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SCIENCE FAIR ’09
Keeping a LOG BOOK
• Keep a log book from day one.
• Use diary entries to record what you do, what you see
  and what you ...
Choosing a TOPIC
• Base your project on a topic you are interested
  in.

• Have you ever come across something and
  wond...
Thinking about your
      TOPIC
       • Brainstorm ideas and key words
         to do with your topic. Organise
         ...
Decide on a KEY
          QUESTION

• What is it that you want to find out?
• What are you going to investigate?
• Write yo...
HYPOTHESIS
• Your hypothesis is like a prediction. What do you think
  the answer might be to your question?

• What is th...
DESIGNING your
             experiment
• This is your method for answering your question and testing
  your hypothesis.

•...
Recording your
                   RESULTS
• Your results are your observations and/or measurements.

• In order to record ...
Analysing your
                RESULTS
• What do your results tell you?
• What patterns or trends did you
  find in your da...
CONCLUSION
• What did you find out?
• Stand back and think about what you have achieved.
  Have you solved the question you...
EVALUATION &
          APPLICATION
• What difficulties did you experience during your
  investigation?

• How could you imp...
Helpful HINTS #1
• Start early - Don’t leave it until the last minute.
• Judges are looking for originality and
  innovati...
Helpful HINTS Cont.
• Keep a detailed and thorough log book.
• Make sure that your display board doesn’t look
  cluttered....
Good Luck
from Miss Holland!
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Science Fair 2009

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  • Transcript of "Science Fair 2009"

    1. 1. SCIENCE FAIR ’09
    2. 2. Keeping a LOG BOOK • Keep a log book from day one. • Use diary entries to record what you do, what you see and what you find. Every step of your investigation needs to be recorded - even any mistakes or accidents, this is all part of being a scientist. • Your log book should show how much time you’ve spent on your investigation and how extensive it has been. • All detailed information can go into the log. E.g. letters written & replies received, newspaper articles, research into the topic, photos. etc.
    3. 3. Choosing a TOPIC • Base your project on a topic you are interested in. • Have you ever come across something and wondered - Why? Science Fair is your opportunity to investigate the answer. • There are many categories you can enter under... plants, environment, consumer science, electricity, electronics, communication, energy, light, count, heat, physics, innovations, chemistry, and more!
    4. 4. Thinking about your TOPIC • Brainstorm ideas and key words to do with your topic. Organise these into a mind map. • Use your mind map to formulate questions you have about your topic. • Find out more about your topic. Use magazines, books, library, internet or experts to find more ideas or learn more about your topic. • Record in your log book.
    5. 5. Decide on a KEY QUESTION • What is it that you want to find out? • What are you going to investigate? • Write your question as an aim. E.g. My aim is to find out...
    6. 6. HYPOTHESIS • Your hypothesis is like a prediction. What do you think the answer might be to your question? • What is the most likely outcome of your experiment? What is the expected result? Why do you think this will happen? • Record your hypotheses before you start the investigate. • Remember that your original hypothesis may not be correct and may lead to further investigations. This is all part of the scientific process.
    7. 7. DESIGNING your experiment • This is your method for answering your question and testing your hypothesis. • To make a test fair you need to think about VARIABLES. What are you actually measuring? What will you need to keep the same to conduct a fair test? What will you change? • Your method is what you are going to do, the procedure. Remember when writing your procedure to include a list of the materials and equipment needed to conduct the experiment. • Your method needs to be written so that anyone could read it and repeat your experiment exactly and gain a similar result.
    8. 8. Recording your RESULTS • Your results are your observations and/or measurements. • In order to record your results you need to ask yourself, what am I observing or measuring? • How will you record your results so that your data is organised and easy to understand? • You may decide to use a table, diagrams or graphs. For some experiments you may wish to take photographs to show changes over time. • Remember that you need to also record the conditions in which you conducted your experiments. E.g. What was the weather like? Temperature? • It is important to REPEAT EXPERIMENTS in order to double check your results or to ensure results are consistent.
    9. 9. Analysing your RESULTS • What do your results tell you? • What patterns or trends did you find in your data? • You need to explain your data. • You need to have collected enough data to support a conclusion. REPEAT EXPERIMENTS. • Your data needs to be organised into appropriate tables, graphs or charts.
    10. 10. CONCLUSION • What did you find out? • Stand back and think about what you have achieved. Have you solved the question you originally thought of? • How do your results compare with your original hypothesis? Were they different? • Use scientific ideas to explain your results. Why did you get the results you did? • REMEMBER TO ANSWER YOUR QUESTION!
    11. 11. EVALUATION & APPLICATION • What difficulties did you experience during your investigation? • How could you improve your investigation? Eg. Fairness, accuracy … etc. • How could your findings be applied or used? • Has your investigation given you ideas for further research? • Where to next?
    12. 12. Helpful HINTS #1 • Start early - Don’t leave it until the last minute. • Judges are looking for originality and innovative ideas. • Make sure your investigation is a fair test. • Avoid investigations involving animals. • Make sure you are familiar with the judging criteria. • Your display needs to be eye catching. Data needs to be displayed in a way that leads the eye easily from one stage to the next.
    13. 13. Helpful HINTS Cont. • Keep a detailed and thorough log book. • Make sure that your display board doesn’t look cluttered. • Repeat your experiment more than once. • Answer your question. • Find out as much as possible about your topic – especially the scientific concepts relating to your topic. • Keep all your information and data together in a box, so you don’t lose any of your hard work.
    14. 14. Good Luck from Miss Holland!
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