• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
2010.02.23 draft youth strategy emt presentation
 

2010.02.23 draft youth strategy emt presentation

on

  • 734 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
734
Views on SlideShare
732
Embed Views
2

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 2

http://www.slideshare.net 2

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Thanks for making the time for me to present on the Draft Youth Strategy that is being prepared for Council by Community Services branch.
  • The purpose of this presentation is to inform EMT about: 1. Key trends effecting the ways young people experience Brisbane in 2010. 2. Programs delivering our 2026 vision for young people. 3. Proposed new initiatives identified in the DRAFT Youth Strategy. The outcomes we want from you are: 1. Some feedback today about the broad strategic directions we are proposing. 2. Make sure the relevant people in your division have got their heads around the strategy and the implications for their work – and provide feedback on the DRAFT Strategy – 2 weeks. 3. Cr Knapp wants us to meet with the other chairs individually in the lead up to E&C. I ask that you provide advice about how to approach these presentations, in light of other matters they are considering – and brief your Chairs in preparation for our discussions with them. 5. Provide advice for our presentation to E&C.
  • This will be Council’s third youth strategy – building on the achievements of the previous two since 1998. In that time Council has built a national and international reputation for innovation in engaging young people. The initiatives proposed in this strategy for the next 5 years will continue to enhance our standing as a leader in local government youth programs.
  • Let’s start with some basic demographics. We work with the Australian Government definition of Youth – between the ages of 12 and 25. In the latest census there were 200,000 in Brisbane – 21% of the population. There were another 138,000 children aged 0-11 – meaning that 36% of Brisbane people are aged 25 or under.
  • Brisbane young people are culturally diverse. At Sunnybank High, for example, students speak 57 languages And in the average Brisbane classroom, there are 2 or 3 students who are not Australian citizens.
  • Young people are an important part of Brisbane’s workforce, … especially in retail and hospitality when they are younger … but then in their early twenties moving into professional, health, manufacturing, construction, education and training roles.
  • There are, of course, young people in every suburb. But if you map the top 10 suburbs for each age group, you can see that there are particular concentrations: School age young people in Aspley and Bracken Ridge there in green, The Gap and Ashgrove in brown, and the suburbs inland from the bay this side of Wynnum there in pink. There are concentrations of uni students in the western suburbs around St Lucia. Young professionals in their early 20’s show up in 2006 moving into the inner city. And then this big band of growth in the outer southern suburbs, across all ages from 0 to 24 – with high levels of cultural diversity and some pockets of disadvantage.
  • I thought we might look at trends by way of a quick quiz. Could I ask you to jot down your answers to these few questions? [click] Which of these activities is in decline among Australian children aged 5-14?
  • What is the leading cause of death for Australians aged 12-25?
  • How many people do you think there might be on Facebook who are “from Brisbane” and “under 26”?
  • What percentage of Queensland 15-17 year olds live in single parent families?
  • True of false? In 2007, 90% of Australians aged 17 had a mobile phone girls use mobiles more than guys those young people who are less well off use their mobiles more than those from wealthier areas Young women were more likely to use the internet for communication; young men were more likely to be playing online games.
  • Let’s see how you went. Australian young people are spending less time playing computer games - and more time at music, dance and drama lessons. Unfortunately, suicide is the leading cause of death, and traffic accidents are second. There are 480,000 people on Facebook who are “from Brisbane” and “under 26” 29% of 15-17 year olds live in single parent families True - three years ago, 90% of Australians aged 17 had a mobile phone True - girls use mobiles more than guys True - poorer young people use their mobiles more True - sad, but true - boys would rather shoot the interesting people they meet online.
  • Our 2026 vision starts with the words “Brisbane is a youthful and enthusiastic city…” There are a lot of young people that we work with who are passionate about Brisbane and love our 2026 vision. The purpose of this strategy is engage young people in that vision. We see this very much as a 2 way thing. Firstly - to ensure that that young people benefit from the whole of Council’s vision. But also that Council benefits from young people’s contribution across the organisation.
