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Motivation for Student Groups
Motivation for Student Groups
Motivation for Student Groups
Motivation for Student Groups
Motivation for Student Groups
Motivation for Student Groups
Motivation for Student Groups
Motivation for Student Groups
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Motivation for Student Groups

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Intended for college student groups and student employees.

Intended for college student groups and student employees.

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  • 1. MOTIVATION WHAT MOTIVATES ME?
  • 2. Understanding what motivates your staff (group) may be your single MOTIVATION most desirable skill. Motives are defined as needs, wants, drives, or impulses within an individual. Motives are directed by an individual’s goals, which may be conscious or subconscious. (Hersey and Blanchard, 1988).
  • 3. Two Categories of Motivation Intrinsic Extrinsic Motivators Motivators Desire Recognition Passion Money Value Achievement Service Power Approval Control
  • 4. What are your motivators? Desire Recognition Passion Money Value Achievement Service Power Approval Control
  • 5. ownership and involvement Delegate Responsibility Be specific. Do not assume that everyone “knows what Motivating through you are talking about”. Be straightforward. Do not be afraid to assign tasks. Do not assume that others will volunteer. Assess the groups’ strengths. The more closely you can “match” delegated tasks to members’ interests and strengths, the more likely the task will be completed. Assess time constraints. Take time limitations into account when delegating tasks and responsibilities. Delegating without allowing reasonable time can result in frustration and resentment.
  • 6. Recognize Achievement. Recognition and Awards Publically, privately, formally, informally, again and again. Motivating through Provide Rewards. When appropriate rewards are great motivator. Even candy can make someone come back to a meeting. Encourage Friendly Competition. For those that thrive on competition provide friendly opportunities that encourage both group cohesion and personal growth.
  • 7. Written Communication. Newsletters, notes, memos, facebook posting, bulletin Motivating through boards are great ways to promote interaction and sense of belonging. Communication Personal Contact. Get to know everyone in your group, take time to listen, learn and respond to the other members. When someone takes off right away after the meeting, they can be missing out on the best part. Ask For Other’s Opinions. When someone feels valued by a group they will continue to contribute. If your group interactions consist of 1 or 2 members talking to everyone, you will loose the others fast.
  • 8. Motivating through Growth Provide Training Opportunities. Even learning business office procedure can motivate certain group members. Stress topics that members can find value in. Go to Conferences/ Workshops. Workshops and conferences can do wonders for getting your group energized and on the same page. Team cohesion and bonding also happen when days are spent together. Share Information. Leaders of the group should share as much information as possible with the group members in order for them to learn and feel value.

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