Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
The Art of the Interview<br />SPDA Workshop<br />February 28,2011<br />
How Do You Handshake?<br /><ul><li>Look your Recipient in the eye.
Don't be a limp fish.
Clearly state your name, first and last.</li></li></ul><li>Agenda<br /> Welcome and Ice Breaker<br />Interview Skill Basic...
What does it mean to be prepared for an interview?<br />
Preparation<br />  Practice Makes Perfect<br />  Utilize networking skills <br />  Do You Research<br />  Plan Your Attire...
Interview Attire<br />
Interview Attire Guidelines<br /><ul><li>A suit with a jacket is almost always the best clothing selection.
Shoes should be clean and conservative.
For women, hosiery should be nude colored and nothing patterned. For men, dress socks are a must – please do not wear athl...
Try to carry a computer bag or other forms of portfolio – purses are too varied as are the tastes and interpretations of t...
Make-up should not be noticeable for men or women, this includes nail polish.
Neckties should be conservative and not too loud – basic gold, burgundy or blue ties are the best selection. Notice, I did...
Be present and pleasant.
Be mindful of your non-verbals in the waiting area – if you look nervous, antsy or unprepared, it will be noticed. </li></...
Smile and have a pleasant demeanor and tone to your voice.
Listen actively to what is being said.
Don’t complain or share how hectic your day is given this interview.
With all communication throughout the interview, make and maintain eye contact.</li></li></ul><li>Performance<br />Your Re...
Answer only questions asked of you.
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

The Art of the Interview

470

Published on

Published in: Career, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
470
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
23
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • A. How do you Handshake?Ask participants to stand and go around the room and introduce themselves to their peers. Once they’ve finished, give the following pointers. Have the group stand and reintroduce themselves to their peers keeping the tips in mind.Pointers:Look your recipient in the eye.Don’t limp fish – have a good grip (not too tight) and shake 3 times.Clearly state your complete name, first and last.Debrief: Did you notice any differences between the first and second introductions about yourself or your peers?Why is this important?
  • B. Agenda:Welcome and Ice BreakerIntroduction to Interview Skills and NetworkingThree Keys to Successful Interviews:PreparationPerformanceFollow-upWhy Network?
  • No matter your age, your employment experience or the type of position, everyone should have great interview skills. These are the key to landing the perfect job.Whether your interview is on the phone, one-on-one or in a group, it is important to apply the techniques we discuss tonight so you can make the most of your opportunity. Your goal and focus with every interview should be stepping closer to a job offer. PreparationFirst things first, you must be prepared. So, what does it mean to be prepared?Group Brainstorm4 Flip Charts – 1 for each groupDivide the participants into 4 groups and ask each to brainstorm how they could successfully prepare for an interview. After 3 minutes, ask each group to share their list.
  • Fill in with the following responses if not mentioned:Practice Makes Perfect – practice with a friend or family member or practice in front of a mirror. And, if you want to truly be prepared, video tape yourself interviewing so you can see the non-verbal communications you deliver.Utilize networking skills – Make connections with individuals who work in the organization or department you are hoping to be hired into as they will have great suggestions for hot topics, important facets to job and the personality of the interviewer(s).Do You Research – Be sure to review the company website, its mission, vision and values, important topics/issues especially where research and or business practices are concerned and look for news stories and/or recent press releases.Plan Your Attire – It sounds cliché but it is true: You never get a second chance to make a first impression. Much of your first impression lies in what you wear and how you look. So, if you arrive to an interview disheveled and drinking an enormous mug of coffee, what might an interviewer perceive about you?
  • B. Interview AttireLet’s talk a little more in-depth about interview attire. In today’s market, for every one position available, there are 4 to 5 people seeking that position. While this makes it a stressful process for interviewees, it also makes for a difficult process for interviewers. Attire is one of those first impression items which will be used to filter out candidates. A good rule of thumb: Always dress one to two positions above the position for which you are applying and interviewing. It is also good to dress consistent to the type of occupation and industry. No matter what the attire, it should be clean, pressed and well-presented. As an interviewer, what would your thoughts be on these individuals? (Show pictures of 4 individuals , some well-dressed and some inappropriately dressed for an interview).Questions:1. What is your first impression of this individual?2. What about their attire is good and what is not?
