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  • 1. GREEN CONSTRUCTION ● FIREFIGHTING IN CONVERTED MILLS ● PREPLANNING ● BASIC FIRE SCHOOL JANUARY 2009 TRAINING THE FIRE SERVICE FOR 132 YEARS Visit www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_C1 C1 1/7/09 8:57:26 AM
  • 2. The newest vehicle in the Spartan Chassis line-up offers purpose-built value unattainable on commercial chassis. Satisfy your desires and your budget by configuring the NFPA- compliant Furion® fire truck cab/chassis to provide the greatest value for your community. 0901FE_C2 C2 1/7/09 8:57:32 AM
  • 3. Enter 100 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_1 1 1/7/09 8:57:39 AM
  • 4. Got a PPE Problem? NFPA 1971 (Structural Fire Fighting) and NFPA 1992 (Liquid Splash) compliant. Also available in a 12” Zipper/Speed Lace. Built with CROSSTECH® footwear fabric for performance unmatched by any other waterproof, breathable barrier. CROSSTECH®, GORE® and designs are trademarks of W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc. GLOBE FOOTGEAR products are sold by Globe Footwear, LLC. GLOBE and designs are trademarks of Globe Holding Company, LLC. 0901FE_2 2 1/7/09 8:57:41 AM
  • 5. PROBLEM : STIFF, POOR-FITTING BOOTS HURT YOUR FEET AND YOUR PERFORMANCE. Unique cement construction combines contoured outsole, 3D lasting board with built-in flex zone, and multi-layer composite puncture protection. Without stiff welts, ribbed midsoles, or steel plates, this attachment process is far more flexible than traditional welt construction. Globe FootGear has been tested to withstand 1,000,000 flexes with no compromise in performance. SAY GOODBYE TO HEAVY, STIFF, MILITARY-CONSTRUCTION BOOTS FOREVER – GLOBE FOOTGEAR IS HERE. REMARKABLY FLEXIBLE WITH A UNIQUE CUSHIONED AND CONTOURED SOLE AND CUSTOM FIT SYSTEM, GLOBE FOOTGEAR FITS BETTER, GRIPS BETTER, AND FEELS BROKEN IN RIGHT OUT OF THE BOX. GLOBE FOOTGEAR COMES IN A RANGE OF STRUCTURAL, TECHNICAL AND EMERGENCY NFPA COMPLIANT STYLES. FIND THE GLOBE SOLUTION TO ALL YOUR PPE PROBLEMS AT A CONFERENCE NEAR YOU, VISIT GLOBEFOOTGEAR.COM TO LOCATE YOUR GLOBE DEALER, OR CALL 800-232-8323. Globe FootGear is part of the Globe family of brands Enter 101 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_3 3 1/7/09 10:28:51 AM
  • 6. JANUARY 2009 VOLUME 162 NUMBER 1 TRAINING THE FIRE SERVICE FOR 132 YEARS PENNWELL CORP. 21-00 Route 208 South Fair Lawn, NJ 07410-2602 Tel.: (973) 251-5040 www.FireEngineering.com P.O. Box 1260 Tulsa, OK 74101 (918) 835-3161 Features 63 THE FIRE SERVICE AND GREEN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION: AN OVERVIEW Ronald R. Spadafora—Green buildings are the future. They help large municipalities across the country provide a healthful environment, fight climate change, and conserve natural resources. Be sure to include them in your preincident planning, as certain design features could impact firefighting operations in these buildings. 79 THE IMPACT OF SOLAR ENERGY ON FIREFIGHTING Timothy Kreis—How do homes and businesses that use solar energy affect fireground safety, and what can firefighters do about it? Incorporate solar energy into your training, and work to develop well-written code regulations and standard operating procedures. 85 ARE YOU PREPLANNING YOUR BUILDINGS? Jack J. Murphy—The importance of conducting building reconnaissance cannot be overstated. Good preincident planning addresses floor and roof assemblies, loads, and obvious signs of deteriorating or weakening structures. As the late great Francis L. Brannigan used to say, “Know your buildings!” BASIC FIRE SCHOOL, P. 16 SCHOOL P 93 99 CAPNOGRAPHY: A TOOL FOR EVERY PATIENT Jim Davis—It is considered the gold standard for assessing airway patency in patients and will become a mandatory part of advanced airway management. Take the time to understand capnography’s benefits and uses; soon, you won’t think of going on a run without using it. 105 GREEN CONSTRUCTION, P. 63 FIREFIGHTING CHALLENGES IN CONVERTED MILLS David DeStefano—Mill makeovers involve change of occupancy, which may change your firefighting options, priorities, and challenges. Fire departments must be involved at all levels in mill conversions—both fire prevention bureau personnel and responding companies—from the design phase through regular inspections. FIREFIGHTER INVOLVEMENT HELPS PASS ICC CODES Sean DeCrane—Fire service participation in the building and fire code process pays off. Here is a summary of the most important code changes that directly impact the fire service that came out of last September’s International Code Council Final Action Hearings. CONVERTED MILLS P. 93 MILLS, 4 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_4 4 1/7/09 9:10:35 AM
  • 7. Proven Performance 4000 Series Rescue Tools 1993 First and still the only UL Listed rescue tools 1999 First rescue tools UL Classified to NFPA 1936 2005 4000 Series Introduced Today, Holmatro® continues to design and test to the more demanding requirement to achieve a UL Listing. The 4000 series is no exception. With features like our patented CORE Technology™, speed valves, unique i-Bolt system, and lighted handles, the 4000 series is engineered with all of the quality and reliability you’ve come to expect from Holmatro®. Holmatro® USA is still the only factory in the world able to produce and offer you UL Listed rescue tools. Whether you choose CORE Technology™, or a twin line system, our 4000 Series continues to help make your job... • FASTER • EASIER • SAFER holmatro-usa.com (410) 768-9662 © 2008 Holmatro, Inc. 0901FE_5 5 Enter 102 at www.fireeng.hotims.com 1/7/09 9:10:41 AM
  • 8. JANUARY 2009 VOLUME 162 NUMBER 1 PENNWELL CORP. 21-00 Route 208 South Fair Lawn, NJ 07410-2602 Tel.: (973) 251-5040 www.FireEngineering.com TRAINING THE FIRE SERVICE FOR 132 YEARS P.O. Box 1260 Tulsa, OK 74101 (918) 835-3161 Departments 8 EDITOR’S OPINION “How Much Fire Service Can We Really Do Without?” 12 VOLUNTEERS CORNER “Developing Proficiency in Today’s Firefighters” 16 TRAINING NOTEBOOK “Basic Fire School: A Teaching Tool for Probies and Veterans” 22 FIRE SERVICE EMS “Fire/EMS Training Tips” TECHNOLOGY TODAY, P. 115 28 ROUNDTABLE “Prefire Planning” 115 TECHNOLOGY TODAY “Homes That Won’t Burn?” “Metal Buildings for Firehouses” 52 NEWS IN BRIEF 60 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 109 FIRE PREVENTION BUREAU “Chief Must Advocate Building Fire Safety” 117 2009 BUYERS GUIDE 111 FIRE COMMENTARY “Alarm Response Policies: To Go or Not To Go?” 169 PRODUCTS/SERVICES/MEDIA 168 APPARATUS DELIVERIES 170 COMING EVENTS 171 COMPANY/ASSOCIATION NEWS 171 NAMES IN THE NEWS 172 CLASSIFIEDS 176 RULES OF ENGAGEMENT “More Cool School: The IC’s Need to ‘Disconnect’ ” THE COVER: This mid-morning fire in Wheaton, Illinois, actually started in the rear of the living area and extended to the garage through an open door. First-due companies arrived to find heavy fire in complete control of the attached garage and rear of the house. As shown in the photo, crews stretched a 21∕2-inch attack line to the driveway to knock down the heavy fire in the garage. They then quickly repositioned the line to the front door to mount an interior attack. Bread-and-butter engine operations such as those shown at this fire require training, professionalism, and quick-thinking officers and firefighters to gain the upper hand. (Photo by Stephen J. Wilcox.) P i di l Postage P id at T l OK 74101 and at additional mailing offices. Periodicals P t Paid t Tulsa, d t dditi l ili ffi 6 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_6 6 www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:10:42 AM
  • 9. Enter 103 at www.fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_7 7 1/7/09 9:10:49 AM
  • 10. EDITOR’S OPINION How Much Fire Service Can We Really Do Without? BY BOBBY HALTON S AMERICAN CITIES AND towns face unprecedented issues regarding budgets, we all must begin to anticipate what the ramifications could potentially be regarding service delivery in our communities. The great statesman Tip O’Neil once said, “All politics is local,” and he was absolutely right. We also know that all fire protection is predominantly local in nature, and local budgets are shrinking fast. Reacting to these shrinking budgets in major metropolitan cities, towns, and villages, local fire departments have already experienced fire station closings, reduced staffing, and companies removed from service. The effects of this economic meltdown will reach every corner of American life, and public safety is no exception. We are witnessing local governments explain fire station closings and company removal with carefully chosen words such as “deactivation,” “brownouts,” and “furloughs.” These politicians are simply using words they learned from Frank Luntz, the author of Words That Work. These are words that make people feel better about closing fire stations and reducing fire protection. These words were selected because they reduce the anxiety and apprehension caused by words such as “closed,” “eliminated,” and “reduced.” Unfortunately, these less-threatening words will be of little comfort to those same citizens when those deactivated, “brownouted,” and furloughed firefighters are not available to answer the call in an emergency. All of this cutting and reducing is being done using the best statistical data that these good people can find to justify their positions. Sometimes, as you listen to their explanations, you feel like you’re watching a truckie trying to fix a computer with a halligan. Benjamin Disraeli said it best: “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics.” Unfortunately, statistics do little to help the citizen who is having trouble breathing, A 8 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_8 8 who is crawling through her smoke-filled home at two in the morning, or who has just had a car accident. We know that we are going to be asked to sacrifice; we know that, as citizens, we are going to be expected to do with fewer services than we have become accustomed to. The overriding question has to be, “To what extent are the ‘local’ citizens willing to reduce the level of fire protection and life safety that your department is currently providing?” Simply showing charts and graphs of run volumes with geographic overlays of response times and overly simplified statistical data does not show the real costs in human treasure. While we acknowledge that, even at standard-compliant levels, we cannot arrive swiftly enough 100 percent of the time, it is clear standard-compliant staffing and response times offer our citizens the best possible advantage. I must disagree with some of my, albeit, well-intentioned but inexperienced peers who have stated that staffing and response times are irrelevant to fireground safety. I could never find any way to legitimize such a statement simply because nothing could be further from the truth. Response times and staffing are critical on both sides of the survival equation. Experienced, street-savvy firefighters understand standard-compliant staffing offers firefighters the best possible safety margins; anything less increases our risks exponentially. The fire service exists for those very times when we can make a difference, when we can save a life, and when we can alleviate someone’s suffering. Cuts are coming; but, because of who we are, we will continue to provide the best possible service under whatever conditions we are forced to operate. More than a thousand homes in Southern California were tragically destroyed in the most recent firestorm. Unfortunately, this firestorm is still not completely contained; many more homes will be taken. To the credit of the excellent services provided by the personnel in the Region 1 mutual-aid group under the direction of Los Angeles County Chief Michael Freeman, at this point no lives have been lost. That statistic is the most important one, not to discount or underestimate the tragedy of all these families losing their property. We must applaud the efforts that saved all the lives in this firestorm’s path of fury. The question becomes for the good citizens protected in that region with such excellent fire responses, “How much fire service can they stand to live without?” If all politics is local, and our elected politicians must ultimately bear the responsibility for dividing up the pie of taxes and revenue to fund fire, police, sewers, roads, libraries, universities, and rest of the services that make up a community, what levels must exist? The answers to these questions will come from you. You must assess locally what your community’s needs are to safely protect the lives and property you have sworn to protect. Those in power and those who have elected them must heed your words. You have that power of influence, and with it comes awesome and dear responsibility. You have a responsibility to the men and women who stand with you and to those whom you serve. This is where politics gets “local” and life in the fire service—whether you want to admit it or not—is closely tied to local politics. When addressing this responsibility, remember all you have learned regarding staffing; response capabilities (task and tactical); fire behavior; human behavior; and, most importantly, the values that make you a firefighter. They are not statistics. They are not lies. www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:10:52 AM
  • 11. RELENTLESS. Facing the unknown at every turn, ÀreÀghters need to have conÀdence in their gear. That’s why our scientists rigorously test our CROSSTECH® Products — so ÀreÀghters can focus on the hazards in their environment. Our fabrics reliably provide maximum heat stress reduction and durable liquid penetration protection. The barriers of choice for ÀreÀghters, EMTs, and law enforcement professionals, CROSSTECH Products have been tried, tested, and proven like no other. FireÀghters are relentless in doing their duty. We’re relentless in giving them the best possible barrier for their gear. crosstech.com 800.431.GORE CROSSTECH, GORE and designs are trademarks of W. L. Gore & Associates ©2008 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Enter 104 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_9 9 1/7/09 9:10:54 AM
  • 12. . . . . ▲ ▲ . . . . ▲ ADVISOR IN MEMORIAM VICE PRESIDENT–AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT MANAGER MARKETING PRODUCTION MANAGER SUBSCRIPTIONS PENNWELL CORP. CHAIRMAN PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER SR. VICE PRESIDENT–GROUP PUBLISHER, BID VICE PRESIDENT–GROUP PUBLISHER 1 EDITORIAL ADVISORS AND CONTRIBUTING EDITORS ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ PHOTO EDITOR ONLINE EDITOR 132. ▲ ▲ . . . ▲ EDITOR IN CHIEF EXECUTIVE EDITOR SENIOR ASSOCIATE EDITOR ASSOCIATE EDITOR ASSOCIATE EDITOR PRESENTATION EDITOR TECHNICAL EDITORS ▲ ▲ ▲ . 21-00 Route 208 South, Fair Lawn, NJ 07410-2602 Tel.: (973) 251-5040, Fax: (973) 251-5065 Visit our Web site at: FireEngineering.com . ▲ TRAINING THE FIRE SERVICE FOR 132 YEARS . . . . ▲ 8▲ ▲ ▲ 9 7 7-200 Chief (Ret.) Bobby Halton (roberth@pennwell.com) Diane Feldman (dianef@pennwell.com) Mary Jane Dittmar (maryjd@pennwell.com) Robert J. Maloney (robertm@pennwell.com) Derek Rosenfeld (derekr@pennwell.com) Josh Troutman (josht@pennwell.com) Glenn P. Corbett, P.E. (gcorbet1@ix.netcom.com) John (Skip) Coleman (ch112ret@yahoo.com) Mike McEvoy (mcevoymike@aol.com) Nate DeMarse (ndemarse.fireeng@gmail.com) Peter J. Prochilo (peterp@pennwell.com) Anthony Avillo, Alan Brunacini, John M. Buckman, Michael N. Ciampo, Paul T. Dansbach, Frank L. Fire, Richard A. Fritz, William Goldfeder, Bill Gustin, Leigh T. Hollins, Arthur L. Jackson, Steve Kreis, Rick Lasky, John M. Malecky, David McGrail, John W. Mittendorf, Frank C. Montagna, Jack J. Murphy Jr., Mike Nasta, Gerard J. Naylis, Gregory G. Noll, John P. O’Connell, William C. Peters, David Rhodes, Rob Schnepp, William J. Shouldis, Michael A. Terpak, Jerry Tracy, Andrea Zaferes Thomas F. Brennan Gloria Adams Ron Kalusha Wendy Lissau Rae Lynn Cooper, Tulsa Sharon Spencer (800) 582-6949 (sharons@pennwell.com) P.O. Box 1260 • Tulsa, OK 74101 • (918) 835-3161 Frank T. Lauinger Robert F. Biolchini Lyle Hoyt Eric Schlett FIRE DEPARTMENT INSTRUCTORS CONFERENCE ® 21-00 Route 208 South, Fair Lawn, NJ 07410-2602 Tel.: (888) TEL-FDIC, Fax: (888) FAX-FDIC Visit our Web site at: http://www.fdic.org EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR EDUCATION DIRECTOR CONFERENCE DIRECTOR CONFERENCE MANAGER CONFERENCE COORDINATOR EVENT OPERATIONS MANAGERS EXHIBIT MANAGERS FIRE ENGINEERING SUBSCRIBER SERVICE FIRE ENGINEERING ADVERTISING PRODUCTION FIRE ENGINEERING BOOKS & VIDEOS FDIC EXHIBITING FDIC REGISTRATION 10 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_10 10 Eric Schlett Chief (Ret.) Bobby Halton Diane Feldman Mary Jane Dittmar Ginger Mendolia Allison Foster, Kay Baker Lila Gillespie, Nanci Yulico (800) (918) (800) (888) (888) 582-6949 • Fax: (918) 831-9482 831-9143 • Fax: (918) 831-9415 752-9768 • Fax: (918) 831-9555 TEL-FDIC • Fax: (888) FAX-FDIC 299-8016 • Fax: (888) 299-8057 www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:10:58 AM
  • 13. Over-engineered? They sure don’t think so. When you put your life on the line, you need equipment that won’t let you down… regardless of the conditions. That’s why at Dräger, safety is everything and exceptional engineering is standard. And why our new PSS®7000 SCBA doesn’t just meet NFPA standards, it exceeds them. In fact, after a series of rigorous comparison tests by the Phoenix Arizona Fire Department, the Dräger PSS7000 was judged the best of all SCBAs on the market. The competition wasn’t even close. To see the details of the Phoenix test, visit www.draeger.com/scbaChallenge. For more information, contact your local Dräger fire service representative or call 1-800-615-5503. The PSS7000 – Re-engineered from the ground up, we took no shortcuts in developing the most ergonomically designed, easiest-to-use and easiest-to-maintain SCBA ever. It’s packed with features including: • Fully adjustable back-plate design • Durable rubber harness (500% more abrasion resistant than cloth) • Five-second cylinder change out • Active CBRN protection with 360° second-stage rotation • Waterproof internal Heads-UP Display • Dual voice amps • Sentinel 7000 – Dräger’s third-generation PASS technology with more than a decade of proven performance Enter 105 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_11 11 1/7/09 9:11:03 AM