  • [Go over the next 4 slides quite quickly – their purpose is to communicate that: - everyone’s favourite program has been included Council is delivering a significant range of programs that engage young people across the whole 2026 vision the delivery is being lead by work units across the organisation In developing the Youth Strategy we have done a comprehensive review of the good ongoing programs, and the new initiatives that we go on to propose are necessary additions.] Let’s just take a moment to review what we are already doing. We are already doing a lot across the organisation to engage Brisbane’s young people in Council’s 2026 vision. Part of the Strategy is about communication what we are already doing.
  • For example, in working towards a smart and prosperous city, Human Resources recruit apprentices, trainees and graduates, and run a range of community employment programs to get disadvantaged kids into jobs. Disaster Management are helping to recruit young volunteers into the SES, and Community Safety have programs encouraging responsible use of alcohol. This important ongoing work is supported by the Youth Strategy. We assume it will continue.
  • As you can see, while my branch has carriage of the Youth Strategy, it is being delivered by work units in branches across the organisation. NES and LAS are making special effort to engage young people in their environment programs, … and City Planning have young people participating in their Neighbourhood Planning, Urban Design and Public Art programs.
  • Our ongoing programs are engaging Brisbane’s young people in creative ways, … and facilitating connections for them as global citizens who are increasingly the city’s ambassadors on the world stage.
  • In putting together this Youth Strategy, we spent a few months last year: running 13 workshops with 140 young people from schools and youth groups across Brisbane (Participants aged 13-24, including Indigenous, African, Pacific Islander, homeless - in groups at Runcorn High, Sunnybank High, Mt Gravatt PCYC, Brisbane Youth Service, Visible Ink Valley, LMYAC, Young Mothers for Young Women, Southside Ed, Acacia Ridge Community Centre, Visible Ink Zillmere, and Lynx Youth Space at Wynnum) getting input from external stakeholders like state government, community, sector peaks and universities (Participants from: UQ, QUT, BYS, Logan City Council, Department of Communities, Queensland Health, Education Queensland, Contact Inc, Red Cross, Youth Outreach Service, Jabiru, Inala Youth Service, QPASTT) and finalising an Action Plan for implementation of the strategy with representatives of all branches on the recently established Cross Council Reference Group on Social Inclusion. Our next steps are: to get feedback on this draft from you, from the chairs, and then present the DRAFT Strategy to E&C And then to finalise the strategy, and the action plan that will guide its implementation. [wave Action Plan]
  • A quick scan of other local government shows that they are doing a lot of different things in this space. The City of Melbourne established a specialist youth arts centre on the river near Federation Square last year, and are expanding their program that gets property owners in the inner city to make vacant building space available to artists. Sydney are focused on employment – with a talent agency for indigenous young actors, and support with getting a drivers licence. Geelong have a new showcase public plaza with a program of youth events, and their own awards in youth week. Vancouver have a program that engages young leaders in the business of local government.
  • The Strategy proposes 4 new lighthouse projects that deliver on the priorities of this administration: A Showcase public space design and animation project that is about managing the pressures of growth. We’ve been discussing this with John Clarke in City Planning. A proposal to establish a new Visible Ink space in that southern growth corridor that responds to the cultural diversity, need for employment programs, and need to affirm community identity and cohesion in that region. A project with Brisbane Transport to reduce mischief on routes that carry lots of young people by engaging them in bus design and employment opportunities . We’re developing this proposal with Sherry Clarke. And a new initiative - the Fresh Futures Dialogues - to tap the passion and talent of our high achieving young people and get them working alongside us to achieve our vision.