  • Here are some general rules on appropriate interview attire:A suit with a jacket is almost always the best clothing selection.Shoes should be clean and conservative. For women, hosiery should be nude colored and nothing patterned. For men, dress socks are a must – please do not wear athletic socks with your suit.Try to carry a computer bag or other forms of portfolio – purses are too varied as are the tastes and interpretations of them.If you wear jewelry, including facial rings, it should be minimalist. Try to keep earrings to one set, two if you must and only one ring per hand.Make-up should not be noticeable for men or women, this includes nail polish.Neckties should be conservative and not too loud – basic gold, burgundy or blue ties are the best selection. Notice, I did not say red. Unless it is an interview for an industry where power, confidence is a perceived positive, a red tie should be avoided.
  • Here are some general rules on appropriate interview attire:A suit with a jacket is almost always the best clothing selection.Shoes should be clean and conservative. For women, hosiery should be nude colored and nothing patterned. For men, dress socks are a must – please do not wear athletic socks with your suit.Try to carry a computer bag or other forms of portfolio – purses are too varied as are the tastes and interpretations of them.If you wear jewelry, including facial rings, it should be minimalist. Try to keep earrings to one set, two if you must and only one ring per hand.Make-up should not be noticeable for men or women, this includes nail polish.Neckties should be conservative and not too loud – basic gold, burgundy or blue ties are the best selection. Notice, I did not say red. Unless it is an interview for an industry where power, confidence is a perceived positive, a red tie should be avoided.
  • B. PerformanceIt’s interview day and your nerves and anxiousness over the position and the importance of your interview have set in. In order to present your “best self,” let’s talk about the four parts to an interview and what to do for each.Your ArrivalArrive early but only by 5-10 minutes – any earlier and you will make your interviewer anxious too.Be present and pleasant.Be mindful of your non-verbals in the waiting area – if you look nervous, antsy or unprepared, it will be noticed.
  • Your GreetingGive a confident handshake.Smile and have a pleasant demeanor and tone to your voice.Listen actively to what is being said.Don’t complain or share how hectic your day is given this interview.With all communication throughout the interview, make and maintain eye contact.
  • Your ResponseMaintain a comfortable but professional posture.Answer only questions asked of you – make them personal and relevant to your experience.Don’t ramble or go off on random tangents and stories.Relax your voice and your pace – talking too fast or too slow could be perceived as a non-verbal indication of a bad behavior.Try to find a connection with the interviewer based on something he or she brings into the conversation – do not attempt to dig for something if not presented.At the most basic level, an interview is a conversation, albeit polite and professional, it should still function as a conversation.
  • Your ExitFirst and foremost, thank the interviewer for his/her time and preparation.Be sure to shake their hand.Ask for a business card – for the purpose of a thank you and follow-up.This is when it is appropriate to reference any timely news such as the promotion, or death of a staff member, offering your praise and/or condolences.Under no circumstances should you linger once the interview is complete.
  • 2. Question and AnswerThe most dreaded and/or feared time within any interview is the part outside your control: the questions. Everyone dreads the ambiguous questions with no right or wrong answer. As a candidate, you have to be prepared for any interview question that comes along.It is best to listen attentively to each question, pause and reflect and then answer, even if you have an instant thought. It will appear you have been thoughtful and intentional about your answer.Activity: Interview Fire DrillWe’re going to practice our answers with an interview fire drill. Instruct participants to line up and face the facilitator. Each person is going to be asked a common interview question and expected to respond within 10-15 seconds. Answer each question to the best of your ability. You will be given feedback as needed. Debrief: 1. Why did we practice in this fashion?2. What was easy to answer?3. What questions were more challenging?
