identified ranked by overall concern*. This iscalculated by allocating a score of 3 points for ‘highly concerned’ 2 points for ‘concerned’ 1ponts for ‘somewhat concerned’ 0 points for ‘not at all concerned’Table: Youth Top 10 Issues of Concern 2011 Rank Issue by overall rating Average rating 1 Illegal drugs 1.67 2 Alcohol 1.64 3 Smoking (cigarettes) 1.64 4 Self esteem 1.63 5 Depression 1.62 6 Anxiety 1.60 7 Self harm & Suicide 1.55 8 Body Image 1.53 9 Health & Fitness 1.51 10 Sexuality & Identity 1.49*This information was not available for the 2010 data‘Alcohol’ is an issue which youth in 2011 generally have a high level of concern about, but with only a third of youthbeing either very concerned or concerned about the issue. The majority of youth (n=100) reported being somewhatconcerned about ‘alcohol’, and this possibly reflects the mixed messages regarding alcohol in society. Alcoholconsumption is conspicuous across the 3 municipalities, particularly in the entertainment districts on Chapel Street andFitzroy Street. As well as alcohol use being normalised by its pervasive use across society and the ease of availability ofalcohol, young people are also exposed to the detrimental effects that misuse of alcohol can have. In contrast ‘illegaldrugs’ are the highest issue of concern in the general youth population in 2011, and also had 54% of youth in 2011 and38.1% of youth in 2010 reporting the issue to be either very concerning or concerning, showing that most youngpeople are moderately to highly concerned about ‘illegal drugs’.‘Illegal drugs’ and ‘smoking’ are not surprising results given both the level of campaigning and visible harm these issuesare associated with. Young people generally see anti-smoking campaigns in the media, and the highly visible andgraphic nature of these campaigns have potentially increased levels of concern regarding smoking. The variouscampaigns regarding the detrimental effects of illicit drug use, as well as potential experiences of seeing peopleaffected by drugs in the municipalities, also means young people are exposed to the issue of ‘illicit drugs’ in a variety ofways. The self-reported rates of young people using tobacco and illicit drugs are quite low across the 3 municipalities, 1ranging from 1.9%-18.8% , indicating that youth concern around ‘smoking’ may relate more to other people smokingas opposed to youth self-identifying an issue they have.The level of concerns around ‘self-harm and suicide’, as both an issue of broad concern and high concern is moreunexpected given that incidents of suicide and self-harm are not as widely prevalent in society. It is not possible todeduce from the data the reasons for this level of concern, but it is possible that the ‘ripple effects’ through societywhen a suicide does occur, and the level of impact suicide and self-harm has on those associated with the affectedyoung person, makes this an issue which a lot of young people are worried about.1 See DEECD Community Adolescent profiles for more comprehensive data on youth smoking and drug use. 10
  12. 12. SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-2012The finding that ‘health and fitness’ is a broad issue of concern for young people has both positive and concerningaspects. It is good that young people are identifying that health and fitness is a significant issue to them, and shows apotential awareness amongst young people of the importance of having good physical health and fitness. That youngpeople are concerned about ‘health and fitness’ also indicates a possibility that young people are experiencingnegative health, or lack of fitness. Multiple young people also indicated in the qualitative data the lack of opportunitiesfor physical recreation due to a combination of cost and lack of safe and accessible recreation spaces, which may berelated to this issue being of high concern for youth.Issues of High ConcernThe Youth survey data indicates that young people in the municipalities of Stonnington, Port Phillip and Glen Eira are ingeneral quite concerned about multiple issues relevant to their wellbeing. Responses in the 2011 surveys showed thatevery issue had at least a third of participants either concerned or highly concerned, with the top 10 issues all having50% or more. This was higher than the 2010 data.Below is a list of the top 10 issues of concern young people identified for 2010 and 2011. The issues have been rankedaccording to the percentage of young people who identified themselves as being ‘very concerned’ or ‘concerned’:Table: Youth Top 10 Issues of Concern 2010 Rank 2010 Issue % Rank 2011 Issue % 1 Pressure to do well at 43.3 1 Health & Fitness 56.1% school 2 Health & fitness 42.3 2 Pressure to do well at school 55.4% 3 Smoking (cigarettes) 40.2 3 Self harm & Suicide 54.6% 4 Grief & loss 38.6 4 Smoking (cigarettes) 54.1% 5 Illegal drugs 38.1 5 Illegal drugs 54.0% 6 Self-harm & suicide 37.4 6 Bullying 53.3% 7 Mental health 36.6 7 Grief and loss 53.1% 8 Racism 36.1 8 Caring for others 52.8% 9 Expectation to achieve 36.1 9 Violence 50.5% from parents 10 Bullying 35.2 10 Racism 50.0%The issues identified in the 2010 and 2011 youth surveys are fairly consistent across both years, indicating that theresults are both an accurate reflection of youth concerns, and that these concerns are remaining consistent. The onlydifferences between the years are ‘expectations to achieve from parents’ featuring in 2010 and ‘pressure to do well atschool’ featuring in 2011. It is possible that these are related issues, and that the issues of ‘pressure to do well atschool’ could have been interpreted as pressure from self, parents or school. ‘Mental health’ features as an issue in2010 but this was not included as a category in 2011, with the issues being listed instead as ‘anxiety’, ‘depression’ and‘family with a mental health issue’ being included to get further details on concerns related to mental health. Insteadof ‘mental health’, ‘caring for others’ featured in the 2011 top 10. It is hypothesised that this may be due to the 2011survey responses being from an older cohort of youth than the 2010 responses, and that issues of caring for youngersiblings or aging parents might be more relevant to this age group.General Concern vs High ConcernIssues that score highly in the very concerned/concerned rankings, but not so high in the overall ratings indicate thatthere is likely a polarised response to the issue. These issues are a priority for certain groups of young people and likelyimpact on them significantly, whereas they are issues that have little impact on those youth not directly affected.Given that SFYS is aimed towards achieving positive outcomes for at-risk young people, and it is acknowledged that 11
  13. 13. SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-2012this involves issues which impact on specific cohorts of youth and not just the general youth population, it is importantto take these cohort effects into consideration.Issues that feature in the top 10 for both general concern and high concern include, Illegal drugs Smoking Self-harm and suicide Health and fitnessThese are issues which most young people are most highly concerned about, and as such warrant being considered byschools and services as a priority for youth wellbeing interventions. They are issues which impact most young peoplesurveyed, and a broad response including education/information, discussions, events and specific support would beuseful in addressing the level of impact these issues are having on young people.Issues in 2011 that feature strongly in general but with lower levels of ‘very concerned’/’concerned’ responses include Alcohol Self-esteem Depression Anxiety Body Image Sexuality and identityThese are issues that appear to moderately impact most youth, and as such are useful topics for schools to considerwhen planning whole of school approaches to wellbeing. Addressing these issues in a broad and systematic mannerthat reaches all students is likely to have the best outcomes in regards to these issues, with group and individualsupport being more suitable for youth directly and significantly impacted by these issues.Issues of high concern to more than 50% of youth surveyed in 2011, but not in the Top 10 overall include Pressure to do well at school Bullying Grief and loss Caring for others Violence RacismThese issues appear to be significantly impacting on a large cohort of youth, but not on the whole population. Giventhis, it would be most suitable for projects and strategies addressing these issues to target youth who are directlyimpacted, while also looking at whole of school approaches to education on the impacts of such topics as bullying andracism, as the youth engaging in these activities are not likely to be self-identify it being an issue of concern to them,and may not be aware of the impact their behaviour has on the wellbeing of their peers.Gender DifferencesThere were pronounced gender differences in response to the youth surveys. The 2011 youth survey data shows thatfemales were more concerned than males about every issue with the exception of ‘smoking’ which males were slightlymore concerned, and ‘alcohol’, in which both males and females were equally concerned. There are also differences inwhich issues were of most concern to females and males.The following table highlights the differences between the 2011 Top 10 issues for males and females based on generallevel of concern for the issue. 12
  14. 14. SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-2012Table: 2011 Top 10 Concerns for Females and MalesRank Issue- Females Rank Issue- Males 1 Health & fitness 1 Smoking 2 Self-harm & suicide 2 Illegal drugs 3 Pressure to do well at school 3 Pressure to do well at school 4 Grief & loss 4 Career path pressure 4 Caring for others 5 Grief and loss 5 Depression 6 Self-harm and suicide 6 Illegal Drugs 7 Parental expectation 7 Body Image 8 Health and fitness 8 Bullying 8 Bullying 9 Violence 8 RacismFemales were more concerned about ‘caring for others’ and ‘body image’, which have traditionally been seen asgendered issues. This contrasts with males having more concerns regarding ‘career path pressure’ and ‘parentalexpectation’, which are also stereotypically gendered issues. Females were more likely to rate ‘depression’ as an issue,however, males did rate issues such as ‘grief and loss’ and ‘self harm and suicide’ highly, indicating that while theydon’t necessarily identify with the word ‘depression’, they are still experiencing difficult and distressing emotions andare highly concerned about these issues.