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Evidence Based Activities to Build Mentoring Relationships for the Australian Youth Mentoring Network
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Evidence Based Activities to Build Mentoring Relationships for the Australian Youth Mentoring Network

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This webinar was presented to the Australian Youth Mentoring Network on December 5, 2011 from Friends for Youth's Mentoring Institute.

This webinar was presented to the Australian Youth Mentoring Network on December 5, 2011 from Friends for Youth's Mentoring Institute.

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  • POLL #1Do match activities impact how a mentoring relationship builds rapport?YesNoPOLL #2 Which activities are best for mentoring matches, according to research?CreativeSportsTutoringCareer-basedJust talking

Evidence Based Activities to Build Mentoring Relationships for the Australian Youth Mentoring Network Evidence Based Activities to Build Mentoring Relationships for the Australian Youth Mentoring Network Presentation Transcript

  • Transforming lives through the power of mentoring
  • Link to slides and recordingof webinar posted to Sarah Kremer Program Director Friends for Youth’s Mentoring Institute
  • AGENDA• Purpose and importance of activities in building relationship• Prescriptive, developmental, instrumental approaches• General activities• Goal setting activities
  • Theory: Relationship Building Higher relationship satisfaction through strong emotional connection • “Positive relationships are seen as the primary way that mentoring leads to improved outcomes for youth who are mentored.” Nation, M., Keener, D., Wandersman, A., &DuBois, D. (2005) • Rhodes’ model of youth mentoring: “a close mentoring relationship characterized by mutuality, trust, and empathy is the catalyst for several intertwined developmental processes pertaining to the social-emotional, cognitive, and identity development of youth.”Rhodes, J. (2005)
  • Theory: Relationship Building• “The presence of a strong emotional connection has been found to be a distinguishing feature of those mentoring relationships that are associated with better outcomes such as improvements in perceptions of scholastic competence and feelings of self-worth.”• Relational processes underpinning successful mentoring relationships: Authenticity, Empathy, Collaboration, Companionship Spencer, R. (2006)
  • Mentoring as Relational Intervention:Collaboration “He supports me in like, he asks me… what I’ve been doing in like, science since I like science a lot. And what I’ve been doing in math and it supports me… to do more work in science and math and other subjects.” JaShawn, a mentee “I’d talk to him on Monday and he’d say oh, I can’t wait for Saturday. He just really hated school.” Wolfgang, a mentor Spencer, 2006
  • Theory: Relationship Building• Successful mentoring relationships are characterized by meaningful interactions that help build relationship – Trust-building – Maintaining boundaries – Good communication – Realistic expectations• Meaningful interactions come from meaningful activities
  • Introduce new ideas, Listen to and opportunities, Help to see help to work and activities choices in order out solving to make better problems decisions Nurture self-confidence Help to define and achieve and positive goals self esteemBe a friend Mentors Help to improve in school and Role learning
  • Activity:Developmental vs. Instrumental
  • Mentoring Approach/Activities Improved connectedness to Mentee feels school • Empathy, praise, attention from mentor •He/she “matters” to mentor Improved •Valued by mentor connectedness to teachers Karcher, M. (2006)
  • Mentoring Approach/Activities Instrumental Developmental Karcher, M. (2006)
  • BUT – Remember…• For some mentees who are unable to form relationships, focusing on goals or projects may be successful approach to building the relationship• Expectations around instrumental activities only work with resources and structure to support them Nakkula, M. (2010)
  • Mentoring Activities How mentors approach mentoring relationship Developmental Instrumental How mentors and mentees What happens decide what toduring meetings do togetherGoal-directed UnilateralRelational Success of Collaborative mentoring Reciprocal relationship Karcher&Nakkula, 2010
