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Webquest All Slides

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  • 1. Greek Mythology Quest Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for 9th Grade English Designed by Sara Ferrarese [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Photo Credit: Flickr.com: Dunechaser
  • 2. Introduction Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] You are a world renowned historian. A recent archaeological dig in Greece has uncovered a never before seen building. You have been asked to come to Greece and be one of the first people to enter this building. The archaeologists would like your expertise and opinions to help them discover the purpose and significance of the building. Photo Credit: flickr.com: Starbuck Powersurge
  • 3. The Task Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] At the end of this WebQuest you will need to type a paragraph explaining what you believe this newly discovered building to be, and what you think it’s importance was to the ancient people of Greece. You will turn this in for credit to prove you have completed all the objectives of the WebQuest. Title
  • 4. The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • Research important gods and goddesses in Greek mythology.
    • You will use the following links to conduct your research. You may want to make notes about the gods and goddess, especially their symbols and areas of influence.
    • Research Links:
    • Apollo
    • Artemis
    • Dionysus
    • Hades
    • Hera
    • Hermes
    • Poseidon
    • Zeus
    • 2. When you have finished your research and taken adequate notes, continue to the next process page.
    • Process Page 2
  • 5. The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] As soon as you reach the hotel in Greece where you are meeting the archaeologists, they rush across the lobby to greet you. You barely have time to put your bags in your room before you are whisked off to the dig site. Once you arrive, you are given a a hard hat and a flashlight before you and your archaeologist guides descend into the center of the newly uncovered building. As you shine your flashlight around, you realize that you are in a round room with only one door. This room is decorated with elaborate paintings of all the gods and goddesses on Mount Olympus. When you are finished inspecting the paintings, your guides lead you through the only door. The next room is much larger than the first, though it, too, is filled with paintings. There are two doors in this room. The one you came in through, and another one leading off in a different direction. The paintings depict a powerful looking god, who sits on a cloud and shoots lightning bolts from his fingers. The god worshipped in this room was obviously… (Click the correct answer) Poseidon Hades Zeus Ares Photo Credit: flickr.com: Dunechaser
  • 6. Yes, that is exactly who was worshipped here. You are sure of it. Now that you have gotten all the information you can from that room, your guides take you through the door to the next room. The next room is equally as beautiful as the first two. The paintings in this room depict a lovely goddess, often with peacocks or cows. Sometimes she is seen sitting on a throne next to the god from the previous room. You know immediately who she is. She is the goddess… (Click on the correct answer) Hestia Hera Artemis Demeter Photo Credit: flickr.com: Dunechaser
  • 7. Yes, there is no doubt about it. This room was intended for the worship of Hera, queen of Mount Olympus and wife of Zeus. Your guides exit the room, with you following. In the next room, you find the walls covered with paintings of great foaming seas, with a god rising up in the midst of the churning water, holding a trident. You see many paintings of ships being tossed about in the waves, and crashed on distant shores, demonstrating this god’s power over the sea. There is no doubt in your mind. This room can only be devoted to… (Click on the correct answer) Hermes Ares Hephaestus Poseidon Photo Credit: flickr.com: Dunechaser
  • 8. Yes, this room was definitely devoted to Poseidon, the god of the sea. As you enter the next room, you notice that the paintings are much darker in nature. This god is shown sitting on a throne of ebony, holding a scepter and a helmet. This god is not shown in the heavens or in the sea, but in dark places resembling caves or underground caverns. There is only one explanation. This god must be… (Click the correct answer) Hades Dionysus Ares Thanatos Photo Credit: flickr.com: Dunechaser
  • 9. Yes, it can only be Hades, ruler of the Underworld. You and your guides are all very uncomfortable in this room, so you quickly move forward into the next room. This next room contrasts sharply with the previous one. This room is filled with bright paintings. These paintings show a beautiful god playing the lyre. Obviously this must be the god… (Click on the correct answer) Hermes Ares Apollo Zeus Photo Credit: flickr.com: Dunechaser
  • 10. Yes, that room was most definitely devoted to Apollo. As you enter the next room, you find it is another dark room, though in the same way as the one devoted to Hades. This one seems more peaceful. The paintings in this room show a beautiful goddess, standing alone by the light of the moon, a bow and arrow in hand, hunting. This room is dominated by portrayals of this goddess in peaceful nighttime forests. This must be the goddess… (Click on the correct answer) Aphrodite Hestia Athena Artemis Photo Credit: flickr.com: Dunechaser
  • 11. Yes, that room was definitely intended for the worship of Artemis, goddess of the hunt. In the next room, you find paintings of a beautiful young god with a winged hat and winged shoes. That makes it very easy to determine what god this room is devoted to. Obviously the ancient Greeks must have used this room to worship… (Click on the correct answer) Hermes Dionysus Hephaestus Hades Photo Credit: flickr.com: Dunechaser
  • 12. Yes, that room was definitely devoted to Hermes, the messenger god. The next room is the most colorful and fascinating of them all. This room was filled with paintings of a merry god, always pictured with wine and grapes. Everyone in the paintings was dancing, drinking and celebrating. It was easy to recognize this god. He could only be… (Click on the correct answer) Zeus Hermes Poseidon Dionysus Photo Credit: flickr.com: Dunechaser
  • 13. Exactly! That room was devoted to Dionysus, the god of wine and celebration. That was the last room in the building. Now you and your guides walk back through all the rooms to the center room, where you climb back out. Now the archaeologists would like you to write up a one paragraph explanation telling what you think the building was, and how it would have been important to the ancient Greeks. To see the rubric for this assignment, click on this sentence.