  • The draft strategy is a detailed document with a lot in it for you to digest and give feedback on. Today I just want to look at each of the 2026 themes - highlight one key finding, the strategies that we have identified to guide our response, and one key initiative for so you can see where we are going with some of these things. For example, we know that mental illness is a real problem – 1 in 4 young people experience a mental disorder, and suicide is a real problem. Our 2026 vision says Brisbane will have the lowest rate of depression, particularly among our young people, in the OECD countries. That’s quite a challenge! Last year we worked with key people from the state Child and Youth Mental Health Service and the University of Queensland to identify how Council could respond. That discussion has kicked off The Resilience Partnership , which does a number of strategic things to give Council staff the skills to promote mental health with young people, and use our libraries, website, staff bulletins etc to get their health and well-being messages out.
  • Young artists are still struggling to find an audience and earn a living in Brisbane. Although the ‘great southern exodus’ of five years ago seems to have slowed, many still move interstate and abroad in search of a more appreciative audience, a more supportive community, and a wider range of economic opportunities. Our strategies are to build pathways for emerging artists to earn a living from their work, and to support them to take their work to wider local and global audiences. Council has a range of programs that provide exciting opportunities, like the Lord Mayor’s Creative City and Emerging Artists Fellowships. The proposed extension to this work that would require additional budget is identified in blue. What our Creative Communities Team want to do over the next few years is to provide clear pathways so young artists can build ongoing careers in their field, earn a living while staying here - and make Brisbane a base for a national and international practice.
  • We know that Brisbane has many smart young people who are achieving national and international recognition . They go interstate and overseas, get their awards, have amazing experiences, get excited about making a difference – but come back to their desk on Monday morning. This strategy and project are about connecting with them, linking them into Council, and engaging them in an ongoing dialogue that gives them opportunities to put their ideas into action and at the same time engages them and us in an ongoing dialogue that refreshes our vision.
  • As you saw on the map, the population of young people in that growth corridor across the outer southern suburbs has gone through the roof. We are keen to get out there with a new Visible Ink youth space. We’d have a little team of youth workers, with a focus on cross-cultural and employment programs for young people at risk, and getting the wider population of young people involved in running local event that build a sense of pride and community cohesion.
  • Our Green Heart community team in NES have been doing some good work with schools across the city. The strategy is to engage as many young people as we can across the city in learning how to make Brisbane more clean and green – by designing curriculum-based learning opportunities that teachers can deliver, and identifying and supporting young sustainability advocates to take leadership roles with their friends, families, schools, and communities. The CitySmart Schools crew are keen to add a small grants program - that would enable some of our most innovative schools to implement new sustainability initiatives that the students would understand as a part of our 2026 vision for a clean and green city.
  • Our consultation with key stakeholders told us that we have to do something soon about contested public space. We have an increasingly diverse population of young people, who are feeling less welcome when they are out and about; we have media and public perceptions that are quick to label their behaviour as anti-social; we have increasing densities that are bringing more and more people together in more and more crowded public spaces; and we have developers who are building public spaces that don’t work well for a wide variety of users. The opportunity that we have is young people who are early adopters of high density lifestyles – and they are in a position to help us to redefine how we think about the public space in these growth neighbourhoods. The idea of this project is to go to the community and to work with them to design and build 2 great child, youth and senior friendly public spaces in our growth corridors, over the next 5 years, that will showcase the best in design. Then our Creative Communities Team will bring these spaces to life with public art and performances that celebrate local expressions of Brisbane’s unique identity and culture.
  • Brisbane Transport report 20-30 incidents each week where (mostly) young people have put a bus out of service - damaging it by tagging, slashing seats, scratching windows, smashing windows and fittings, and kicking panels. Repairs cost $2M per year. We also have problems with passengers abusing drivers, and throwing rocks at buses. BT are very concerned that someone is going to get seriously hurt or killed. These incidents are concentrated on several suburbs, in particular in that southern growth corridor. This project would identify those bus routes that carry large numbers of young people and have a lot of incidents. We would get our youth outreach workers to connect with those young people who are regular passengers. The idea is to build relationships with a group of peer leaders – and get them involved with the local bus workshops. Some would be in groups designing the interior and exterior of buses, so that they tell their stories. Others would get jobs as trainees and apprentices with the workshops – repairing damage. We might even get some of those big young pacific islanders on board as drivers. Its hard to play up when you’ve got some ownership of the bus, and your cousin is the driver.
