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The New Smart Customers - How They Really Buy
 

The New Smart Customers - How They Really Buy

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How can we address this? It is not online or offline. Consumers gather information and buy their desired products and services through multiple channels. There is no unique or simple pattern for the ...

How can we address this? It is not online or offline. Consumers gather information and buy their desired products and services through multiple channels. There is no unique or simple pattern for the when and why.

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  • Presentation at the sixth EuroIA in Paris – 24. September 2010
  • In fact, it’s not even about the shortest distance anymore .
  • Simplistic customer purchase process You probably know these simple models of a customer purchase process: Customer views TV or print ad Goes to the store Compares the options Chooses the best option Buys the item And is then hopefully the consumer is aligned with the brand. We argue that it’s not that easy any more (and probably never was).
  • More realistic customer purchase process Today customers search for reviews in Google watch recommendations on YouTube use price comparison engines discuss with their friends on Facebook test it in the store before they finally buy the product in the online shop or in-store Afterwards many provide their feedback on your products, your service and your brand in multiple channels
  • Situations Customers get in touch with you in various situations Be it relaxed at home or in a hurry while travelling The may live in a big city or in a small town where the next retailer is miles away
  • The purchase path depends on different factors The Buyer People have different preferences, habits, attitudes and personalities, e.g. Decision style: cognitive (consider the purchase thoroughly, make pro-con-lists) vs. emotional (rely on gut feelings, buy impulsively) Preferences: e.g. attitude towards and social situations (e.g. being in a crowd, line-ups) Gender Age and computer literacy (2010 in Germany: 100% of the age group 14-19 are online compared to 30% of the age group 60+, source: ARD/ZDF-Online Study 2010) The Product Everyday products (e.g. milk): are bought habitually, automatically, not considered every time you purchase Clothes: are bought more visually-driven, it is about looks and feeling comfortable Electronics: are bought more cognitive-driven, it is about features, usability etc. The Circumstances and Culture Distance to buy certain products in-store (e.g. 45 min drive to the city) Availability of internet (e.g. slow internet connections in India, not everyone owns a computer) Shopping infrastructure (missing online stores of the major players in India) Ease of arranging delivery times / sending items back (e.g. people that are working long hours) Urgency for buying the product (e.g. you need to have the product by tomorrow)
  • Spontaneous Purchase buying something out of mere pleasure, without having realized wanting to have such a thing before Considered purchase where the buyer spends some thoughts on what to buy and does some research beforehand
  • Considered purchase: Initial Criteria Example: Buying a camera
  • Considered purchase: Research Example: Buying a camera Research visited different stores – small and big chain spoken to staff tested in-store read consumer magazines spent 10 hours online: price comparison, manufacturer websites, product details online borrowed a camera and tested it blogged about the experiences
  • Considered purchase: Decision and Purchase Example: Buying a camera Decision and Purchase bought a bridge-camera meets all the initial criteria (good lens, fixed lens, wide focal length range, manual shutter speed and aperture, works with rechargeable and non-rechargeable batteries) also meets some criteria that emerged during the research process (inclinable display, RAW format) good price
  • Considered purchase: After-purchase Example: Buying a camera After-purchase Used and evaluated the camera very satisfied overall lens cap produced scratches on the lens recommended the camera to others never written a review or rated the camera
  • Five stages of the purchase process Idea: Identification of a need Research: Gathering of the information that allows the buyer to make a decision Decision: Decide for a certain product and purchase channel Purchase: Buy the product online, mobile or in a physical store After-purchase: Evaluate the product, share the opinion with other consumers, the reseller, the manufacturer and adapt brand perception
  • Forrester Study: European Technographics® Benchmark Survey , Surveyed 25,932 respondents (age 16 and older) in the eight markets of France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Sweden, and the UK Questions about their shopping behavior for research-decision and purchase phase Results: For 47% of purchases the consumers stayed offline for the entire process For 17% of purchases the consumers stayed online for the entire process For 36% of purchases the consumers hopped channels Some started to research online, then went to a store, where they finally bought Some went back home to buy in the internet. Some started offline, then did some research on the internet, but finally bought in a store For cross-channel consumers it is important to create seamless transitions between channels