  • 14. VOLUNTEERS CORNER Developing Proficiency in Today’s Firefighters BY NORM CARROLL EARS AGO, WE DID NOT NEED to spend much time with extra training because, after the initial training, we were out there doing the job every day. Now, we are not responding to as many fires; therefore, we need to spend more time practicing the skills so we can be proficient when asked to perform on the fireground. Over the past 24 years, I have developed some concepts that might help your firefighters acquire the training needed to maintain the proficiency level your public expects. Y ing session exciting. It will take a lot of work, but consider the result if you do not provide the best training possible to your firefighters. You do not want to become a statistic. So, you have to dazzle your firefighters. Use the computers they grew up with. Employ simulators, Power Point®, and Webcasts to get them interested in being the best they can be. DEVELOPING A SCHEDULE What are we going to drill on tonight? I don’t know if you have ever heard that before. I have, and it is a very dif- what the drill topic is, we can counter with, “What do you need signed off in your task book?” WHY CONTINUAL TRAINING? When I first started in the fire service, volunteer firefighters worked in their communities, and the business owners were also firefighters. It was not uncommon to have a business close down so all could go on the alarm. This was a great service to the community. Unfortunately, times change; the firefighters do not work in the community and even Firefighters must feel that they have ownership in the training program. They should want to be there and to get involved. Understanding the younger generation of firefighters is important in determining how they learn tasks. The latest generation has been brought up with computers and video games. These individuals expect everything to be instantaneous. They also subscribe to the concept that says, “If I do it wrong, I can press the reset button and start all over.” Unfortunately, there are no reset buttons in real life. We have to help them understand that this is just not possible. Because of technology, this generation also has never used many of the hand tools to which earlier generations have become accustomed. For instance, if you were trying to explain to a new firefighter how to start a positive-pressure ventilation (PPV) fan or a chain saw and that the action would be like starting a lawn mower, they might look at you and ask, “Where is the button to start it”? or they might even tell you, “Someone else is going to start it for me.” These are challenges you, as a trainer, will have to overcome to teach these firefighters. You also have to make every train12 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_12 12 ficult question to answer half an hour before the drill is supposed to start. Our department has developed a task book, a concept other departments use as well. The drills cover firefighter skills required by the state. Our combination department has a 12-member career staff and 45 volunteers. The state requires that a career staff member meet a minimum training level equal to 229 hours of training within one year of appointment. The career staff must accomplish 100 hours of in-service training annually. Since the career and volunteers are doing the same job, why is there a difference in the requirements? Since there was not a requirement for the volunteer firefighters, I created one for our department. I became a trainer and was certified to teach all the courses the state requires. As I started teaching the courses, the firefighters kept asking for more courses. Eventually, the firefighters met the 229 hours required by the state. Once a few achieved that level, they wrote the new standard, saying, “If I can do it, everyone can.” Now when someone comes up to ask though you might own a business in the community, you cannot close down for every alarm because there has been a marked increase in alarms. That is one reason training needs to be done all the time. Many firefighters work shifts other than 9 to 5. If they are working every Tuesday night at 7 p.m., how do they get their training? Create a schedule that has all shifts in mind and makes training a priority all the time. You can create a lesson on ladders and tell all firefighters it will be offered different days and nights throughout the week. If firefighters attend more than one session, what would be the problem? You would then have proficient firefighters. This should be everyone’s goal. I have seen trainers who are not there for the firefighters. If you are not there to train firefighters, why are you there? You need to be the one that leads the training. If the drill is to start at 10 a.m., be there and ready to go at 9:30 a.m. Firefighters’ time is precious. If we are not ready when they are, we are not taking care of their needs. Yes, there should www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:11:07 AM
  • 15. Pierce Ultimate Configuration It’s called the PUC—a short name for a tall list of design breakthroughs. By John Phillips S horter, lighter, lower center of gravity, sharper turning radius, increased agility—it sounds like a to-do list created by engineers from a major auto manufacturer. Except this isn’t a passenger car or the latest crossover SUV. It’s Pierce’s new PUC, an acronym for Pierce Ultimate Configuration. The PUC isn’t a single piece of hardware, nor a lone accessory. Rather, it’s a whole new vehicle layout—a bumper-to-bumper rethink— that allows fire-and-rescue apparatus to carry more equipment on a smaller, more maneuverable, pump-and-roll platform. The patent-pending PUC design begins with the pumphouse. Traditional pumps are mounted amidships, driven by a split shaft off the transmission. That has always meant that four or five feet of real estate was consumed just by the pumphouse. The PUC’s pump, on the other hand, is driven off the engine’s flywheel—a rear engine power take-off. That, in turn, has allowed the pump housing to be moved far forward, above the frame rails and under the cab’s seat-box area. “The pump drive system is simple,” says Kevin Day, Fleet Services Manager for Oregon’s awardwinning Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue, “and it eliminates the need for additional drivetrain components used in traditional transfer-case designs. It saves weight, reduces drivetrain stress and, theoretically, reduces fuel consumption during pumping operations.” Day’s department, having purchased their first Pierce product in 1980, now operates a total of 80 response vehicles serving 418,000 citizens. The department’s Apparatus Committee, consisting of AOs, firefighters, officers and mechanics, has overseen the purchase of nine PUC pumpers. Six units have been delivered; three of those have already been introduced into service. Three more PUCs are scheduled for delivery next spring. Moving the pumphouse forward and downward accrued other benefits. For one thing, the pump’s position lowered the truck’s center of gravity, which made for more nimble handling. “As urban density increases, and streets and cul-de-sacs become more congested,” says Day, “maneuverability is a real consideration.” The far-forward pump also freed up as much as 30 percent extra storage space—up to 500 cubic feet—while simultaneously reducing the pumper’s wheelbase by as much as 18 inches. Day says his current 187-inch-wheelbase PUCs can carry more gear than the 212-inch-wheelbase pumpers they’ve replaced. “All of our medical equipment can now be located in one compartment,” he points out. “If the unit carries a full complement of extrication tools, we can now place it in the compartment more ergonomically for the crews.” The PUC is designed for easy maintenance. All of the pump’s plumbing and valving are mounted on top. “Accessibility is greater than any of our previous pumps,” Day says. “The time it takes to access valves and connections has been significantly reduced.” Because all Pierce pumpers have tilt-forward cabs, access is superb. “Any maintenance or repair can be performed at ground level, rather than on overhead lifts,” he adds. On traditional pumpers, the area reserved for crosslays was usually atop the pumphouse. But with the PUC’s pump moved forward, the crosslays have been relocated between the cab and the truck’s body, and they’ve been lowered to chest height. “Lower crosslays are easier to shoulder and easier to reload,” Day notes. Ladders, stokes baskets, and backboards are also far lower, as is the hosebed. “Firefighters risk injury to their knees and backs when shouldering a hose load and stepping off the tailboard,” Day continues. “The PUC body has a hosebed height nearly 11 inches lower than our previous pumper’s body. We anticipate that most of our firefighters should be able to shoulder the load from the ground.” What’s more, the PUC’s pump uses a large clutch that electrically engages the impeller, so putting the pump into gear no longer induces that awful grinding. And it’s a quick two-step process. “The apparatus engineer need only apply the parking brake and activate the pump drive,” Day says. Pump panels are available in side-or top-mount positions, with the operator standing next to hose connections instead of over them. “The inlets and discharge ports are low and easy to connect,” Day adds, “and the pump panel is laid out in an intuitive manner, with easy-to-use controls. In addition, the pumper’s exhaust stack is vertical, directed up and away from ground level operations, which also reduces noise at the pump panel.” All PUCs are true pump-and-roll designs, crucial for fighting a moving wildfire or for when you simply need to reposition the pumper for a better angle of attack. Since its introduction 18 months ago, the PUC has already accounted for more than 200 new Pierce orders. It is available on all Pierce custom chassis. John Phillips has been writing about cars since 1974, is the author of two books, and has been an editor at Car and Driver for 20 years. © 2008 Pierce Manufacturing. An Oshkosh Corporation Company. Enter 106 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_13 13 1/7/09 9:11:08 AM
  • 16. be some accountability on their part: They showed up when you told them to be there, excited about doing some training to make them more proficient. When you are instructing, you need to make sure you incorporate your department’s policies. What better way to make sure everyone is on the same page? Unfortunately, you may not agree with all your department’s policies, but they are the policies you have, so work with them. Do not try to undermine the authorities by telling everyone that the policy is wrong. If you want to change a policy, go to those making policy and ask if they might review the policy for revision. You will lose all credibility with the firefighters and management if you cannot follow policies. ••• There are many great new techniques for performing our jobs. Make sure that these techniques are safe and will work within your department and that everyone is fully trained in them before they are used at an incident. There is no automatic guarantee that a technique that works for one department will work for another. Instructors must demonstrate proficiency. They must be able to do the task they are teaching perfectly before the students. Firefighters must feel that they have ownership in the training program. They should want to be there and to get involved. It is up to the instructor to create this atmosphere. ● ● NORM CARROLL is a firefighter/ paramedic with the Manlius (NY) Fire Department. He has served nine and a half years as a career firefighter and six years as a volunteer in the same department. He has an associate degree in public fire protection from Rancho Santiago Community College in Santa Ana, CA. He has been with the New York State Office of Fire Prevention and Control since 2000 as a state fire instructor, teaches outreach courses in Onondaga County, and is an adjunct instructor with the New York State Academy of Fire Sciences and the Utica (NY) Fire Department Fire Academy. Enter 107 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_14 14 www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:11:09 AM
  • 17. Enter 108 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_15 15 1/7/09 9:11:12 AM
  • 18. TRAINING NOTEBOOK Basic Fire School: A Teaching Tool for Probies and Veterans BY FRANK H. HAMMOND JR. 1 2 (1) Basic Fire School students attack a vehicle fire. The attack team approached at a 45° angle on the driver’s side front corner using a ground-sweep water application; the crew then moved to the passenger area to complete extinguishment. (Photos by author.) (2) A student is coaxed to the tip of Brewer (ME) Fire Department’s Ladder 1. Every student completed an aerial climb; many students climbed a ladder for the first time and experienced “height discomfort” issues. ROM RECRUIT SCHOOL TO advanced training events, it is almost a mantra: “Don’t forget the basics!” Basic Fire School not only provides an avenue to get your newest recruits up to speed; it can also deliver, as individual or grouped sessions, recurrent fire training to a fire department. Broken into 15 sessions, Basic Fire School covers all aspects of firefighting, from history to coordinated live-fire training evolutions [that are set up to conform to National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1403, Standard for Live Fire Training Evolutions]. Fire service instructors, training officers, and company officers who provide firefighter training often look for a packaged, locally adaptable program that is easy to work with and significantly weighted with practical skills evolutions. Basic Fire School can be used in a myriad of applications, including regular company/ department training sessions, weekend training programs, and a recruit academy. It is loaded with evolutions to help your newest firefighter and challenge your seasoned firefighters. Although this F 16 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_16 16 program is not a path to certification, it can help firefighters achieve qualifications or enhance/renew skills they may or may not use at each response. As with most departments I have visited across the country, many fire departments in my area find it difficult to answer the question “What should we do for training this week or month?” Although NFPA 1001, Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications, along with several other standards such as those of the Insurance Service Office (ISO) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration clearly outline what needs to be done and, in some instances, how much time must be invested, few, if any, standards outline how to get it all done. What may seem rudimentary on the outside as far as class development goes is quite a hurdle whether you are a full-time training coordinator for a large department or the training officer for a smaller department. Time seems to be the largest obstacle when it comes to planning, preparing, and delivering quality, basic-level firefighter training. Basic Fire School makes it quite easy: All the training is broken down into four- and eight-hour sections and grouped into 15 sessions of approximately 16 hours each. It is very possible and very easy to take a section of the program on the fly and deliver it to new and veteran department members. During the course of 15 sessions, firefighters will don their personal protective equipment (PPE) at least 100 times, probably more. Proper PPE and SCBA donning procedures are covered during the first session and continue to the end of the program. Although this may not quite work for your recurrent training programs, I found it very helpful for getting the newer firefighters used to donning and doffing their gear safely and efficiently. For a mixed audience, you could set the newer firefighters up against the more experienced firefighters for time (and perhaps some bragging rights). Team building is one of the many unwritten by-products of Basic Fire School, along with training to a standard within the context of actual operations and learning in a safe, controlled environment. www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:11:15 AM
  • 19. 372,000 019 814 Berry Court, Upland, CA 91786 USA www.championrescuetools.com ©2009 Champion Rescue Tools ® The BEAST is a registered trademark Patented Enter 109 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_17 17 1/7/09 9:11:19 AM
  • 20. TRAINING NOTEBOOK 3 4 (3) Students are guided through roof operations—again, for the first time for most of them. The first trip was made without SCBA; each subsequent operation followed the rule “off the ground—on air.” (4) “Marching Practice.” Students prepare for LP gas fires. Before working with live fires using LP gas, students engaged in practice runs using dry and wet lines. Once the fires were started, every student completed nozzle duty for at least one evolution. TRAINING SESSIONS The sessions are as follows: • Session I: Orientation—complete the required paperwork, then review the fire department’s history, organization principles, fire department roles, firefighter guidelines, standard operating procedures/guidelines and policies, regulations, and working with other agencies. • Session II: Firefighter qualifications, firefighter safety, firefighter rehabilitation, communications, self-contained breathing apparatus, and personal protective equipment. • Session III: Review National Incident Management System, fire behavior, fire response, and size-up. • Session IV: Fire extinguisher operations, including fire suppression using Class A, Class B, and simulated Class C fires. We took an old meter box, stuffed it with straw, and set the straw on fire; no live electricity was used. Gear Storage Solutions That Protect Your Investments Preserve and extend the life of Turnout Gear, Hose and Air Bottles by using Gearmasters or Ready Rack systems - both are designed to meet your needs and maintain your budget. Visit us online at TheFireStore.com or call 800-852-6088 for more information. GEARMASTERS TERS R TheFireStore.com 800.852.6088 Enter 110 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_18 18 1/7/09 9:11:20 AM
  • 21. Enter 111 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_19 19 1/7/09 9:11:28 AM
  • 22. TRAINING NOTEBOOK • Session V: Firefighter tools and equipment identification, uses, and basic maintenance; several forcible entry techniques are practiced. • Session VI: Search and rescue operations, including primary and secondary search operations, along with patient carries and drags. • Session VII: Ladder operations for ground and aerial ladders. • Session VIII: Water supply principles and practices—fire hydrants, large-di- ameter hose, portable tanks, and rural hitch setups are covered. • Session IX: Firefighter survival practices, such as what to do when you are lost; calling a Mayday on a radio; rapid egress over ground ladders; plus “Stay low in the heat” and “If you cannot see your feet, you should not be on them.” • Session X: Hose, nozzle, streams, and foam operations such as loads, advances, taking up, rolls, and producing foam. • Session XI: Ventilation, salvage, and overhaul practices—on the roof with an ax; practice with pallets; breaking glass; and salvage cover rolls, folds, and throws. • Session XII: Complete ventilation, salvage, and overhaul practices; conduct prefire briefings. • Session XIII: Vehicle/refuse container fire operations. • Session XIV: Class B fire operations— we use liquefied petroleum gas. • Session XV: Class A fire operations. We bring it all together for combined operations—search, attack, backup, ladders, and ventilation. PROGRAM EASY TO ADAPT The written portion of this program provides information regarding the intent of each session, props, supplies needed, apparatus and tool needs, and learning/performance objectives. Although the framework of this program is quite structured, it is still adaptable to any department with any number of tools that may be available—for example, if your department does not have access to an aerial device or a 50-foot Bangor ladder, omit the objectives involving those tools. On the other hand, if you have a special tool or an appliance that you use regularly, simply plug it into the program at the spot that is right for your department. ••• From the newest recruit to the most seasoned veteran, competency in basic firefighting skills is a most critical asset. As a stand-alone fire academy type delivery or section-by-section sessions for regularly scheduled training, the department or company officers can use the Basic Fire School training package to provide safe, effective, and relevant fire training to the firefighters in their charge. ● ● FRANK H. HAMMOND JR., a 25-year veteran of the fire service, is a training program manager for the Maine Fire Training Program. He is a certified emergency medical technician, firefighter II, driver/operator, airport firefighter, fire instructor II, and fire officer II. He has an associate degree in fire science and also serves as a lieutenant with the Lincoln (ME) Fire Department. Enter 112 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_20 20 www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:11:30 AM
