Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Class 8  - accountability and measuring success
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Class 8 - accountability and measuring success

97

Published on

What does it mean to have a successful library collection? How can that success be measured in terms of community benefit? How do you communicate those benefits to your users and stakeholders?

What does it mean to have a successful library collection? How can that success be measured in terms of community benefit? How do you communicate those benefits to your users and stakeholders?

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
97
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Accountability and Measuring Success IS 430 (UCLA) Sarah Clark Monday, November 25, 2013
  • 2. Overview of Today 1. Measuring Success and Communicating Benefits (60 min) 2. Group-led discussion of readings (30 min) 3. Field Trip and Guest Speaker: Julia Glassman, UCLA College Library (70-90 min)
  • 3. Next Week ● Bring the following: ○ Your library’s mission + Your community profile and needs assessment ○ Your collection policy ○ Your website/flyer/artifact to connect your users to your resources
  • 4. Final Project ● Due: Friday, December 13th (sorry!) ● Submit via email: sarahclark@ucla.edu ● You can pick it up from the GSEIS office after break. Credit: Clear Guitar
  • 5. Measuring Success... Flickr CC @martapiqs … and demonstrating your success to your stakeholders and community.
  • 6. Evaluation and Measuring Success ● How do you determine what “success” means in terms of a library collection? ● What are ways to measure success of our collections? ● What are the benefits and drawbacks to those methods? Flickr CC @SalFalko
  • 7. The Logic Model
  • 8. Source: KnowHowNonProfit.org
  • 9. Outcomes Outcome = the impact your collections and services have on your user community. Ask yourself: What is the big purpose? What impact do I want my collections to have on my user community? How will I measure that impact?
  • 10. Outputs Outputs = Activities and what is produced through activities. Libraries tend to be good at measuring outputs: #of participants, #circulations, etc.
  • 11. Source: QuantumLeap.com
  • 12. Everyday example H E A D A C H E Situation Get pills Take pills INPUTS OUTPUTS Source: University of Wisconsin Feel better OUTCOMES University of Wisconsin - Extension, Cooperative Extension, Program Development and Evaluation University of Wisconsin - Extension, Cooperative Extension, Program Development and Evaluation
  • 13. Everyday logic model – Family Vacation Family Members Budget Set up camp Car Camping Equipment INPUTS Drive to state park Cook, play, talk, laugh, hike OUTPUTS Source: University of Wisconsin Family members learn about each other; family bonds; family has a good time OUTCOMES University of Wisconsin - Extension, Cooperative Extension, Program Development and Evaluation University of Wisconsin - Extension, Cooperative Extension, Program Development and Evaluation
  • 14. A bit more detail INPUTS OUTPUTS OUTCOMES Long- Program investments What we invest Activities Participation What we do Who we reach Short Medium term What results SO WHAT?? What is the VALUE? Source: University of Wisconsin University of Wisconsin - Extension, Cooperative Extension, Program Development and Evaluation University of Wisconsin - Extension, Cooperative Extension, Program Development and Evaluation
  • 15. Fully detailed logic model Source: University of Wisconsin University of Wisconsin - Extension, Cooperative Extension, Program Development and Evaluation University of Wisconsin - Extension, Cooperative Extension, Program Development and Evaluation
  • 16. Source: University of Wisconsin University of Wisconsin - Extension, Cooperative Extension, Program Development and Evaluation University of Wisconsin - Extension, Cooperative Extension, Program Development and Evaluation
  • 17. OUTPUTS What we do ACTIVITIES •Train, teach •Deliver services •Develop products and resources •Network with others •Build partnerships •Assess •Facilitate •Work with the media •… Source: University of Wisconsin Who we reach PARTICIPATION •Participants •Clients •Customers •Agencies •Decision makers •Policy makers Satisfaction University of Wisconsin - Extension, Cooperative Extension, Program Development and Evaluation University of Wisconsin - Extension, Cooperative Extension, Program Development and Evaluation
  • 18. OUTCOMES What results for individuals, families, communities..… SHORT MEDIUM LONG-TERM Learning Action Conditions Changes in Changes in ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Awareness Knowledge Attitudes Skills Opinion Aspirations Motivation Behavioral intent CHAIN Changes in Behavior ● Conditions Decision-making ● Social (wellPolicies being) Social action ● Health ● Economic ● Civic ● Environmental OF Source: University of Wisconsin OUTCOMES University of Wisconsin - Extension, Cooperative Extension, Program Development and Evaluation University of Wisconsin - Extension, Cooperative Extension, Program Development and Evaluation
  • 19. Work Backwards from Your Goal
  • 20. Example Outcome at Windward ● Collection: Grab and Read ● Target Group: High School students too busy for pleasure reading ● Outcome: Students who otherwise would not read for fun will take breaks from the rigor of school to reignite their imaginations and rediscover the love of learning independently and with friends.
  • 21. What Are Your Outcomes? ● Identify a target community. ● Create a specific outcome connected to your collection.
  • 22. What Are Your Outcomes? OUTCOMES What results for individuals, families, communities..… SHORT MEDIUM LONG-TERM Learning Action Conditions Changes in Changes in ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Awareness Knowledge Attitudes Skills Opinion Aspirations Motivation Behavioral intent Changes in Behavior ● Conditions Decision-making ● Social (wellPolicies being) Social action ● Health ● Economic ● Civic ● Environmental
  • 23. Demonstrating Success communicating your successes with your community and with stakeholders
  • 24. Flickr CC @Enokson
  • 25. Turning Data into Stories ● Show the problem (and how you plan to make a difference). ● Show your impact. Source: Daniel Melbye ● Make your data beautiful. ● Return to the story.
  • 26. Storytelling in Presentations Nancy Duarte
  • 27. Elevator Speech Flickr CC @daryl_mitchell
  • 28. So, what is it that you are doing here? Flickr CC @daryl_mitchell
  • 29. Elevator Speech should ... ● … be simple and memorable. ● … be ready at any time for a chance encounter. ● … show what your collection contributes to the community and why it matters. ● … create curiosity. Flickr CC @daryl_mitchell
  • 30. Step 1: Imagine Success Imagine success. What does it look like? Invent the results you want. What impact does your collection have on your community? Flickr CC @Fairfax Library Foundation
  • 31. Step 2: Who is Your Audience? How will you modify your message for different stakeholders? Organizational Head Librarian Peers Patrons
  • 32. Speed Elevator Speeches -- Round 1 1. Find a partner. 2. One person gives his/her elevator speech as if the partner is a key stakeholder. (30 sec) 3. Partners switch roles. (30 sec) 4. Rotate to a new partner. 5. Repeat.
  • 33. Speed Elevator Speeches -- Round 2 1. Find a partner. 2. One person gives his/her elevator speech as if the partner is a library patron curious about the collection and its purpose. (30 sec) 3. Partners switch roles. (30 sec) 4. Rotate to a new partner. 5. Repeat.
  • 34. Parting Words ● Begin with your purpose. Know what outcomes you want. ● Consider how you will measure your success from the beginning. Flickr CC Local Studies NSW ● Embrace the power of storytelling.

×