  • Sapient-Study Objective Existing research available online mostly describes how consumers behave In addition we wanted to find out why people behave that way Sapient-Study 447 respondents Countries: United States & Canada (n=160), India (n=152), Europe (n=123), Others (n=12) High smartphone penetration of 72% (normal population ca. 20%) Young sample (86% between 20 and 40 years) High internet usage (40 online hours per week on average compared to 13 hours in the normal population) Survey structure Part 1: general information (age, gender, country, education) shopping infrastructure (distance to buy certain products like bread and clothes) general online and mobile behavior (services used e.g. email, search engines, news, blogs, forums, homebanking, social platforms, instant messaging, videos, podcasts, microblogging Part 2: Detailed questions on the purchase process of a product or service they purchased recently Addressing the phases idea, research, decision, purchase and after-sales Part 3 Reasons to go online or visit a store
  • Results Most people have the impression, that the idea was triggered intrinsically (“I wanted it.” and “I needed it.”) Very few said that they actually responded to extrinsic events (online or offline advertisement, product in a shop window, saw someone else) Interpretation This is a subjective impression. Participant may not be aware how they are influenced by extrinsic triggers. Advertisement influences more what people buy, not so much that they buy something.
  • Results Participants reported to have rather specific ideas about products (80% rather specific) Interpretation / Implication Specificity of product idea influences the research process: It is not so much about browsing and being inspired, more about finding something specific
  • The purchase process: Research Questions How exactly do people gather information in order to inform their decision? Do they do different gather information differently for different product categories? Procedure We asked the participants to think about a purchase they recently made We asked them which product they bought We clustered all the answers in product categories
  • Product types Most products fell into the categories: Travel (flight bookings, train ticket or hotels) Consumer electronics (cameras, lcd tvs, headphones) Computer hard and software (mostly laptops) Mobile phones Media and leisure (mostly books or small sports equipment) Clothing and footwear Only a few products fell in the last categories: Beauty & health Furniture Food
  • Information gathering Then we gave them a list of things you can do before you buy The list contained online activities, offline activities and channel neutral activities For each activity we asked them whether they did this and how helpful this was Offline activities (red) I went to a store and looked at products. I went to a store and spoke to the sales personnel. I spoke to people I know. I read trade magazines / consumer magazines. I borrowed products from others and tested them. I had a look at product ratings. Online activities (blue) I browsed the manufacturers websites. I consulted people in forums / chats. I read online test results. I used price comparison engines. I read online reviews. I ordered the products online and tested them. I called the hotline. Channel neutral activities (grey) I looked at the descriptions of resellers. I compared the descriptions.
  • Information gathering for computer hard- and software Then we gave them a list of things you can do before you buy The list contained online activities, offline activities and channel neutral activities For each activity we asked them whether they did this and how helpful it was Color coding Red: offline activities Blue: online activities Grey: channel neutral activities Shade coding Dark shade: “I did this and it was very helpful” Medium shade: “I did this and it was somewhat helpful” Light shade: “I did this, but it was not at all helpful” Results People reported to have a strong preference for online research Most respondents find other peoples’ opinions very helpful (e.g. online reviews and rating) They also tend to look at the website of the manufacturer and read the descriptions “ Looked at products in-store” is only on rank 6 “ Advise from staff” is only on rank 9, compared to other sources this is the source most people ranked “not helpful” The pattern looks similar for consumer electronics Interpretation Buying computer hard- and software is about best features and best user experience This can be researched far better online than in-store, since staff is mostly not able to give valuable insights
  • Results for clothes and footwear “ Looked at products in-store” is only on rank 1 (ca 55% rate it as “very helpful”) Other information sources are far behind (next is “manufacturer websites” which is rated as “very helpful by approximately 25%) Interpretation Buying clothes is about good looks, comfortable fit and decided with gut feeling
  • Results for travel Most people reported to use price comparison engines (>50%) First 7 sources are online / channel neutral, “I call the hotline” is only on rank 8. Interpretation For flight and train tickets the differences in what you get are not so big, but the differences between prices can be huge When booking hotels, people depend on descriptions and other people’s opinions Buying travel products is about getting the same thing for a better price Travel is the category that is bough online the most
  • Check product availability online 45% have checked the availability online before going to the store Consumer Commerce Barometer Survey by IAB Europe, TNS Infratest and Google surveyed people in 42 countries – about 2000 people per country. Results are available online: consumerbarometer.eu
  • Check product availability online 23% report that they have taken printouts of product information to the store.