  • 23. ENDLESS SHORING SYSTEM IN THE WORLD POSSIBILITIES THE MOST VERSATILE VEHICLE STABILIZATION STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE TRENCH RESCUE ELEVATOR RESCUE HIGH ANGLE RESCUE HEAVY RIGGING RESCUE SUPPORT SYSTEMS From Vehicle Stabilization to Structural Collapse, Paratech’s Rescue Struts are the backbone of the safest, strongest and most easily deployable rescue strut systems in the world. The flexibility and versatility of our Rescue Struts means every Paratech Rescue Support System can be easily expanded to meet virtually any rescue support scenario. Paratech... quality, innovation, and reliability in everything we do. Contact us for more information or a product demonstration. 1-800-435-9358, www.paratech.us or paratech@paratech.us 0901FE_21 21 Enter 113 at fireeng.hotims.com 1/7/09 9:11:41 AM
  • 24. FIRE SERVICE EMS Fire/EMS Training Tips BY BARRY S. DASKAL FFECTIVE IN-SERVICE EMS training is one very critical yet overlooked element in fire service-based EMS organizations. In many departments, EMS is considered a by-product or backburner service to fire suppression. With lower staffing levels, more calls for service, and administrators’ demands to do more with less, time for drilling and training is greatly reduced. EMS is often the first area to be sacrificed despite representing a disproportionately higher percentage of responses. In the volunteer environment, this is further exacerbated by time spent attempting to maintain necessary firefighting qualifications and Occupational Safety and Health Administration mandates. EMS training might only get brushed up on during the periodic refresher course time or, worse yet, might become nonexistent. Many agencies rely on patient contact through call volume as the way to keep their providers’ skills sharp. Maintaining EMS skills is just as critical as maintaining fire suppression proficiency. Like any profession, fire service trends run the gamut from basic firefighting operations to collapse rescue, trench rescue, hybrid vehicle extrication, hazardous materials, and weapons of mass destruction. Like other industries, our major focus in the fire service is “back to basics” firefighting. EMS responses are second nature. We encounter patients all the time, and their problems are generally the same. So why do we train? Don’t train only when a new intervention technique, medical device, or procedure is introduced. Train every day. Using skills on real patient encounters is not training; it might actually reinforce bad habits without our knowing it. Many EMS drills are just a by-product of firefighting drills. Vehicle extrication leads to a patient (generally a mannequin) being removed and then verbalizing and stabilizing injuries or a man- E 22 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_22 22 nequin “rescued” from a structure fire or collapse that is dropped at the feet of the EMS crew relegated to “standby.” For the fire/EMS officer who realizes, accepts, and embraces that EMS training must be at regular intervals, the question then becomes, “How do you accomplish this?” WHERE DO WE START? EMS drill planning essentially requires the same procedure for firefighting drills, with some subtle but distinct differences. The first decision is what to train on. Evaluate the patient types you regularly encounter, such as cardiac complaints, respiratory emergencies, diabetes patients, general illness, syncope, and motor vehicle crash patients. Develop a list of important skills used on a routine basis. These are your bread and butter responses. Think about some of your more unique responses—patient contacts where you had to think just a little bit outside of the box. Did the patient have an unusual chief complaint? Was a rarely used skill or piece of equipment called for? Once you identify target areas or subjects to train on, create a lesson plan. Firefighting drill planning for many officers has become very familiar. There are numerous premade templates and even full drills available online. One of the best resources for firefighters is provided by the Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute Web site. I prefer to use the fire service-based model resource, since this is the format with which personnel in combined fire/EMS agencies are most familiar. Take your topic list and write a brief topic description and what you hope to accomplish. Because we talk about inservice training with our members, we know our target audience and the level of instruction required. Here, there are distinctions between writing an EMS drill and planning a firefighting evolution. Establish a spreadsheet and a topic schedule. The first column lists the indi- vidual lesson topic. Then have several consecutive columns that include the following: the type of drill (lecture vs. hands-on or a combination of the two), a detailed description of the drill’s main focus and intention, the lead instructor and assisting facilitators, and any special notes (material resources, training locations, and any other pertinent information). RESOURCES AND REFERENCES Standard EMT and paramedic textbooks are your technical reference material. Your state, regional, and local policies and protocols are your detailed information sources. Another great resource is your standard patient care sequence—from your scene survey to transport. Your patient care report is a great format for identifying different areas on which to focus. Obtaining available equipment resources for EMS training can be more difficult than for fire suppression training. For fire training, securing a facility or other training location is often the greatest challenge. All the tools you need are on the rig. For EMS training, there are a few more intricacies; training materials tend to be the greatest challenge. What materials do you need? Are they easily obtainable? For your training to be effective, you require patients and some patient care aids. Budget constraints generally dictate what you can and can’t obtain. A moulage kit costing several hundred dollars may be too much of an investment, but $20 worth of make-up from the local pharmacy or big box store can be effective. An advanced life support (ALS) “mega-code” mannequin is ideal, but the $5,000 needed may not be readily available. You can convert the beat-up rapid intervention team training mannequin into an unconscious, unresponsive patient with simulated traumatic injuries with simple things such as various colored children’s clay, broken pieces of www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:11:44 AM
  • 25. ® LIFEPAK 15 MONITOR / DEFIBRILL ATOR The New Standard in Clinical Innovation Physio-Control has partnered with emergency service professionals since the beginning. This experience, along with our partnerships with leaders in patient monitoring, provides us with the knowledge to create products and capabilities that no one else offers—to fit your clinical needs. We’ve been leading the way with proven clinical innovations from the beginning, and we continue to do so. The 15 is the newest monitor/defibrillator offered by Physio-Control, building on our legacy of partnership and trusted products. Designed to meet your needs now and in the future, it includes: „ Non-invasive and continuous detection of carbon monoxide (SpCO), oxygen saturation (SpO2), and methemoglobin (SpMET) through integrated Masimo Rainbow technology. „ The CPR Metronome with audible prompts has been proven to aid users in performing compressions and ventilations within the recommended range of AHA Guidelines1. „ Energy dosing to 360J for difficult-to-defibrillate patients. „ Easy to acquire pre-medication 12-lead ECG and reliable, continuous monitoring of all 12 leads in the background to alert you to changes via our ST Trending feature. The LIFEPAK 15 monitor/defibrillator raises the bar on clinical and operational standards, and durability. Go to www.CheckOutTheFuture.com/clinical to learn more about how the 15 sets the new standard in clinical innovation. Visit www.physio-control.com or call us toll free at 1.800.442.1142 for more information about other Physio-Control products. 1 Kern et al, AHA presentation abstract, Circulation 2008 Pending 510(k) Clearance Enter 114 at fireeng.hotims.com ©2009 Physio-Control, Inc. Redmond, WA 98052 USA. All rights reserved. 0901FE_23 23 1/7/09 9:11:45 AM
  • 26. FIRE SERVICE EMS chalk, and some old spare clothes. Disposable supplies also present a stumbling block. To bandage a wound or stabilize a shoulder or limb, you must use gauze, triangular bandages, and tape. They cost money and must be restocked. Set aside a 20- or 30-gallon plastic container to keep “disposable” items in for reuse during training exercises. Human patients are generally easy to find. You can preprogram partners, crew, and other station members as patients using index cards with their chief complaint, history of the present illness or injury, medications, medical history, and other pertinent information. Conduct full interviews, deliver oxygen to your patient via nonrebreathing mask, conduct nebulizer treatments using water instead of medications (always use local policy and procedures as a guide), take vital signs, and perform hands-on assessment. For ALS scenarios, you can adapt and overcome. If ALS arms and mannequins are not available, you might consider reverting to the real thing. Anyone taught to establish an intravenous line practiced on themselves and their classmates. Again, follow local policy and procedures. You can place EKG machines on patients and take and interpret three-lead and 12-lead evaluations. For dysrhythmias that need attention, hand a Web site printout to the student instead of a rhythm strip. Use small sharps containers with IV tubing that has the injection port facing out as your patient’s arm, and administer medications. Place a small (50 ml) spiked saline bag under the patient and tape the tubing to the arm to represent an established IV line. MOTIVATION AND EXECUTION When writing your lesson plans, come up with a motivational statement—a brief paragraph that explains to the students the importance of mastering the skills they are about to learn. The motivational statement is generally interchangeable with the detailed description you plugged into your spreadsheet next to the topic. The firehouse is a good general place to perform your drills. The parking lot for your personal vehicles, the apparatus bay, lounges, offices, and inside or outside the location will suffice. After all, you routinely encounter patients in all of these locations. Choose a location for a particular evolution, and place your crew in that remote area with the equipment they would normally remove from the apparatus while you program and place the patient. Brief the crew on the situation they will respond to, and allow them to grab any additional equipment they feel they may require based on the dispatch information you give them. Give the crew a time limit (generally 10 minutes from initial patient contact). The crew responds to the patient location and begins care. The scenarios must be straightforward to start. You can throw every possible situation at your providers. It’s never a straightforward sick job with stable vital signs where a thorough evaluation and interview lead to an informed diagnosis and treatable situation. Instead, offer an acute pulmonary embolism patient frothing at the mouth and gasping for air or a motor vehicle collision victim who was thrown from the car and now has COLUMBIA SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY COMPLETELY ONLINE DEGREES (Concentration in Fire Science) OTHER DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS AVAILABLE Enter 115 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_24 24 1/7/09 9:11:46 AM
  • 27. Photo by: Greg Collaco THE ONLY THING WE INSTALL IS CONFIDENCE. Fire doesn’t like to lose. Neither do we. A fire will battle to stay ablaze until its last ember is extinguished. Wouldn’t it be nice to arm your department with equipment that’s forged with the same fortitude? At Waterous, we design and manufacture the hardest fighting fire pumps, CAFSystems™ and portable pumps in the world. No one matches our technology, innovation, performance or craftsmanship. All of which provides the confidence you need to face the flames. Bring a better fight to the fire. Call 651-450-5000 / Visit waterousco.com. Vehicle Mounted Pumps CAFSystems™ Foam Systems Portable Pumps Enter 116 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_25 25 1/7/09 9:11:49 AM
  • 28. FIRE SERVICE EMS an open head wound, unequal pupils, a hemopneumothorax, and unstable vitals. EXPECTED OUTCOME To determine if any training initiative is effective, you must have quantifiable, expected results. Run crews through several similar evolutions to establish whether they are consistently achieving a minimum standard. Evaluate the students using standard objective patient care criteria. An excellent resource is the practical testing sheets from the National Registry of EMTs or your local regional certification agency. In addition, I prefer to have the crews that are not involved in a particular evolution watch the current scenario. This allows them to observe the performance of the crew in action, critique their peers, and think about what they might have done differently. I find peer review more valuable than corrections coming solely from the instructor/evaluator. The majority of critique points are typically verbalized by the students’ peers. This leaves the instructor/evaluator room to add additional points or summarize the main learning points of the evolution. After several varied training sessions, look for patterns and see where improvement is needed. Are you bringing the right equipment in to every call? Are your crews working as a team, interacting with and feeding off each other, or are they islands unto themselves? Are your basic life support providers solid with assisted medication protocols? Are your ALS providers able to properly perform and interpret a 12-lead EKG? These regularly scheduled drill periods, combined with your formal quality assurance/quality improvement, should paint an accurate picture of the consistency and quality of patient care. When you have achieved this as your standard, it is time to set the bar higher and challenge providers to continue to advance their studies and skills. For agencies that require continuing education credits, the medical community always has some type of continuing education session in progress at regular intervals at various healthcare facilities. Your medical director can serve as a bridge to access this type of valuable training. Success in the field is a direct result of classroom training and preparation. Basic, regularly scheduled field fire/EMS service training will consistently improve your skills and have a greater positive effect on patient outcomes. ● ● BARRY S. DASKAL is a police officer/aircraft rescue firefighter with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Police Department at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City. He is also a certified EMT-critical care and clinical lab instructor at the Nassau County (NY) EMS Academy and a member of the Wantagh (NY) Fire Department. He previously served as a police officer with the New York City Police Department and as a supervising fire alarm dispatcher with the Fire Department of New York. He has been a volunteer firefighter since 1990 and has served as a captain and training officer. He is the creator and host of “The Average Joe Firefighter Podcast” on FireEngineering.com. Enter 117 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_26 26 1/7/09 9:11:50 AM
  • 29. It Works the Way You Think Computer-Aided Dispatch for Fire and EMS Public safety agencies respond to incidents differently so it only makes sense that they dispatch differently. RescueNet CommCAD is designed specifically for fire and EMS agencies, which means no more cumbersome workarounds for fire and EMS dispatchers. This map-centric dispatch system allows you to easily manage incidents within maps, which gives you a more in-depth assessment of the incident location and the surroundings. With CommCAD, you can customize panel and map views the way you want them; the way that makes the most sense to you. All of these capabilities that are inherent in RescueNet CommCAD take the guesswork out of dispatching and help you improve response decisions and times. RescueNet CommCAD is one component in a suite of integrated data management solutions that work together to improve operational efficiencies for both fire and EMS agencies. RescueNet CommCAD is backed by ZOLL Data Systems, so you benefit from years of experience in dispatch systems and hundreds of successful installations nationwide. To get your FREE white paper “The Top 10 Things to Consider when Buying a Computer-Aided Dispatch System”, call 800.474.4489 or visit www.zolldata.com/CADwhitepaper10. www.zolldata.com 1.800.474.4489 Enter 118 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_27 27 1/7/09 9:11:56 AM
