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Annotated Bibliographies and Notetaking
Annotated Bibliographies and Notetaking
Annotated Bibliographies and Notetaking
Annotated Bibliographies and Notetaking
Annotated Bibliographies and Notetaking
Annotated Bibliographies and Notetaking
Annotated Bibliographies and Notetaking
Annotated Bibliographies and Notetaking
Annotated Bibliographies and Notetaking
Annotated Bibliographies and Notetaking
Annotated Bibliographies and Notetaking
Annotated Bibliographies and Notetaking
Annotated Bibliographies and Notetaking
Annotated Bibliographies and Notetaking
Annotated Bibliographies and Notetaking
Annotated Bibliographies and Notetaking
Annotated Bibliographies and Notetaking
Annotated Bibliographies and Notetaking
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Annotated Bibliographies and Notetaking

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How to create annotated bibliographies and take good notes for historical research. Created for a history seminar for 12th grade students at Windward School in Los Angeles.

How to create annotated bibliographies and take good notes for historical research. Created for a history seminar for 12th grade students at Windward School in Los Angeles.

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  • 1. Annotated Bibliographies History 12 Senior Seminar, Ryan Staude, December 9, 2011
  • 2. Why Annotated Bibliographies?
      • What does it mean to annotate?
      • Why is Ryan asking you to create an annotated bibliography?
      • What should a source annotation include?
  • 3. Annotation Defined
    • Annotate : (v.) to add notes to (a text or diagram) giving explanation or comment.
    • -- Source: The Oxford American Dictionary
  • 4. Annotate:  What's in Shetal's Bag?  (and why?) http://www.flickr.com/photos/bardgabbard/3951445679 /
  • 5. Annotated Bibliography
    • Overview: a list of sources with a short explanation of the source and how it will be useful to you.
    • Length of annotation: About 150 words
    • Purpose: Inform the reader of the relevance, accuracy and quality of the sources
    • -- source: Olin and Uris Libraries, "How to Prepare an Annotated Bibliography, http://olinuris.library.cornell.edu/ref/research/skill28.htm
  • 6. Potential Elements of an Annotation
      • Once sentence description of source and, if applicable, author’s thesis.
      • Brief description of who author is and his/her credentials as an authority on the subject.
      • Brief description of the evidence the author uses to support his/her theses.
      • A brief description of the value of the book for your project
    • Adapted from A Pocket Guide to Writing in History , 5th ed., buy Mary Lynn Rampolla, (New York: Bedford/St. Martin’s), 2007.
  • 7. Annotations Should...
    • ... Summarize (topics, main arguments)
    • ... Assess (usefulness, authority)
    • ... Reflect (How helpful is this source for you? How will you use it to shape your argument?)
  • 8.
    • ... Summarize (What is in her purse?)
    • ... Assess (How useful will these items be on the date?)
    • ... Reflect (How helpful are the items? Which will be most essential to the success of her date?)
    Shetal is going on a date to a club.
  • 9. Why Bother?
    • Creating an annotated bibliography...
    •     ... forces you to examine your sources critically.
    •     ... will allow you to begin thinking of how to structure your argument
  • 10. Effective Note Taking
  • 11. How Do You Take Notes?
      • What are your strategies for “pre-reading” a text before taking notes on it?
      • What does it mean to read a source actively (vs. passively)?
  • 12. Pre-Reading Strategies
    • Determine if a source will be valuable by examining the following:
      • Title and subtitle of the source
      • Table of contents
      • Appendices, maps, illustrations
      • Abstract or summary of the source
      • Section headings
      • Bibliography.
  • 13. Pre-Reading Strategies
    • Key Questions:
      • Who wrote this source and why? Who published it?
      • When was this source written?
      • What is the author's or creator's thesis or purpose? Who is the intended audience?
      • What evidence does the author use to support his or her argument?
      • What sources does that author cite?
  • 14. Pre-Reading Strategies
    • Final Considerations:
      • How trustworthy is this source?
      • How relevant is this source to your topic?
  • 15. Reading Actively
      • Consider the author's thesis as you read and understand the facts presented. Read the introduction and conclusion first.
      • Collect facts -->  Organize and interpret information.
      • Ask questions: What is the author's point? Do you agree? Why or why not?
  • 16. Have a Conversation with the Source
    • Write as you read:
      •   Summarize main points of a source. Be selective and concise!
      • Look up unfamiliar words and write definitions in your notes or on photocopies of your sources.
      • Respond in the margins: ask questions, disagree, and make connections to other texts.
      • Tag/add keywords to your notes to help you organize them later.
      • Write reflections and reactions to what you read.
      • Review what you have written regularly. 
  • 17. Have a Raucous Conversation
    • "Studs Terkel...was known to admonish friends who would read his books but leave them free of markings . He told them that reading a book should not be a passive exercise, but rather a raucous conversation ."
    • Source: Holly Epstein Ojalvo, "Do You Write in Your Books?", NYT Learning Network, February 22, 2011,   http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/02/22/do-you-write-in-your-books/
  • 18. Questions? Thoughts?

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