  • 3. How to Answer a Difficult QuestionWhile federal, state and local laws may prevent this from occurring, you may find yourself in an interview being asked an inappropriate question. Although it can be difficult to answer, there are strategies for approaching these questions without saying “Excuse me, you can’t ask me that!” They are:1. Refuse to answer the question – This is, of course, the easiest option. But, it is also the least likely to secure you the job. 2. Answer the question regardless of inappropriateness – By answering the question, you may be giving information to the interviewer which can be misconstrued or perceived incorrectly. We are want to believe we are objective interviewers yet we all have filters through which we see the world. If you are comfortable, you can use a positive spin and ask the interviewer how this question relates to the position.3. Provide an answer which addresses the underlying question – This is the best choice of the three and gives you an opportunity provide the information they really want to know. For instance, “How close are you and your family?” If this is a job requiring relocation across the country or across the pond, the interviewers may want to assess your comfort and willingness to make this move and how long you will stay. A sample response might be, “While we are close, my family is in full support of me making this move and looks forward to vacationing while visiting me.”
  • Some Examples:Are you a US Citizen?How much do you weigh?Do you have any disabilities?How old are you?Caveat: An interviewer can ask if you are 18.Are you married?Do you have children?Have you ever been arrested?Caveat: An interviewer can ask if you have ever been convicted of a felony.These are all tactics which can be used to approach challenging questions. If you are thoughtful and intentional about your responses, you will find a way to respond in a polite, positive way which still answers their underlying concerns.
  • For the sake of time, I am going to share a handout with you regarding post-interview following up. Please take time to review this handout as the follow-up is just as important as the introduction. Most importantly, be sure to follow-up via hand-written thank you or an email to be sure you reiterate your appreciation of the interview opportunity as well as your excitement for the position.
  • III. Why Network?For some, networking is a simple, transactional exchange. A relationship to serve a purpose and once the purpose is complete, the relationship is as well.But, networking can be a much greater, broader and more useful resource if viewed as a social and life skill based in relationship building. The key to networking is making the purpose about helping others to achieve their goals through linking them to people who make this possible. If a networker themselves, they will help you achieve your goals as well.Group Discussion: What are some of the reasons networking is worth the time and energy?Fill in the following which were not shared by group:It is the most cost effective marketing tool when seeking a job.70-80 percent of jobs are found and filled through networking.Every person you meet has potentially 200-250 connections which could be advantageous to you – this means anyone you could want to meet is only 5-6 contacts away.It links you to industry leaders who can not only share contacts, but skills, knowledge and resources.
  • So, how can you network?Be prepared and knowledgeable about your professional goals – you have to be able to communicate this to those with whom you interact. Get involved in interest groups.Volunteer around your community.Build relationships at parties when presented with opportunity to meet new people.Don’t forget your family and friends.Have resumes or business cards with you at all times.Don’t be afraid to share that you’re looking for a job or to ask for any connections.Utilize social networks such as LinkedIn to build a professional network which will stay with you no matter how much you change jobs.
  • Activity: Six Degrees of SeparationHandout Six Degrees of Separation worksheet. Ask everyone to fill in the type of job they are seeking at the top of the sheet. Instruct participants to go around the room and share their desired job with others to see if they have familial, professional or friend connections which would help you. The first person to a legitimate six degrees wins a prize.
  • Review the main three points of the day:Introduction to Interview SkillsPerformancePerformanceFollow-upWhy Network?Ask group to share one thing they learned today that was new, interesting or valuable to their interview skill set.Remember, good interview skills are about preparation, performance and follow-up. Be confident in your skills and knowledge and you will ensure your interviewer feels confident in you.
  • Transcript of "The Art of the Interview"

    1. 1. The Art of the Interview<br />SPDA Workshop<br />February 28,2011<br />
    2. 2. How Do You Handshake?<br /><ul><li>Look your Recipient in the eye.
    3. 3. Don't be a limp fish.
    4. 4. Clearly state your name, first and last.</li></li></ul><li>Agenda<br /> Welcome and Ice Breaker<br />Interview Skill Basics<br /> Three Keys to Successful Interviews:<br />Preparation<br />Performance<br />Follow-up<br /> Why Network?<br />
    5. 5. What does it mean to be prepared for an interview?<br />
    6. 6. Preparation<br /> Practice Makes Perfect<br /> Utilize networking skills <br /> Do You Research<br /> Plan Your Attire<br />
    7. 7. Interview Attire<br />
    8. 8. Interview Attire Guidelines<br /><ul><li>A suit with a jacket is almost always the best clothing selection.
    9. 9. Shoes should be clean and conservative.