  • 30. ROUNDTABLE OPINIONS FROM AROUND THE COUNTRY Prefire Planning INDSIGHT IS ALMOST ALWAYS 20/20, but there is no substitute for being prepared. I’m not sure where preplans were invented. If it’s like most things in the fire service, some department had the idea of going out and looking at buildings and coming up with a few “preliminary” plans on what to do if that specific building catches on fire. Then, some firefighter on vacation or visiting an aunt in that town talked to a local firefighter who told him the department was very progressive, to the point that it went out and made plans for fighting a fire— before the fire occurred! The visiting firefighter then went back to his department and discussed the idea with someone who “bumped” it up through the food chain until the chief of his department now had a brilliant new idea! In Toledo, commercial buildings that meet specific hazard requirements are assigned to house captains. The house captain divides the preplans among the three shifts. Thursday is the designated preplan day. Company officers and their crews are required to complete the preplan in a specific timeframe. After new preplans are completed, companies update existing plans. There are specific forms and criteria for each preplan. Occupant name and occupancy type, special or hazardous processes, built-in fire suppression features, all fire department connections, hydrant locations and flows, and the building’s required fire flows are among some of the information gathered. The company officer’s battalion chief reviews the completed plans and then forwards them to headquarters, where they are again checked and then put into the preplan book for dissemination to all line companies. They are carried on all apparatus and are listed in alphabetical order by street address. —John “Skip” Coleman retired as assistant chief from the Toledo (OH) Department of Fire and Rescue. He is a technical editor of Fire Engineering; a member of the FDIC educational advisory board; and author of Incident H 28 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_28 28 QUESTION: Do your fire suppression units conduct prefire planning? If so, what information do they gather and where does the information end up? M Management f the S for h Street-Smart Fi S Fire Officer (Fire Engineering, 1997), Managing Major Fires (Fire Engineering, 2000), and Incident Management for the StreetSmart Fire Officer, Second Edition (Fire Engineering, 2008). Thomas Dunne, deputy chief, Fire Department of New York Response: Our fire units conduct fire prevention activities three times a week. In a department with well over 300 companies, this creates a lot of opportunities to discover situations that call for a prefire plan. The company officer can initiate some elements of a prefire plan and enter the information directly into our computerized dispatch system. Information gathered includes dangerous conditions, construction details, and tactical recommendations. This information is subsequently sent to every responding unit when an alarm is transmitted for that address. High-rises, large commercial buildings, and other complex occupancies may call for a more detailed prefire plan, including a building diagram along with response requirements, water supply information, tactical considerations, and any other items that may be vital to establish a safe firefighting strategy. Chief officers prepare these plans based on information drawn from our fire units. Chiefs can consult the plan while responding to an incident or when operating at the command post. The development of a full prefire plan may call for the experience and expertise of a chief or company officer, but discovering the need for one does not. We train our personnel to consider how they would fight a fire every time they walk into a building, whether they are there to perform an inspection, handle a minor emergency, or investigate a false alarm. I h In that way, our fire suppression units are i i always conducting prefire plans. Gary Seidel, chief, Hillsboro (OR) Fire Department Response: Our fire suppression personnel work with our fire inspectors to ensure that we have reviewed all appropriate occupancies, especially those with unusual fire or safety hazards, for construction type, occupancy type, fire protection systems, utilities, fire loads, storage, building inventory, exposures, egress and access points, and water supply. We look at existing building and occupancy records and use the site plans from our new construction inspectors. Otherwise, we create them from the beginning. Our inspections and prefire tours are conducted with the cooperation of the owner/occupants. Our preplans are entered into the department’s computers and are available to the whole department and are also added to our computer-aided dispatch (CAD) system and are available on our mobile data computers (MDCs); they are tied to our in-vehicle mapping program for use at an emergency scene. We also have hard copies in the stations and on the apparatus, should the computer malfunction. We revise our prefire plans periodically. If an occupancy or building changes, we complete or revise our prefire plan on the new certification of occupancy. Craig H. Shelley, fire protection advisor, Saudi Arabia Response: Being an industrial fire department, we perform preincident response planning at all facilities and buildings (other than residential areas) to which we respond—structures and vessels that make up the plant area, response times, construction, detection www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:12:00 AM
  • 31. Tell Us Your Story When lives are in the balance and seconds count. for a chance e to o win * The truck pictured is no The truc pictu d is no he truck pictured not ru ctu ur ot the actual contest unit nd may the actual contest unit and may he actua ontest unit nd ma tual on est t nt s r ec fter ma ke eal add-ons. reflect after-market dealer ad on reflect after market deal add-on reflect after-market dealer add-ons er ke ea dd The Tradition ES contest unit features the following options: • International® chassis (4-door) • Hale® pump (1250 gpm) • 89 cu. ft. of NFPA hosebed storage • Adjustable ladder rack • • • • Side-mount pump panel Spacious body compartments for storage of NFPA equipment Extended enhanced body provides increased cubic feet of storage 1000-gallon tank Tell Us Your Story... Is your department the most deserving fire department in the U.S.? To mark the launch of the Tradition ES Series, E-ONE is offering your department the opportunity to win a new Tradition ES commercial pumper. Please “Tell Us Your Story” and let the industry decide. On January 16, 2009, E-ONE will begin our “Tell Us Your Story” contest in which your department could be eligible to win a new Tradition ES pumper. Simply visit www.E-ONE.com and in 500 words or less tell us why your department deserves to win. Seven finalists will be announced on March 30, 2009 and the fire industry will vote online for the most deserving department. The winner will be announced during FDIC in E-ONE’s booth (#9104 – Lucas Oil Stadium) at 3:00 p.m. on Friday, April 24th. Submit your entry online by March 9, 2009. One entry per department. No purchase necessary. Void where prohibited by law. Visit www.E-ONE.com on January 16th for contest rules and “Tell Us Your Story.” Thank you to our sponsors for their generous contributions: y p Enter 119 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_29 29 © 2009 E-ONE, Inc. 1/7/09 9:12:05 AM
  • 32. ROUNDTABLE and alarm systems, exposures, confined spaces, hazardous materials, fixed and semifixed extinguishing systems, contact information, and a sketch of the area to include hydrant locations and access points. Preincident response planning is the foundation of the incident action plan (IAP). Mitigating fires or emergencies in an industrial setting requires implementation of plans, preparation, and proper use of resources coordinated by an effective emergency management organization. However, even with a plan in place, success is not guaranteed. When preincident planning, one way to ensure all points are covered is to use the 15-point size-up acronym COAL TWAS WEALTHS and develop a checklist to ensure all points are considered. Each letter represents an item to be considered during size-up. By gathering as much of this information during site visits and preincident response planning, the incident commander can format an IAP much easier, and items to be addressed during size-up can be identified. Jim Mason, lieutenant, Chicago (IL) Fire Department Response: We do prefire planning with in-service suppression units. The inspections are primarily on commercial occupancies, schools, and the public areas of mixed-use buildings like stores with apartments. We don’t go into the private dwelling areas of these buildings. The primary reason for the inspections is to look for building code violations. The fire prevention section provides the addresses for the companies. The information acquired goes to the fire prevention bureau for enforcement purposes. We also do a “target hazard” inspection in which the company determines the address to be examined. These are buildings the company officers feel need to be gone through much more closely than the average occupancies in the area. The decision to inspect them is based on heavy occupancies like convalescent homes or even high-rises, but it could also be for buildings maintained under current codes or that have had occupancy changes over the years. The prevention bureau does not necessarily know the criteria for these inspections, but the firefighters working in the area know them. The inspectors look for ways to improve the response, such as the existence of installed systems, occupancy problems, and initial placement of the firstdue companies. A written form is completed and turned into district headquarters. The information is soon made available for all units responding to the address. David Rhodes, battalion chief, Atlanta (GA) Fire Department Response: Our department does not have an organized preplan system. This has been an on-again/off-again task that is currently off. Preplans are now done by self-initiative and include mostly target hazards such as fuel storage facilities. When we did preplans, our lack of a central repository and distribution system relegated the documents to a file cabinet or maybe on the battalion chief’s vehicle. Our department operates without mobile data terminals, so the preplans we have are paper copies and are limited to the first-due station. Since our program is off Enter 120 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_30 30 www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:12:07 AM
  • 33. Enter 121 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_31 31 1/7/09 9:12:14 AM
  • 34. ROUNDTABLE again, updated preplans are left to the initiative of the company officer or battalion chief. Our fire companies do a minimum of 10 building familiarizations per month, but there is no system for capturing and sharing the information gathered. Bobby Shelton, firefighter, Cincinnati (OH) Fire Department Response: Every fire company in our department is responsible for fire safety inspections in their running areas. According to our procedures manual, it is the company commanders’ responsibility to do prefire plans of high-hazard occupancies such as medical facilities, industrial occupancies, and educational institutions. A copy of those plans and the information that should be provided on the plans are to be kept on the company level; a copy is sent to the Fire Prevention Bureau. On a regular basis, fire safety inspections are performed to keep company members familiar with occupancies and any changes that may occur within the structures. From time to time, the district chief may have a drill in a high-hazard occupancy in his district so that all companies on the first alarm can do a walk-through and discuss strategy and tactics as well as any special characteristics of the scene of which all members should be aware. Jeffrey Schwering, lieutenant, Crestwood (MO) Department of Fire Services Response: We have incorporated our prefire planning into our annual business inspection program, performed by our engine companies. This enables all members to take an active role in the preplanning process. The chief and assistant chief/fire marshal approve all preplans. The preplans are made readily available to all platoons for training purposes. Preplans are used in company drills, including those with our automatic-aid companies, to keep all responders on the same page. All preplans are based on a checklist used by all personnel and contain the size of the structure, utilities, construction, nearest hydrant, and other information that alerts our officers and members to what they may face. Also, our equipment may be on other assignments and an automatic-aid company would be first due to an incident in our city. The preplans are in the vehicles of the chief and assistant chief. Copies of the preplans are also in the captain’s office. We are preparing to make the preplan books available in the apparatus for our engine companies. The program has proven to be positive for our community and our department. It has been at least 10 years since our department has recorded a fire loss in a commercial business. The program will be updated and changed as our buildings change, to ensure the safety of all members. Ethan Holmes, firefighter, Wyomissing (PA) Fire Department Response: Our department members assist the fire commissioner in conducting fire inspections and developing prefire plans on the type of construction, utility locations, emergency contact information for normal operating hours and after hours, hydrant locations, alarm panel locations with applicable codes, special hazards (i.e., hazmats), fire protection sys- Enter 122 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_32 32 1/7/09 9:12:16 AM
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  • 40. ROUNDTABLE tems, and a drafted plan of the occupancy. We enter all of the information into our computers on our apparatus, where it can be easily located by street address, occupant name, or preplan number. A current hard copy of the plans is also kept in three-ring binders in the cab. We annually inspect our preplan guides and update them as needed unless there is a change of business prior to our annual updates. Richard Wood, captain, Enterprise Fire Company #1, Phoenix, NY Response: We did walk-throughs with the department in the past, but no one took notes or made a layout of the building. When I was voted in as captain in charge of training, I made up a sheet and gave one to all members going through the building; if one person saw something, he could note it so that all members would know what we are looking for in a building walk-through. After the walk-through, we would sit down and talk about what we saw and the problems we found. The list of what we were looking for was not the greatest, but it was a start. The information gathered is kept in a three-ring binder in the apparatus and the chiefs’ vehicles so first-due vehicles have the basic information on the building. Mike Bucy, assistant chief, Portage (IN) Fire Department Response: We revised our prefire planning process several times. We used to require loads of time and data but found the results were too “bulky” for our needs. We have since revised the information to a one-page sheet (two sheets if a map is included) that consists of the most basic information—location and contacts, hydrants in the area, size (which then calculates needed fire flow), construction type, hazards to personnel, and sprinkler systems. They are put into PDF form and added to the computers in the apparatus. Mark K. Stigers, assistant chief, Middletown Fire Protection District, Louisville, KY Response: We developed a multipage information-gathering template for our preplans that is included in the final preplan that gives the IC the detailed information he may need. We also put some of the more important data on a one-sheet “quick reference” page for the company commanders to use on initial arrival. Floor plans are added for new buildings by obtaining PDF files and inserting various information on these drawings from our preplan software. In cases where floor plans are not available, we draw them using the preplan software. We now place the preplans in binders; we recently acquired computers in the apparatus and command vehicles and use a thumb drive to access the preplans. It is easier to update using this system than going to each computer and updating; the company commander goes to our intranet site and downloads the updates. Edward Moore Jr., lieutenant, Jackson (NJ) Fire District 3 Response: We use a computer database program created by members of the fire district. The program is broken down into information screens for all EXPERIENCE OUR NEW SHIELD BUILDER AT : www.paulconwayshields.com 1.800.955.8489 PAUL CONWAY YOUR SINGLE SOURCE FOR SHIELDS EQUIPMENT ALL FIREFIGHTER GEAR. SHIELDS FOR ANY STYLE OF HELMET TRADITIONAL OR MODERN. Enter 123 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_34 34 1/7/09 9:12:26 AM
  • 41. Enter 124 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_35 35 1/7/09 9:12:33 AM
  • 42. ROUNDTABLE four fire districts in town. The information gathered is also broken down into categories: Street Preplan, Business Preplan, Residential Preplan, Fire Hydrants, and Landing Zones. Street Preplan shows a map of the area along with directions from the fire station, hydrant locations, listings of all houses and all businesses on the street, intersecting streets with address ranges, and a map page overview graphic. Business Preplan contains all informa- tion for a commercial property. Information collected includes building construction, length, width and height, fire hydrants, auxiliary appliances, utilities, hazards, and pictures and maps. Contact information includes business owner, occupant, maintenance, and emergency contact. Each business has a drawing of the floor plan attached to the file along with general pictures of the building. Each preplan is updated annually, when the crew performs annual fire inspections. PERFECTED, PROVEN TRUSTED THE TECHNOLOGY LEADER SINCE 1989 FoamPro, the industry leader in foam management technology, offers the widest variety of fully automatic and easy-to-use proportioning and refill systems. Microprocessor-driven technology and flow-based automatic operation assures precision solution on demand. Specify the best on your apparatus. 1-800-533-9511 w w w. f o a m p r o . c o m Enter 125 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_36 36 Residential Preplan includes the number of stories, house type, fuel, primary entrance, hazard information, basement, truss roofs, and swimming pools for water supply. A picture of Division A of the residence is also provided. Each fire apparatus has a laptop computer with touch-screen capability. The information is synchronized with the main computer server at the fire station. Responders can have access to information about any location. Brent Sanger, assistant chief, Atkinson (GA) Volunteer Fire Department Response: Our small volunteer department has a limited number of members. Our department conducts prefire plans using members available at the time. Prior to conducting prefire plans, all members undergo a training class explaining what a prefire plan is, how to conduct it, what to look for, and how to address questions or concerns from the business owners in the area. Before we began our prefire planning, a letter was sent to all occupancies in our district explaining what we would be doing, why, and how our members would be dressed. The last item was included to help reduce security concerns at some businesses. These occupancies include churches, schools, daycare centers, as well as regular businesses. So far there has been little resistance. After all our plans are complete, full copies are kept on all engines; simpler versions are distributed to neighboring departments that respond automatic aid to our district. Susan M. Kirk, fire prevention officer, Warren County (VA) Fire and Rescue Services Response: Three years ago when I started preplanning, there were a few plans in a file cabinet with some wellgathered information, but there was no way to readily access it for use at an incident. We realized that something had to be done; I organized and revamped this program. Our fire suppression units now complete preplans and submit information gathered to the fire administration, where they get put into an organized three-tier format. We have unit books for quick access that include basic written information, a site drawing, and a floor plan. www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:12:34 AM