  • The last initiative that I want to show you is this one. We had about 80,000 international students in Brisbane last year – and the numbers are going up dramatically. They are highly visible, and some are vulnerable and become victims of unscrupulous landlords and rip off. They are keen to socialise with locals, but can struggle to make links. This project would link them with services and support they need, and connect them with business and professional networks in their field.
  • Thanks for listening. This is what I am hoping you will do from here: 1. Give us some feedback today about the broad strategic directions we are proposing. 2. Provide more detailed feedback on the DRAFT Strategy from your areas – by 19 March. Let me know how we can best facilitate this – you might want to send us comments, or have us attend a regular meeting, or ask us to convene a special meeting with particular people – the important thing from our end is to get this right – so you let us know how to best get your feedback. 3. Brief your Chairs in preparation for our discussions with them in the week of 22 March. 4. Provide advice for our presentation to E&C.

2010.02.23 draft youth strategy emt presentation 2010.02.23 draft youth strategy emt presentation Presentation Transcript

  • Delivering ‘a youthful and enthusiastic city’ Youth Strategy 2010-2015 Draft EMT Presentation 3 March 2010 Community Services Branch
  • Purpose of this presentation
    • To inform EMT about:
    • Programs delivering our 2026 vision for young people.
    • Key trends effecting the ways young people experience Brisbane in 2010.
    • Proposed new initiatives identified in the DRAFT Youth Strategy.
    • Outcomes sought from EMT:
    • Feedback today on strategic directions.
    • Final feedback from Divisions (2 weeks).
    • Guidance prior to E&C.
  • Council’s third youth strategy building on previous achievements - Red Cross Night Cafe 2004 - Mt Gravatt PCYC youth space 2003 - Youth Team - Visible Ink Zillmere space 2002 - Stylin’ Up festival - Visible Ink Valley space 2001 - Working On employment program - Visible Ink website 1999 Youth Strategy #1: 1998-2004 - Showcase Public Space #2 - Brisbane hosts Asia Pacific Cities Summit Youth Program 2015
    • Showcase Public Space #1
    • Bus design and employment strategy
    2013
    • - Visible Ink South
    • Neighbourhood Planning Web 2.0 youth engagement
    2012 - Brisbane hosts Asia Pacific Cities Summit Youth Program - Social Inclusion for International Students 2011 - The Resilience Partnership - Libraries Online Learning Environment 2010 Youth Strategy #3: 2010-2015
    • Lord Mayor’s Creative City
    • NightRec recreation outreach pilot
    2009
    • Rites of Passage Strategy
    • City Smart Schools
    • Youth Enterprise Symposium
    • Loud in the Library
    2008
    • Asia Pacific Cities Summit Youth Forum #1
    • Sunnybank Multicultures
    2007 - 2026 Youth Visions Showcase 2006 - Lord Mayor’s Youth Advisory Council - Linx Youth Space at Wynnum 2005 Youth Strategy #2: 1998-2004
  • Basic demographics
    • Australian Government definition of ‘young people’ = aged 12-25
    • Brisbane in 2006 had:
    • 201,757 young people aged 12-25 (21% of the population)
    • + 138,393 children aged 0-11 (15%)
    • = 340,150 … 36% of Brisbane people are aged 25 or younger
    • - Australian Bureau of Statistics 2006 Census - Brisbane Local Government Area
    • Projection for 2016: 219, 000 aged 12-25 (19% 0f the population)
    • - Planning and Information Forecasting Unit (PIFU)
  • Brisbane young people are culturally diverse
    • 21% were born overseas (United Kingdom, New Zealand, Pacific Islands, Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa)
    • 11% were NOT Australian citizens
    Students at Sunnybank High speak 57 languages
    • 49% (31,710) of those aged 15-19 were employed - primarily in retail (32%) and hospitality (26%)
    • 71% (60,778) of those aged 20-24 were employed - primarily in retail (17%) and hospitality (12%)
    • - but also in their early twenties moving into
        • professional services (10%)
        • health (9%)
        • manufacturing (7%)
        • construction (6%)
        • education and training (6%)
    Young people are an important part of Brisbane’s workforce
  • Basic demographics - concentrations of different age groups Australian Bureau of Statistics 2006 Census
  • Trends … a quick quiz
    • Q 1. Which of these activities is in decline among Australian children aged 5-14?