  • Mentoring Activities • Goal-directed: How mentors approach explicit mentoring relationship outcomes are priority Developmental • Relational: Instrumental buildingmentors How and sustaining relationship is and mentees What happens priority decide what toduring meetings do togetherGoal-directed UnilateralRelational Success of Collaborative mentoring Reciprocal relationship Karcher&Nakkula, 2010
  • Mentoring ActivitiesDevelopmental Instrumental• Discussion of How mentors approach • Academic relationships mentoring relationship discussion• Casual Developmental about behavior, conversation Instrumental attendance,• Playing sports How mentors dropping out and mentees• Playinghappens What games •decide what to Discussion• Creative during meetings about do together activities Goal-directed importance of Unilateral Relational future Success of Collaborative • Tutoring/home mentoring Reciprocal relationship work Karcher&Nakkula, 2010
  • Mentoring Activities• Unilateral: one- How mentors approach mentoring relationship sidedDevelopmental How mentors• Collaborative:Instrumental and mentees reflects both unique decide what to perspectives do together• Reciprocal: taking Success of Unilateral turns or give-and- mentoring Collaborative take relationship Reciprocal
  • What Works Best? How mentors approach mentoring relationship Developmental Instrumental How mentors and mentees What happens decide what toduring meetings do togetherGoal-directed UnilateralRelational Success of Collaborative mentoring Reciprocal relationship Karcher&Nakkula, 2010
  • What Works Best? How mentors approach mentoring relationship Developmental Instrumental How mentors and What happens mentees decideduring meetings what to do togetherGoal-directed UnilateralRelational Success of Collaborative mentoring relationship Reciprocal Karcher&Nakkula, 2010
  • Positive Youth Development • Prepares young people to meet challenges of adolescence and adulthood through coordinated, progressive series of activities and experiences • Purpose: become socially, morally, emotionally, physically, and cognitively competent • Strengths-based vs. deficit-based • Youth are resources, not problems
  • Mentoring as Asset Intervention• Not only reducing risky behavior but supporting strengths• Assist in providing assets where possible and appropriate, not providing all of them or solving all problems• Assets grounded in relationships
  • 5 Conversation Starter Resources• Kid Chat: Questions to Fuel Young Minds and Mouths, Questmarc Publishing• Kid Chat, Too: All-New Questions to Fuel Young Minds and Mouths, Questmarc Publishing• Propellers – Quick Questions to Launch Good Conversations, Search Institute• “Conversations on the Go”: Clever Questions to Keep Teens and Grown-Ups Talking, Search Institute• 99 Tips for Talking with Your Teenager, Adolescent Counseling Services, http://www.acs-teens.org/99tips.php
  • Friends for Youth’s Mentoring InstituteMentoring Journal
  • Friends for Youth’sMentoring InstituteAcademic ActivityGuide
  • MentoringResource Center’sMaking the Grade:A Guide toIncorporatingAcademicAchievement IntoMentoringPrograms andRelationships
  • • Simple Things to Eat Well and Stay Active• FAQs• Conversation Starters Around Eating and Physical Activity• Ideas for Activities• Common Challenges and Easy Solutions• 10 Things to Do with Your Mentee http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/chc/wmy/images2011/EatWell_StayActive_HaveFun_aGuideforMentors.pdf
  • Taking Activities to Next LevelActivity Why It’s Good for My While We’re At It MenteeBaking cookies Good skill to learn; Encourage mentee to read conversations strengthen recipe, measure relationship; cookies to eat ingredients; could take cookies to neighbor, someone in needPlanting garden Satisfying to see when Take flowers to someone in plants grow; visual need or to thank someone; reminder; opportunity for plant garden for someone harder topics who needs helpAttending professional Fun; exciting; watch favorite Conversations about playerssports game players in person who “made good”; talk about reality of making it to pros and other ways of working in sports Probst, 2006
  • Taking Activities to Next LevelActivity Why It’s Good for My While We’re At It Mentee
  • Tips in Planning Activities• Be honest and upfront about ups and downs in relationship• Brainstorm new activities to do together• Set goals for your relationship• Empower your mentee to share thoughts and feelings• Be sensitive to developmental stage of your mentee and find out about other stressors Probst, 2006
