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The future of transportation maintenance
 

The future of transportation maintenance

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An analysis of International Air Transport Association (IATA) delay codes shows that airline-controlled processes, such as maintenance, ground handling, and supply chain, are the leading cause of late ...

An analysis of International Air Transport Association (IATA) delay codes shows that airline-controlled processes, such as maintenance, ground handling, and supply chain, are the leading cause of late flights.

Today, maintenance orders are run in overnight batches on decades-old IT systems. That’s tolerable for routine maintenance but does little to address the unexpected— such as an unforeseen engine fault. To improve response time, airlines must gather the right data, preferably in real time.

A new kind of data analysis could underpin new maintenance practices that save millions and improve customer satisfaction:

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    The future of transportation maintenance The future of transportation maintenance Presentation Transcript

    • NO. 11E-Book SAP Center for Business Insight |Brief |Q&A |Case Study |Inquiry |E-Book The Future of Transportation Maintenance
    • The Future of Transportation Maintenance2 NO. 11©2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company.All rights reserved. Airline-related (maintenance, supply chain, operations, ground handling) Air traffic & flight control Weather Miscellaneous Airport operations (non-airline or cross-airline) Airport security 42% 33% 11% 6% 5% 3% An analysis of International Air Transport Association (IATA) delay codes shows that airline-controlled processes, such as maintenance, ground handling, and supply chain, are the leading cause of late flights. Maintenance Is a Major Contributor to Delays Excerpted from: Flying Blind
    • The Future of Transportation Maintenance3 NO. 11©2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company.All rights reserved. Why Airlines Need to Keep Planes in the Air The newest jumbo jet Average planes in a major airline fleet Optimal airtime for long-range planes Cost per hour of downtime per plane 200 $10K18HOURS Excerpted from: Flying Blind $200M –$390M
    • The Future of Transportation Maintenance4 NO. 11©2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company.All rights reserved. To Improve Maintenance, Airlines Must Gather the Right Data DATA SOURCES INCLUDE: Today, maintenance orders are run in overnight batches on decades-old IT systems. That’s tolerable for routine maintenance but does little to address the unexpected— such as an unforeseen engine fault. To improve response time, airlines must gather the right data, preferably in real time. Airplanes Airlines Aircraft manufacturers External maintenance providers Regulators Spare-parts suppliers Source: The Next Revolution in Transportation: Predictive Maintenance
    • The Future of Transportation Maintenance5 NO. 11©2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company.All rights reserved. The Holy Grail: Predictive Maintenance Michael Denis, Vice President of Customer Engagement at InfoTrust Group WE DON’T KNOW WHAT WE COULD DISCOVER IF WE MASHED UP ALL THESE SOURCES OF LATENT AND REAL-TIME DATA. THERE’S HUGE POTENTIAL IN INCREASING THE REVENUE-GENERATING CAPABILITY OF PLANES. ” “ Source: Q&A: Holding Pattern
    • The Future of Transportation Maintenance6 NO. 11©2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company.All rights reserved. Predictive maintenance If airlines had visibility across the ecosystem of maintenance participants, they could build deep data stores on part lifespan, enabling them to schedule maintenance before a part fails. Proactive crew response If crews received alerts when a part was failing during a flight, they could have the necessary experts and parts ready when the plane lands instead of waiting until performing a check on the ground. Opportunistic maintenance scheduling If a maintenance engineer has to open the wing to deal with an unexpected fault, he could proactively perform upcoming routine maintenance whilehe’s in there. Dynamic maintenance packaging Instead of taking a plane out of service for 10 days for maintenance, crews could make 10 overnight checks when theplaneisonthegroundanyway. Exact fuel requirements Crews could give a plane exactly the fuel it needs rather than weighing it down with an extra buffer that is based solely on a lack of information. A new kind of data analysis could underpin new maintenance practices that save millions and improve customer satisfaction: Next-Generation Maintenance: Dynamic, Opportunistic, and Real Time TO LEARN MORE ABOUT HOWAIRLINES COULD IMPROVE MAINTENANCE OPERATIONS, READ OUR IN-DEPTH REPORT, FLYING BLIND. The SAP Center for Business Insight is an organization that discovers and develops new research-­based thinking to address the challenges of business and technology executives. 1 2 43 5
    • © 2013 SAPAG or an SAP affiliate company.All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or for any purpose without the express permission of SAP AG. The information contained herein may be changed without prior notice. Some software products marketed by SAP AG and its distributors contain proprietary software components of other software vendors. National product specifications may vary. These materials are provided by SAP AG and its affiliated companies (“SAP Group”) for informational purposes only, without representation or warranty of any kind, and SAP Group shall not be liable for errors or omissions with respect to the materials. The only warranties for SAP Group products and services are those that are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services, if any. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty. SAP and other SAP products and services mentioned herein as well as their respective logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of SAP AG in Germany and other countries.Please see http://www.sap.com/corporate-en/legal/copyright/index.epx#trademark for additional trademark information and notices. SAP Center for Business Insight |Brief |Q&A |Case Study |Inquiry |E-Book NO. 11