  • 43. I N T R O D U C I N G The HFSC Fire and Sprinkler Burn Demonstration Kit A COMP LE TE G U I DE TO BU I LDI NG A N D US I NG A DR A M ATIC LIVE-FI RE DEMONSTR ATION I N YOU R COMMU N ITY One of the best ways for a fire department to raise awareness about home fire safety is to host a live fire demonstration. HFSC has developed a new tool to help fire departments – large and small – use this effective teaching tool locally. Built for Life Fire Departments will be the first to receive the free Fire and Sprinkler Burn Demonstration Kit. We’ve put together all the instructions you’ll need to build a side-by-side burn demonstration unit for your department. Here’s what is in the kit: • A video showing how to build a side-by-side burn demonstration unit for your fire department • Printed instructions with easy-to-follow photographs • Itemized materials and tools lists • Guidance for educational outreach • Guidance for evaluating your burn demonstrations • Materials to help you gain local sponsors • Customizable public relations materials BECOME A BUILT FOR LIFE FIRE DEPARTMENT TODAY • Visit HomeFireSprinkler.org • Enter FIRE SERVICE • Enroll your department • Best of all, it's free FIRE DEPARTMENT H o m e F i r e S p r i n k l e r. o r g The Built for Life education program is supported by the Fire Prevention and Safety Grant funding through the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Enter 126 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_37 37 1/7/09 9:12:37 AM
  • 44. ROUNDTABLE Our second tier is our Command book, which travels with all officers for more in-depth material safety data sheets on hazardous substances, aerial and site photographs, emergency plans, contractor blueprints, and alarm system zone maps. Our third tier is our digital program; the chief, dispatch, or I can immediately e-mail our preplans to anyone with computer access. If we should call a specialty team in, we can e-mail them the information about the incident with all the preplan information at a touch of a button. A team three hours away will know the size and impact of the incident before even leaving home base. We have even placed these preplans with our mutual-aid companies in two separate jurisdictions and have made them available to our local Sheriff’s Office Tactical Team. Our fire suppression units gather this information on a predetermined form so all information is organized and uniform. Information includes building address and key holder information, key box information, building construction and features, water supply and suppression information, utility shutoff locations, alarm system features, exposures, concerns for life safety and health, chemical and tank information, and occupancy and hours of operation. A written format streamlines the forms and distribution. This program has decreased on-scene call time and resulted in more effective emergency mitigation. It has strengthened our relationships with local commercial businesses and has made us visible to the public. Richard Wilson, lieutenant, Bartlett (IL) Fire District Response: Our fire companies and medic companies conduct fire preplans. As we complete company inspections, one of our members draws the exterior of the building, noting entrances/exits, utilities, and special hazards. The preplans are limited to the information needed to make a great start at suppression if needed. The problem we had before establishing this preplan committee, headed by our Fire Prevention chief, was that everyone wanted to see different requirements. After the information has been gathered, it is now input into a computer program. Our next step is to have the information loaded to our laptops as well as our battalion chief’s vehicle. Beyond that, perhaps if other departments purchase that program, we may be able to link the information so that neighboring towns responding to our incidents will be able to have a heads up as well. Enter 127 at fireeng.hotims.com 38 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_38 38 Paul Dove, fire marshal, Coldwater (MI) Fire Department Response: Our department’s platoon members survey various buildings based on training assignments and target hazards annually. We also create CAD preincident survey drawings based on fire prevention inspections. These drawings are used during the platoon’s on-site surveys; changes discovered in occupancy, hazards, operations, and construction are noted so the stored plans can be revised. Information includes hazardous materials locations and products, utilities, fire protection systems and details, emergency contacts, floor plans, hazards, acces- www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:12:38 AM
  • 45. Enter 128 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_39 39 1/7/09 9:12:43 AM
  • 46. ROUNDTABLE sibility, water supply, building construction, and egress points. The completed surveys are stored electronically on our city’s backed-up server; a copy is also added to each platoon and the administration’s preincident survey book. The plans are also loaded and updated to a board laptop as necessary; updated paper copies are distributed to all personnel as needed. Access to the plans is available through wireless Internet on the onboard laptop; the plans are also accessible by other jurisdictional agencies for use in addition to accessible mapping and utility plans for our jurisdiction. Jay Womack, lieutenant, Euclid (OH) Fire Department Response: Our department distributes building inspection forms to each company in the city monthly. The company officer ensures that these inspections are completed by the end of the month and are turned over to our Fire Prevention Bureau. The Bureau conducts follow-ups when the fire company doing inspections issues a hazard correction notice to the business owner. The inspection cards have pertinent information on one side: construction, fire protection, and the emergency key holders’ phone numbers. The reverse side of the card has the following: a plot plan that shows means of ingress and egress, hazards, and utility shutoffs. It is up to the crew to update the emergency contact information and to make changes to the plot plan to reflect the occupancy’s current layout. All of the data collected on the inspection cards/preplans is entered into the platoon chief’s computer, mounted in the command vehicle, for easy reference at the fire scene. These visits help us to visualize fire conditions in the building and run a hypothetical scenario of our tactics. We have found it beneficial to update our preplans. Just last week, for example, we came across a rear door of a commercial structure that appeared to be a simple steel exterior door. A closer look from the inside revealed a second door constructed of metal bars that had three deadbolts. This information went on the inspection card preplan form; it may one day save a life. George Potter, fire protection specialist (ret.), Board of Governors of Spain’s Firefighters Association Response: Prefire planning is a vital part of the emergency response plan. This document should include the following: accurate descriptions of the facility including location, access, construction information, and data on the activities carried out; fuels present and their locations and quantities; specific hazards; fire protection measures; resources available (and those recommended/necessary); and proposed emergency response actions to be executed within the entity’s internal structure (should you confirm alarms and evacuate, leaving the situation for the local emergency services to resolve, or stand and fight according to their capabilities and safety levels?). These internal response documents make it possible for firefighters and officers to foresee what could happen and how to act before a relatively small incident can become a disaster. Enter 129 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_40 40 1/7/09 9:12:44 AM
  • 47. Hale Muscle Pumps Everything about them is high-performance. Including the warranty. You already know that Hale Muscle Pumps are serious performers – innovative, rugged, with a track record of proven reliability. Itʼs no wonder that firehouses all over the world specify them by name. So weʼve developed a warranty that matches the power of our Muscle Pumps and provides the coverage you expect from a leader. We call it the “Hale High-5 Performance Warranty.” You get the most comprehensive FIVE-year warranty coverage in the industry backing up the most popular “High Flow” pumps on the market. Never go into a fire alone. Go with a mighty Hale Muscle Pump – with a warranty to match. Contact us for details. Call 800-220-4253 or click to www.HaleProducts.com. SERVING SIDE-BY-SIDE Enter 130 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_41 41 1/7/09 9:12:48 AM
  • 48. ROUNDTABLE One of the major faults, however, is that often a business or an industry will say that the emergency plan is in compliance with workplace safety legislation and effect only minimum implementation, limited response personnel training, little or no simulated emergency situation drills, and so on—without inviting the local fire department to come, watch, and participate. However, if the fire department is invited to take an active role in the implementation of the plan, comment on the results, and contribute suggestions for improvements, industry will have a solid partner to work with if and when an emergency should occur in the establishment. A great number of occupancies (industries, hospitals, commercial malls, high-rises, and so on) are required to have emergency response or self-protection plans. You should have copies available for all personnel in the department for consultation, to coordi- nate visits and tours, and to participate in the practical training of their personnel. Once you get these elements into your response procedures, the chances of successfully resolving emergencies improve dramatically. Thomas Sharpe, lieutenant, Hilda (SC) Fire Department Response: Ours is a small-town department, but we do have preplans on hydrant location and gallons per minute (gpm) information, basic facility information, type of construction, utility disconnects, unusual hazards, exposures, inside firefighting equipment information, needed fire flow, and after-hours contact. The plans are for businesses and places of public assembly. Nick Morgan, firefighter, St. Louis (MO) Fire Department Response: All front-line companies are required to conduct a prefire walkthrough inspection of buildings in their first-in still district at least three times per month on each shift. Of course, not all of our companies take this as seriously as they should. We have a basic guideline for each inspection that requires companies to record or update information on building layout, fire suppression or detection systems, the number and locations of nearby hydrants, the locations of utility shutoffs such as gas and electric, the locations of annunciator panels and emergency exits, a very basic description of construction type, and a brief narrative specifying which companies will respond to a first-alarm fire and the positions they will take on arrival. The information is compiled and kept in binders, which are kept in the office of each company’s captain. This is one of the most important routine tasks fire companies can perform. However, I believe the information we require is insufficient for the hazards presented by modern methods of building construction and fire loading. With the many new buildings being erected in our city, companies need to go out and walk through these buildings while they are under construction to see how they are being built. Finished buildings are deceptive. We are seeing increasing numbers of buildings with lightweight components Enter 131 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_42 42 www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:12:49 AM
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  • 50. ROUNDTABLE such as trusses and wooden I-beams, tilt-up masonry walls, and lightweight steel framing and wall studs. In addition, many of the older buildings in the city are undergoing all types of rehab work, which completely changes the layout and fire loading of the structures, as well as adds lightweight building components to buildings that previously did not have them. On-duty companies should take every opportunity to visit these buildings, especially during construction or rehab, and become familiar with their layout and the hazards to firefighters created by the modern construction materials and practices. This information should be assimilated into a computer-based preplan system so that all of the companies in the city have ready access to it if a fire should occur in one these structures. Hugh Stott, deputy chief, West Chicago (IL) Fire District Response: For several years, our companies were out doing prefire surveys—measurement of the footprint of the building, the location of the key box, the location of the utility shutoffs, building construction hazards, overhead wires, chemical storage, the direction and distances to hydrants, and the location of alarm panels. That information was then entered into a computer to be converted into a usable and consistent format. We have been using mobile data computers for a few years to bring mobile mapping and incident information from the fire alarm office to our first-due apparatus. The data must be kept current. The keyholder and contact information is kept as current as practical by the alarm office, which receives the information from the Fire Prevention Bureau. Mike Reeves, captain, Lynchburg (VA) Fire Department Response: Our department conducted surveys in the past and filed them away, never to be seen again. We are now revisiting them under the name of “fire safety surveys.” This time we purchased a computer program in which to store the surveys. When a company is dispatched to an address where one of these surveys has been conducted, a pop-up on the responding unit’s computer makes the information available to all responding units. This program is in the early stages; it will take a long time to cover all businesses in town for information on water supply, hydrant location, key information, contacts, the building size and occupancy, and much more. In addition to information, digital photos and aerial views of the structures will be available. Rick DeGroot, deputy chief, Summit (NJ) Fire Department Response: Our small municipal department protects a suburban city of 25,000 in the NY/NJ metro area. We have recently implemented a program in which the suppression shifts are responsible for conducting preplans of commercial and multifamily buildings. Each platoon is assigned two building locations a month and performs site visits as a group while in service. One of the shift battalion chiefs is responsible for coordinating the program with the four duty shifts. Information includes construction type, occupancy, building status, emergency contacts, building size and layout, location of utility Enter 133 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_44 44 www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:12:56 AM
  • 51. Enter 134 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_45 45 1/7/09 9:12:59 AM
  • 52. ROUNDTABLE shutoffs, fire suppression and detection systems, exposure information, water supply availability, access problems, and any other hazards. The building is then given a numerical rating based on all of these factors, resulting in a risk assessment score. The crews also take digital photos of the building from all exposures and also try to get a picture of the roof. A drawing is also prepared using CAD software to produce interior floor plans and an exterior plot plan of the building. We try to secure floor plans from the building owner, if available. All this information is then uploaded into a commercially available software program that allows access via the Internet. We are also in the process of equipping our front-line apparatus with laptops to access this information in the field. Our experience has been very positive so far. Building intelligence is a critical component of what we do, and many of us have overlooked 2.8 MILLION BTU VS. YOUR TRAINEES Challenge your trainees to fight the MAGNUM Fire Training System with extinguishers or handlines for full scale hands-on training. With an output of 2.8 million BTU your trainees feel the heat and learn how to respond. Smart Controls shutdown the auto-ignition only if the fire is knocked out completely. For more information visit us online at www.bullexsafety.com. [ 1-888-4BULLEX ] [ WWW.BULLEXSAFETY.COM ] Enter 135 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_46 46 it for years. Taking advantage of available technology to get this critical information to our firefighters at the emergency scene can help to make our jobs safer and to better protect the public. Chris Stephens, lieutenant, Decatur Township (IN) Fire Department Response: Unfortunately, our department has no formal prefire planning program. The administration will support company officers who want to initiate an aggressive prefire planning program within their companies. The company with which I operate began an aggressive prefire planning program two years ago. We began with the buildings in our immediate response area and then spread out into our seconddue areas. We looked at several types of preplan sheets and chose one used by a neighboring department. It includes address, occupancy, building construction type, box assignment, exposures, fire flows, predicted strategies, and anticipated problems. We use the reverse side of the sheet, which is blank, to draw a rough sketch of the building layout. If the building is a simple structure, we record all interior walls, doors, etc. The more complex the structure, the more we do not do this. At the least, we record the building’s shape, egress/ingress points, hydrant locations, and gas/electric meter location. If a building has standpipe or sprinkler connections, we record their locations along with the location of the riser rooms. Once the information is finalized, we put the preplan sheet into a binder that is kept on our engine. We do this to allow the first-due officer to refer to the information or to pass the binder on to the IC if it is a working incident. The final step is to pass the information on to the other shifts; this is done verbally, or the officer/ firefighter reviews the preplan sheets. If there is a serious building hazard or code violation, we notify our code/prevention department immediately. Andy Krajewski, battalion chief, Golden Gate Fire Control Rescue District, Naples, FL Response: We have prefire plans on every front-line apparatus, reserve pumper, and shift battalion chief’s ve- www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:13:00 AM
