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The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
The changing face of academic libraries
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The changing face of academic libraries

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Presentation by Mauren Wade. …

Presentation by Mauren Wade.


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  • 1. The changing face of libraries: an academic perspective Maureen Wade Director of Library Services LSE 5 August 2009
  • 2. Changing face of academic libraries • Changing HE environment • Shift from print to electronic information • Changing expectations and behaviour of library users • Pressure on budgets and space
  • 3. Changing HE environment • Government agenda on expansion of universities • The student as customer – improving the student experience • Government pressure to produce and disseminate research – linked to funding
  • 4. Shift from print to electronic information • E-journals well-established; e-books slower to take-off • Libraries still managing print as well as e-resources • More complex resource discovery and access issues • Expectation of information in digital format
  • 5. Use of e-journals • RIN report: E-journals: their use, value and impact, April 2009 • UK universities spent nearly £80 million on e-journals in 2006/07 • Estimate of 102 million articles downloaded in one year • Back-runs as well as current journals increasingly available • On-campus and remote access
  • 6. E-books • Availability of large collections of e- books eg Oxford Scholarship Online • Title-by-title acquisition of e-books for course reading • Availability of e-book readers: Sony, Kindle • Awaiting tipping point in usage of e- books
  • 7. Resource discovery • Library catalogues primarily designed for access to print books • Library users want access to e-journals at article level • Libraries need to integrate access to information in different formats • Students and researchers expect Google-type search options
  • 8. Access issues • Universities moving to streamline access to e-resources – single sign-on • Reciprocal access between libraries for print collections – for e-resources hampered by licensing conditions • Moves by JISC, SCONUL and M25 Consortium to address this issue
  • 9. Changing user expectations • Most information should be available electronically • Google-type search functionality and integration • Variety of types of study space to suit different styles of working • Libraries will collect and manage universities’ research outputs
  • 10. Pressure on library budgets and space • Hybrid libraries – collecting print and electronic no longer affordable • Extra costs of VAT on e-resources and higher-than-RPI inflation • Pressure on space of continuing growth of print collections • Pressure on space and budgets of expanding student numbers
  • 11. How are academic libraries meeting these challenges? • Shift from print to electronic information • The Library as a place • Financial pressures • Managing universities’ research outputs
  • 12. Print to electronic – resource discovery • Purchase of journal records to provide article-level searching • Cataloguing of e-books alongside print • Use of web 2.0 tools to highlight collections – blogs, Delicious tags, Facebook presence • Add-on interfaces to library catalogues – to give Google-type searching and Amazon functionality
  • 13. Digitisation of print • Collaboration with commercial providers eg Google / Oxford • JISC £22m digitisation programme 2004-09 • 19th century pamphlets online • First World War poetry digital archive • British Cartoon Archive • Individual university fundraising
  • 14. The Library as a place • Services to academic staff are increasingly delivered to the desktop • Collaboration to reduce duplication in print collections – UK Research Reserve project • Focus on high-quality storage of archives and special collections • Design of range of study spaces to suit diverse needs
  • 15. Changing study space needs • Group study – large areas and bookable rooms • Learning cafes – food and drink, soft seating • Silent areas for individual study • Fixed PCs still required • Wireless everywhere plus power for laptops
  • 16. Coping with financial pressures • Use of self-service • RFID for self-service loans • Virtual reference desk software • Information skills via VLE • Focussing collection policies in liaison with academic staff • Providing course materials online to cut down on multiple copies
  • 17. Library’s role to promote research output • Huge rise in institutional repositories of research papers • Universities bringing in ‘mandates’ to ensure deposit of research papers • Theses increasingly being made available in institutional repositories • Work underway on formats and metadata standards
  • 18. What does this all this change mean for library staff? • Basic values and skills remain essential • Leadership and strategic vision • Effective management of people and resources • Subject knowledge & information management skills • Customer service ethos
  • 19. New roles /skills for library staff • More technical knowledge of information systems and software • Knowledge of metadata formats and standards – building on cataloguing /classification • Specialist roles emerging eg digitisation manager, data librarian, information skills trainer • Marketing skills – targeting services to specific user groups
  • 20. Questions?

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