  • Retrieve information with the mobile phone in-store 80% of smart-phone owners in our survey have used their mobile phone in-store to retrieve product information
  • Taking photos in-store People also reported to have taken photos in fitting rooms to continue their research online later, e.g. because a product was not available in their size / color or because they wanted to get a better price
  • Taking photos in-store People also take photographs of themselves in order to get other people’s opinions.
  • The purchase process: Decision Questions How easy is it for people to make a decision? What is crucial for them in order to decide for a certain product?
  • Ease of decision Questions The decision for a products seams to be easier for products where people tend to decide with your gut feelings (e.g. clothing) The decision seem to be more difficult for products where people tend to decide cognitively (e.g. computer hard- and software), or intensely compare prices (e.g. travel)
  • Most helpful for making a decision Offline inputs Regarding the offline sources the respondents reported that it was most helpful to see and test the products to get recommendations from friends Online inputs Regarding the online sources the respondents reported that it was most helpful to get an overview on what is available to get other people’s opinions (reviews and ratings) Channel neutral inputs Regarding the channel neutral sources the respondents reported that it was most helpful to buy a certain brand that they knew and trusted Interpretation In order to make it easy for people to decide it is necessary to combine the strength of online and offline sources together with a strong brand
  • The purchase process: Purchase Questions Why do people purchase online, offline or mobile? What do they like about this purchase channel, what do they consider to be a disadvantage?
  • Price comparison 90% of respondents in the Sapient internal study report to already have used price comparison engines
  • Product delivery 24% find arranging suitable delivery times difficult 42% find it in-convenient to return items 38% think that shipping cost is too expensive anyway Impact Online retailers should think about allowing multiple ways for the customer to receive their products
  • Product delivery 23 % have already reserved an item online and picked it up in-store
  • The purchase process: After-purchase Question How many people actively share their opinions online?
  • Summary People have the impression that their purchase mostly was intrinsically triggered To make them stay their information needs have to be addressed These needs differ for different product groups Bring the best of the online- and offline together – then you might make it easier for your customers to decide for your product For purchasing a product through channel the key variables are: Price, trust and convenient delivery. Customers are happy to share their thoughts: Listen to their feedback thoroughly.
  • Golden circle Concentrate on the why when creating your offerings People don’t buy what we do, they buy why we do it Golden Circle by Simon Sinek “ By why, we mean: Why does your organization exist? Why do you get out of bed every morning? And why should anyone care?” This is what makes a brand, product or service relevant for a customer TED presentation http://www.startwithwhy.com/#video1
  • To address this complexity we need appropriate tool
  • Know you systems and processes It is necessary that you know your systems and processes Create a stable, high-performing and yet flexible foundation before looking at additional offerings Departments are often separated for different channels > Silo thinking Align Content Availability of your information Structure and taxonomies Billing process etc. Beware of just adding features Clean up first You may end up in maintenance hell
  • A great team It is essential to know that a great customer experience can’t be created when not all relevant stakeholders are involved and gave their buy in A cool website with innovative social media integration can fail quite fast when the customer get’s the wrong product delivered and reports that on YouTube Know what can be achieved in the retail stores What if you are working with mix of own flagship stores, franchisers and retailers? You probably want to hit the market soon. – Align on what is possible in the given time in an early stage – A ‘small tweak’ to get this small additional metadata in your product description page may take 2 month to roll it out in your back end.
