City Food Co.: Growing Detroit One Meal At A Time
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City Food Co.: Growing Detroit One Meal At A Time

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City Food Co. is a source for all things food-related located in the heart of Eastern Market, near downtown Detroit. Its everyday purpose will be to serve as a retail outlet for culinary tools, ...

City Food Co. is a source for all things food-related located in the heart of Eastern Market, near downtown Detroit. Its everyday purpose will be to serve as a retail outlet for culinary tools, educational materials and locally-produced food products. Local organizations will be able to reserve its conference space for hosting meetings and community forums. The commercial kitchen space will hold cooking classes for adults and school groups. City Food Co. events will invite local growers, business owners and policy makers for meals prepared by local chefs in order to engage in the necessary dialogue between the stakeholders of the Detroit food scene.

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    City Food Co.: Growing Detroit One Meal At A Time City Food Co.: Growing Detroit One Meal At A Time Document Transcript

    • City Food Co. Focus on growing Detroit one meal at a time Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • acknowledgements Robert Rabinovitz Norman Fryman Nevin Cohen Graig Donnelly Erik Howard Alison Hertweck Daniel Berry John Mundy Rebecca Salimenn-Witt Patrick Crouch Jackie Victor Nick Seccia
    • table of contents Abstract Brainstorming Food Accessibility Problem Statement Food: National Landscape Food: New York Detroit Timeline Detroit History Detroit Now Detroit Opportunity Growing Detroit Detroit Food: Case Studies Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • Detroit Food: Prototypes Detroit Food: Personas Detroit Food: Scenarios City Food Co. Intervention System Map Inspirations Design Iterations Floor Plans Street View Renderings Logo Research Promotional Material City Food Co. Future Projections References
    • Everything Is Going To Be Alright, Martin Creed Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • “A thorough reexamination of what a city is, was, and could be is underway in Detroit and the possibilities seem endless. Obviously there are major issues to be dealt with but for those with an idea and the drive to realize it there isn’t a better place to be in the United States right now.” - Andrew Wagner, Editor -in-Chief, ReadyMade Magazine 2
    • abstract Abandoned staircase in the Michigan Theatre, which is now used for a parking structure. Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • context “As least it’s not as bad as Detroit.” For many years the city of Detroit has been the basis for comparisons on what happens to a city when it faces hardship and cannot see its way out. It has served as a guide of what not to do in an urban environment. With more land than San Fran- cisco, Manhattan and Boston combined and only 800,000 people, it is a hybrid of urban and rural life. The landscape is burned and crumbling, showing the remains of the once-thriving domestic automo- tive industry. Much of the population ran from their responsibilities to their neighborhoods by moving to the city’s outskirts, not only taking their families and physical belongings, but also their wealth. After years of being the brunt of jokes and being ignored by their own governments, the city now has a bur- geoning class of people who want to take back their city through food production. 4
    • abstract John Hantz, Taja Seville and Patrick Crouch Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • opportunity “If it can happen in Detroit, it can happen anywhere.” While there are numerous groups working towards making Detroit a better place to live through the production and selling of food, a cohesive strategy is yet to be revealed to those living in the imme- diate community, surrounding suburbs and to the rest of the country. Such organization of a united agenda will be appealing to those wishing to invest in further food-related interventions. Detroit is in a position to show naysayers that it can re-invent itself after facing such economic, social and physical devastation. It is important for the groups to unite in a physical manifestation rather than digital to show its commitment to contributing to the future of the city and being accessible to those who want to get involved. Detroit is a city full of pride and there is much resistance to those who create plans without actually standing on the front lines with those they are intending to serve. 6
    • abstract retail forum dinner party Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • City Food Co. Focus on growing Detroit one meal at a time solution “Detroit may be the best positioned to become the world’s first one hundred percent food self-sufficient city.” City Food Co. is a source for all things food-related located in the heart of Eastern Market, near down- town Detroit. Its everyday purpose will be to serve as a retail outlet for culinary tools, educational ma- terials and locally-produced food products. Local organizations will be able to reserve its conference space for hosting meetings and community forums. The commercial kitchen space will hold cooking classes for adults and school groups. City Food Co. events will invite local growers, business owners and policy makers for meals prepared by local chefs in order to engage in the necessary dialogue be- tween the stakeholders of the Detroit food scene. 8
    • brainstorming What is “real” food? organic. local. non-processed Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • What is accessibility? source. education. policy 10
    • brainstorming A. GROWN B. SOLD global national city state regional How is food distributed? Does scale affect efficiency? Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • What is accessibility? source. education. policy 12
    • problem statement Lack of access to fresh, nutritional food is a problem in both de- veloped and non-developed countries around the world. With the industrialization of food production producing more foods that are not “real,” void of processing, obesity rates among chil- dren are higher than ever. If the capabilities exist to produce food, then why is world hunger still an epidemic today? Hunger and malnutrition are the #1 risks to health worldwide, greater than AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined. World agricul- ture produces 17 percent more calories per person today than it did 30 years ago, despite a 70 percent population increase. the principal problem is that many people in the world do not have the sufficient land to grow, or income to purchase, enough food. The answers might not be in production methods, but in the dis- tribution channels that deliver the food to people. The main rea- son behind malnutrition is poverty and malnutrition also feeds poverty. Economists estimate that every child whose physical and mental development is stunted by hunger and malnutrition stands to lose 5-10% in lifetime earnings. In order to make fresh food cheaper, the existing distribution channels need to be re- worked so the lower operating costs for farmers and corpora- tions can be transferred to consumers. Shifting the focus from the local food movement, an ideology that contains the food supply to those who the capability to grow the food and also those who can afford it, to a more regional perspective could bridge the gap between the food elite and the starving poor. Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • What’s missing from the local food chain, the regional food chain, is an infrastructure that makes sense and brings down the cost in the game of sustainable food is in distribution ---it’s not in growing. - Dan Barber, owner Blue Hill and Stone Barns The goal of this project is not to find the ultimate so- lution to ending world hunger, but to unfold a new model for the distribution of food in the United States, that will prove operating in a regional food supply sys- tem is both a feasible economic and socially respon- sible strategy to equal access to fresh, nutritious food. There is an opporunity to set the standard for such distribution by beginning in the country’s urban envi- ronments. this project will explore the different parties within the political, social and economic sectors that are interested in playing a role in changing the coun- try’s relationship to food, and how they distribute their information to the communities they serve. 14
    • food: national landscape whole foods market is committed to the concept of fresh, healthy, local foods. Since the beginning, we have remained committed to supporting local products and the people who supply them. In ad- dition to featuring local products in our stores, we’re putting our money where our mouths are by providing up to $10 million in low-interest loans to independent local farmers and food artisans. We’re proud to support small producers who need a hand, not a handout, to help them make their dreams reality. wal-mart buys more united states agricul- tural products than any other retailer in the world, and we realize the important role that American farmers play in today’s so- ciety — both in terms of ensuring our high- quality food supply and supporting the local and national economies. Wal-Mart is committed to purchasing food from lo- cal growers for distribution to stores in their areas. This commitment reflects our ever- important goal to provide consumers with quality, affordable, home-grown agricul- tural selections. Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • share our strength® is a national organi- zation that works hard to make sure no kid in America grows up hungry. we weave together a net of community groups, activists and food programs to catch children facing hunger and sur- round them with nutritious food where they live, learn and play. We work with the culinary industry to cre- ate engaging, pioneering programs like Share Our Strength’s Taste of the Nation®, Share Our Strength’s Great American Bake Sale®, Share Our Strength’s A Tasteful Pur- suit®, Share Our Strength’s Great Ameri- can Dine Out™, and Share Our Strength’s Operation Frontline®. This food revolution is about saving Ameri- ca's health by changing the way you eat. It's not just a TV show, it's a movement for you, your family and your community. If you care about your kids and their future take this revolution and make it your own. educate yourself about food and cook- ing. Find out what your child is eating at school. Make only a few small changes and magical things will happen. Switching from processed to fresh food will not only make you feel better but it will add years to your life. 16
    • food: national landscape let’s move! has an ambitious but important goal: to solve the epi- demic of childhood obesity with- in a generation. Let’s Move will give parents the support they need, provide “The physical and emotional health healthier food in schools, help of an entire generation and the eco- our kids to be more physically nomic health and security of our na- active, and make healthy, af- tion is at stake,” said Mrs. Obama. fordable food available in every “This isn’t the kind of problem that part of our country. can be solved overnight, but with ev- eryone working together, it can be Join First Lady Michelle Obama, solved. So, let’s move.” community leaders, teachers, - First Lady Michelle Obama doctors, nurses, moms and dads in a nationwide campaign to tackle the challenge of child- hood obesity. Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • This is a usda-wide effort to create new economic opportunities by bet- ter connecting consumers with local producers. It is also the start of a na- tional conversation about the impor- "Part of our 'Know Your Farmer, tance of understanding where your Know Your Food' initiative is to food comes from and how it gets to link the agricultural commu- your plate. Today, there is too much nity to urban markets to bring distance between the average Amer- new understanding of the im- ican and their farmer and we are mar- portance of healthy eating shalling resources from across USDA and provide enhanced ac- to help create the link between local cess to fresh foods. We expect production and local consumption. consumer demand for locally grown food in the U.S. to rise from an estimated $4 billion in 2002 to as much as $7 billion by 2012." - Kathleen Merrigan, Deputy Secretary USDA 18
    • food: new york case studies bk farmyards is a Brooklyn-based decentralized farm- ing network providing local food to reduce the city’s reliance on fossil fuels and offering local jobs to boost the economy. We are seeking partnerhsips with de- velopers willing to temporarily transform their idle land to farmland; homeowners who want to eat from their own yard; and city agencies holding under-utilized land. our strategy is to stay nimble, growing food be- tween the cracks of urban development. “We’re willing to work outside of Brooklyn, too. You just have to have space and light.” - Stacey Murphy, owner bk farmyards Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • basis™ is a mission-driven company based in New York City committed to good food for all. We are passionate about good food that is traditional, localized, and 100% traceable. we partner with producers and local communities to sell good food at affordable prices. “It just doesn’t make sense that we should take food from strangers.” - Bion Bartning, owner Basis 20
