Change management and the Changing the Learning Landscape programme
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Change management and the Changing the Learning Landscape programme

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This presentation outlines briefly the approaches to supporting change taken during the first year of the Changing the Learning Landscape programme, funded in England by Hefce in 2012-13. It also......

This presentation outlines briefly the approaches to supporting change taken during the first year of the Changing the Learning Landscape programme, funded in England by Hefce in 2012-13. It also introduces some key concepts in change management and includes questions for delegates to encourage them to reflect on how this maps to changes they have been involved in

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  • F2f events were popular with both the senior leaders and their teams. Teams probably got more out of it as they could discuss and reflect with each other throughout the events.The big drawback for the senior leaders was the time away.From the feedback the big strength was listening to each other (other HEIs). Group coaching (with the implementation teams) seemed to go well.  Action Learning sets (with senior leaders) – first meeting f2f, online after that. The online ones work well – can start before 9 if it suits participants, so as not to interfere with the day job. Participants very engaged, saw the set as an opportunity to test ideas with peers and to be honest and open with problems.  Facilitation for user needs, visioning etc. We have had some good feedback about the use of scenarios for visioning and identifying student needs of the future. There did seem to be an appetite for more of that kind of exercise and almost all of the senior leaders said that they would like to have had more actual students involved in the programme.  Base-lining, audits etc did come up, they senior leaders were cagey but in the ALS they all discussed openly their benchmark institutions and how they measured up. I think when it came to reflection on their institution they were open in admitting that they didn’t have a full picture of the practice that was going on.
  • A specified change is embedded when the new practices that you are seeking to introduce are accepted and demonstrated by a majority of those who need to do so. To embed a new practice in your organisation you need to enable a change in the component of the culture that impacts upon the new behaviour required of individuals.Culture is simply defined as ‘the way things are done around here’
  • Formulate a clear strategic vision: In order to make a cultural change effective a clear vision of the university’s new strategy, shared values and behaviours related to that specific change is needed. This vision provides the intention and direction for the culture change.Display top-management commitment: Culture change must be managed from the top of the organisation, as willingness to change of the senior management is an important indicator. The top of the organisation should be seen and heard to be very much in favour of the change in order to actually implement the change in the rest of the organization. Model culture change at the highest level: The behaviour of the senior management needs to symbolize the kinds of values and behaviours that should be realised in the rest of the institution. It is important that the management shows the strengths of the current culture – ‘celebrating what we do well’. In most cases, to reduce anxiety, and therefore resistance, it must be made clear that the current organisational does not need radical changes, but just a few adjustmentsModify the organisation to support organizational change: This means addressing what gets in the way of the change required. This includes identifying what current systems, policies, procedures and rules need to be changed in order to align with the new values and desired culture. This may include a change to accountability systems, compensation, benefits and reward structures, and recruitment and retention programs to better align with the new values and to send a clear message to employees that the old system and culture are in the past.Highlight the benefits of the new practices: The institution’s leaders and managers should be able to articulate the connections between the desired behaviour (the adoption of new practices) and how it will impact and improve the organisation’s success, to further encourage buy-in in the change process. Training should be provided to all affected and should ensure full understanding of the new practices and the reason for their adoption, and all communication should support this. Ensure there is a connection between the interests of the institution and of those affected. Changes in practice can be seen to be counter to cultural norms and thus can lead to tensions between organisational and individual interests, which can result in ethical concerns for those practitioners involved.
  • Checking and Maintaining ProgressTo ensure that practices are embedded the following are important: Evaluation:This can be conducted periodically to monitor the change progress and identify areas that need further development. This step will also identify obstacles of change and resistant employees and to highlight successful adoption of new practices. Constant CommunicationUse all possible means to convey the messages that you want the individuals that need to adopt new practices see and hear. Celebration:Find good new practice and publicly reward individuals and teams. Acknowledging and rewarding improvement and engagement will also encourage continued change and evolvement. Change managers:Consider nominating change managers or equivalent to refresh the process.
  • Formulate a clear strategic vision: In order to make a cultural change effective a clear vision of the university’s new strategy, shared values and behaviours related to that specific change is needed. This vision provides the intention and direction for the culture change.Display top-management commitment: Culture change must be managed from the top of the organisation, as willingness to change of the senior management is an important indicator. The top of the organisation should be seen and heard to be very much in favour of the change in order to actually implement the change in the rest of the organization. Model culture change at the highest level: The behaviour of the senior management needs to symbolize the kinds of values and behaviours that should be realised in the rest of the institution. It is important that the management shows the strengths of the current culture – ‘celebrating what we do well’. In most cases, to reduce anxiety, and therefore resistance, it must be made clear that the current organisational does not need radical changes, but just a few adjustmentsModify the organisation to support organizational change: This means addressing what gets in the way of the change required. This includes identifying what current systems, policies, procedures and rules need to be changed in order to align with the new values and desired culture. This may include a change to accountability systems, compensation, benefits and reward structures, and recruitment and retention programs to better align with the new values and to send a clear message to employees that the old system and culture are in the past.Highlight the benefits of the new practices: The institution’s leaders and managers should be able to articulate the connections between the desired behaviour (the adoption of new practices) and how it will impact and improve the organisation’s success, to further encourage buy-in in the change process. Training should be provided to all affected and should ensure full understanding of the new practices and the reason for their adoption, and all communication should support this. Ensure there is a connection between the interests of the institution and of those affected. Changes in practice can be seen to be counter to cultural norms and thus can lead to tensions between organisational and individual interests, which can result in ethical concerns for those practitioners involved.
  • Formulate a clear strategic vision: In order to make a cultural change effective a clear vision of the university’s new strategy, shared values and behaviours related to that specific change is needed. This vision provides the intention and direction for the culture change.Display top-management commitment: Culture change must be managed from the top of the organisation, as willingness to change of the senior management is an important indicator. The top of the organisation should be seen and heard to be very much in favour of the change in order to actually implement the change in the rest of the organization. Model culture change at the highest level: The behaviour of the senior management needs to symbolize the kinds of values and behaviours that should be realised in the rest of the institution. It is important that the management shows the strengths of the current culture – ‘celebrating what we do well’. In most cases, to reduce anxiety, and therefore resistance, it must be made clear that the current organisational does not need radical changes, but just a few adjustmentsModify the organisation to support organizational change: This means addressing what gets in the way of the change required. This includes identifying what current systems, policies, procedures and rules need to be changed in order to align with the new values and desired culture. This may include a change to accountability systems, compensation, benefits and reward structures, and recruitment and retention programs to better align with the new values and to send a clear message to employees that the old system and culture are in the past.Highlight the benefits of the new practices: The institution’s leaders and managers should be able to articulate the connections between the desired behaviour (the adoption of new practices) and how it will impact and improve the organisation’s success, to further encourage buy-in in the change process. Training should be provided to all affected and should ensure full understanding of the new practices and the reason for their adoption, and all communication should support this. Ensure there is a connection between the interests of the institution and of those affected. Changes in practice can be seen to be counter to cultural norms and thus can lead to tensions between organisational and individual interests, which can result in ethical concerns for those practitioners involved.
  • Formulate a clear strategic vision: In order to make a cultural change effective a clear vision of the university’s new strategy, shared values and behaviours related to that specific change is needed. This vision provides the intention and direction for the culture change.Display top-management commitment: Culture change must be managed from the top of the organisation, as willingness to change of the senior management is an important indicator. The top of the organisation should be seen and heard to be very much in favour of the change in order to actually implement the change in the rest of the organization. Model culture change at the highest level: The behaviour of the senior management needs to symbolize the kinds of values and behaviours that should be realised in the rest of the institution. It is important that the management shows the strengths of the current culture – ‘celebrating what we do well’. In most cases, to reduce anxiety, and therefore resistance, it must be made clear that the current organisational does not need radical changes, but just a few adjustmentsModify the organisation to support organizational change: This means addressing what gets in the way of the change required. This includes identifying what current systems, policies, procedures and rules need to be changed in order to align with the new values and desired culture. This may include a change to accountability systems, compensation, benefits and reward structures, and recruitment and retention programs to better align with the new values and to send a clear message to employees that the old system and culture are in the past.Highlight the benefits of the new practices: The institution’s leaders and managers should be able to articulate the connections between the desired behaviour (the adoption of new practices) and how it will impact and improve the organisation’s success, to further encourage buy-in in the change process. Training should be provided to all affected and should ensure full understanding of the new practices and the reason for their adoption, and all communication should support this. Ensure there is a connection between the interests of the institution and of those affected. Changes in practice can be seen to be counter to cultural norms and thus can lead to tensions between organisational and individual interests, which can result in ethical concerns for those practitioners involved.

