Toward a Quantum Theory of Media

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TDG President and Principal Analyst, Michael Greeson presents the beginning stages of his Quantum Theory of Media- where anytime, anywhere media is reshaping the fundamentals of creation, …

TDG President and Principal Analyst, Michael Greeson presents the beginning stages of his Quantum Theory of Media- where anytime, anywhere media is reshaping the fundamentals of creation, distribution, and consumption.

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  • Sarah: Thank you very much for joining us today for a very unusual webinar on the subject of the digitization of media and its impact on the traditional linear media value chain. As the titles suggests, and as the whitepaper demonstrates, this is merely a prologue to a larger theory of digital media that TDG will be developing over the next several years (thus the preface “Toward” a quantum theory of media).

Transcript

  • 1. www.AskTDG.com Capitalizing on Convergence Michael Greeson President, Principal Analyst In Front of the Curve.™
  • 2. Opening Remarks
    • Presenter: Michael Greeson, President, Principal Analyst
    • Topic: Toward a Quantum Theory of Media
    • First of Monthly TDG Member Webinars
    • 45-Minute Presentation, 15-Minute Q&A
  • 3. Agenda
    • When Worldviews Collide – A Brief History of ‘Quantum’
    • Crosspollination of a Radical Idea
    • Non-Linear Experiences & Quantum Media
    In Front of the Curve.™
  • 4. Agenda
    • When Worldviews Collide – A Brief History of ‘Quantum’
    • Crosspollination of a Radical Idea
    • Non-Linear Experiences & Quantum Media
    In Front of the Curve.™
  • 5. In Front of the Curve.™ Competing Schools of Thought Paradigm Normal Science Challenge is resolved within the paradigm, normal science continues – scientific evolution. Challenge cannot be resolved within existing assumptions, “paradigm shift” takes place – scientific revolution. Anomalies TDG illustration based on material from Thomas Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.
  • 6. PARADIGM SHIFT The History of Space In Front of the Curve.™ Aristotle (340 BC) Earth was stationary and the sun, moon, planets, and stars revolved around the earth – circular motion was perfect and the earth was the center of the universe. Ptolemy (200 AD) The earth stood at the center of the universe surrounded by eight spheres which themselves moved in a perfect sphere. There was nothing beyond the fixed stars, they were the “boundary” for the universe). Copernicus (1514) Sun was stationary at the center of the universe, around which the earth and the planets revolved around orbits were elliptical, not perfect spheres!
  • 7. The History of Space PARADIGM SHIFT In Front of the Curve.™ Galileo (1609) Galileo observed that Jupiter was accompanied by several small satellites or moons that orbited around it, implying that everything did not have to revolve around the sun or the earth . Newton (1687) Postulated law of universal gravitation according to which each body in the universe was attracted toward every other body by a force that was stronger the more massive the bodies and the closer they were to each other. Implication: there is no unique standard of rest, which means that one could not give an event an absolute position in space (as Aristotle believed). Newton still believed in absolute time – time was considered separate from and independent of space.
  • 8. The History of Time In Front of the Curve.™ Roemer (1676) Based on observations of moons of Jupiter, he observed that the light from the moons took longer to reach us when we were farther away. In other words, the speed of light was fixed and our experience of it was impacted by distance. Michelson & Morley (1887) Attempting to confirm the ether hypothesis, they actually disconfirmed it. Maxwell (1865) Radio and light waves should travel at a certain fixed speed, but since absolute space was gone, there was no “thing” from which “fixed speed” could be measured. Posited ether as a medium through which light traveled and which exerted an impact on its final observed speed.
  • 9. The History of Time PARADIGM SHIFT In Front of the Curve.™ Plank (1900) Suggested that light, X rays, and other waves could not be emitted at an arbitrary rate, but only in certain packets he called ‘quanta.’ Einstein (1905): Ether was unneeded provided one was willing to abandon the idea of absolute time! Even light does not have an absolute speed (that is, distance traveled over a specific period of time) but is instead impacted by the force of gravity (General Theory of Relativity). Gravity is a consequence of the fact that space-time is not flat but curved by the distribution of mass and energy in it. So much for the concept of absolute time!
  • 10. The History of Time PARADIGM SHIFT In Front of the Curve.™ Heisenberg (1926): Measuring the location of a particle disturbs the particle and change its velocity in a way that cannot be predicted. The more accurately you try to measure the position of the particle, the less accurately you can measure its speed, and vice versa. Given that particles are never at rest, objective or absolute measurement is impossible. Concept led to the reformulation of classical mechanics into a new theory called quantum mechanics : At best, a particle has a quantum state, which is a combination of position and velocity that can never be predicted, but would fall within a range of different possible outcomes, each with a probability attached to it. Quantum mechanics therefore introduces an unavoidable element of unpredictability and randomness into science.