    • food: new york case studies great performances is the only events com- pany in New York City to operate its own organic farm. This reflects the firm’s love for authentic flavors and commitment to sus- tainable agricultural practices. Established in 2006, Katchkie Farm, located in upstate New York, provides Great Performances with a connection to locally grown food that makes it possible to provide clients with deli- cious organic food within 24-36 hours of har- vest. the company also runs the mae mae cafe next door to its catering facilities in the tribeca neighborhood of new york city and also produces a product line such as organ- ic ketchups from the katchkie farm. “The farm is life-affirming. Food creates community, and the farm is a wonderful extension of that.” - Liz Neumark, CEO Great Performances Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • The meat Hook and the brooklyn kitchen labs are located in the Wil- liamsburg neighborhood, in Brook- lyn, New York. The two shops joined forces in 2009, the Brooklyn Kitchen had previously opened in 2005, and are under one roof to provide a one- stop shop environment for local food- ies in the neighborhood. In addition to housing a butcher shop and cook- ing supply store that has everything from classic cookbooks to Le Creu- set cookware, the location also has two spaces for rent for those wishing to host cooking classes and private events. “It’s recession-proof. People tend to cook at home, so we might as well have better meat for less money and give them a little help on the side.” - Tom Mylan, owner The Meat Hook 22
    • detroit timeline 1701: French army officer, Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac, founded Detroit. 1701-1800: The city was divided into ribbon farms, narrow strips that ran from the river back one or two miles, which gave each family access to the waterfront. 1817: Legislative act establishes Catholepistemiad, or Univer- sity of Michigania. 1837: Michigan became the nation’s 26th state. 1862: Vernor’s is the oldest soda in America, tied with Hires Root Beer. As the story on the bottle says, when Detroit phar- macist, James Vernor, was called off to the Civil War in 1862, he left behind a “secret mixture” of 19 ingredients in an oak cask. 1875: Sanders was first opened by Fred Sanders June 17, 1875 and started with a single retail shop in Downtown Detroit. 1876: Fred Sanders served his, and the nation’s, first Ice Cream Soda. 1899: Ransom E. Olds established first automobile factory in Detroit. Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • 1908: First Ford Model T manufactured; General Motors founded. 1909: In 1909, Wayne County built the first mile of concrete highway in the world on Woodward Avenue between Six and Seven Mile roads. 1919: The nation’s first 4-way three-color traffic light was in- stalled on the corner of Woodward and Michigan Avenues in Detroit. 1920: Going on air in August 20, 1920, 8MK, later renamed WWJ, is believed to be the first station to broadcast regular news reports. 1928: Ford River Rouge Plant completed, largest factory complex in the world, employed 100,000. 1929: Ambassador Bridge opened between Detroit and Wind- sor, Ontario; at the time was longest bridge in the world. 1930: The Detroit-Windsor Tunnel was completed making it the first traffic tunnel between two nations. 1930: The Cross and Peters company known today as Better Made, was founded on August 1st, 1930. 24
    • detroit timeline 1932: Cranbrook Academy of Art is founded. It’s reasonable to say that the work emanating from Cranbrook in the 20th century changed the way people live, and the way they understand art and design. Students include Eero Saarinen, Charles Eames and Florence Knoll. 1935: United Automobile Worker’s Union (UAW) formed in Detroit; Detroit Tigers won World Series. 1941: Auto plants converted for production of war materials, Michigan became known as “Arsenal of Democracy” 1942: The world’s first urban freeway opened to the public, the Davison Freeway. 1945: Detroit Tigers won World Series 1954: Nation’s first regional shopping center, Northland Mall opens, home of the largest Macy’s. 1959: Barry Gordy, Jr. founded Motown Records. 1967: Five days of race riots in Detroit, 43 killed, 1,189 injured, over 7,000 arrested, much of inner city destroyed. 1968: Detroit Tigers won World Series 1974: Gerald Ford became the 38th U. S. President Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • 1980s: Originating in the 1980s, largely as an underground movement, the increasingly popular new music proved electronics can be used to express both funk and soul. Juan Atkins, Derrick May, and Kevin Saunderson, a Detroit trio who were high school friends, are considered the Godfathers of Techno. 1984: Detroit Tigers won the World Series 1989: Detroit Pistons won NBA championship 1990: Detroit Pistons won NBA championship 2005: General Motors announced massive job cuts 2008: Detroit Red Wings won 11th Stanley Cup 2008: The CEO’s of Ford, Chrysler and General Motors trav- elled to Washington D.C. to ask Congress for bailout mon- ey. 2010: President Barack Obama delivers commencement speech to the 2010 University of Michigan graduating class. 26
    • detroit History Paris of the Midwest, City of Churches, City of Trees, Motor City, Motown---- all of these names have been synonymous with Detroit, once pronounced “day-twah” (from the French le detroit, meaning “the strait”). Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • Now Detroit city is gritty, hardworking, and yes, elegant, a city of heart and soul, never easy to capture in a single snapshot. 28
    • detroit present Kilpatrick pleaded guilty in September 2008 to two felony counts of obstruction of justice stemming from his efforts to cover up an extramarital affair. He also pleaded no contest to charges of assaulting a police officer attempt- ing to serve a subpoena on a Kilpatrick friend in that case. He was accused of blocking a criminal investigation into his office and firing a police deputy to cover up the affair. He served 100 days in jail and was released to five years of probation in February 2009. He was ordered to pay $1 million in restitution as part of his original plea deal. Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • “We are stabi- lizing neighbor- hoods and the city as a result of a reduced Nearly 2 million people used to live in Detroit. population by Fewer than 900,000 remain. centralizing resources, not “Detroit will probably be a city of 700,000 people when it’s all shrinking its said and done,” says Doug Rothwell, CEO of Business Lead- ers for Michigan. “The big challenge is, what do you do with borders.” a population of 700,000 in a geography that can accommo- date three times that much?” - press release from the office “We have to be realistic,” says George Jackson, CEO of the of Mayor Detroit Economic Growth Corp. (DEGC). “This is not about Dave Bing trying to re-create something. we’re not a world-class city.” Houses in Detroit are selling for an average of $15,000. mayor dave bing and his team are proposing shrinking the city and consolidating neighborhoods, in order to use the given budget to provide better services for its residents. 30
