The Early Bird Gets the Worm, EBEEC

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Program recommendations for East Boston Early Education Center\'s home reading program. With Maura Wolk. For class at HGSE (H703).

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The Early Bird Gets the Worm, EBEEC

  1. 1. East Boston Early Education Center<br />
  2. 2. EBEEC Staff and Students<br />Staff<br />48.7% White<br />46.2% Hispanic<br />2.6 % Asian<br />2.6% Black<br />Staff : Student – 1:13<br />90% of teachers are highly qualified<br />Student Native Languages <br />Spanish <br />Portuguese<br />Arabic <br />Chinese<br />Vietnamese<br />92% of students qualify for free or reduced-price lunch<br />92% of students are English Language Learners<br />
  3. 3. Program Theories<br />Early literacy intervention for low SES children<br />Hart & Risley (1995); Reading First (2009)<br />Literacy-rich learning environments<br />Parental involvement<br />Surround Care model <br />
  4. 4. Program Goals<br />Language development<br />Literacy instruction<br />Parental involvement in child education<br />
  5. 5. Weakness<br />Although the EBEEC encourages parents to read at home with their children: <br />Noway to keep track<br />No incentive <br />No help with explicit and practical strategies to support shared reading interactions<br />
  6. 6. Recommendations:<br />Accountability for parents and teachers to participate<br />Interactive techniques for parents<br />Advice for conducting shared book reading, narratives, and arts and crafts activities<br />Incentives to participate in shared book reading activities<br />
  7. 7. Accountability & Incentive <br />Book log<br />To be completed by children and parents together<br />To be used by teachers to track levels of participation<br />Semi-annual book fair<br />To reward families for their participation<br />Community literacy <br />
  8. 8. Shared Reading Activities<br />Book reading routine and dialogic (?) reading<br />Parent and child narratives<br />Arts and crafts <br />
  9. 9. Goals of<br />Help parents maximize the learning potential of shared book reading<br />Teach strategies for literacy-related interactions that contribute to children’s language development<br />Provide incentives for parents and students to participate in shared reading at home<br />
  10. 10. Shared Reading<br />Establish a system of accountability<br />Measure participation in order to track compliance and attrition and make necessary modifications or recommendations<br />Promote rich home literacy environment<br />
  11. 11. Program Strengths:<br />Explicit instruction of literacy components<br />Many “highly-qualified” teachers <br />Most paraprofessionals have early education backgrounds and/or a college degree<br /> <br />Culturally diverse staff<br /> <br />Paraprofessionals trained through on-site mentorship<br /> <br />
  12. 12. Parent workshops help build skills for students’ continued literacy and socio-emotional development at home<br />100% attendance<br /> <br />Parent ESL and computer literacy classes<br /> <br />Play room for parents with small children not registered in Boston Public Schools<br />
  13. 13. Program Weaknesses: <br /> <br />No summer component<br />Ineffective professional development <br />No emotional or mental health support offered to parents<br />No data to track student progress after G1<br />
  14. 14. Parents given no guidance for reading at home with children<br /> <br />Parents not involved in classroom activities<br />No monitoring of parent participation, evaluation progress, effectiveness of services offered, or follow-up after services have been used<br />Effectiveness of parent programs not evaluated<br />
  15. 15. References<br />Bus, A. G., van IJzendoorn, M. H., & Pellegrini, A. D. (1995). Joint book reading makes for success in learning to read: A meta-analysis on intergenerational transmission of literacy. Review ofEducational Research, 65, 1-21.<br />Hart, B., & Risley, T. R. (1995). Chapter 6: The early experience of 42 typical American children (pp. 119 139). Chapter 7: Accomplishments of the 42 children at age 3 and later (pp. 141-173). Meaningful differences in the everyday experience of young American children. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.<br />Mol, S. E., Bus, A. G., de Jong, M. T., & Smeets, D. J. H. (2008). Added value of dialogic reading parent-child book readings: A meta-analysis. Early Education and Development, 19, 7-26.<br />Peterson, C., Jesso, B., & McCabe, A. (1999). Encouraging narratives in preschoolers: An intervention study. Journal of Child Language, 26, 49-67.<br />United States Department of Education (2009). Reading First. Retrieved from http://www2.ed.gov/programs/readingfirst/index.html<br />van Kleeck, A. (2004). Fostering preliteracy development via storybook interactions: The cultural context of mainstream family practices (pp. 175- 208). In C. A. Stone, E.R. Silliman, B. Ehren, & K. Apel (Eds.), Handbook of language and literacy. New York: Guilford.<br />

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