        • (a) Playing computer games
        • (b) Music lessons
        • (c) Dance lessons
        • (d) Drama rehearsals
  • Trends … a quick quiz
    • Q 2. What is the leading cause of death for young people aged 12-25 in Australia?
        • (a) Traffic accident
        • (b) Infectious disease
        • (c) Suicide
        • (d) Drug and alcohol misuse
  • Trends … a quick quiz
    • Q 3. How many people on Facebook are “from Brisbane” and “under 26”?
        • (a) 120,000
        • (b) 240,000
        • (c) 360,000
        • (d) 480,000
  • Trends … a quick quiz
    • Q 4. The proportion of Queenslanders aged 15-17 who live in single parent families is:
        • (a) 9%
        • (b) 19%
        • (c) 29%
        • (d) 39%
  • Trends … a quick quiz
    • True or False?
    • In 2007,
        • (5) 90% of Australians aged 17 had a mobile phone
        • (6) Young women used mobiles more than young men
        • (7) Young people from less well off areas used their mobiles more than those from wealthier areas
        • (8) Young women were more likely to use the internet for communication; young men were more likely to be playing online games.
  • Trends … quiz answers
    • A 1: (a) Australian young people are spending less time playing computer games - and more time at music, dance and drama lessons 1
    • A 2 (c) Suicide is the leading cause of death of Australians aged 12-25 2
    • A 3: (d) There are 480,000 people on Facebook who are “from Brisbane” and “under 26” 3
    • A 4: (c) 29% of 15-17 year olds live in single parent families 4
    • A 5: True - three years ago, 90% of Australians aged 17 had a mobile phone 2
    • A 6: True - girls use mobiles more than guys 2
    • A 7: True - poorer young people use their mobiles more 2
    • A 8: True - boys would rather shoot the interesting people they meet online 2
    • 1 2006 ABS Survey of Children's Participation in Cultural and Leisure Activities
    • 2 State of Australia’s Young People. Office for Youth, Commonwealth of Australia
    • 3 Facebook stats accessed 1.2.2010
    • 4 Snapshot 2009: Children and young people in Queensland, Commission for Children and Young People
  • Purpose of the Youth Strategy
    • The purpose of the Youth Strategy is to ensure:
    • that young people benefit from the whole of Council’s vision,
    • and that the whole of Council benefits from young people’s contribution to achieving our 2026 vision for Brisbane.