    • detroit present ten tips for downsizing detroit 1. stop calling it “downsizing.” Nobody is talking about shrinking Detroit’s city limits. Nobody is saying Detroit won’t remain at 139 square miles. And downsizing just sounds bad. Call it “rightsizing” or “re- generating.” Drop “downsizing” from the debate. 2. never try to forcibly relocate residents. Detroiters share painful memories of the urban renewal bat- tles of the 1950s, when neighborhoods were bulldozed in the name of progress. Just last month, the Rev. Horace Sheffield III referred to Mayor Dave Bing’s downsizing plans as “ethnic cleansing.” 3. stop selling vacant land to speculators. Each fall, the Wayne County treasurer auctions distressed parcels that have been seized for nonpayment of property taxes. These parcels are mostly vacant lots in Detroit, or lots with dilapidated houses or commercial structures on them. Speculators can buy parcels for as little as $500 each. 4. merge the detroit and wayne county land bank authori- ties. Both the city and county operate such authorities to deal with tax-foreclosed properties seized by the government. Be- cause of disagreements and distrust between the city and county, these land banks operate separately, contrary to the best models in the country, including the nationally praised Genesee County Land Bank. 5. prohibit any redevelopment in neighborhoods marked for mothballing. This may seem counterintuitive, because the most aban- doned districts would seem to be the ones most eager for redevelopment. Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • 6. don’t expect urban farming to solve all the problems. Advocates of urban agriculture sometimes see Detroit filling up all of its empty vistas with city farms. But it is unlikely that urban agriculture will ever occupy more than a small portion of the estimated 40 square miles of vacancy in the city. Mul- tiple strategies will be needed to deal with Detroit’s vacant property problem. 7. check cleveland. Cleveland is ahead of most other cities in sponsoring pilot programs to deal with vacant lots. City government and nonprofit leaders have teamed up to sponsor at least 50 pilot proposals in distressed neighborhoods. 8. use data to understand detroit’s neighborhoods. Recently, the nonprofit research group Data Driven Detroit produced the city’s most accurate map of housing vacan- cy. These maps showed the pockets of both abandonment and higher density. 9. Target code enforcement to achieve specific aims. There aren’t enough city inspectors to target all the distressed properties in the city. But by selectively going after absentee landlords who let their properties deteriorate in key districts, the city could speed up the process of seizing those parcels either for blight or unpaid taxes. 10. use greening strategies to reinvent detroit. With so much excess land available, the city has the option to become a much more earth-friendly, environmentally sus- tainable place. Use the vacancy to lace the city with green- ways, bicycle lanes, nature trails, pocket parks, urban farms and wildlife habitats. - John Gallagher, Business Writer, Detroit Free Press , May 9, 2010 32
    • detroit opportuntiy “As Detroit rolled into the second half of the twentieth century it had, and still has, its share of big city problems. But today Detroit, “City of Champions,” is ready for a comeback and the chance to recreate the city that it once was.” Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • “Lots of peo- ple want to make movies in Detroit... we’re a great backdrop for sci-fi thrillers (The Island) or dramas that need a gritty backdrop (Gran Torino). But not many filmmakers make mov- ies ABOUT this notorious city. That is why Grown Michigan is being resourceful in finding new in Detroit, a industry opportunities to help its economy documentary bounce back from the fall of the automo- tive companies. The film incentive, officially by two Dutch called the film production credit, is a refund- filmmakers, able, assignable tax credit of up to 42% of is so the amount of a production company’s ex- impressive.” penditures (depending upon type) that are incurred in producing a film or other media - Karen Dybis, entertainment project in Michigan. Time Magazine 34
    • detroit opportuntiy Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • Detroit area citizens, busi- ness owners, students, voters, homeowners, tax payers, consumers and overall die-hard Michiganders are taking their passion for the city to the www.rethinkdetroit.org Web through social media and blogs in order to cap- ture the voices of those who http://www.positivedetroit.net/ do not believe Detroit is finished. They believe the city can be better. They believe it can be the place to re- imagine the American dream. And they believe they www.detroitmoxie.com are the ones to lead the way. 36
    • detroit: growing tHe city of all the cities in the world, detroit may be best positioned to become the world’s first one hundred percent food self-sufficient city. there is open land, fertile soil, ample water, willing labor, and a desper- ate demand for decent food. and there is plenty of community will be- hind the idea of turning the capital of american industry into an agrarian paradise. Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • detroit is producing somewhere be- tween 10 and 15 percent of its food supply inside city limits—more than most american cities, but nowhere near enough to allay the food desert “The untold problem. story is that this [urban agriculture] is not a new thing. It’s been going on here and other places for genera- tions. People who had been grow- the city lies on one hundred and for- ing here for ty square miles of former farmland. years might manhattan, boston, and san francis- not have had co could be placed inside the bor- the oppor- ders of detroit with room to spare, and tunity to tap the population is about the same as into the large the smallest of those cities, san fran- amount of cisco: eight hundred thousand. money now being thrown at it.” - Patrick Crouch Project Manager, Earthworks Urban Farm 38
    • food: detroit case studies Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • “This is a new movement. It’s been go- ing on but its new in an organized fashion, a commercial fashion.” - Jackie Victor co-owner Avalon Bakery 40
    • “We’re work- ing with the folks who will buy the pro- “The greening of detroit, is a 501 (c)(3) not for profit or- duce on one ganization, established in 1989 to guide and inspire the end, so get reforestation of Detroit. A new vision was established, expanding the greening’s mission to guide and inspire restaurants others to create a ‘greener’ detroit through planting and and institutions educational programs environmental leadership, advo- used to the cacy, and by building community capacity.” idea of buying The Greening of Detroit supports hundreds of family and locally-grown community gardens each year through its participation produce and in The Garden Resource Program Collaborative. The col- what they can laborative partners include The Greening of Detroit, Mich- expect in the igan State University Extension, Capuchin Soup Kitchen/ reliability and Earth Works Garden and the Detroit Agriculture Network. quality of it. The Greening of Detroit serves as the fiscal agent for the partnership, providing fundraising services, staffing and We are work- program coordination. ing with the