Transcript

  • 1. Title hereSupporting change: Sarah Davies, Jisc
  • 2. Changing the learning landscape Activities, 2012-13 • Development programme for senior leaders • Supporting programme for their teams • Consultancy support for institutions • CPD events – disciplines and educational developers • Student engagement has been key theme • Reshaping for 2013-14
  • 3. Changing the learning landscape Approaches to supporting change • Face to face development events • Group coaching • Action learning sets • On-site facilitation for user needs, stakeholder engagement, visioning • Audit/baselining/reflection on current practice • Mini-projects
  • 4. Changing the learning landscape Embedded change New practices •Accepted •Demonstrated Culture •Changed to encourage new practices
  • 5. Changing the learning landscape The ingredients • Clear strategic vision • Visible top management commitment • Model culture change at highest level • Modify the organisation to support the change • Highlight the benefits of new practices • Connect the interests of the institution and those affected
  • 6. Changing the learning landscape Keeping it going • Evaluation and review • Constant communication • Celebration • Change managers
  • 7. Changing the learning landscape Culture and alignment Artefacts Values Tacit assumptions
  • 8. Changing the learning landscape The process Strategy 5% Planning 5% Education and training 15% Anchoring 75% Changing the learning landscape
  • 9. Changing the learning landscape Discussion • Do you recognise the different levels of culture at your institution? • How has/could this impact on your change initiatives? • What are your tips for effective change management throughout the change process? (Note these down)
  • 10. Changing the learning landscape Discussion • Bearing in mind the points raised in your discussion... – How can Jisc and CLL partners best support positive change in the sector? – What sort of interventions are most effective?
  • 11. Changing the learning landscape Acknowledgements • Slides 4-8 are based on information collated by Glyn Jones, Leadership Foundation Associate, as part of his work for the Changing the Learning Landscape programme.