Powerful Projects

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This is the slideshow for the Power Projects presentation at the Laptop Institute in 2009

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  • Also—use discussion tab on the wiki!Press F5 or enter presentation mode to view the poll Are you live blogging this session?
  • Press F5 or enter presentation mode to view the poll
  • http://www.scenesystems.com
  • How did this man lead to this result? He got his pilot’s license at 14. Flew fighter planes. Investigated accidents. Training!
  • Consider asking what folks want. Could go in 2 directions here—example projects or anatomy.
  • Author of Influencer, Crucial Conversations
  • Imaginative rehearsal.Young children engage in pretend play actively. It’s how they learn to understand the world around them as well as their place in it. It’s also how they practice making moral decisions.
  • Digital storytelling, a conversation between a fictional and an historical character of the same time period.
  • They probably look a lot like some of the projects you are used to seeing. But there’s more to it. Medieval project.
  • Really—the Sundance channel posted two of our student videos!
  • Students build a boat out of found materials. It has to work. Play movie (QuickTime!)
  • What was missing from Bloom was the idea that students would be contributors of original works. Ken Robinson asks a fair question: How did we get to be a society that values reading works of literature more than becoming a creative writer? When did Art History become a more respected program of study than studio art?
  • What successful projects happen at your school?Press F5 or enter presentation mode to view the poll
  • What was missing from Bloom was the idea that students would be contributors of original works. Ken Robinson asks a fair question: How did we get to be a society that values reading works of literature more than becoming a creative writer? When did Art History become a more respected program of study than studio art?
  • What tools do teachers need to design successful projects?Press F5 or enter presentation mode to view the poll
  • What does this resemble? UBD.
  • How can you give it to them?Number one—release time for planning or paid time in the summer.
  • Well worth downloading.
  • Tools for successful projects. http://tsheko.wordpress.com Lots of sessions on using tools. We can get into these later if we have time.
  • Reflective component can help with this.
  • Reflection might be oral rather than written.
  • Never give an assignment that you can’t stand to read 72 of.
  • Started as just a collaborative research site. Tagging on steroids, could share articles w/sticky notes. But wait, there’s more.
  • So that they won’t move back home! http://isenet.ning.com/video/alan-november-3-skills
  • Who is she? Prof. sprout! Good readers are so engaged that they become the characters in the stories they read. How can technology help make this more real? Well, it isn’t by listening aloud or by watching movies.
  • San Diego State University Department of Educational Technology. Intentional plan for 6th grade is to move students from concrete to abstract reasoning through a series of projects. One way to do that is to learn to draw a scale drawing. Is once enough?
  • Took this problem to MIT seniors. Can you light a bulb with just one wire and a battery? They all failed it. Need another wire to complete the circuit. BUT you can simply touch the bulb to the + side and complete the circuit.
  • Took this problem to MIT seniors. Can you light a bulb with just one wire and a battery? They all failed it. Need another wire to complete the circuit. BUT you can simply touch the bulb to the + side and complete the circuit.
  • Powerful Projects

    1. 1. What subject is this again?<br />
    2. 2.
    3. 3.
    4. 4.
    5. 5.
    6. 6. What has to change?<br />What stays the same?<br />How do we provide more real experiences in education?<br />
    7. 7. Direct experience<br />Simulated experience<br />Vicarious experience<br />Instruction<br />Patterson et al., 2007<br />When does learning really stick?<br />
    8. 8. Imaginative Rehearsal<br />
    9. 9.
    10. 10. What do some of these projects look like?<br />
    11. 11.
    12. 12.
    13. 13. Bloom<br />Used to stop here:<br />
    14. 14.
    15. 15. Bloom<br />Used to stop here:<br />
    16. 16.
    17. 17.
    18. 18.
    19. 19. What do teachers need?<br />
    20. 20.
    21. 21. Tools<br />
    22. 22.
    23. 23. Tania Sheko<br />http://tsheko.wordpress.com<br />
    24. 24. Fewer grades<br />Divergence of products<br />Differentiation <br />More teacher work in planning<br />Less large group instruction<br />FLOW!<br />What changes with integrated projects?<br />
    25. 25. You can add in grades for accountability steps.<br />Process grades matter<br />Reflective component<br />Fewer grades<br />
    26. 26. Be wary of letting much work happen at home with younger students.<br />Follow the athletic coach’s model. <br />Allow students to struggle.<br />Give choices<br />Divergence and differentiation<br />
    27. 27. For good teachers, it is a different kind of work.<br />Project design is creative and collaborative.<br />Teachers need to show students their thinking process.<br />More teacher work?<br />
    28. 28.
    29. 29.
    30. 30.
    31. 31.
    32. 32. Sift through massive amounts of information and make meaning from it<br />Connect globally<br />Self-directed<br />Alan November says kids need<br />
    33. 33. Design a bird<br />Habitat<br />Features<br />Food<br />Behavior<br />
    34. 34. Create a new species of bird.<br />Use a GPS to walk the fronts of a battle of the American Revolution<br />Examples of projects<br />
    35. 35. Imaginative Rehearsal<br />
    36. 36. Social networking means don’t need kids in same classes<br />
    37. 37. 1:1 allows feedback to the process (Elizabeth Helfant)<br />What does 1:1 bring to PBL?<br />
    38. 38. Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001<br />Bloom and the knowledge dimension.<br />

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