growers so Each year the garden resource program supports over they can meet 200 community, family and school gardens, all produc- those quality ing food for detroit neighborhoods. Marketing opportuni- and depend- ties are available for these community gardeners under the grown in detroit® brand at a GRP sponsored booth ability expec- at Detroit’s Eastern Market and mini-Farmer’s Market’s tations.” throughout the city. These gardens are currently produc- ing around 100 tons of food each year, and the program - Rebecca is growing on an average of 20% annually. Salimenn-Witt president, Greening of Detroit Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • “I think peo- ple would be surprised hearing this from me, but simply turning land into large farms is not In 1997, Brother Rick Samyn felt a calling to start a gar- the answer. den at his workplace, the Capuchin Soup Kitchen. The What are the response was overwhelming and positive. That small system condi- plot of land grew into what is our Urban Farm project tions? What today. about the earthworks urban farm seeks to restore our connection issues around to the environment and community in keeping with race and the tradition of our spiritual patron, St. Francis. It is a class? There is working study in social justice and in knowing the origin a complexity of the food we eat of economic systems in This project relies on the gracious donations of time from volunteers and materials from sponsors. Neighbors Detroit.” and friends of all ages, incomes and faiths join us in our work. We hope that you will visit us and see what a - Patrick special project Earthworks Urban Farm has become. Crouch Project Manager, Earthworks Urban Farm 42
    • Participants of the Garden Resource Program are in- vited and encouraged to participate in one of 8 Gar- den cluster groups, which are based on geograph- ic region within the city of Detroit, Highland Park & Hamtramck. the purpose of the cluster groups is to connect gardeners and urban farmers living and working in the same area of the city in order to pro- vide a support network and access to additional re- sources. Additional resources include tilling, soil test- ing, compost, wood chips, mulch, weed fabric, tool sharing, and volunteers . Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • “I’ve lived in L.A., N.Y., Connecticut, London, Min- neapolis, and been around a lot, seen a lot of cities. detroit’s 138 square miles are home to But I’ve never enough abandoned lots to fill the city of San seen these francisco. long stretches Enter Urban Farming. of unused land.” Urban Farming’s mission is to create an abun- - Taja Seville, dance of food for people in need by plant- founder ing gardens on unused land and space while Urban Farming increasing diversity, educating youth, adults and seniors and providing an environmental- ly sustainable system to uplift communities. Corporate sponsors include Home Depot, Triscuit, Atlantic Records and Whole Foods. 44
    • In class the day of the announced closing, stu- dents reacted angrily, rais- The catherine ferguson academy for young women is an alternative high school located in Detroit, MI. they ing questions provide education and resources for pregnant teens, about day grades 9-12. Many of the teens come from underprivi- care, credit leged backgrounds and are faced with daily challeng- transfers and es that infringe upon their educational opportunities. the school’s ur- Lots used for farming and a barn built by the students ban farm. lie adjacent to the school. The barn houses a variety of farm animals that the students help care for. The school “Schools close recently implemented an urban farming course under while liquor the direction of science teacher Paul Weertz. stores open.” The students learn how to grow and nurture plants in an - Sade Lewis, urban environment. as a result of this farming program, student, 100 percent of the students have access to fresh pro- Catherine duce that is often unavailable to many of the teens. Ferguson Academy The Ferguson Academy is open to any high school age pregnant teen that lives in Detroit. each student must be accepted to a two year college or four year univer- sity before they are eligible to graduate. on march 17, 2010 ferguson students learned their school would close and relocate. Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • The detroit food policy council is committed to nurtur- ing the development and maintenance of a sustain- able, localized food system and a food-secure city of Detroit in which all of its residents are hunger-free, healthy and benefit economically from the food sys- tem that impacts their lives. “The DFPC has been developed to affirm the City of Detroit’s commitment to nurturing the development of a food secure city in which all of its citizens are hun- ger-free, healthy and benefit from the food systems that impact their lives. This policy also affirms the City of Detroit’s commitment to supporting sustainable According to food systems that provide people with high quality a 2007 study food, employment, and that also contribute to the long-term well-being of the environment.” completed by the research and consult- ing group Mari Gal- lagher, roughly 550,000 Detroit residents – more than half Our objective is to open a number of community- the city’s pop- based grocery stores, the first one serving as a pilot. ulation – have These stores will provide healthy, quality grocery prod- to travel twice ucts at a fair price. Quantity, quality, and variety will be chosen with community help. Better product cre- as far or farther ates a healthier population. to get to the closest grocery The project, known as detroit community grocery store as they store coalition, will work to ensure that workers are do to reach from the neighborhoods where the store is located. the closest fast The idea is to provide a way for workers and the com- munity to build wealth. Essentially, a portion of the store food profits from will be reinvested to create similar grocery restaurant or stores throughout the city of Detroit, thus strengthen- convenience ing other Detroit neighborhoods and benefiting the store. city as a whole. 46
