6610smithmodule3pptfinal

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6610smithmodule3pptfinal

  1. 1. Gender in TechnologyEnhanced Learning A presentation by Sarah Smith, in partial fulfillment for course Education 6610: Research in Computers in the Curriculum
  2. 2. Methods
  3. 3. Findings
  4. 4. Participation in technology-enhanced learning environments
  5. 5. Attitudes toward technologyenhanced learning
  6. 6. Gendered communication
  7. 7. Discussion
  8. 8. Conclusion
  9. 9. Implications
  10. 10. Limitations
  11. 11. References
  12. 12. 1. Atan, H., Sulaiman, F., Rahman, Z.A. & Idrus, R.M. (2002). Gender differences in availability, internet access and rate of usage of computers among distance education learners. Educational Media International, 39(3-4), 205210. 2. Colley, A. (2003). Gender differences in adolescents’ perceptions of the best and worst aspects of computing at school. Computers in Human Behavior, 19(2003), 673-682. 3. Craig, D. (1999-2000). A league of their own: gender practices among adolescents and teachers in a technology-enhanced learning environment. Journal of Educational Technology Systems, 28(4), 349-363.
  13. 13. 4. Davidson-Shivers, G., Morris, S. & Sriwongkol, T. (2003). Gender differences: are they diminished in online discussions? International Journal on E-Learning, 2(1), 29-36. 5. González-Gómez, F., Guardiola, J., Rodríguez, Ó. & Alonso, M. (2012). Gender differences in e-learning satisfaction. Computers & Education, 58(1), 283-290. 6. Guiller, J. & Durndell, A. (2007). Students' linguistic behaviour in online discussion groups: Does gender matter? Computers in Human Behavior, 23(5), 2240-2255.
  14. 14. 7. Heemskerk, I., ten Dam, G., Volman, M. & Admiraal, W. (2009). Gender inclusiveness in educational technology and learning experiences of girls and boys. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 41(3), 253-276. 8. Huang, W.H.D., Hood, D.W. & Yoo, S.J. (2013). Gender divide and acceptance of collaborative web 2.0 applications for learning in higher education. The Internet and Higher Education, 16, 57-65. 9. Huynh, M., Lee, J-N. & Schuldt, B. (2005). The insiders` perspectives: a focus group study on gender issues in a computer-supported collaborative learning environment. Journal of Information Technology Education, 4, 237-255.
  15. 15. 10. Jeong, A. (2006). Gender interaction patterns and gender participation in computer-supported collaborative argumentation. American Journal of Distance Education, 20(4), 195-210. 11. Kay, R. H. (2009). Examining gender differences in attitudes toward interactive classroom communication systems (ICCS). Computers & Education, 52, 730-740. 12. Lee, I. (2002). Gender differences in self-regulated on-line learning strategies within Korea’s university context. Educational Technology Research and Development, 50(1), 101-111.
  16. 16. 13. Li, Q. (2002). Gender and computer-mediated communication: an exploration of elementary students' mathematics and science learning. Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching, 21(4), 341-359. 14. Machado, C. (2011). Gender differences in student discourse on discussion board and blogs: an instructor’s quest to create a level playing field in a hybrid classroom. Journal of Interactive Online Learning, 10(1), 36-48. 15. Yulkselturk, E. & Bulut, S. (2009). Gender differences in selfregulated online learning environment. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 12(3), 12-22.

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