  • Know your customers Tailor your offerings to their interests, behaviors and situations What is successful for competitor X may fail for you if your customers behave different or have other interests
  • Well know sources Customer segmentation Field studies (e.g. let your online stakeholders work in the offline store and vice versa) Interviews Surveys Focus Groups Testing (e.g. Multivariate testing)
  • Web analytics Web analytics will help you to understand the actual behavior of your customers Know where they come from Track the buzz around your brand, products or services on Twitter Check if your conversion funnel works well It’s difficult to handle cross channel but there are some workarounds – later more on this topic
  • Now that you have the data you should model the experience of your customers
  • Personas Extend your Personas, they should contain: Their online behavior Their touchpoints – This could be local retailers, call center or your Facebook page – They will always leave their marks and shape the brand experience The equipment normally used by the Persona
  • Customer journeys For example this customer journey from Buckminster Not a high glossy deliverable but a great example of the influence and gravity of different touchpoints on the purchase flow of a customer In this case someone’s wife is booking a travel: Note: Search in the Google galaxy, then a disruption by a TV show in the memory nebula
  • More deliverables And there several other deliverables you can use, e.g. Map current and future experience of your customer to the purchase process. This should also be extended with the most likely used channels or touchpoints of your customer Create a Mental Model from the data of your interviews to identify gaps (Indi Young) Map your current offerings with the interest and ideas of your customers These deliverables are an important basis for discussions and alignment with and between the stakeholders
  • Let’s have a look at some ideas and examples
  • Be honest with your customer You don’t have the control over all the channels anymore Your customers communicate and research on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and blogs etc. And they check rating sites where your products are discussed Earn trust
  • Shared customer experience For example Juicystar01 has nearly 500 thousand subscribers and over 25 million channel views on YouTube She just shows her results of their newest shopping tour on YouTube in short videos – A user generated product test channel Customers provide their opinion on your products to a wide audience And they ask for opinions of others
  • Integrate the user Talbots.com addresses this by integrating user generated content on their website Users provide stories on the products and situations in their life Helpful: Opinion of relevant others Won Best in Class award for eCommerce @ interactive media awards 2010 Q2
  • Share happiness Awarded ice ‘vending’ machine for Heart brand (maybe better known as Wall’s or Langnese in local markets) Primary aim of this machine is not to sell a product directly Smile and you get an ice cream for free ;-) Probably not the best way to make money with this machine But very effective to create happy customers that share there experience with your brand on Facebook and among their friends
  • This is a music video This is a music video for the spring summer collection of Diesel It is also the entry point for the online shop Hovering on the people reveals interactive elements. Clicking on those opens a preview of the according item. Would be great if this would work completely integrated YouTube. But provides a good way to use the same content to link to the online shop without a break in the story. http://www.diesel.com/ahundredlovers/ Created by anomaly and stink digital
  • Put it in the right place Future vision by Notion Design Interactive experience on a device that suites best the customer’s current situation. Overlay on given content Entry points to online store or additional information
  • Extend your offline store E.g. a bookstore Create an online presence of an offline store. This can be achieved with a white label solution with branding of the local retailer These solutions that use the same system for customer’s online purchase and reseller’s order in store and just differ in CSS and featured products. Can be used at home or as self service kiosk in store. Online site provides additional information. E.g. on a special topic of the book seller. Recommendations and reviews by a renown and trusted expert Provide local activities to tie the customer to your store. (e.g. lectures) - Make him return not only because of the content he can purchase - He could do that also at Amazon