  • 14. Beginning 1 Developing 2 Accomplished 3 Exemplary 4 Score Drawing Conclusions Student rarely drew appropriate conclusions from the information given. Student sometimes drew appropriate conclusions from the information given. Student usually drew appropriate conclusions from the information given. Student always drew appropriate conclusions from the information given. Justification of Conclusions Student rarely showed appropriate justification for conclusions. Student sometimes showed appropriate justification for conclusions. Student usually showed appropriate justification for conclusions. Student always showed appropriate justification for conclusions. Spelling and Grammar Work had frequent errors in spelling and grammar. Work had several errors in spelling and grammar. Work had a few minor errors in spelling and grammar. Work was free from errors in spelling and grammar.
  • 15. I’m sorry. That is incorrect. Double click to end this slideshow and try again.
  • 16. Evaluation Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Beginning 1 Developing 2 Accomplished 3 Exemplary 4 Score Drawing Conclusions Student rarely drew appropriate conclusions from the information given. Student sometimes drew appropriate conclusions from the information given. Student usually drew appropriate conclusions from the information given. Student always drew appropriate conclusions from the information given. Justification of Conclusions Student rarely showed appropriate justification for conclusions. Student sometimes showed appropriate justification for conclusions. Student usually showed appropriate justification for conclusions. Student always showed appropriate justification for conclusions. Spelling and Grammar Work had frequent errors in spelling and grammar. Work had several errors in spelling and grammar. Work had a few minor errors in spelling and grammar. Work was free from errors in spelling and grammar.
  • 17. Conclusion Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Now you have refreshed your memory of some of the many Greek gods and goddesses, and you have written a paragraph in which you drew conclusions about the building that was presented to you, and the significance of myth in the lives of the ancient Greeks.
  • 18. Credits & References Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Thank you to www.pantheon.org for all of your wonderful pages on Greek gods and goddesses. A huge thanks to Dunechaser on www.flickr.com for your wonderful pictures of Greek gods and goddesses made of Legos. And The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group for their template and training materials.
  • 19. Greek Mythology Quest (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for 9th Grade English Designed by Sara Ferrarese [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Photo Credit: flickr.com: Dunechaser
  • 20. Introduction (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This webquest was developed to supplement a unit on Homer’s The Odyssey , and to help students remember previous lessons in Greek mythology. This lesson helps students make connections between Greek mythology and it’s significance to the culture and lives of the people of ancient Greece . Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 21. Learners (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson is meant for 8 th or 9 th grade English students, but also crosses over into humanities, history, and social studies. Prior to completing this lesson, learners only need to know how to navigate through a powerpoint presentation, and how to make assumptions based on the given information. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 22. Curriculum Standards (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page English Standards addressed: STANDARD 5: Students read to locate, select, and make use of relevant information from a variety of media, reference, and technological sources. This teaches critical thinking and inference making as well. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 23. The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion 1. Research important gods and goddesses in Greek mythology. You will use the following links to conduct your research. You may want to make notes about the gods and goddess, especially their symbols and areas of influence. Research Links: Apollo Artemis Dionysus Hades Hera Hermes Poseidon Zeus 2. When you have finished your research and taken adequate notes, continue to the next process page. Page 2 As soon as you reach the hotel in Greece where you are meeting the archaeologists, they rush across the lobby to greet you. You barely have time to put your bags in your room before you are whisked off to the dig site. Once you arrive, you are given a a hard hat and a flashlight before you and your archaeologist guides descend into the center of the newly uncovered building. As you shine your flashlight around, you realize that you are in a round room with only one door. This room is decorated with elaborate paintings of all the gods and goddesses on Mount Olympus. When you are finished inspecting the paintings, your guides lead you through the only door. The next room is much larger than the first, though it, too, is filled with paintings. There are two doors in this room. The one you came in through, and another one leading off in a different direction. The paintings depict a powerful looking god, who sits on a cloud and shoots lightning bolts from his fingers. The god worshipped in this room was obviously… (Click the correct answer) Poseidon Hades Zeus Ares (The process continues in this quiz format, and spans several extra presentations so students cannot cheat.)
  • 24. Resources (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page All that is needed to implement this lesson in the classroom is a computer for every student, and a copy of all the powerpoint files on each computer. Only one teacher is needed for this, because it is more of an individual assignment. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 25. Evaluation (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Beginning 1 Developing 2 Accomplished 3 Exemplary 4 Score Drawing Conclusions Student rarely drew appropriate conclusions from the information given. Student sometimes drew appropriate conclusions from the information given. Student usually drew appropriate conclusions from the information given. Student always drew appropriate conclusions from the information given. Justification of Conclusions Student rarely showed appropriate justification for conclusions. Student sometimes showed appropriate justification for conclusions. Student usually showed appropriate justification for conclusions. Student always showed appropriate justification for conclusions. Spelling and Grammar Work had frequent errors in spelling and grammar. Work had several errors in spelling and grammar. Work had a few minor errors in spelling and grammar. Work was free from errors in spelling and grammar.
  • 26. Teacher Script (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
    • Answers:
    • Zeus
    • Hera
    • Poseidon
    • Hades
    • Apollo
    • Artemis
    • Hermes
    • Dionysus
  • 27. Conclusion (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page While this lesson will not teach Greek mythology on it’s own, it makes a fun supplement to Greek mythology lessons. It also helps students learn to make connections and inferences about cultures and their religious beliefs. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 28. Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Thank you to www.pantheon.org for all of your wonderful pages on Greek gods and goddesses. A huge thanks to Dunechaser on www.flickr.com for your wonderful pictures of Greek gods and goddesses made of Legos. And The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group for their template and training materials. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion

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