‘Smoking’ is a significant issue of concern for males (rated 1.67), and while this did not rate in the females top 10, it didrate at 1.64, indicating that there is a similar level of concern for the issue amongst the sexes. It is concerning to notethat ‘violence’ was a top 10 issue for females and ‘racism’ a top 10 issue for males, given the detrimental impact bothof these issues have on youth wellbeing. Males may have rated racism as more of an issue than females given thatmost youth from non-English speaking backgrounds surveyed were males.Despite these differences in response from males and females, there are 6 issues they have in common in their top 10concerns, Health and fitness Self harm and suicide Pressure to do well at school Grief and loss Illegal drugs BullyingThis show that most of the issues impacting on young people are not gendered issues and are relevant to most youngpeople surveyed. In regards to service delivery and wellbeing interventions, this data highlights the importance ofconsidering whether providing gendered responses to an issue is most appropriate, or whether there would be greaterbenefit in involving both males and females. Given the complexity of some topics and of the dynamics and potentialimpacts of mixed service delivery it is suggested that this decision needs to be evaluated on a case by case basis.Qualitative Youth DataAs part of the 2011 Youth Survey, young people were given the opportunity to respond to the question, “What do you think services could do better to address issues for youth in your area?”This was to elicit information regarding young people’s experience of the service sector and areas where they feel theyneed either more support (increased access to service) or better support (quality of service). 13
  15. 15. SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-2012There were 161 qualitative responses from youth in regards to the question. These responses were qualitativelyanalyzed and grouped into 11 themes (see table on following page). That 161 responses could be quite easilycategorized into 11 themes shows there is a consistency of experience for young people in regards to the servicesector and where they experience the service gaps to be.Table: 2011 Themes from Qualitative Data Theme Number CommentsInformation & education 47 The majority of youth want more education and access to information on managing issues pertinent to them. This includes awareness of services available, provision of information, and more services visiting schools.Safety in public spaces 23 Safety in public was a major theme for young people with requests for self-defense classes, more police and better safety at train stations.Recreational 15 Multiple young people requested more recreational space andactivities/spaces activities, with skate parks being mentioned three times. Young people would like more youth events to attend, especially on school holidays and weekends/evenings.Underage drinking & 9 Some young people feel there needs to be a stronger approach tosmoking combating underage drinking and smoking, with harsher penalties and more information on the negative consequences.Strength based 9 Nine young people requested supports that focused on earlyinterventions intervention topics such as building self-esteem, teaching life skills and problem solving skills.Homelessness 9 Nine young people felt there needed to be more don’t to address homelessnessSexuality 9 Young people requested more sex education, access to free condoms, and more open dialogue about unwanted sexual experiences.Access to support 6 Access to services which offered free support was highlighted as an area of need.Employment services 3 Some young people felt there needs to be more employment support services for job seekers.Body Image 3 Education on body image and the impacts of the fashion/media industry on girls body image were requested.Parenting 2 Two young people felt there needed to be more parenting programs and support for parents.Access to information was the strongest theme for young people in regards to service requests, and young peoplemostly felt that schools were the best medium for this to occur. A lot of young people responded that they didn’t knowwhere to access information and support. Given that Glen Eira, Stonnington and Port Phillip are relatively service richareas with multiple options for youth support, this indicates that there needs to be more advertising and educationregarding available services for young people.Safety was the second highest mentioned issue in the qualitative data, with issues concerning safety at train stations,requests for more police presence in public places, better street lighting, and safer public places to be at night. Theneed for safe and accessible recreation spaces for youth was also highlighted, with requests for more youth events andskate parks. This finding is supported by the DEECD Adolescent Community Profiles which showed that while mostyoung people felt safe in the municipalities during the day time, they largely felt unsafe in the evenings, particularly foryouth residing in Port Phillip and Stonnington. 14
  16. 16. SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-20124.5 Comparison to 2006-2007 Needs AnalysisThe 2006-2007 Needs Analysis found that the main issues for young people were, Mental health and wellbeing Social skills Challenging behaviors Parenting skill developmentWith emerging issues of, Body image Bullying and friendships Self harm School ReluctanceWhile it is acknowledged that different methodologies were used in the 2006-2007 and 2010-2011 surveys the resultsshow the continued concern regarding mental health and wellbeing issues for young people. This finding is notsurprising given the relationship mental health has with physical health, drug and alcohol use and young people’ssocial and family situations. Mental health issues can be conceptualized as the ‘end product’ of the impact of lifestressors on young people, which further enhances the importance of early intervention and prevention strategies inconjunction with increased access to coping strategies and support services. 