  • Your online team This could be your online team It’s important for your staff to know both worlds Use your staff as direct feedback channel to your online self service system Offline staff as Online Chat Partner Online stakeholders to work in retail store Online Kiosk to be used by your Staff and customers Customer often knows more about your products than your staff. Train them to use this system > Same information as customer has at home
  • Intelligent signage A short user journey: A customer walks by the store front She discovers an interactive ‘window’ with product information on featured products – 24 hours a day / 7 days a week She looks at some products and finally enters the store
  • Interactive mirror A short user journey (continued): She finds a jacket and has a look at herself in a mirror She swipes the badge of the jacket on the mirror and get‘s information on the item and is offered additional combinations with other items She tries one of the suggested trousers. Unfortunately it is too big but in the Online store the correct size is available She puts the trouser in her virtual shopping basket to the other items
  • Mood box A short user journey (continued): In the changing room she is provided with different ambiences She finds herself immediately transferred into her next hiking trip in the mountains
  • Augment your information www.taschenkaufhaus.de What items fit in this bag? Not only pure measurements Bag in context with a person’s silhouette – See size relations
  • Provide contextual tools Ionos: Mobile app for iPhone and Blackberry Focus on a special context Flight status + real-time change alerts Gate information + Maps Security wait times Parking lot availability Ground transportation options Concessionaire listings + user ratings Baggage claim location Local weather conditions
  • Web analytics It’s difficult to track Online-to-Offline conversion Vouchers available online to bring customers in the store A cup of coffee with some cookies for free are an incentive to hand out QR code Provide Unique QR code on a voucher (so you know what website the customer visited) Use personalized URLs QR code on Item detail page of an online shop > Create a bookmark on the mobile > Reveal the information in a store
  • Smart Targeting by SDL tridion Matches search terms used by visitors to display relevant results Knows where your visitors come from – be it Google, Facebook, Twitter, your search marketing campaigns or affiliate websites Enables you to create an intelligent and dynamic CMS

The New Smart Customers - How They Really Buy The New Smart Customers - How They Really Buy Presentation Transcript

  • The New Smart Customers http://www.flickr.com/photos/tao_zhyn/2450284882/
  • THE NEW SMART CUSTOMERS
  • THERE ARE MILLIONS
  • AND THEY ARE ALL DIFFERENT http://ken-jennings.com/blog/?m=200809
  • THE SHORTEST DISTANCE BETWEEN TWO POINTS IS NO LONGER A STRAIGHT LINE.
  • What used to be this….
  • Is now this
  • Situations Customers get in touch with brands in various situations – be it relaxed at home or in a hurry while traveling. They may live in a big city or in a small town where the next retailer is miles away.
  • How customers really buy
  • The purchase path depends on different factors PRODUCT personality preferences habits attitudes everyday products information-intense products look-and-feel products urgency to buy the product shopping infrastructure CULTURE
  • Spontaneous purchase http://www.flickr.com/photos/37504045@N00/237947864 There are different ways to shop for products. Sometimes we buy spontaneously, out of mere pleasure, not having realized that we wanted to have such a thing before. Sometimes we consider purchases more deeply: During the considered purchase we spend some thoughts on what to buy and we do some research beforehand.
  • Considered purchase: criteria
    • My new camera:
    • easy to carry around
    • takes great photos
    • telephoto and wide-angle lens
    • manual shutter speed and aperture
    • rechargeable, but also works with normal batteries
  • Research process
    • visited small stores and big chain retailers
    • spoke to staff and tested in-store
    • read consumer magazines
    • spent 10 hours online: price comparison, manufacturer websites, product details online
    • borrowed a camera and tested it
    • blogged about the experiences
  • Decision & purchase
  • After-purchase
    • Used and evaluated the camera
    • Recommended the camera to others online or in real life
    • Stayed in touch with the brand and the retailer
  • The purchase process
  • Purchase paths Forrester 2009, Depicting European Shoppers’ Complex Purchasing Decision Path
  • The purchase process: Idea http://www.flickr.com/photos/kubina/1497679352/
  • Need identification How did you get the idea for the purchase? SapientNitro online survey August 2010
  • Specificity of product vision SapientNitro online survey August 2010 How specific was your initial idea of the product in your opinion?