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  • 54. ROUNDTABLE Advance Ultra® Wear Test hicle. A prefire plan coordinator assigns each shift at least one building a month in which to conduct a walk-through and develop the preplans. At the same time, we conduct a training session. At a minimum, engine companies in that zone walk through the structure as well. For each preplan, we have an occupancy form (text document), a site plan drawing (drawing program), and a more detailed drawing of each structure on the site (multiple-building school, golf course clubhouse and maintenance building and cart barn—also a drawing program). The occupancy form has the name and address of the site, emergency contact with phone number, type of occupancy, hydrant and fire department connection (FDC) location, number of floors, fire flow, building construction type (including material type for walls, floors, and trusses), roofing material, utilities shutoff locations, and a notes section for listing the locations of fire alarm control panel, key box, and additional hazards. On the drawings, the site plan will have the layout of the buildings, hydrant locations. On the individual building drawings, we have locations of hydrants, fire department connection/post-indicator valve, key box, fire alarm control panel, roof/attic access, and labeled interior layout (office/restroom). Vance L. Duncan III, deputy chief, Erie (PA) Bureau of Fire Response: Our fire suppression units conduct prefire plans containing building name and address, description, number of stories, building size (L × W), construction type, roof construction (trusses?), floor construction (trusses?), occupancy type, initial resources required (engines, trucks, rescues, chief officers), hazards to personnel, location of water supply, available flow, estimated fire flow (at 25-, 50-, 75-, and 100-percent involvement), fire behavior prediction, projected strategies, problems anticipated, utility locations, fire alarm panel location, key box location, fixed protection/detection systems, primary access point to interior, stairwell locations, roof access (from *One Month Trial 800-422-3833 w w w. q u e s t h q . c o m TENCATE is a trademark of ROYAL TEN CATE NV. SOUTHERNMILLS ADVANCE ULTRA are trademarks of SOUTHERN MILLS, Inc. CROSSTECH®, GORE® and designs are trademarks of W.L. Gore Associates, Inc. 3M and Scotchlite are trademarks of 3M Enter 137 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_48 48 Enter 138 at fireeng.hotims.com 1/7/09 9:13:04 AM
  • 55. ROUNDTABLE interior), owner contact information, occupant contact information, additional notes (address numbers visible from the street, building sides accessible, building setbacks or other barriers to aerial device operations, trees/shrubs that could hide hydrants or FDCs, barred windows or security doors, power lines or overhead obstructions to restrict the use of ladders, for example). This information is submitted to the administrative office and is input in the current dispatch system; the information will be input into the new Erie County Public Safety Dispatch Center’s computer system. Brian Zaitz, firefighter/paramedic, Metro West (MO) Fire Protection District Response: Prefire plans are essential to initial incident response for safe and effective mitigation. The first-due response units preplan the plans for their area. The survey is typically done during normal business hours and is not traditionally scheduled and conducted outside of the normal annual inspections. The engine company officer talks with the business owner as the remainder of his crew walks around the occupancy gathering information on building dimensions, FDCs, entrances, exits, and other notable features. They make a field sketch of the building and include the dimensions along with any FDCs, key box locations, entrances and exits, utility connections and hydrants located within close proximity. As the crew enters the building, they meet up with the officer in charge and begin a walk-through of the interior to note alarm panels, fire suppression systems, and building layout. These sketches and findings are then taken back to the station where a formal drawing is made and the information is translated, using computer software, into a prefire plan that is entered into the preplan software located on the laptop in all fire apparatus as well as staff vehicles. These preplans can be easily pulled up on the computer while en route or on arrival. They are listed by their street reference and correlate to a noted map page for ease of locating. Enter 139 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_49 49 Enter 140 at fireeng.hotims.com 1/7/09 9:13:06 AM
  • 56. ROUNDTABLE Enter 141 at fireeng.hotims.com Vicki Schmidt, firefighter/training officer, Buckfield (ME) Fire Department Response: Our rural department has started writing preplans for target hazards. We have software with an onboard computer with easy touch screen access that holds the plans while en route to calls. Residential structures have the basic size and construction details. Several other values are entered with a selection of default options offered by the software. Currently, most addresses have at least a default response plan; we are advancing those plans to include more detailed preplanning information. Structures, businesses, and properties outside the basic values have proven more challenging. Information includes water supplies, EMS response, staging areas, and alternative routes; we then place this information on plot maps, mostly using freely accessible Internetbased mapping software as the background. Firefighters have added photos to complement building footprint diagrams and to indicate utility connections, special hazards, and other important first-due information. We looked beyond the response plan to document exactly what the property involved, how we were going to mitigate an incident occurring there, and answered: “What are the top 10 things we need to know about this property?” Fire was our main incident, but there were several properties we found would prove demanding in even a small natural disaster. Evacuation plans, staging areas, and other logistical needs were realized for those areas. Although the computer contains the plans, we can also export to formats we can e-mail to mutual-aid towns, print for file, and review at training. David Comstock, chief, Western Reserve (OH) Joint Fire District Response: Department inspectors primarily complete the preplans; they are assisted by firefighters from the district’s three stations and have square footage of the building, building hazards, roof and floor assembly/composition, utility type and shutoff location, water flow needs and availability/location, structural and load hazards, and owner and occupant contact information. Unfortunately, this Enter 142 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_50 50 www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:13:08 AM
  • 57. ROUNDTABLE information is placed on paper and thereafter will be maintained in the inspection and department offices, as well as the district’s command vehicle. Firefighters and officers of the district understand the importance of having this information quickly available to the dispatchers and arriving firefighters but have not yet integrated this process into our dispatch system. A goal of the department (and other departments within the county) is to make preplan information readily accessible. The fire departments have jointly applied for a grant to improve the availability of information to our departments as well as to provide the information to other departments responding in mutualaid situations, via mobile data terminals in all apparatus. Rick Mosher, lieutenant, Merriam (KS) Fire Department Response: We conduct prefire planning during our commercial fire inspections. Our fire preplan database allows us to print an existing standardized form for each business in the city. This form is used to update or change information at the fire inspection. Then the fire companies update or create new files when visiting with the commercial businesses in our city during their fire inspection. Each year we inspect every commercial business in the city; this allows for great fire prevention and prefire plan updates. This is possible because our fully developed landlocked suburb is only 4.5 square miles. We note construction type, building and business owner information, type of occupancy, emergency contact information, key box, standpipe, sprinkler locations, any special hazards, special interest, and hazardous materials locations and quantity. We also check the box key to make sure the business master key is functional. This information is updated in our fire department database and uploaded to the Johnson County Fire Alarm Office, which can make the information available so that the MDTs in the engine or truck company can access the information. The MDT fire preplan is a great aid during the late-night/early-morning hours when the alarm company cannot contact a responsible party or if other business information is needed. This program has proven to be very successful. ● www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_51 51 If You Want To Handle More Call Volume With The Same Staff And Do It Lightingfast, You Need CADVoice ® 1626 Cole Blvd, Suite 325 Golden, CO 80401 (303) 932-0014 www.locution.com Enter 143 at fireeng.hotims.com 1/7/09 9:13:10 AM
  • 58. NEWS IN BRIEF FOR MORE NEWS, VISIT WWW.FIREENGINEERING.COM NFPA: Large-loss fires grew by more than 54 percent in 2007 n 2007, there were 25 more largeloss (property damage of at least $5 million) fires than in 2006, according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) report Large-Loss Fires in the United States 2007. This represents an increase of more than 54 percent (71 fires in 2007 vs. 46 fires in 2006). Among other key findings noted in the report are the following: • Large-loss fires killed 19 civilians and injured 168 firefighters and 67 civilians. • These fires resulted in $3.5 billion in direct property loss in 2007; total fire property loss for 2007 was $14.6 billion. • Most of the increase in dollar loss in 2007 resulted from the Southern California Firestorm. This fire was one of 20 fires that caused more than $20 million in property damage and was one of five that caused a loss of more than $100 million. ● I USFA and NIST complete thermal imaging study echnical Note 1499, Performance Metrics for Fire Fighting Thermal Imaging Cameras—Small- and Full-Scale Experiments, presents research conducted by the United States Fire Administration (USFA) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) on thermal imaging cameras (TICs). Imaging performing metrics (on image contrast, effective temperature range, resolution, and thermal sensitivity); test methods; and science-based information and national standards, including National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1801, Standard on Thermal Imagers for the Fire Service, are included. The Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate funded the report. T 52 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_52 52 Line-of-Duty Deaths October 13. Firefighter William Joseph Miller, 24, Blue Mound (IL) Fire Department: unknown, investigation ongoing. October 16. Paramedic-Firefighter Brian D. Neville, 32, Baltimore County (MD) Fire Department: cause unknown. October 29. Firefighter Adam Cody Renfroe, 24, Crossville (AL) Fire Department: perished inside the fire structure while searching for victims. November 3. Fire Police Officer Wayne Brown, 63, Bristol (RI) Fire and Rescue Department: cause of death undetermined. Source: USFA Firefighters Memorial Database U.S. Fire Administrator Greg Cade explains: “This research partnership has developed critical information to support the development of a national standard on thermal imaging technology that previously did not exist, which will enhance the safety of our nation’s firefighters.” A variety of commercially available TICs were assessed in the laboratory and in full-scale burns. The research also explored new technology that might enhance the performance of future thermal imaging devices and provide ways to incorporate new technology into enhanced infrared cameras. Differential resolution, thermal exposure, performance during suppression, and ease of use were also evaluated. This project complemented existing NIST-funded research related to developing a standard on thermal imaging technology. Thermal Imaging Research Needs for First Responders: Workshop Proceedings was previously published as part of this study. These reports can be downloaded, free of charge, from the USFA (www. USFA.dhs.gov) and NIST (www.NIST. gov) Web sites. Information about this partnership effort can be found under the Research section of the USFA Web site. ● NFA announces 2009 classes he National Fire Academy’s (NFA) Fiscal Year 2009 second semester application period opened on November 1 and includes classes that run from T April 1 through September 30, 2009. A Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) general admission application Form 75-5 should be submitted as soon as possible. Application information is available at http://www.usfa.dhs.gov/ nfa/about/index.shtm/. The NFA course schedule is at http://www.usfa.dhs.gov/ applications/nfacsd/. Additionally, the NFA recommends that applicants read Eight Tips for Completing a Successful NFA Application before filling out the FEMA Form 75-5 application. The document can be downloaded from http://www.usfa.dhs.gov/ nfa/about/attend/apply.shtm/. Specific questions can be submitted by clicking the “Contact Us” link at the top of the sites listed above. ● USFA forms partnership with the Lessons Learned Information Sharing Network he United States Fire Administration (USFA) has formed a partnership with the Lessons Learned Information Sharing Network (LLIS.gov), the national network of lessons learned, best practices, innovative ideas, and preparedness information for homeland security and emergency response professionals. LLIS. gov, a repository for information, also serves as a network that enables homeland security and emergency response professionals from across the country to share their knowledge and expertise in a secure, online environment, according to the USFA. T www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:13:26 AM
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  • 60. NEWS IN BRIEF LLIS.gov members can access the USFA Resource Page for USFA technical and special reports, related LLIS.gov original content, featured documents, and valuable links at LLIS.gov and then click on “US Fire Administration Resource Page” under “LLIS.GOV PARTNERS.” ● DHS simplifies grant process for localities, issues 2009 grant guidance ocal officials will find it easier to apply for a Department of Homeland Security (DHS) security grant for the 2009 $3 billion counterterrorism grant program. According to an article by Spencer S. Hsu, Washington Post staff writer, state and local agencies seeking grants will have “far fewer strings attached than in past years.” The states and agencies had been requesting modifications for some time. The following modifications of the program were also made: • Recipients were advised months earlier of the total amount of funding Congress mandated for the states and 62 designated high-risk cities. • Recipients can also do the following: spend up to 50 percent of homeland security grants for personnel expenses, up from 25 percent; ease a 25 percent local-match requirement for rail, transit, and port security aid; and lift a three-year limit on funding for intelligence analysts in law enforcement “fusion” centers, which police chiefs nationwide have requested. L MEDICAL PRODUCTS RECALLED • Mislabeled ReliOn insulin syringes. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified health care professionals and patients that Tyco Healthcare Group LP (Covidien) is recalling one lot of ReliOn sterile, single-use, disposable, hypodermic syringes with permanently affixed hypodermic needles, which may be mislabeled. Using these syringes may lead to patients’ receiving an overdose of as much as 2.5 times the intended dose of insulin, which may lead to hypoglycemia, serious health consequences, and even death. Only Lot Number 813900 ReliOn 1cc, 31-gauge, 100 units for use with U-100 insulin is involved; it is labeled as follows: “100 units for use with U-100 insulin.” The syringes, distributed by Can-Am Care Corp., are sold only at Walmart stores and Sam’s Club. Consumers and health care professionals who suspect they have the recalled product may contact Covidien at (866) 780-5436 or www.relion.com/ recall/. • Thoratec Corporation’s HeartMate II Left Ventricular Assist System (HM II LVAS). Damage may occur to the percutaneous lead of all serial numbers of Catalog No. 1355 or 102139, distributed since November 2003. Over time, the company explains: “Wear and fatigue of the percutaneous lead connecting the HeartMate II LVAS blood pump with the system controller may result in damage that could interrupt pump function, which could require reoperation to replace the pump and potentially result in serious injury or death. The estimated probability of the need for pump replacement because of percutaneous lead damage is 1.3 percent at 12 months, 6.5 percent at 24 months, and 11.4 percent at 36 months.” Healthcare professionals with patients supported by a HeartMate II LVAS should assess the wear and fatigue of the percutaneous lead and instruct patients on the management and care of the lead. The entire 2008 MedWatch Safety Summary, including a link to the manufacturer’s press release, is at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch/safety/2008/safety08.htm#HeartMate/. • ETHEX Corporation: oversized tablets of generic products. A nationwide voluntary recall was initiated for the following generic products because of the potential for oversized tablets and, consequently, overdosing, which may have serious consequences: —Propafenone HCl Tablets: 150 mg, 225 mg, and 300 mg. —Isosorbide Mononitrate Extended Release Tablets: 30 mg and 60 mg. —Morphine Sulfate Extended Release Tablets: 15 mg. —Morphine Sulfate Immediate Release Tablets: 15 mg and 30 mg. —Dextroamphetamine Sulfate Tablets: 10 mg. For lot numbers and additional information concerning these recalls, contact ETHEX Customer Service at (800) 748-1472 or by e-mail at customer-service@ ethex.com, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., CST. “Security Grants to Have Fewer Requirements: DHS Eases Rules Amid Criticism from Struggling Local Officials,” Washington Post, November 6, 2008. DHS released in November guidance pertaining to applications for the more than $3 billion funding program for states and local governments. Information on the preparedness grant programs is at www.dhs.gov and www.fema.gov/ grants/. ● NFPA codes and standards development process meets SAFETY Act criteria he U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), in September, designated the National Fire Protection T 54 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_54 54 A Association (NFPA) codes and standards i ti n d nd t nd rd development process as a “Qualified Anti-Terrorism Technology” (QATT) under the Support Anti-terrorism by Fostering Effective Technologies Act of 2002 (SAFETY Act). NFPA’s codes and standards development process was also certified as an “Approved Product for Homeland Security.” Designation as a QATT and certification as an approved product for homeland security under the SAFETY Act provide legal protection for the NFPA codes and standards development process as applied to antiterrorism. Federal protections under the DHS Designation and Certification are retroactive; the NFPA’s t hn l technology will be protected from its ill b pr t t d fr m it “first date of sale,” September 11, 2001. ● USFA highway vehicle fires report released n estimated 258,500 highway vehicle fires occur annually, resulting in 490 civilian deaths, 1,275 civilian injuries, and $1 billion in property loss,” according to the United States Fire Administration’s (USFA) Highway Vehicle Fires. The document, part of the USFA’s Topical Fire Report Series, was developed by the USFA’s National Fire Data Center and is based on 2004 to 2006 data from the National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS). A www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:13:29 AM