    10. 10. For women, hosiery should be nude colored and nothing patterned. For men, dress socks are a must – please do not wear athletic socks with your suit.
    11. 11. Try to carry a computer bag or other forms of portfolio – purses are too varied as are the tastes and interpretations of them.</li></li></ul><li>Interview Attire Guidelines<br /><ul><li>If you wear jewelry, including facial rings, it should be minimalist. Try to keep earrings to one set, two if you must and only one ring per hand.
    12. 12. Make-up should not be noticeable for men or women, this includes nail polish.
    13. 13. Neckties should be conservative and not too loud – basic gold, burgundy or blue ties are the best selection. Notice, I did not say red. Unless it is an interview for an industry where power, confidence is a perceived positive, a red tie should be avoided.</li></li></ul><li>Performance<br />Your Arrival<br /><ul><li>Arrive early but only by 5-10 minutes – any earlier and you will make your interviewer anxious too.
    14. 14. Be present and pleasant.
    15. 15. Be mindful of your non-verbals in the waiting area – if you look nervous, antsy or unprepared, it will be noticed. </li></li></ul><li>Performance<br />Your Greeting<br /><ul><li>Give a confident handshake.
    16. 16. Smile and have a pleasant demeanor and tone to your voice.
    17. 17. Listen actively to what is being said.
    18. 18. Don’t complain or share how hectic your day is given this interview.
    19. 19. With all communication throughout the interview, make and maintain eye contact.</li></li></ul><li>Performance<br />Your Response<br /><ul><li>Maintain a comfortable but professional posture.
    20. 20. Answer only questions asked of you.
    21. 21. Don't ramble or go off on random tangents and stories.
    22. 22. Relax your voice and your pace.
    23. 23. Try to find a connection with the interviewer based on something he or she brings into the conversation.
    24. 24. At the most basic level, an interview is a conversation.</li></li></ul><li>Your Exit<br /><ul><li>First and foremost, thank the interviewer for his/her time and preparation.
    25. 25. Be sure to shake their hand.
    26. 26. Ask for a business card – for the purpose of a thank you and follow-up.
    27. 27. Appropriate time to ask questions, offer condolences or praise.
    28. 28. Under no circumstances should you linger once the interview is complete.</li></ul>Performance<br />
    29. 29. Question & Answer<br />Interview Fire Drill<br />
    30. 30. How to Answer Difficult Questions<br />Refuse to answer the question.<br />2. Answer the question regardless of inappropriateness.<br />3. Provide an answer which addresses the underlying question.<br />
    31. 31. How to Answer Difficult Questions<br /><ul><li>Are you a US Citizen?
    32. 32. How much do you weigh?
    33. 33. Do you have any disabilities?
    34. 34. How old are you?
    35. 35. Caveat: An interviewer can ask if you are 18.
    36. 36. Are you married?
    37. 37. Do you have children?
    38. 38. Have you ever been arrested?
    39. 39. Caveat: An interviewer can ask if you have ever been convicted of a felony.</li></li></ul><li>Post-Interview Follow-up<br />
    40. 40. Why Network?<br /><ul><li>It is the most cost effective marketing tool when seeking a job.
    41. 41. 70-80 percent of jobs are found and filled through networking.
    42. 42. Every person you meet has potentially 200-250 connections which could be advantageous to you – this means anyone you could want to meet is only 5-6 contacts away.
    43. 43. It links you to industry leaders who can not only share contacts, but skills, knowledge and resources.</li></li></ul><li>How can YOU network?<br /><ul><li>Be knowledgeable about your professional goals and prepared to share.
    44. 44. Get involved in interest groups.
    45. 45. Volunteer around your community.
    46. 46. Build relationships at parties when presented with opportunity to meet new people.
    47. 47. Don't forget your family and friends.
    48. 48. Have resumes or business cards with you at all times.
    49. 49. Don't be afraid to share that you're looking for a job or to ask for any connections.
    50. 50. Utilize social networks such as LinkedIn.</li></li></ul><li>Six Degrees of Separation<br />
    51. 51. Closing<br />Lets Review<br /><ul><li>Introduction to Interview Skills
    52. 52. Performance
    53. 53. Performance
    54. 54. Follow-up
    55. 55. Why Network?</li>
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×