    • My criteria:
    • easy to carry around
    • takes great photos
    • telephoto and wide-angel lens
    • manual shutter speed and aperture
    • rechargeable, but works also with normal batteries
    • My criteria:
    • a good camera
  • The purchase process: Research http://www.flickr.com/photos/andercismo/2349098787/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • Product types Consumer electronics Travel Beauty, cosmetics and health Food Clothing and footwear Mobile phone or accessories Furniture Media and leisure Computer hard- & software
  • Information gathering SapientNitro online survey August 2010
  • Computer hard- and software SapientNitro online survey August 2010 It is about information very helpful a little helpful not helpful Offline Online Channel neutral
  • Clothes and footwear SapientNitro online survey August 2010 It is about look and feel very helpful a little helpful not helpful Offline Online Channel neutral
  • Travel SapientNitro online survey August 2010 It is about price very helpful a little helpful not helpful Offline Online Channel neutral
  • More online information gathering I searched department stores online to see where I could find the same boots for the best price. (Bought Frye Boots.) I watched for e-mail deals from airlines, specifically spirit air. (Bought a travel.) I emailed the reseller asking for further detail on the product. (Bought herb pots.) Browsed the Dell Outlet store and signed up for their offers program. (Bought a laptop.) I compared which websites had free shipping . (Bought a stand for gardening equipment.) I looked at different aggregators websites (Expedia and Opodo). Their user experience is different and it gave me information to refine my results. (Bought flight London-Sydney.) I watched the product and similar products on eBay auctions to compare price difference for new vs. used products (Bought a Therm-A-Rest camping matress.) Video reviews on Youtube is super helpful. (Bought printer/scanner/copier.) What else did you do to be able to make your decision?
  • More offline information gathering Open Question in SapientNitro online survey August 2010 I created a list of all my options - prices, dates, places covered and prioritised them. (Bought a holiday to Jordan.) I also photographed the products and scanned the barcodes to locate pricing on the web that could beat the physical store. (Bought socks.) I got home demos from manufacturers (Bought home water purifier system.) Watched television shows dedicated to gadgets and mobile phones. (Bought an HTC Desire.) What else did you do to be able to make your decision?
  • 45% SapientNitro online survey August 2010 Consumer Commerce Barometer 2010 of respondents to the Consumer Commerce Barometer study sometimes check availability online before going to the store.
  • Consumer Commerce Barometer 2010 of respondents to the Consumer Commerce Barometer study have taken printouts of product information to the store. 23%
  • 80% SapientNitro online survey August 2010 of smart-phone owners in our survey have used their mobile phone in-store to retrieve product information.
  • Dark figure SapientNitro online survey August 2010 http://lh3.ggpht.com/_eN9tzgso-m0/S3k81g8DNQI/AAAAAAAAIpY/fwN9hLEpEaY/s720/F.P.HoseNeu3.JPG Some respondents also reported to have taken photos in fitting rooms to continue their research online later.
  • Dark figure http://lealoves.blogspot.com/2008/07/akute-shoppingunlust.html On the internet consumers also blog their pictures to share their experiences and get other people’s opinions.
  • The purchase process: Decision http://farm1.static.flickr.com/172/378441879_621a7c7782_z.jpg?zz=1
  • Ease of decision: Products easy to decide difficult to decide so so
  • Most helpful for making a decision In-store demo Advice from store staff Calling customer care. Consumer magazines Personal recommendations and advice from friends and family To see and test the product Chats and Forums Reviews and Ratings Price comparison engines Detailed product information Product comparison Good pictures from multiple perspectives. Demo videos Trust in the brand
  • The purchase process: Purchase http://www.flickr.com/photos/srs0001/4562512283/
  • Reason for purchase channel Open Question in SapientNitro online survey August 2010 The best price. I could see and test the product. Online Offline Great assistance by staff. No delivery times, I don’t have to wait. It was the easiest. It was the closest. I had a voucher. I got a discount. In India: So I know what I get. Ease of delivery. No pressure by sales people. It was on sale. It was not available in-store. Avoided the lineups. More choice. I had a voucher. 24 / 7
  • 90% SapientNitro online survey August 2010 SapientNitro online survey August 2010 of respondents in the Sapient internal study report that they have already used price comparison engines.