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  • 62. NEWS IN BRIEF The report also noted the following: • 84 percent of highway vehicle fires occur in passenger vehicles; • the leading causes of highway vehicle fires are accidental (29 percent) and failure of equipment (28 percent); and • 62 percent of these fires originate in the vehicle’s engine, running gear, or wheel areas. The report can be downloaded at http://www.usfa.dhs.gov/statistics/reports/index.shtm/. ● Federal rule will make it easier to make school buses safer ew federal rules will mandate higher seat backs, lap and shoulder belts on small school buses, and set safety standards for seat belts on large school buses, according to U.S. Secretary of Transportation Mary E. Peters. The new rule requires that all new U.S. school buses be equipped with 24-inchhigh seat backs; the current requirement is 20-inch-high seat backs. The higher seat backs, Peters explained, will help N prevent taller and heavier children from being thrown over the seat in a crash. In addition, all new school buses weighing less than five tons will be required to have three-point seat belts. New standards for seat belts on large school buses will be specified. Peters announced also that the federal government would now allow school districts to use federal highway safety funds to pay for the cost of installing belts. ● courses taken before October 1, 2008. Earlier this year, the NFA began issuing CEUs for its online Coffee Break Training, available at NFA Online (www.nfaonline. dhs.gov). Direct questions about the CEU program to Stacey Harmon, instructional systems specialist, at (301) 447-1624 or Stacey.A.Harmon@dhs.gov. ● NFA to issue CEUs for on-campus courses E n October 1, 2008, the United States Fire Administration began issuing continuing education units (CEUs) to students attending courses on the National Fire Academy (NFA) campus in Emmitsburg, Maryland. Students who attend NFA on-campus classes designated with an “R” will receive from 5.0 to 8.0 CEUs for each course. The number of CEUs depends on course length. The CEUs will be printed on the student’s end-of-course certificate. CEUs cannot be granted for on-campus O 2009 Harvard Fire Executive Fellowship applications due February 2009 ight senior fire executives will be awarded fellowships to attend Harvard’s annual “Program for Senior Executives in State and Local Government.” The three-week program will be held June 7-26 and July 5-24, 2009. Fellows must be available to attend either session. The program will provide the tuition. Applicants are responsible for travel costs to the final interview process in Emmitsburg, Maryland and, if selected, also to Cambridge. The National Emergency Training Center in Emmitsburg will provide housing for the interview Enter 147 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_56 56 1/7/09 9:13:35 AM
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  • 64. NEWS IN BRIEF process in April 2009. Fellows are expected to continue their professional contributions to fire and emergency services in light of their state and local program experience. The application form and directions for applying are available at http://ksgexecprogram.harvard.edu/download/ ksgapp.doc/. School of Government. Application packages postmarked after February 14, 2009, will not be considered. Direct questions regarding application procedures only to Mary Wingert at the USFA at (301) 447-1085 or (e-mail) mary. wingert@dhs.gov/. Additional information is available at www.usfa.dhs.gov/ nfa/harvard/index.shtm or http://ksgexecprogram.harvard.edu/Programs/sl/ overview.aspx/. ● report to the Web site in October. The report (#08-511) documents a highway incident that has a favorable outcome because the crews maintained situational awareness and employed best practices to avert injury. The report is at www. firefighternearmiss.com/. ● Near-Miss Reporting System posts 2,000th report IAFC and TV Worldwide launch TV channel for responders T he National Fire Fighter Near-Miss Reporting System posted its 2,000th he Internet television channel www. iafctv.org has been established as a worldwide educational resource for fire and emergency service communities. Launched jointly by the International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC) and TV Worldwide, it will present newscasts, town hall meetings, IAFC conferences, interviews with fire service leaders, and emergency alerts, according to the IAFC. Additional information is available from Edie Clark, IAFC’s director of communications, at (703) 896-4827 or eclark@iafc.org/. ● T NFPA hosts Urban Fire Forum wenty fire chiefs, including Gregory Cade, U.S. fire administrator and a former chief of the Virginia Beach (VA) Fire Department, participated in the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Urban Fire Forum in Quincy, Massachusetts, in October. Among topics addressed included fire and life safety challenges in a depressed economy, community/fire service partnering projects directed at the challenges caused by the housing foreclosure crisis, the NFPA-Columbus (Ohio) fire safety project, cultural recruitment, fire-based EMS, multiagency large housing development community projects, incident management, trends in firefighter deaths and injuries, succession planning, wind-driven fires, formulating a fire service legislative strategy, the fire data model/data exchange project, and updates on successful sprinkler installation programs. Facilitators for this year’s forum were Chief Bill Stewart, Toronto (Ont., Canada) Fire Department and Metropolitan “Metro” Fire Chiefs Association president; Russ Sanders, Metro Chiefs executive secretary and NFPA regional manager; and Curt Varone, NFPA’s director of public fire protection. ● T Enter 149 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_58 58 www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:13:40 AM
  • 65. Sterling Rope Lifelines for Rescue SuperStaticTM HTP StaticTM FireTech 32TM 8mm Personal Escape WaterLineTM In October 2007, Sterling Rope and Ropes that Rescue constructed a highline that spanned over 2100 feet of Arizona desert, from Bell Rock to Courthouse Butte. We did this not to break records, but to expand our ex tensive field testing so that we can continue to improve our products. Our products are not only certified to NFPA standards, but are constantly tested to perform in extreme real world applications. No matter what your rescue or safety applications are, Sterling ropes are your lifelines. Learn more about Sterling Rope’s entire lineup of rescue, escape, and personal safety ropes at www.sterlingrope.com. SuperStatic: The mainstay of any rope rescue kit, these are the best per forming, most durable nylon static ropes. HTP Static: Super strong, low stretch, 100% polyester static rope. Outstanding performance and durability due to its unique construction. FireTech 32 Personal Escape Ropes: From 6.8mm – 9mm, Sterling offers the most tested, proven and diverse line of high heat resistant search and escape cords. PHOTO BY JOHN BURCHAM The right rope for rescue. 0901FE_59 59 www.sterlingrope.com 800.788.7673 Enter 150 at fireeng.hotims.com MADE IN USA 1/7/09 9:13:48 AM
  • 66. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (January 2009) Codes are everybody’s business at least our take on the challenge. If we ditor in Chief Bobby Halton’s “A Good Sign, the Maltese Cross” (Editor’s Opinion, September 2008) was great. We, as a service, have to pay more attention to codes—even firefighters on the line. All too often, we assume that it’s only for the prevention firefighters. I am curious. Did the building identification Maltese symbol provision pass at the convention? Chris H. Wessels Assistant Chief Atlanta (GA) Fire Rescue E Jack Murphy, Fire Engineering Advisory Board Member, responds: The F75 IFC Part 1 and IBC Part 2 code proposal for a national building identification sign did not pass. The ICC committee could not be overridden from the floor. Efforts will be made to modify the proposal and reintroduce it at the next code cycle. “Old” and “new” firefighters must share the challenges ditor in Chief Bobby Halton’s “NASCAR and Elephants” (Editor’s Opinion, Fire Engineering, August 2008) was very moving and, as always, thought provoking. For what it is worth, I see much of the same. As “older” firefighters, we share, by our actions, what we think is important. I do not see any less “leaning into” our work in the generations that follow us. I see those folks as far more adaptive and flexible and smart than I ever thought I could be. I’m a 9∕16-inch wrench, and a fair one. They are that and computers and cell phones and texting and so much more— and largely with a large, strong, hardworking, and happy heart. Our work, to me, is challenging in many regards. We as a culture are a people of challenge. Challenge defines us. If we’re happy with our newer firefighters, perhaps we’re sharing “the challenge” or E 60 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_60 60 are not happy with “them,” maybe we’re not doing our “old guy” and “old girl” part in sharing the challenge. The challenge speaks for itself, and it demands, of all things, sacrifice of something greater than we are. I have heard that great people are not average article and book about high-rise firefighting, begins to closely observe highrise construction, thinks about every high-rise operation response, and adds some unique experience to the body of accumulated knowledge about high-rise firefighting. Into this mental mix comes worst-case scenarios—“what ifs” such as We, as a service, have to pay more attention to codes—even firefighters on the line. All too often, we assume that it’s only for the prevention firefighters. people with something added but average people with nothing taken away. So, our challenge as “older firefighters” is to make certain that the first thing we do is not to take anything away from these folks. Maybe our disappointment should be with ourselves. Thanks for challenging us to make sure we’re in the right place and for challenging us to take nothing away. Brian Crandell Assistant Chief Central Valley Fire District Gallatin County, Montana How high-rise experts evolve would like to comment on the great article “High-Rise Firefighting Perils: Veterans’ Perspectives” by Jeff Crow in the October 2008 issue. Every decade or so, a veteran fire chief is assigned to a downtown highrise district in a major city, as I was 20 years ago, and is shocked and amazed to discover the potential major disaster of high-rise fires. This chief quickly starts to ask questions of every veteran chief, past and present, who ever responded to a high-rise fire. Then he devours every I uncontrolled fire spreading from floor to floor; hundreds of people trapped in the buildings; fires that spread 10 or 20 floors; billowing smoke over the skies of the city for several days; and, finally, high-rise buildings collapsing into the streets and nearby buildings. Next, the chief starts to talk about the problem to anyone who will listen and finds not many listeners outside of the high-rise district. If lucky, he begins to lecture and teach high-rise tactics and strategy and finally writes about the problem in an article or a book, as Jeff Crow has done so well. I would like to call attention to the fact that I am the author of the following four books, published by Fire Engineering: Safety and Survival on the Fireground (1992), Strategy of Firefighting (2007), Command and Control of Fires and Emergencies (1999), and Collapse of Burning Buildings (1988). Command and Control of Fires and Emergencies includes the most information about high-rise firefighting. The October issue is great. Vincent Dunn Deputy Chief (Ret.) Fire Department of New York www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:35:05 AM
  • 67. headsets intercoms bone conduction interfaces accessories i n t e g r a t e d C O M M U N I C A T I O N Enter 151 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_61 61 S Y S T E M S 7340 SW Durham Road Portland, OR 97224 USA 800-527-0555 email: sales@firecom.com www.firecom.com 1/7/09 9:35:07 AM
  • 68. Servo Command™ A Winning Combination... The Servo Command™ Foam Proportioning System on The Fire Apparatus of Your Choice Servo Command™ Foam Proportioning Modules are available from National Foam and your preferred Fire Truck manufacturer. By specifying Servo Command™, National Foam will provide the industry standard “On-Demand” foam system and pump module built, tested and certified for the most reliable and accurate foam proportioning. This module’s construction and reliability are based on decades of experience and proven performance in the most challenging environments. With over one thousand units in the world, NF is clearly the market leader. NF’s module in combination with the apparatus of your choice will provide years of dependable service. • Foam Proportioning Pump Modules for Serious Flammable Liquid Response. • Servo Command™ - Simply the best industrial foam proportioning solution available. • Request NF Servo Command™ by name from your preferred apparatus manufacturer. RED ALERT ® Emergency Hotline (1) 610 363 1400 Exton, PA 19341 USA Tel (610) 363 1400 Fax (610) 524 9073 www.kidde-fire.com Enter 152 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_62 62 1/7/09 9:35:08 AM
  • 69. The Fire Service and Green Building Construction: An Overview B Y R O N A L D R . S PA D A F O R A 1 HIS ARTICLE PRESENTS THE FUNDAMENTALS OF green building construction in the United States. Key terminology, indicated in italics, is included in the Glossary. Green technology is becoming increasingly prevalent throughout the United States and will have to be evaluated from the perspective of preincident planning. T THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT Building construction and occupancy use greatly affect human health and the environment. Vast amounts of resources are employed during construction, renovation, and operation. The production of these resources negatively impacts our environment. Buildings worldwide use an estimated three billion tons of raw materials annually. In the United States, residential and commercial buildings consume almost 50 percent of the total U.S. primary energy and produce more than 130 million tons of construction and demolition waste yearly. Pollutants released from energy consumption in buildings include sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon dioxide, and mercury. SUSTAINABLE DESIGN Green building construction, also known as sustainable design, allows large metropolitan areas to provide healthful indoor and outdoor environments, fight climate change, and conserve natural resources. Advanced technologies are creating high-performance buildings that use energy efficiently and effectively. These structures are built in an ecological manner. The objectives of sustainable design include protecting the health of building occupants; improving worker productivity; using energy, water, and materials more economically; using recycled building materials; and reducing the environmental impact associated with the building construction industry. THE GREEN BUILDING BOOM The market for America’s green building construction for 2007 has been estimated to be in the neighborhood of $30 billion. The U.S. market in green building products and services for this same year was approximately $12 billion. Green buildings are being erected in many large municipalities throughout the country. In San Francisco, municipal buildings (new construction and major renovations more than 5,000 square feet) must be built green. Chicago requires that all new public buildings be of www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_63 63 (1) You never know what you will encounter when operating in and around green buildings. These roof-mounted mirrors (heliostats) are used to reflect the sun’s rays down to a two-acre park below. (Photos by author.) sustainable design. The Windy City has green schools, police stations, and libraries. In September 2007, Orlando opened Florida’s first green firehouse, Station 15 in Lake Nona’s Savannah Park district. Seattle, Washington, passed a law in 2005 requiring new prisons, offices, schools, colleges, and other publicly funded buildings to be constructed in an environmentally friendly manner. New building code regulations in Boston, Massachusetts, necessitate green construction criteria for structures greater than 50,000 square feet. Atlanta, Georgia, recently built an award-winning live-work-play community (Atlantic Station) using sustainable design in an area that was previously the site of Georgia’s first steel mill. In January 2008, Dallas, Texas, became the nation’s first major city to launch a comprehensive Web site dedicated to the environment (www.GreenDallas.net), reflecting its commitment to green initiatives. In New York City (NYC), Local Law 86/2005, known as the Green City Buildings Act, requires most capital construction and major alterations to be built green. NYC owns approximately 1,300 buildings and leases more than 12.8 million square feet of office space. This directive will affect an estimated $12 billion in construction over the city’s 10-year capital plan. In Lower Manhattan, the Battery Park City Authority uses sustainable design for all commercial and residential building construction. The Solaire, completed in 2003, is the nation’s first green residential high-rise building. It has photovoltaic FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 63 1/7/09 9:35:13 AM