2Looking at the data from the 2006-2007 , there are some shifts in regards to young peoples’ concerns. For example,the following Top 10 issues from 2010 and 2011 were all not raised in the 2006-2007 Stonnington Youth IssuesFindings report: - Pressure to do well at school - Health & fitness - Smoking - Grief & loss - Racism - Expectation to achieve from parentsWhile these issues may have been of some concern to young people back in 2006-2007, they are now appearing to beof stronger concern and indicate areas where supports and interventions may need to either be established, orincreased in order to address these issues.That ‘mental health and wellbeing’, ‘social skills’, ‘body image’, ‘bullying’, and ‘self-harm’ have continued to be issuesof significant concern for young people over the last 5 years demonstrates that schools and the service sector need tocontinue to work towards addressing these issues and ensuring that programs and services are targeting the impactsthese issues have on young people.2 The 2006-2007 Stonnington Youth Issues Findings data was from 10-25 year olds connected to the City of Stonnington 15
  17. 17. SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-20124.5 Overall Data Interpretation There are approximately 21, 143 young people aged 10-17 years living in the municipalities of Glen Eira, Port Phillip and Stonnington. There is a combined total of 88 primary and secondary schools in the region, not including alternative education options, which increases the number to 99. The 2011 Needs Analysis is a snaphot of issues which are of most concern to young people in the region, and to the schools and services that work with these young people. The data shows that young people across Stonnington, Port Phillip and Glen Eira are concerned about the impact that mutliple life stressors such as school pressure, family and peer relationships have on their wellbeing. These stressors are having impact s such as anxiety, depression and low self-esteem, resulting in young people either engaging in, or becoming concerned about, reactive behaviours such as alcohol, illicit drugs, and self- harm and suicide. Services and schools are particularly concerned with the levels of anxiety they are seeing young people experience, while young people are generally more concerned about illegal drugs, alcohol and smoking. Young people are also generally concerned about self-esteem, depression and anxiety. The data shows that there are a significant cohort of young people who are highly concerend about pressure to do well at school, health and fitness, racism and bullying. While these issues might not appear in the top 10 general concerns, they are issues that require support and intervention given the impact they can have on young peoples’ developmental trajectory. Services and schools are generally in agreeance with the issues they are most concerned about regarding young people, with the exception that schools are more concerned about alcohol and services more concerned about social skills. While there are some differences between the concerns schools and services have for young people, and the concerns young people themselves have, there are more similarities than differences. This shows that there is a general consensus on which issues are most impacting young people, and this is positive in terms of providing programs and services to young people. Young people are also clearly articulating a desire for more access to information and coping strategies to help them address issues. Schools and services are in agreeance with this need for better access to information and service coordiantion, particularly for specialist services. Young people also want more information on available services as they don’t always know where to go for support. As a region with a rich service sector and a broad array of support services for young people, it would appear there is a need to further strengthen the partnerships between schools and the service sector in a manner that is visible and engaging of young people. This indicates that a shift is required in strategic planning from ‘increasing links between schools and services’, to ‘increasing links between youth and services through schools’. The findings of the 2011 Needs Analysis when compared to the 2006/2007 Needs Analysis suggest that the landscape of wellbeing issues and concerns for young people is constantly evolving, with some fundamental issues remaining consistent across the 5 years. This highlights the importance of conducting youth, service and school surveys so there is a clear and accurate picture of the issues impacting young people in the municipalities of Stonnington, Port Phillip and Glen Eira. 16
  18. 18. SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-20125. Recommendations What is working well? The municipalities of Stonnington, Port Phillip and Glen Eira have a vast array of youth services and projects across the entire service spectrum from recreation through to crisis response. Detailing all of these services and initiatives is beyond the scope of this document, however, inferences can be deduced from various data sources to highlight areas where youth issues are being effectively addressed. The DEECD Adolescent Community Profiles for 2010 indicate that all 3 LGAs are performing well in -providing mainstream and alternative education pathways for the completion of yr 12 or equivalent. -reducing youth crime rates- a likely outcome of increased educational and vocational engagement. -creating a sense of community safety during the daytime (after dark is still an issue) In addition to this, qualitative responses from the Youth Survey indicate that the services young people come into contact with are meeting their needs and they have a positive experience of them. The issue for young people and schools is in gaining knowledge of, and accessing, these services, as well as receiving information and support at school before the issues require external intervention. Recommendation for the services sector and schools 1. Increase availability of information and education sessions, coping strategies (particularly for anxiety), and strength-based activities within the school environment to assist in combating issues before students resort to reactive behaviours such as alcohol, school refusal, or self- harm. There should be a focus on building young people’s self-esteem and resilience as an early intervention, as well as targeting issues highlighted by young people in the youth surveys. 