  • Ongoing programs engaging Brisbane’s young people in the whole of Council’s 2026 vision
    • Active and Healthy
    • Provision of parks and recreation facilities (NES & LAS)
    • Drinkwise Parents 5 Point Plan (Community Safety)
    • ‘ Working On’ youth in recovery employment program (Human Resources)
    • Vibrant and creative
    • Lord Mayor’s Young and Emerging Artists Fellowships (Community Services)
    • Stylin’ up festival (Community Services)
    • Brisbane Powerhouse (Brisbane Powerhouse)
    Chill Out Recreation Program RADAR bands event @ Indro
  • Ongoing programs engaging Brisbane’s young people in the whole of Council’s 2026 vision
    • Smart and Prosperous
    • Online learning environment for high school students (Library Services)
    • Council workforce feeder programs (Human Resources)
    • Young Employees Strategy (Human Resources)
    • Sir Thomas Brisbane Planetarium (Business Services)
    • Friendly and Safe
    • Black Diamonds (Community Services)
    • Extreme Weather Heroes (Disaster Management)
    • Taskforce Against Graffiti (Local Asset Services)
    • Alcohol Management Plans (Community Safety)
    Inkubator tenants running their own social enterprises from Visible Ink Valley Multicultures crew learning harmony at Sunnybank High
  • Ongoing programs engaging Brisbane's young people in the whole of Council’s 2026 vision
    • Clean and Green
    • Green Heart Schools (NES)
    • Downfall Creek and Boondall Wetlands Environment Centre Schools Programs (LAS)
    • Towards Zero Waste Education Centre (City Waste)
    • Catchment Kids (Water Resources)
    • Well Designed sub-tropical city
    • Neighbourhood Planning (City Planning and Community Services)
    • Living City (City Planning)
    • Artforce (City Planning)
    • Arbour Day (NES)
    Water Futures Think Tank Green Unit student campaign at Ferny Grove High
  • Ongoing programs engaging Brisbane’s young people in the whole of council’s 2026 vision
    • Accessible and Connected
    • Active School Travel (Transport and Traffic)
    • www.visibleink.org (Community Services)
    • Safe School Travel Program (Transport and Traffic)
    • MMS 2FIXIT (Contact Centre)
    • Regional and World City
    • Lord Mayor’s Youth Advisory Council (Community Services)
    • Asia Pacific Cities Summit Youth Forum (International Relations Unit)
    • Brisbane Welcomes International Students (Economic Development)
    A2Z road crew exploring transport futures Asia Pacific Cities Summit Youth Forum
  • Methodology
    • 1. Background research:
      • Literature review
      • Internal mapping of programs and issues
    • 2. Engagement:
      • 13 workshops -140 young people from schools and youth groups across Brisbane
      • 2 workshops - key external stakeholders: state government, community, sector peaks and universities
      • Cross Council Reference Group on Social Inclusion
    • 3. Next steps:
      • Feedback from EMT and Chairs
      • E&C Presentation
      • Finalise Strategy and Action Plan
      • Launch Strategy
    The following findings and key initiatives come from a Strategy Development Process that involves:
  • What other places are doing
    • Signal Youth Arts Centre - near Federation Square for young people aged 13 to 20 years. (City of Melbourne)
    • Creative Spaces - brokers access to vacant inner city properties for artists. (City of Melbourne)
    • Drivin’ 4 Employment - assists young people to gain their learners and provisional driver’s licenses. (City of Sydney)
    • Lights Camera Action - website based talent agency for Indigenous actors and extras providing work in film, television and theatre and advertisements. (City of Sydney)
    • Western Beach Youth Activities Area - high quality 'Barcalona style plaza' with great facilities and cutting edge design, featuring performance areas, skating and boarding area, sculptures, multimedia, catwalk – and an officer to program activities and events. (City of Greater Geelong)
    • Impetus Youth Awards  - recognise those young people who make significant contributions to education, community work, sport, culture, the arts and the environment. (City of Greater Geelong)
    • YouthPolitik - civic education and youth leadership development program for 15-20 year olds provides explores issues that our city faces, builds leadership skills and provides hands-on experience in municipal governance, politics and project development. (City of Vancouver)
  • Lighthouse projects 2010-2015
    • Showcase public space design and animation project
    • Managing the pressures of growth
    • City Planning: John Clarke
    • Visible Ink South
    • Managing the pressures of growth
    • Community Services: Steve Capelin
    • Bus design and employment pilot project
    • Keeping Brisbane moving
    • Brisbane Transport: Sherry Clarke
    • Fresh Futures Dialogues
    • Environmental Sustainability/New World City
    • Human Resources: Tara Waller, CISP: Steven Smith
    The Strategy proposes 4 new lighthouse projects that deliver on the priorities of this administration:
  • Active and Healthy City
    • Key initiative
    • The Resilience Partnership
    • New partnership with Child and Youth Mental Health Service:
    • train frontline Council staff and community partners in mental health awareness and prevention
    • distribute health promotion materials
    • support young people’s peer-to-peer health promotion initiatives.