  • 11. Space and time are now dynamic qualities: when a body moves, or force acts, it affects the curvature of space and time – and in turn the structure of space-time affects the way in which bodies move and forces act. Time & Space Today In Front of the Curve.™
  • 12. The Classic View The Modern View Events take place at particular moments in absolute time that is independent of the observer. 4-dimensional space-time, in which space and time are but different parts of a single reality. Toward a Quantum Theory of Mechanics In Front of the Curve.™ The universe is predictable and knowable according to universal laws that are absolute and transcend space and time. The universe is by nature random, and while it is knowable according to scientific laws, the laws themselves are relative and non-absolute. Space and time are two separate dimensions of reality. Objects exist at a finite point in absolute space – natural position is at rest. Bodies are never at rest nor occupy a single position in space: natural position is in motion. Gravity impacts the flow of time, so time is impacted by spatial distribution of matter – there is no such thing as absolute time.
  • 13. Agenda
    • When Worldviews Collide
    In Front of the Curve.™
    • Crosspollination of an Idea
    • Non-Linear Experiences & Quantum Media
  • 14. Agenda
    • When Worldviews Collide
    In Front of the Curve.™
    • Crosspollination of an Idea
    • Non-Linear Experiences & Quantum Media
  • 15. Crosspollination of an Idea
    • It’s impact on media theory is well-defined.
    In Front of the Curve.™
    • Quantum theory impacted academic disciplines far beyond the physical sciences.
    • Social sciences (sociology, psychology, even political science) and philosophy (metaphysics, epistemology, even ethics) were forever changed.
    • ‘ Knowledge’ became non-absolute, relative to the observer and their context.
  • 16. Quantum – From Mass Media to Masses of Media In Front of the Curve.™
    • BC (Before Computers) versus AC (After Computers).
    • Mid-20 th century: computer introduced.
      • Initially used a ‘production’ tool.
      • Evolved to become a universal media machine, now used for production, storage, and distribution.
      • Late 20 th century: diffusion of personal computing, the Internet, and ‘new media’ including web sites, PC games, interaction media, virtual realities, digital video, and human-computer interfaces.
  • 17. Contemporary Media Theory In Front of the Curve.™
    • Numerical representation
    • Modularity
    • Automation
    • Variability
    • Cultural Transcoding
    Source: Leo Manovich’s The Language of New Media (MIT Press, 2001)
  • 18. Agenda In Front of the Curve.™
    • When Worldviews Collide
    • Crosspollination of an Idea
    • Non-Linear Experiences & Quantum Media
  • 19. Agenda In Front of the Curve.™
    • When Worldviews Collide
    • Crosspollination of an Idea
    • Non-Linear Experiences & Quantum Media
  • 20. What is Non-Linear Video? In Front of the Curve.™
      • Non-linear video is characterized by “two-way” experience :
        • No preset schedules – content on demand.
        • High levels of consumer control, interaction and personalization.
        • Think “audience of one.”
    • Linear video is characterized by a “one-way” broadcast experience :
      • Preset schedules intended to serve massive audiences at a single showing.
      • No direct user interaction or personalization.
      • The dissolution of absolutes.
  • 21. Non-Linear Video Applications Place Shifting (Any Place) – takes your content, both stored and real-time, and “shifts” it to any location. Stand-alone CE platform enabled by broadband connection PC download enabled by broadband connection Time Shifting (Any Time) – records live TV programming and “shifts” the time if can be enjoyed to fit your schedule, not the programmers. In Front of the Curve.™
  • 22. Non-Linear Video Applications Device Shifting (Any Device) – shifts prerecorded and live video to any networked device that is enabled to render video, be it a TV, a PC, or a mobile media device. Stand-alone CE platform enabled by broadband connection In Front of the Curve.™
  • 23. In Front of the Curve.™ Toward a Quantum Theory of Media The Classic View The Modern View Consumer as ‘empty vessel’ to be filled at the whim of programmers. Consumer as participant, as determinant of media experience. Absolute Space – Media is best enjoyed when the consumer is resting in one place. No Absolute Space – Media should be enjoyed at any place, portability and mobility become key. Absolute Time – Content offered at predetermined times according to programmer’s schedule. No Absolute Time – Media should be enjoyed at any time, on demand, according to the user’s schedule. Dedicated devices for dedicated media experiences. Converged devices for multiple media applications. Passivity rules (implication of natural state of rest). Interactivity rules (implication of natural motion).
  • 24. Quantum Consumption Any Device Any Content Any Location Any Time
  • 25. “ Linear channels are out the window. The goal is a seamless integration of all content sources – live, stored, on-demand and Internet – personalized down to the individual viewer.” - Sezmi Founder and CEO Buno Pati In Front of the Curve.™
  • 26. www.AskTDG.com Q & A In Front of the Curve.™ Michael Greeson President, Principal Analyst