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M6 web quest_activity_sarah_adams
M6 web quest_activity_sarah_adams
M6 web quest_activity_sarah_adams
M6 web quest_activity_sarah_adams
M6 web quest_activity_sarah_adams
M6 web quest_activity_sarah_adams
M6 web quest_activity_sarah_adams
M6 web quest_activity_sarah_adams
M6 web quest_activity_sarah_adams
M6 web quest_activity_sarah_adams
M6 web quest_activity_sarah_adams
M6 web quest_activity_sarah_adams
M6 web quest_activity_sarah_adams
M6 web quest_activity_sarah_adams
M6 web quest_activity_sarah_adams
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M6 web quest_activity_sarah_adams

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  • 1. Working with Students with Special Needs M6- WebQuest Assistive Technology Activity Sarah Adams
  • 2. Overview <ul><li>Students with learning disabilities require a little more assistance in the classroom in order to learn. </li></ul><ul><li>Learning disabilities (LD) can range from a student having trouble in a certain educational area (examples: written and spoken language, reading, and math) </li></ul><ul><li>Or they could be more physical or mental; meaning the child has a hard time paying attention and/or sitting still (commonly referred to as ADHD or ADD). </li></ul><ul><li>More physical than this would be a student with a visual or auditory disability (He/she can not see or hear as well as his/her peers) </li></ul><ul><li>Students with disabilities are required to learn in a least restrictive environment, this means that under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act that any disabled child should have the opportunity to work in a classroom among non-disabled children as much as possible. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Have access to many things their classmates have and not be denied just because they have a disability. </li></ul></ul>
  • 3. Overview cont’d <ul><li>Teachers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use different resources in order to help the learning process with a child with special needs. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The use of assistive technology in the classroom can help children to learn better with their individual issues. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Parents </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Work with teachers and child outside of the classroom in order to help the child learn. </li></ul></ul>
  • 4. What is Assistive Technology? <ul><li>“ Any item, piece of equipment or product system, whether acquired commercially off the shelf, modified or customized, that is used to increase, maintain or improve the functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities.&amp;quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Quote from: http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~wilbur/access/assistive.html </li></ul><ul><li>Can range from something simple with very little technology being used or to the use of a very complex software program. </li></ul><ul><li>With the use of it, it can allow for the inclusion of a disabled child so that they can do the work that is required of them along with their classmates. </li></ul>
  • 5. Types of Assistive Technology <ul><li>No technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Like it alludes to, these are the ones that require no technology in order to be used (or very little technology) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Low technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Include devices that are electronic in nature, but do not include sophisticated computer components. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>High technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Includes complex and multifunctional technology that includes a computer and software of some kind. </li></ul></ul>
  • 6. Areas of Instruction in which Assistive Technology can be Used <ul><li>Organization </li></ul><ul><li>Note Taking </li></ul><ul><li>Writing </li></ul><ul><li>Reading </li></ul><ul><li>Math </li></ul>
  • 7. Organization <ul><li>No Technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teach students to organize thoughts by using flow charts to plot out their ideas </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Low Technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Outline function on a word processing program (i.e. Microsoft Word) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>High Technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use of complex graphic software in order to help students to plot out their thoughts by using different colors to represent each different group of ideas </li></ul></ul><ul><li>These solutions are good for students that have trouble getting their thoughts onto paper and those that struggle with the beginning of the writing process. </li></ul>
  • 8. Note Taking <ul><li>No Technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teacher provides fill in the blank work sheets for students to fill in during the lesson </li></ul></ul><ul><li>High Technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sending notes to students through email </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Videotaping class for students who can’t attend for long period of time due to a long term illness </li></ul></ul>
  • 9. Writing <ul><li>Students have the most trouble with the mechanics of writing (grammar, spelling and punctuation). However, students also have trouble with parts of the writing process or lack the motivation to write. </li></ul><ul><li>No/Low Technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Dictionaries and Thesaurus can help with grammar and spelling </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Word processing software </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Networked computers: allow for students to help each other with their writing skills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use of recorder to record the lesson and listen to it again later can be used by those who have trouble with their writing skills. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>High Technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use of Interactive Whiteboard (SmartBoard): students work together as a group to edit a piece of writing that is displayed </li></ul></ul>
  • 10. Reading <ul><li>No Technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Large print books/Braille books that can be used for both visually and auditory impaired </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Low Technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Audio books for the visually and auditory impaired </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Use of recordings that are specifically available for students who are blind or dyslexic </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Electronic books </li></ul></ul><ul><li>High Technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Text reading software </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>PDF Reading software </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Screen readers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Braille embosser: used to translate regular text into Braille </li></ul></ul>
  • 11. Math <ul><li>No Technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teacher created cheat sheets </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Study guides </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Low Technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use of large key calculators or talking calculators </li></ul></ul><ul><li>High Technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>On screen calculators can be used by the teacher to teach the lesson so students can see how the different functions on the calculator work (specifically for the scientific/graphing calculators) </li></ul></ul>
  • 12. Other Accommodations in the Classroom <ul><li>Accommodations are alterations in the presentation of a certain task in order to help a disabled child do the same assignment as their classmates. </li></ul><ul><li>There are many different types of accommodations that can be provided to a child depending on what type of learning disability they have. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Example #1: Students with an auditory problem can be provided with an audio tape and students with a visual problem can be provided with worksheets (and other assignments) that have larger print. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Example #2: Auditory impairments in the classroom can also be fixed with the use of ALDs (Assistive Listening Devices); Frequency Modulation (FM) system and Infrared system are just two of the several options that are available to be used in the classroom to help with hearing. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Example #3: Students with ADHD can be provided with frequent breaks during an assignment or a test </li></ul></ul>
  • 13. Other Accommodations cont’d <ul><li>Use of consumer electronic devices (ex: PDAs/cellphones, MP3 players- specifically I-pods) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>I-pods: different apps are available in order to help with the learning process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>PDAs/cellphones: record/playback lectures, look up spelling of words, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Hearing devices </li></ul>
  • 14. Conclusion <ul><li>Special needs children require a little more than a regular child in the classroom, but with the many resources available to teachers today (this includes resources that use no technology and those that use a lot) help with the learning process and allow for the child to participate in the classroom along with his/her classmates. </li></ul>
  • 15. Sources <ul><li>http://www.ldonline.org/article/Accommodations_for_Students_with_LD </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.essortment.com/all/commonlearning_rnmz.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://ericdigests.org/2003-1/assistive.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~wilbur/access/assistive.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/504faq.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.gpat.org/resources.aspx?PageReq=GPATImp </li></ul><ul><li>http://kidshealth.org/parent/positive/learning/iep.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://asha.org/public/hearing/treatment/assist_tech.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Least_Restrictive_Environment </li></ul>

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