Ergonomics Of Computer Usage
 

Ergonomics Of Computer Usage

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Presented at seminar in September 2007 in Seychelles medical college. Published here as a 'How-to' for general public information.

Presented at seminar in September 2007 in Seychelles medical college. Published here as a 'How-to' for general public information.

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Ergonomics Of Computer Usage Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Ergonomics of Computer Usage Dr Sanjoy Sanyal MBBS, MS, MSc (UK), ADPHA, ADHRD Seychelles Presented in Seychelles medical college in September 2007
  • 2. A few simple measures can avoid a lot of pain in the neck (pun unintended!)
  • 3. Posturing body parts
    • Computer directly in front
    • Forearms horizontal
    • Wrists in neutral, comfortable position
    • Upper arms hang naturally at sides
    • Breaks during sessions
  • 4.  
  • 5. Upper limbs
    • Wrists in neutral position, neither bent up, down nor sideways.
    • Do not lean wrists on wrist-straps while typing.
    • Shoulders / arms relaxed and hanging naturally.
    • Elbow / forearm rest comfortably on work surface, parallel to floor;
    • Elbow at 90-degree angle.
  • 6.  
  • 7.  
  • 8.  
  • 9. Lower limbs
    • Back of knees extending no more than 3-4 finger lengths from end of chair.
    • Thighs parallel to floor, comfortably supported on seat of chair
    • Leg-torso angle = 90-100 degrees
    • Feet in front of seat and resting flat on floor.
    • If feet are not reaching floor, adjust height of chair, or put a footrest under feet.
  • 10. Wrong workstation posture
  • 11. Correct workstation posture
  • 12. Spine and back
    • Back in full contact with backrest
    • Lumbar curve of chair fitting lumbar spine
    • Avoid improper body alignment
    • Neck straight or slightly forward.
    • Avoid looking up and improper neck posture
  • 13.  
  • 14. Chair
    • Adjustable backrest - tilts easily, yet provides solid back support
    • Curved lumbar support
    • Able to be raised / lowered, swiveled / locked at different angles
    • Average adult : Seat 1½ feet (45 cm) above ground, placed 1½ feet (45 cm) from table; table 2 -2 ½ feet (60-75 cm) high.
  • 15.  
  • 16. Eyes
    • Avoid locking eyes into fixed-screen stare .
    • ‘ Rule of 30 ’: Every 30 minutes look towards an object approximately 30 feet away, for 30 seconds.
    • Keep eyes level with upper margin of monitor
    • Should not be necessary to swivel eyes downwards > 40 degrees from horizontal when looking from top to bottom of screen.
  • 17. Workstation setup
  • 18. Workstation setup
  • 19. Workstation setup
  • 20. Desktop screen
    • Anti-glare screen.
    • In front of a window, its back facing the window.
    • Screens < 17 inches (43 cm) should be one-arm + 3 inches away from fingertips.
    • Larger screens 7-8 inches away from fingertips.
    • Or , 1 ½ to 2 feet (45 to 60 cm) from eyes.
    • Screen directly in front of user’s eyes, not angled in vertical or horizontal axes.
  • 21. Laptop screen
    • Adjust viewing angle for:
      • Best display
      • Least eye strain
      • Least muscle fatigue
      • Optimum brightness
  • 22. Desktop peripherals
    • Top margin of monitor at eye-level.
    • Mouse to right or left of keyboard, at same height.
    • Keyboard located at elbow height
    • ‘ B'-key lined up with the navel
    • Keyboard legs should be knocked down, so that it lies flat on table
    • Wrist-rests may be used to reduce strain on wrists.
  • 23. Room lighting
    • Work area adequately lit / ventilated.
    • Windows/lights should not create glare / reflection on display
    • Indirect light to avoid bright spots on display
      • Overhead lighting is best, or
      • Fluorescent light with a grid or shield covering the fixture
  • 24.  
  • 25. “ Keep head on your shoulders, Watch your hand, Look straight, Keep an eye on your back.”
  • 26. References
    • Dr Venkata Ramana Rao , RSI specialist, myotherapist and ergonomist; RSI Healthcare.
    • Rich Epstein , Director of the Moore Center for Rehabilitation, Stamford and a founder of the Moore Center Ergonomics and Injury Prevention Company
  • 27. THAN-Q