    • Outcome: Young people at risk of mental illness staying healthy, coping with life and connecting with people who care about their well-being.
    • Lead: Community Services
    • Key finding
    • One in four young people experience mental illness
    • suicide is the leading cause of death for this age group
    • evidence based research - what works are prevention, promotion and early intervention programs that build resilience and connectedness.
    • Strategies
    • Support youth-led and community based initiatives that improve the physical fitness, mental health, nutrition and emotional well-being of Brisbane young people.
    • Build resilience and connectedness for young people who access Council programs.
  • Vibrant and Creative City
    • Key initiative
    • Creative pathways
    • Well established programs - Creative Sparks, Creative City and Lord Mayor’s Young and Emerging Artists Fellowships.
    • In 2010-2015 we will support these artists and emerging producers to build a career:
    • introducing them to the right people in the arts industry
    • support getting their first and subsequent paid gigs
    • learning how to earn a living from their arts practice.
    • Outcome: Young artists enriching our communities and learning how to make a living from their work.
    • Lead: Community Services
    • Key finding
    • Young artists are still struggling to build a career
    • limited pool of producers, venue owners, benefactors and funding sources
    • the ‘great southern exodus’ of five years ago seems to have slowed
    • but many still move away in search of a more appreciative audience, a more supportive community, and a wider range of economic opportunities.
    • Strategies
    • Build supportive industry networks that provide pathways for emerging artists to turn their passion into a sustainable enterprise.
    • Showcase the work of Brisbane’s emerging artists – and support them to take their work to wider local and global audiences.
  • Smart and prosperous city
    • Lighthouse project
    • Fresh Futures Dialogues
    • support, work shadowing, mentoring, networking and speaking opportunities throughout the year
    • annual Fresh Futures event to connect with the city’s civic, cultural, intellectual and business leaders
    • every 4 years this event ramped up into a Fresh Futures Festival to coincide with Brisbane hosting the Asia Pacific Cities Summit.
    • Outcome: Smart young achievers bringing fresh insight and passion that continually refreshes our shared vision for Brisbane.
    • Lead: Human Resources and CISP
    • Key finding
    • Smart young people are achieving national and international recognition
    • many of Brisbane’s smart young people win local, national and international awards
    • they attend national and international forums but do not get much opportunity to share that experience when they return
    • their passion for the future of Brisbane is informed by amazing experiences, but they have few opportunities to share their insight.
    • Strategies
    • Support our smart young people to participate in national and international experiences, listen to the insights they bring back with them, and get them working alongside us toward achieving Our Shared Vision – Living in Brisbane 2026.
  • Friendly and safe city
    • Lighthouse project
    • Visible Ink South
    • a new Visible Ink space supporting an emerging generation of diverse, young, emerging civic leaders who are shaping the culture and identity of these outer southern suburbs
    • adapting the successful Visible Ink model to meet local priorities for: cross-cultural programs, employment programs, and local events that build a strong sense of pride and community cohesion.
    • Outcome: Connected and engaged young citizens making their own unique contributions to the identity and cohesion of the outer southern suburbs.
    • Lead: Community Services
    • Key finding
    • Southern growth corridors
    • huge numbers of children and young people growing up in new housing estates and infill developments in outer southern suburbs
    • limited access to facilities, programs, public transport, recreation, and employment opportunities
    • cultural diversity, disadvantage, disengaging from school.
    • Strategies
    • Support young people to develop their own initiatives that give fresh expression to Brisbane’s personality.