    • No longer do you have to drive miles and miles and fight traf- fic to shop for your fresh produce. One can find all of that in Midtown, near Wayne State University and the Detroit Med- “The store will ical Center Hospitals. all of their produce is handpicked each day by Hollis and kim from vendors at eastern market operate as a and from companies in michigan. It’s the goal of Hollis and ‘city market’– Kim at Kim’s Produce to bring healthy deliciousness to De- smaller than troit’s Midtown. As a family run business, they have the plea- a full-service sure of making those community connections and helping supermarket, to bring Detroit a new business to spur development. which requires a minimum footprint of 30,000 square feet — and Jason and Paul Kado, owners of carry fewer the four Detroit-area locations of Rice Bowl restaurants, will break items.” ground on a new midtown gro- cery store, Sunflower Market, in - Paul Kado May, 2010. The market witll be a co-owner, new convenience for residents of Sunflower downtown and growing Midtown, Market who often complain they have few choices for groceries. While there are several markets on the outskirts of the city and a few in- dependents operate within its borders, detroit has been without a national grocer since 2007. Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • “The market will be a full- service, user- friendly urban grocery store. You’ll find ev- erything to put a meal together. Yes, we’ll have In May, 2010, brothers Michael and English butter, Peter Solaka are opening Ye Olde but we’ll also Butcher Shopppe on the main strip have Land O’ of Woodward Avenue in downtown Detroit, reviving their family business Lakes.” of the 1970s and 80s that they helped run as children with their father, which - Michael bore the same name. The store plans Solaka to offer meat and fish, all non-pack- co-owner, aged, along with mops, brooms, Ye Olde Butcher cleaning supplies, wine, beer and a Shoppe patio section for casual dining for cus- tomers. “it’s a big project with many challenges, but we’ve got our hearts completely in it,” says peter. 48
    • “There’s an openness here that New York Brothers Phil and Ryan Cooley opened their slows bar bQ in the Corktown neighborhood of Detroit, and Chicago in 2005. Since its opening the restaurant has gar- don’t have. nered positive reviews for its food and its contri- Unlike other bution to bringing business to the area. Phil has cities, here it’s since launched an arts collective, Los Pistoleros, a level playing to do volunteer projects. phil has recently been field -- as op- hosting “underground” dinners in unlikely loca- tions to benefit charity in abandoned buildings posed to ‘Get throughout the city. He has also hosted national in line.’” figures and city officials at Slows to discuss fu- ture of Michigan Central Depot, the restaurant’s - Phil Cooley towering neighbor across the street. co-owner, Slows Bar BQ Ryan is the president of O’Connor Real Estate and Development, whose offices are a few doors down from Slows. “people are looking to move downtown right now,” he says. “People are looking for modern spaces in Detroit, mod- ern living in Detroit’s old neighborhoods, spaces with character.” Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • “When we started, we Joseph and Bob McClure have turned their didn’t look at grandfather’s recipe for pickles into a national this as a rev- business that has generated over $300,000 in enue maker. revenue over the last two years. the recipe and the company’s owners have been featured in We did it The New York Times, the food network, Bon because we Appetit, GQ and “the martha stewart show.” liked to.” The brothers have expanded their presence - Joseph outside of Detroit by selling at locations such McClure as The Meat Hook, in Brooklyn, New York. Jo- seph has arranged participating in the store’s co-owner, monthly classes by teaching sessions on mak- McClure’s ing pickles. The classes continuously sell out. Pickles McClure sells two types of pickles — spicy and garlic dill — relish of the same flavors and beer- based mustard online and at more than 100 retail locations across the U.S. Revenue grew from $20,000 in 2007 to more than $300,000 in 2009. mcclure handles all of the production at its 2,500-square-foot facility, but by next year he hopes to move the company to a 15,000- square-foot space in downtown detroit. 50
    • “What the village was in Jackie Victor and Ann Perrault opened avalon bakery in De- the 60s in New troit because they saw an opportunity. Today some 500 cus- York, Detroit tomers a day line up to buy Avalon’s breads, scones, muffins, and coffee. They include suburbanites, students from nearby can be today. Wayne State University, and area hospital workers. Avalon You can do it also supplies top local restaurants and specialty shops with with hard work breads and pastries. and grit.” Victor is skeptic of everyone jumping on the urban farming - Jackie Victor to save the city. “I think I am suspect of someone with no co-owner, background in urban agriculture and community organiz- Avalon Bakery ing. Sure, it can be idealistic, it can be wonderful, but also dangerous.” In regards to Mayor Dave Bing’s strategy to shrink the city, Victor thinks its a step that needs to happen. “On the one hand it’s scary, but everyone know’s he is right. The com- munity needs to engage instead of pushing back. It’s sort of inevitable.” Victor sees Detroit as a great place for one to start a busi- ness. “this could be the place where the corner store was reinvented. The fact that national chains have abandoned the city is fabulous for small businesses. They are not sucking up the marketing oxygen and we are not competing with national campaigns.” she says. “i believe detroit is a gem in the rough for small businesses. there is pent-up demand, little competition, along with low cost of living and real estate prices.” Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • Dave Mancini opened Supino Pizzeria in 2009, after spend- ing time reading cookbooks at night after working during the day as a physical therapist. He was inspired by a 2001 trip to his father’s hometown of Supino, Italy. An avid cook, Mancini was so taken with the pizza there that he came home determined to learn how to make it. The idea of making it his career as well came scores and scores of pizzas later, as he baked pies for himself and his friends to perfect the recipe. His pies are a blend of Supino’s and New York’s styles. Like virtually every other pizza maker, he believes the soul of a great pie lies in its crust. And his, of course, has its secrets. “Part of it is that I use a lot of moisture. It’s a very wet dough,” he says. It’s extremely difficult to handle, but its high moisture content makes it bake up lighter and crisper in the 670-degree oven. 52
    • “I want to be an urban farmer. I want to start a com- munity garden in some kind seed wayne is dedicated to building sustainable of ecovillage food systems on the campus of Wayne State Uni- versity and in Detroit communities. with farmers and chefs.” SEED Wayne works in partnership with community- based organizations promoting food security, urban - Tom Howe agriculture, farm-to-institution, and food and fitness freshman, planning and policy development. Wayne State University “Michigan has the second most diverse agriculture in the United States [with 150 crops],” says Kami Pothukuchi, associate professor of geography and urban planning at WSU and the founder of the larg- est inner-city campus with a comprehensive food systems program, that is not run by an agriculture school. “we could add another $2.58 billion to the state’s economy if we increased production of local food by another 10 percent.” Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • “Eastern Market hosts a year-round, large retail mar- ket one day a week and a highly seasonal (June- October) Wholesale Market in the early morning Some are call- hours from Monday-Friday. It is estimated that the ing for wide- retail market draws from 10,000 customers at low season (January-February) to more than 40,000 dur- spread experi- ing peak season (May-September). mentation with many types of michigan is second to california in terms of the urban agricul- number of crops grown commercially but Eastern ture in the city. Market also draws growers from nearby locations in “This is definite- Southern Ontario-the hydroponics capital of Can- ada, and from the Amish belt that stretches across ly the time for northern Ohio and Indiana. ready, shoot, aim.” ...the turmoil in the local economy [that] has marked the past eighteen months with major loss of - Dan employment and tax base within southeast Michi- Carmody gan. against that bleak backdrop, the growing im- portance of the local food movement has helped president, make eastern market an even more important eco- Eastern nomic development anchor...” Market Corp. “as interest grows in re-balancing our food system to a more regional approach and as the wide vari- ety of urban agriculture proposals are implemented, eastern market may provide a national model for how to re-build a stronger regional food system.” - Request for Proposal Eastern Market Brand Development 54
    • “economic impact starts at the roots.” “I come from a food family. Everything in my family was based around cooking and eating and getting to- gether around Mission: As an active member of our local food community the table.” here in Southeastern, Michigan, we source a large per- centage of our products from family farms and local - Nick Seccia producers. Through our procurement of locally raised Executive Chef, products, we feel that we offer a better tasting, health- The Henry Ford ier product for our guests as well as helping to sustain and promote our local food community of producers and local family farms. As a result of his involvement in the local food move- ment, chef nick seccia was selected to be a dele- gate at slow food’s terra madre forum in turin, italy in october 2006. The event is a global gathering that brings together everyone from farmers and fishermen to chefs, educators and economists so that they can share experiences and help develop new concepts of agriculture and food supply. Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • Mission: The Rattlesnake features the highest-qual- ity, sustainably harvested seasonal foods combined with the creative work of James beard award-winning chef Jimmy schmidt. The Rattlesnake has been honored with the DiRoNa Award, Wine Spectator Award and the Star Diamond Award from The American Academy of Hospitality Sciences. 56
    • “There is an In the late 1990’s Majora Carter took a bold step into opportunity to the world of urban planning. Shye spearheaded the creation of the south bronx greenway – an 11 mile re-build De- network of bike and pedestrian paths meant to con- troit from the nect neighborhoods to the river front and each other ground-up, by with cost-effective, low impact storm water manage- its people, not ment capacity, local entrepreneurship opportunities, by huge cor- and active living features to improve public health porations. That and reduce traffic congestion – were set in motion. is truly sustain- Her consulting group is committed to a larger strategy able.” to move under-performing communities into a healthy and productive economic conditions. - John Mundy Project “carter visited detroit recently to talk up her plan to Manager, create a worker-owned urban agriculture cooperative Majora Carter venture. By pooling the efforts of numerous small grow- Group, LLC ers in Detroit, it would attempt to grow big enough to generate real profits and a return for investors. But it would be run by local community growers themselves. That seems to fit midway between Detroit’s hundreds of tiny, volunteer garden plots and the big, mecha- nized, for-profit farm that businessman John Hantz pro- posed earlier this year.” Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • “There’s too much talk around the com- munity and not enough around the Detroit-based Hantz farms l.l.c. seeks to create the individual.” world’s largest urban farm on underutilized land in the city of detroit. The for-profit venture aims to transform - John Hantz Detroit into a destination for fresh, locally grown natu- founder, ral foods, create a viable, beautiful environment that Hantz Farms will enhance the city, attract tourism, increase the tax base, create jobs and greatly improve the quality of life in Detroit. Hantz is willing to commit $30 million to the project. He’ll start with a pilot program this spring involving up to 50 acres on Detroit’s east side. “Out of the gates,” he says, “it’ll be the largest urban farm in the world.” The venture was announed March, 2009 and the appointment of President, Michael Score was made on December 15, 2009. 58
    • Why can’t THIS The Barr Mansion, in Austin, Texas is the first certified organic events facility in the U.S. that opened in 2009. “the green ten” 1. The nations first and ONLY Certified Organic events facility 2. Food USDA Certified Organic by Oregon Tilth 3. Gardens are Certified Organic and Certified Wildlife Habitat 4. The Green Restaurant Association’s Highest Scoring Restaurant 5. A Zero Waste facility diverting 97% of our waste stream 6. Linens organic cotton, hemp, linen or recycled fabric 7. All food waste goes to compost and back to the gardens 8. local, local, local - from vegetables to curtain rods 9. 100% post-consumer paper from Austin’s waste stream for office 10. Austin GreenChoice Renewable Energy Partner Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • happen HERE? 60
    • prototypes master list farmers’ market at the Henry ford Street food vendor district (or Travelling) Grown in Detroit food festival Grown in Detroit cookbook Detroit-based Fresh Direct system Local-based grocery store Culinary schools partnership and scholarship program with local schools Fresh bodega (gas stations) program Zip car (truck?) food pick-up/delivery system growing detroit “Zagat” rating system & guide for resatuarants Detroit agriculture awareness campaign (TV spots, farm map, website) Community outreach/partnership campaign with Hantz Farms Meal kits for senior citizens with local produce (Meals on Wheels) Retail box store for Hantz Farms (or other organizations) Herb planters in tires for residential gardens (tires from firestone) Special events space (house or loft) uses all local vendors (i.e. food) Design new packaging for local food to enable efficient regional delivery Bike food delivery service (from big box stores and local gardens) Public transportation bus routes for food shopping New “urban agriculture” brand: individual gardens and commercially focused City Food Co.: mixed-use space in Eastern Market Partnership with Majora Carter Group’s proposal of American City Farm Brand Eastern Market Re-Development Plan to increase traffic to match weekend Transform abandoned automotive factories into food production sites Sell local produce to institutions: hospitals, universities, prisons Barter program vs selling program University of Michigan (nano- technology) used for farming Composting and soil contamination research to designate farm space in city Business plan training kit (flash cards, book, website, social network for growers) Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • + 62