  • Consumer Commerce Barometer 2010 24% find arranging suitable delivery times difficult. 42% find returning items inconvenient. 38% think that shipping cost is too expensive. https://www.dpd.com/de/content/download/763/7406/image/DPD_Bildmotiv_Zustellung_2C_02.jpg
  • Consumer Commerce Barometer 2010 23% http://www.flickr.com/photos/brackch/4351273998/ have already reserved an item online and picked it up in-store.
  • The purchase process: After-purchase http://www.flickr.com/photos/sambhusankar/4218337610/
  • After purchase Open Question in SapientNitro online survey August 2010 Have you ever done one of the following… ?
  • The purchase process: Lessons learned The right formula for every product – be it information, mood, look & feel or ratings Intrinsic triggers. All you need to do is make them stay! Bring the information of both worlds together to enable decision making Trust. Good prices. Fast and flexible delivery. Engage your customers and make them help you.
  • How can we address this?
  • CREATE RELEVANCE
  • Why? How? What? Golden circle by Simon Sinek
  • Toolbox http://www.flickr.com/photos/ctreadway/3607458841/
  • KNOW YOUR SYSTEM AND PROCESSES
  • A great team
  • KNOW YOUR CUSTOMERS
  • Well known sources Field studies Customer segmentation Interviews Surveys Focus Groups Testing
  • Web analytics Web analytics helps you to understand the behavior of your customers: Know where they come from, track the buzz around your brand, products or services on Twitter, check if your conversion funnel works well.
  • MODEL THE EXPERIENCE
  • Personas Extend your Personas: Think about their online behavior and their touchpoints with your brand: This could be local retailers, the call center or your Facebook page – they will always leave their marks and shape the brand experience.
  • Customer journeys Buckminster.be
  • More deliverables Service Blueprint Touchpoints Matrix Mental Model Experience Map
  • Show time http://www.flickr.com/photos/st3f4n/2769915203/
  • BE HONEST
  • Shared customer experience Juicystar01 has nearly 500,000 subscribers and over 25 million channel views on YouTube. She presents the results of her latest shopping tour on YouTube in short videos – a user generated product test channel.
  • Integrate the user Talbots.com integrates user generated content on their website: Users provide stories on the products and situations in their life Won Best in Class award for eCommerce @ interactive media awards 2010 Q2.
  • IT’S ABOUT CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE
  • Share happiness Award-winning ice ‘vending’ machine for Heart brand (better known as Wall’s or Langnese in local markets): Smile and you get an ice cream for free! Probably not the best way to make money, but very effective to create happy customers who share their experiences with your brand on Facebook and among their friends.
  • CONNECT THE CHANNELS
  • This is a music video http://www.diesel.com/ahundredlovers/ Music video for the spring summer collection of Diesel and also the entry point for the online shop. Hovering on the people reveals interactive elements. Clicking on those opens a preview of the respective item. Created by Anomaly and Stink Digital
  • Put it in the right place http://www.designbynotion.com/metamirror-next-generation-tv/ Future vision by Notion Design Interactive experience on a device that suits best the customer’s current situation.
  • Extend your offline store http://www.flickr.com/photos/macinate/2016365041/ Create an online presence of an offline store. This can be achieved by creating a white label solution that is later branded by the local retailer. The solution can be used online or as self service kiosk in store. In contrast to pure online shops provide additional information, e.g. on your special focus. Your online recommendations and reviews will be experienced as coming from a renowned and trusted expert your clientele knows from real life. Furthermore provide local activities to tie the customer to your store (e.g. readings). Make him return not only because of the content he can purchase - he could do that also at Amazon.