    • Reach out to young people at risk.
    • Work with young people in growth corridors to develop a sense of identity and pride in their communities.
  • Clean and Green City Key initiative Green Heart Schools. Professional development and curriculum-linked programs support teachers, while students participate in workshops, excursions, public speaking competition and art show. In 2010-2015 Council will establish a Project Green Heart small grants pool to support and showcase innovative sustainability projects in schools. Outcome: Children and young people who are aware of their impact on the environment, learning sustainability through action in the classroom and schoolyard. Lead: Natural Environment and Sustainability
    • Key finding
    • Schools are nurturing generational awareness and responsibility .
    • Many Brisbane schools have excellent environment programs.
    • Young people from these schools form significant youth sub-cultures who understand environmental issues, share a generational awareness of their impact on the planet, and assume that they need to lead the way in living more sustainably.
    • Strategies
    • Provide curriculum-based learning opportunities at schools that engage many young people in learning how to make Brisbane more clean and green.
    • Support young sustainability advocates to take leadership roles with their friends, families, schools, and communities.
  • Well designed sub-tropical City
    • Lighthouse project
    • Showcase public space project
    • design & build 2 great child, youth & senior friendly public spaces
    • showcase the best possible universal design in the city’s growth corridors
    • bring these spaces to life with public art and performances that celebrate local expressions of Brisbane’s unique identity and culture
    • Outcome: Young designers, business people and early adopters of high density living working together to redefine’ neighbourhood’ and the role of the local park or plaza as a vibrant all-ages place for the community to come together.
    • Lead: City Planning
    • Key finding
    • Contested public space in the city’s growth corridors
    • public space remains contested
    • melting pot of diversity, negative perceptions and growing frustration
    • rapid population growth and increased density of development in the city’s growth corridors.
    • Strategies
    • Nurture an emerging culture among young people that expects and supports innovative subtropical design and sustainable planning.
    • Design, manage and animate public spaces that enhance local identity, inter-generational relations and community cohesion.
  • Accessible and Connected City
    • Lighthouse project
    • Bus design & employment pilot project
    • identify bus routes with high levels of patronage by young people
    • engage those who are regular passengers on those routes as peer leaders
    • encourage their friends in preventing anti-social, damaging and dangerous behaviour
    • bus design and employment opportunities
    • Outcome: Young bus passengers taking the lead in encouraging responsible behaviour among their peers.
    • Lead: Brisbane Transport
    • Key finding
    • Irresponsible behaviour damaging buses and deterring other passengers
    • Council’s bus fleet managers report 20-30 incidents each week where (mostly) young people have put a bus out of service
    • damaging it by tagging, slashing seats, scratching windows, smashing windows and fittings, and kicking panels
    • repairs cost $2M per year
    • Strategies
    • Involve young people in designing buses that are fun to travel in.
    • Employ young people from areas with high bus patronage as drivers and maintenance workers.
  • Regional and World City
    • Key initiative
    • Social inclusion for International Students.
    • events to socialise with other Brisbane young people
    • a supportive social infrastructure to link students with services and support
    • connect students with business and professional networks in their field
    • Outcome: International students, going home with positive experiences of connecting with Brisbane young people with the same interests or in the same line of work.
    • Lead: Community Services
    • Key finding
    • International students are isolated and vulnerable.
    • approximately 80, 000 in 2009
    • up 26% on the previous year
    • highly visible
    • particular vulnerabilities - easy targets
    • often express a strong desire to socialise with locals, but can come and go without making significant connections
    • Strategies
    • Support visiting international students to access services and make ongoing connections with locals who share the same personal and professional interests.
    • Build skills and connections among young civic, business, professional and community leaders that enhance relations with cities in the Asia-Pacific region.
  • Outcomes sought
    • Outcomes sought from EMT:
    • Feedback today on strategic directions.
    • Final feedback from Divisions (by 19 March).