    • personas caroline age: 23 marital status: single children: none occupation: graduate student, Wayne State University teaching assistant income: $19,000 Home: apartment on campus in downtown Detroit transportation: 1998 Ford Focus cooking: non-existent, depends on take-out dave age: 62 marital status: married, 31 years children: none occupation: retired middle school teacher income: $45,000 Home: home in historic neighbor- hood in Detroit transportation: 1992 Ford Lincoln Town Car cooking: gardens in backyard for vegetables, shops at chain gro- cery store in suburbs for meat Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • kim age: 32 marital status: divorced children: 6-year-old son occupation: paralegal for city office income: $50,000 Home: apartment in Southfield, suburb of De- troit transportation: 1999 Toyota Camry cooking: shops at chain grocery store in sub- urbs, goes to Eastern Market on weekends for produce once a month. wants to learn healthy recipes to make for her son. tim age: 27 marital status: single children: none occupation: furniture maker income: $30,000 Home: live/work space in loft in Eastern Market transportation: none, walks or relies on public transportation cooking: shops exclusively at Eastern Market since he lives nearby, cooks at home. 64
    • city food co. intervention retail dinner party forum Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • City Food Co. Focus on growing Detroit one meal at a time solution “Detroit may be the best positioned to become the world’s first one hundred percent food self-sufficient city.” City Food Co. is a source for all things food-related located in the heart of Eastern Market, near down- town Detroit. Its everyday purpose will be to serve as a retail outlet for culinary tools, educational ma- terials and locally-produced food products. Local organizations will be able to reserve its conference space for hosting meetings and community forums. The commercial kitchen space will hold cooking classes for adults and school groups. City Food Co. events will invite local growers, business owners and policy makers for meals prepared by local chefs in order to engage in the necessary dialogue be- tween the stakeholders of the Detroit food scene. 66
    • CITY FOOD CO. $69,000 / 7,000 SQ. FT Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • “This is an incredible collection of people. They’re people who contrib- ute to Detroit. They’re leaders. Pride is a contagious thing. It could spread out from this neighborhood into the rest of the city.” - Holice P. Wood, resident 68
    • city food co: inspirations retail Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
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    • city food co. : inspirations dinner party Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
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    • city food co. : inspirations forum Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
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    • city food co. : inspirations rooftop events & green roof Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
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    • city food co. : design iterations Several versions of the layout were explored in order to design the most efficient use of the layout, as well as to discover how to incorporate all three facets of the business, retail, dinner party and forum, under one roof. Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • Utilizing the roof of the build- ing to host private events would provide another rev- enue stream in addition to the everyday retail pres- ence on the bottom floor. The roof could be designed as a green roof or house a small vegetable garden. The space could also serve as a lookout point for cus- tomers to relax and watch the activity happening in the Eastern Market across the street. 78
    • city food co. : floor plans pHase one: retail and dinner party Purchase Price (7,000 sq. ft.) = $70,000 Renovations @ $50/sq. ft. (7,000 sq. ft.) = $350,000 total phase one = $420,000 Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • pHase two: forum and rooftop events Roof Addition @ $120/ sq. ft. (2,500 sq. ft.) = $300,000 Green Roof @ $15/sq. ft. (4,500 sq. ft.) = $67,500 total phase two = $367,500 total both phases = $787,500 80
    • city food co. : street view street view before & after Photography by Erik Howard Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
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    • city food co. : logo researcH City Food Co. Focus on growing Detroit one meal at a time The first semester analysis of the overall food system inspires the logo for City Food Co. to emphasize the partnership necessary between each of the stakeholders of the Detroit food scene. global national city state regional Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • city food co. : promotional material poster iteration one By creating this document that compiles the visual data and overall message of the business, City Food Co. will be able to advertise itself in a variety of formats, including billboards, newspapers, magazines, online, TV spots and window post- ers at local food businesses. 84
    • city food co. : promotional material poster iteration two Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
    • city food co. : promotional material poster iteration tHree 86
    • city food co. : proJections City Food Co. becomes a gathering place for people in the food movement in the city of Detroit by providing an outlet for organizations to hold forums, private companies to host parties on the roof, and aspiring cooks to learn how to turn the fresh produce being grown in the city into real, everyday meals. phase one: online extension Growing Detroit becomes online outlet for those interested in the food movement in Detroit. Serves as the go-to source of information on those growing, selling and buying produce. phase two: product extension Tire Garden is a product sold at City Food Co. It serves as a vehicle for encouraging residents to start growing a portion of their food, no matter how small. As neighbors see other yards with the tires out front, a network is created around a common activity. phase three: brand extension Farmers’ Market at The Henry Ford is an extension of City Food Co. and of the mission of Eastern Market. The weekly event connects happenings in the City to those occurring in the suburbs. Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.
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    • Sarah Garza. Parsons The New School for Design. School of Design Strategies. Design & Management. Senior Thesis. Spring, 2010.