2. Continue to invest in alternative education pathways and innovative engagement programs for youth at risk of disengagement in order to maintain high rates of Yr 12 completion across the three municipalities. 3. Develop and implement strategies to increase the physical activity levels of young people through increased youth events, access to recreational facilities and within the school environment. Physical activity is highly correlated with both physical and mental wellbeing, and is an important preventative measure against chronic illnesses such as obesity, heart disease and depression. 4. Increase education on safe sex and access to contraception given that almost a third of sexually active young people across the region are not using contraception (DEECD Adolescent Community Profile), and young people are stating the need for sex education and free access to contraception. 5. Provide young people with information on the negative effects of alcohol, cigarettes and illicit drugs, and ensure that campaigns targeting these issues include a youth focus. 17
  19. 19. SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-2012 Recommendations for partnerships 1. Produce a regularly updated service guide for Glen Eira, Port Phillip and Stonnington, like the Inner Middle Southern Region Service Guide 2011-2012 recently released by the Bayside Youth Charter. Ensure there is web access to this information that it is youth-friendly and easily accessible. 2. That SFYS encourages schools to ensure that their partnerships with external agencies involves youth participation and enhances youth access to information and support. In this way schools are the conduit through which young people can access information and services. 3. That SFYS continues to produce both Service and Student newsletters quarterly, and the SFYS Weekly Newsflash, to ensure information on supports and services is disseminated to schools and students across the region in a timely fashion, and increase schools’ awareness of specialist services and programs. 4. For the SFYS Coordinator to continue quarterly meetings with the Youth Services Coordinators from Stonnington, Port Phillip and Glen Eira to increase communication and collaboration on key strategic directions and initiatives for the SFYS Program. 5. Encourage schools to consider having (or sharing regionally) a dedicated member of staff in the role of Community Liaison to assist with building relationships with services. Recommendations for Youth Participation 1. A SFYS-led Youth Forum to be held at least every 2 years to access the youth voice, obtain up-to- date information about youth issues, and give young people the chance have their say and contribute to decision-making about youth strategic planning. 2. Schools to consult with their student committees, or use other methods of youth consultation, when developing wellbeing initiatives and projects in their school to ensure they are addressing the localised needs of young people. 3. Future SFYS surveys used for the purposes of Needs Analysis involve consultation with young people to ensure that any emerging issues are captured in the survey questions.Please contact Holly Carpenter- SFYS Coordinator on 8290 7026 if you would like to suggest any furtherrecommendations, or comment on the current recommendations. Input from services and schools would behighly valuable in building a picture of how schools and the service sector can best meet the needs of youngpeople in the cities of Stonnington, Port Phillip and Glen Eira. 18
  20. 20. SFYS: Needs Analysis Report 2011-20126. BibliographyDEECD (2010) Adolescent Community Profile: City of Stonnington. Compiled using VCAMS data from the Victorian Department of Education & Early Childhood Development, the Department of Human Services, the Department of health, Victoria Police, and the Australian Bureau of Statistics.DEECD (2010) Adolescent Community Profile: City of Port Phillip. Compiled using VCAMS data from the Victorian Department of Education & Early Childhood Development, the Department of Human Services, the Department of health, Victoria Police, and the Australian Bureau of Statistics.DEECD (2010) Adolescent Community Profile: City of Glen Eira. Compiled using VCAMS data from the Victorian Department of Education & Early Childhood Development, the Department of Human Services, the Department of health, Victoria Police, and the Australian Bureau of Statistics.ABS (2006) Census of Population and Housing: Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA).7. List of AppendicesAppendix A: Survey MethodologyAppendix B: Survey Templates 2010Appendix C: Survey Templates 2011Appendix D: Comprehensive Youth Data 2010Appendix E: The 2010 Youth ForumAppendix F: Comprehensive Youth Data 2011Appendix G: Comprehensive School Data 2010Appendix H: Comprehensive School Data 2011Appendix I: Comprehensive Service Data 2010Appendix J: Comprehensive Service Data 2011Appendix I: Funding Opportunities / Grants 19

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