  • Why Goal Setting?• Goals help youth develop self confidence.• Goals help develop motivation and sense of purpose.• Goals help youth develop a sense of accomplishment.• Goals help develop self-control.• Goals help youth see connections to academics.• Goals help develop self-reliance and self- management.• Goals help youth gain awareness of options.• Goals help develop positive attitude. Mentoring Resource Center, 2005
  • Age Appropriate Goals • Elementary School: Exposure • Middle School: Identity • High School: Future OrientationMaking the Grade: A Guide to Incorporating Academic AchievementInto Mentoring Programs and Relationships, 2005
  • • 12 modules • Background • Activity • Tips for Mentors• Careers• College• Character• Activity and Resource Guide• Achievement Chart http://www.mentorkids.org/attachments/-01_Full%20file%20FOR%20WEB.pdf
  • Sustain and Deepen Relationship Through Goals • Discuss why goals matter • Choose specific goals • Identify activities • Assign roles • Set deadlines Making the Grade: A Guide to Incorporating Academic Achievement Into Mentoring Programs and Relationships, 2005
  • Goal Activities/Steps Roles/Responsibilities TimelineRead and Read books, write Mentee: Read selected Book 1 bydiscuss summary, and then books June 23.books from discuss, like a book Book 2 bySummer club format Mentor: Will take the July 15.Reading List When we do this, we’ll lead on starting the Book 3 by also plan something discussion because she August 6. else for part of our has been involved in time together book clubs beforeStay involved Activities that we both Mentor: Wants to run Tennis: Fallin outside like: Bike riding, tennis, at least once/week at 2005activities horseback riding, middle school track All others: running monthly 2005-06 Mentee: Will build up to running 5 times around trackBlue Ribbon Mentor-Advocate Program,http://superstars.americalearns.net/2006/06/june-2006-syndee-kraus-go-to-for.html
  • Is this Strategy? How mentors approach mentoring relationship Developmental Instrumental How mentors and What happens mentees decideduring meetings what to do togetherGoal-directed UnilateralRelational Success of Collaborative mentoring relationship Reciprocal Karcher&Nakkula, 2010
  • Friends for Youth’s Mentoring InstituteMentoring Journal
  • Center for Health Communication, Harvard School for Public Health, 2011, Eat Well, Stay Active, Have Fun: A Guide for Mentors. http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/chc/wmy/images2011/EatWell_StayActive_HaveFun_aGuideforMentors.pdfKarcher, 2008, The study of mentoring in the learning environment (SMILE): A randomized evaluation of the effectiveness of school-based mentoring. Prevention Science, 9, 99-113.Karcher, Herrera, & Hansen, “I dunno, what do you wanna do?”: Testing a framework to guide mentor training and activity selectionKarcher&Nakkula, Youth mentoring with a balanced focus, shared purpose, and collaborative interactions both in Karcher, M. &Nakkula, M. (Eds.) 2010. New Directions for Youth Development No. 16: Play, Talk, Learn, Promising Practices in Youth Mentoring. Wiley Periodicals: San Francisco, CA.Kremer, S. (2005). Friends for Youth’s Mentoring Journal. http://www.friendsforyouth.org/MentorJournal.htmlLaird, H. (2003). Friends for Youth’s Academic Activity Guide. http://www.friendsforyouth.org/AcademicActivityGuide.htmlMentoring Partnership of Long Island, Discovering the Possibilities – “C”ingYour Future, http://www.mentorkids.org/attachments/-01_Full%20file%20FOR%20WEB.pdfMentoring Resource Center, 2005, Making the Grade: A Guide to Incorporating Academic Achievement Into Mentoring Programs and Relationships. http://educationnorthwest.org/resource/647Probst, K. (2006). Mentoring for Meaningful Results: Asset-Building Tips, Tools, and Activities for Youth and Adults. Minneapolis: Search Institute.
  • Questions?
  • Thank you!Link to slides and recordingof webinar posted to
  • Mentoring Institute Conference13th Annual Mentoring Conference Making A Difference Every Day: Program Support in Youth Mentoring February 9-10, 2012Tim Cavell, Ph.D. Keynote SpeakerOracle Conference Center
  • www.mentoringinstitute.org 650-559-0200 http://www.facebook.com/pages/Friends-for- Youth/105093182858863 http://twitter.com/friendsforyouth http://www.friendsforyouth.blogspot.com/ http://www.youtube.com/user/FriendsforYouthOrg