  • Your online team http://www.flickr.com/photos/bike/3983843569/ This could be your online team. It’s important for your staff to know both worlds. Use your staff as a direct feedback channel to your online self service system.
  • IN STORE EXPERIENCE
  • Intelligent signage © 2010 SapientNitro and Designaffairs A short user journey A customer walks by the store front and discovers an interactive ‘window’ with product information on featured products – 24 hours a day / 7 days a week.
  • Interactive mirror © 2010 SapientNitro and Designaffairs A short user journey (continued) She finds a jacket and has a look at herself in a mirror. She swipes the badge of the jacket on the mirror and gets information on the item and on related articles. She tries on one of the suggested trousers. Unfortunately it is too big but the correct size is available in the online store. She adds the trousers to her virtual shopping basket.
  • Mood box © 2010 SapientNitro and Designaffairs A short user journey (continued) In the changing room she is provided with different ambiences. She finds herself immediately transferred into her next hiking trip in the mountains.
  • CONTEXT IS KING
  • Augment your information http://www.taschenkaufhaus.de/ Which items fit in this bag? taschenkaufhaus.de not only shows the measurements of the bag but also views from different angles and the bag in context with a person’s silhouette, so the customer can understand the size relations.
  • Provide contextual tools Ionos: Mobile app for iPhone and Blackberry Ionos’ Mobile app for iPhone and Blackberry focuses on the special context of a person at an airport. The user can retrieve information that is relevant in this situation, such as flight status and real-time change alerts, parking lot availability, gate information and maps, security waiting times and concessionaire listings (including user ratings). The user can also retrieve information on ground transportation options, baggage claim locations and local weather conditions, which become relevant after arriving at the destination.
  • TRACK CONVERSION
  • Web analytics http://www.flickr.com/photos/arcadiaphotographicuk/4883308302/ Vouchers available online bring your customers into the store and allow you to track online-to-offline conversion: A unique QR code on the detail page of a certain product can be saved as a bookmark. Revealed in store the customer gets a free cup of coffee with some cookies in return – and you know what website the customer visited at home that made him come here.
  • Smart targeting http://www.flickr.com/photos/davepearson/537557306/ Smart Targeting by SDL Tridion matches search terms used by visitors to display relevant results. Thus you know where your visitors come from – be it Google, Facebook, Twitter, your search marketing campaigns or affiliate websites – and enables you to create an intelligent and dynamic CMS.
  • Wrap up
  • Wrap up Know your system and processes Know your customers and their current situation Focus on the why and create relevance for the customer Align your information and offerings Connect the channels and track the paths Create a connected customer brand experience Know their needs in each phase of the purchase process
  • Sources and recommendations
    • Books
      • Underhill, P. (2008). Why we buy: The science of shopping. Simon & Schuster.
      • Schwartz, B. (2005). The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less. Harper Perennial.
    • Reports and studies
      • Fehrenbach, C. & Rösgen, A. (2010). How the customer really buys. Sapient internal online survey on consumer behavior (internal resource).
      • Camus, L., Freeman Evans, P., Klevchuk, O. & McGowan, B. (2009). Depicting European shoppers' complex purchasing decision path. Forrester.
      • Freeman Evans, P., Camus, L. & McGowan, B. (2010). Trends 2010: European retail eBusiness and channel strategy. Forrester.
    • Online resources
      • Consumer Commerce Barometer: consumerbarometer.eu
      • Sinek, S. (2010). The Golden Circle TED presentation: http://www.startwithwhy.com/#video1
  • Carmen Fehrenbach Information Architect Psychologist Focus on Media Psychology Axel Rösgen Sr. Information Architect Industrial Designer Focus on Computational Design
  • THANK YOU! www.sapientnitro.com Twitter: @sapientnitro facebook.com/sapientnitro [email_address] [email_address]