  • 70. ● GREEN CONSTRUCTION Glossary Brownfield: Abandoned or underused industrial or commercial facility/site. Building flush-out: The practice of allowing building materials and finish coatings to cure and release volatile organic compounds (VOC) prior to building occupation. Building systems commissioning: The process of ensuring installed energy systems function as specified; performed by a third-party Commissioning Authority. Certified (sustainable harvest) wood: Wood harvested in an environmentally friendly manner to encourage responsible forest management practices. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC): Ozone-depleting chemicals used in heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, and refrigeration (HVACR) systems. Cradle-to-cradle: A material or product that is recycled into a new product at the end of its defined life. Energy Star: A U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)administered program that evaluates products based on energy efficiency. Engineered (prefabricated) lumber: Composite wood products (PV) cell panels on the exterior wall façade that convert sunlight into electricity. U.S. GREEN BUILDING COUNCIL The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), established in 1993, is a nonprofit organization consisting of the nation’s “Leader Of The Pack” made from lumber, fiber, veneer, and glue. Fly ash and slag concrete: Lightweight concrete using recycled aggregates for the cement mix. Fly ash is a by-product of coal during the generating of electricity; slag is produced during the reduction of iron ore to iron in a blast furnace. Graywater reuse. Domestic wastewater used once in a kitchen/ laundry/bathroom sink, shower, tub, or washer. It is refiltered and reused for tasks that don’t require potable water. Heat island effect. Elevated temperatures over a metropolitan area caused by structural and pavement heat releases and vehicle emissions. Light pollution. Obtrusive light produced by humans that can have adverse health effects and disrupt ecosystems. Low-emissivity (low-E) windows. Windows that inhibit the transmission of radiant heat while allowing natural sunlight to pass through, thus reducing the amount of energy lost through windows. Sick building syndrome. Occupants’ acute, diagnosable illness whose cause and symptoms can be directly attributed to pollutants within the building. foremost leaders from the building industry. It is composed of more than 12,000 organizations. Members include building owners, real estate developers, facility managers, architects, engineers, general contractors, subcontractors, product manufacturers, government agencies, and nonprofits. The USGBC mission statement seeks to transform the way buildings and PO Box 159 4444 E. 146 th St. N. Skiatook, OK. 74070 1-800-260-9950 www.huskyportable.com 970-461-8731 OnSceneSolutions.com Husky’s New Pinch Free Frame Design!!! (standard) Products – x Folding Frame Tanks (steel, alum) Pinch Free!!! x Husky’s Patent Pending “Easy Lift Handles” Standard x Self Supporting Tanks (100 – 40,000 gal.) x Salvage Covers, Hall Runners, Hose Bed Covers x De-Con Pools, Staging Mats, Supply Line Brackets Husky’s #1 Concern Is Customer Satisfaction! Call Today!!! Ph 800-260-9950 / Fax 918-217-3483 www.huskyportable.com Call for a Dealer Near You! Enter 153 at fireeng.hotims.com • Lifetime Warranty • Anodized, Aluminum Construction • Easy Online Ordering • Rated Up To 1,000 lbs Capacity Enter 154 at fireeng.hotims.com 64 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_64 64 1/7/09 9:35:15 AM
  • 71. The ISG ELITE is the only imager in the world that can provide a clear thermal image up to temperatures of 2,000°F One day, it could save your life. Enter 155 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_65 65 1/7/09 9:35:19 AM
  • 72. ● GREEN CONSTRUCTION 2 (2) A bicycle storage room could create an entanglement hazard for firefighters operating under smoky conditions. communities are designed, built, and operated. Its goal is to make them environmentally and socially responsible, healthful, and enhancers of the quality of life. The USGBC created in 1999 Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®)—a voluntary, consensus-based national standard for constructing high-performance, sustainable buildings—as a rating system for new commercial buildings. It is now used as a model for neighborhood development and a wide variety of building occupancy groups. LEED® addresses new construction, core and shell; system operations; and maintenance. Financial incentives (tax credits and loan guarantees) can be obtained from the federal government under the U.S. Energy Policy Act of 2005. State and local monetary motivations may also be available to governmental and private builders. LEED® GREEN BUILDING RATING SYSTEM™ LEED® certification is based on the Green Building Rating System™. It has seven prerequisites with specific design and performance criteria and a point system that is organized into six broad categories. Although prerequisites do not provide points toward the overall score, all must be met to qualify for certification. The six general categories are as follows: Sustainable Sites (maximum 14 points): erosion and sediment control (prerequisite); urban and brownfield redevelopment, building orientation; encouraging the reuse of existing buildings and sites, site selection; reducing the adverse environmental impact of new developments; storm water management; garden roofs; bicycle stands and parking spaces for carpools, alternative transportation; reducing heat island effect and light pollution. Water Efficiency (maximum 5 points): water use reduction, graywater reuse technologies, high-efficiency plumbing fixtures, irrigation technology, water-efficient landscaping. Energy and Atmosphere (maximum 17 points): minimum energy performance (prerequisite), building systems commissioning (prerequisite); chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) reduction in HVACR equipment (prerequisite); optimize energy performance; Energy Star appliances, compact fluorescent lamps/ bulbs, on-site renewable energy, PV cell panels; low-emissivity (low-E) windows; properly sized HVAC systems; additional 1 2 3 Enter 156 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_66 66 www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:35:20 AM
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  • 74. ● GREEN CONSTRUCTION 3 commissioning, measurement and verification; alternate energy, alternate fuels. Materials and Resources (maximum 13 points): storage and collection of recyclables (prerequisite); reducing the life-cycle environmental impact of materials; construction waste management; encouraging the use of engineered (prefabricated) lumber in construction; certified (sustainable harvest) wood; reusing an already existing building shell; lightweight building materials, recycled materials in construction; fly ash and slag concrete; use of local/regional (500-mile radius) materials; cradle-to-cradle technology. Indoor Environmental Quality (maximum 15 points): minimum indoor air quality performance (prerequisite); environmental tobacco smoke control (prerequisite); reduc- 4 5 (3) Graywater reuse technology introduces chemicals as part of its odor-control system. Acquire vital information from the appropriate material safety data sheets to enhance firefighter safety. (4) A green building parking garage provides an electric fill station for its residents. Extinguish incipient fires in these areas with dry chemical or carbon dioxide extinguishing agents. 4 ing indoor pollutants; decreasing the threat of sick building syndrome to occupants; use of low-emitting volatile organic compounds (VOC) adhesives, sealants, paints, thinners, carpets, and composite wood; installing permanent carbon dioxide (CO2) monitoring systems; increased ventilation levels; building flush-out before occupancy; acoustic control; daylighting; sun control and shading devices; improving thermal comfort. Innovation and Design Process (maximum 5 points): using a LEED® accredited professional and incorporating green building features not addressed by the LEED® Green Building Rating System™. There are four LEED® certification levels: Basic—26 to 32 points; 6 Enter 158 at fireeng.hotims.com 68 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_68 68 www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:35:26 AM
  • 75. If You Find Yourself a Little on Edge No Rescue is Ordinary — Your Equipment Shouldn’t Be Either For more information contact your CMC Rescue Dealer or visit www.cmcrescue.com Professional rescue is serious business. You have to be able to trust your training and your equipment. CMC Rescue understands. For 30 years, we’ve earned our reputation for quality and innovation by designing and developing advanced equipment to make rescuers safer and more effective. Request the CMC Catalog online or call 800-235-5741. Enter 159 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_69 69 1/7/09 9:35:37 AM
  • 76. ● GREEN CONSTRUCTION Silver—33 to 38 points; Gold—39 to 51 points; and Platinum—more than 51 points. IMPORTANT DESIGN FEATURES Listed below are five important green building design features that chief officers and firefighters should become familiar with to help ensure successful, effective, and safe firefighting operations. Lightweight building materials. Green building construction design uses lightweight and recycled materials 1 to reduce cost, waste, and energy. They include plastics, straw bale (agriboard), bamboo, lightweight concrete, engineered lumber, laminated wood I-beams, wooden roof and floor trusses connected with metal gusset plates, and light-gauge coldformed steel and open-web steel bar joists. These materials are alternatives to dimensional lumber, standard concrete, and traditional heavy steel beams. In general, lightweight structural elements are rapidly affected by the heat from a fire, causing THEIR PPV SUPER WON’T RUN VAC’S ON A GFCI? VR2 WILL! NEW! Super Vac Variable Speed VR2 runs on GFCI with no problems. Plus it has no CO problems and works with 15 amp circuit breakers. This VR2 provides precise control of the air movement and up to 30% more airflow than other single speed electric PPV. See your dealer for the New VR2 from Super Vac in sizes16”,18”, 20’’ and 24”. Shown below is 18” model with optional Light Kit and Chevron reflective decal. NEW them to weaken and eventually fail. Plastics melt or crumble under fire conditions and emit large amounts of smoke and toxic gases. Engineered lumber allows for less construction waste but usually is less substantial than dimensional lumber. The reduction in size and mass typically correlates to a reduction in the time firefighters have to safely perform interior firefighting operations. Laminated wood I-beams may have web components constructed of recycled wood chips that can lose their cohesiveness when exposed to fire. The top and bottom chords of these structural elements are glued to the web and may also break apart when heated. The metal gusset plates connecting wooden trusses will fall off as the heat from the fire disintegrates the wood they are penetrating. Light-gauge steel wall studs, C-joists, and open-web steel bar joists will reach their softening point (1,100°F) and failure point (1,300°F) in a very short time (five to 10 minutes). Their low heat threshold corresponds to reduced mass. On a positive note, however, some cement mixes using synthetics, slag, or fly ash aggregate to replace conventional sand and gravel form a lightweight concrete that is stronger than standard concrete. Lightweight construction should influence the way your fire department operates. Chief officers must be acutely aware of the duration of the incident. Remember, the time your communications office received the alarm is not the time the fire started. This gap could encompass hours. Your size-up strategy should be strictly defensive when you encounter a heavy fire situation in an unoccupied building. Operations should change quickly from an offensive attack to “surround and drown” tactics in buildings constructed of lightweight structural elements when initial hoselines are unsuccessful in controlling a fire threatening lightweight load-bearing elements. PV cell panels. A PV cell panel system generally has four primary components: (1) PV cell panels made from silicon alloys that absorb the sun’s rays and convert them into electricity, (2) a charge controller that protects storage batteries from overcharging, (3) batteries that store the direct-current (DC) electricity, and (4) an inverter that changes the DC electricity stored in the batteries 2 www.supervac.com Super Vacuum Manufacturing Co.,Inc. P.O.Box 87,Loveland,CO 80539 1.800.525.5224 Enter 160 at fireeng.hotims.com www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_70 70 1/7/09 9:35:39 AM
  • 77. Entenmann-Rovin Co. WORLD LEADER IN QUALITY BADGES SINCE 1888 www.ENTENMANN-ROVIN.com 800-581-3535 or 323-278-1999 Fax: 323-278-1980 2425 S. GARFIELD AVENUE, LOS ANGELES, CA 90040 Enter 161 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_71 71 1/7/09 9:35:42 AM
  • 78. ● GREEN CONSTRUCTION to standard 110/240 volts alternating current (AC). PV cell panels can be found on building roofs, setbacks, and wall facades. This alternate energy source can inhibit firefighter access to the areas in which it is installed. It could also negate ladder placement (apparatus and portable), depending on the size and positioning of the PV cell system, and hinder egress from the roof or setback. This would be especially important in an emergency where firefighters or occupants must be rescued. Do not breach PV cell panels to obtain a ventilation hole. PV cell panels are wired to enhance volts and amps. Even when power is removed from the panels, wiring may remain energized during daylight hours or when illuminated by lighting. During fire conditions, water and metal tools are used extensively for extinguishment, forcible entry, ventilation, and overhaul. Preplan your firefighting strategy accordingly. Hauling a hoseline up to the roof that has PV solar panels and maneuvering it once on the roof can be very dangerous. Firefighters snagging hose could lose their balance and fall from the roof. The panels also present a tripping and entanglement hazard. Flames extending through the roof or out of top-floor windows can compromise the integrity of the panels, conduit, and insulation of the system. In these instances, firefighters can suffer an electrical shock, or worse. You will also be faced with electricity hazards in the room or area where the storage batteries and other components of the system are located. These systems can also hamper or prevent vertical and horizontal ventilation. A PV cell panel roof arrangement, for example, can cause you to cut the primary ventilation hole in an area other than the ideal location (directly over the fire). This can lead to fire’s spreading laterally across the top-floor ceiling to the diverted roof opening, endangering firefighters and occupants inside the building. The lack of a properly placed roof opening can also cause heat and the products of combustion to build up inside the structure. This situation can lead to flashover or backdraft conditions. Inadequate ventilation can also inhibit visibility, making interior searches for victims more difficult. Also, a PV cell panel system is just more weight the building’s load-bearing structural members must support. This is in addition to what firefighters already have to deal with (cell phone sites, wood decking, furniture, roof gardens, gravity tanks, penthouses, and antennae). This weight increases the chance of collapse should a fire or inclement weather conditions compromise these building elements. Some recommendations when encountering structures with PV cell panel installations include the following: • Preplan sites to become familiar with components’ locations and help formulate firefighting strategy. • Train all members of your department on the panel sites; emphasize operational dangers and safety considerations. • Include PV cell panel system information in computer communication technologies designed to provide responding chief officers and firefighters with critical building data. • Work with legislators in developing codes and ordinances for these systems that meet your department’s require- miniUNICUS is our new budget minded integrated breathing air cylinder recharging system for high or low pressure SCBA or SCUBA cylinders. It might be smaller than our UNICUS III Series Cylinder Recharging Systems, but miniUNICUS is not short on features. FEATURES miniUNICUS Electric Motor Drive • Hinged Gauge Panel with Final Pressure Gauge, Storage Pressure Gauge, Oil Pressure Gauge and Individual Fill Position Pressure Gauges • E-Stop Button • Industry First UL® Listed Electrical Panel - Standard • PLC Controller with NEMA 4 Electrical Enclosure • Smart Pad Operator Interface console with 4-Line Text Display • Sound Attenuating Enclosure with Slam-Action Latches and Lift-Off Hinges BAUER COMPRESSORS Inc. 1328 Azalea Garden Road • Norfolk, VA 23502 Phone (757) 855-6006 • Fax (757) 857-1041 E-Mail: sls@bauercomp.com • www.bauercomp.com Versatile Breathing Air Systems... from the Breathing Air Experts Enter 162 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_72 72 1/7/09 9:35:42 AM
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  • 80. ● GREEN CONSTRUCTION ments for safety. Consider including the installation of placards and signage on the exterior of the structure as well as in areas where PV cell panel components are present. The signs will warn firefighters that PV cell panels are present and inform them where emergency electrical shutoffs can be found. • Insist on the provision for remote emergency shutoffs that are separate and distinct from the main electrical panel. Ideal placement would be on the roof or setback where the PV cell panels are found and outside the battery storage room/area. • Seek a reasonably wide operating space around the perimeter of PV cell panel configurations atop roofs and setbacks. Furthermore, insist that these systems be installed in a place remote from combustibles (foliage, furnishings, equipment, and paints). • Store batteries in isolated areas within enclosed rooms. Batteries should be inside code-approved, properly vented cabinets or on racks situated above the floor. Daylighting. This feature may have a significant impact on the construction of a building’s roof, walls, and interior design. It will also affect the way firefighters access, operate, ventilate, and egress structures during fire situations. Multiple skylights are popular daylighting roof additions. When removed, they provide firefighters with a convenient way to vertically ventilate the building. Firefighters must be careful, however, not to fall through these glass fixtures during nighttime 3 and smoky rooftop conditions. Saw-tooth roofs containing roof monitors (vertical skylights) provide added natural top lighting to the interior of a building. These roofs may be difficult to ladder properly because of their corrugated design. They can also prove problematic to operate on when performing ventilation duties. Venting roof monitors may not provide adequate vertical ventilation during a fire if the wind direction is such that the products of combustion are pushed back into the building. Clerestory windows, located glazing running along the top exterior walls, are another daylighting design feature. Avoid placing ladders directly onto walls containing these windows. Failure of the glass could cause a firefighter to fall into the building against which the ladder is placed. These windows can be prime locations for initiating horizontal ventilation should the need exist. Sun control and shading devices are on exterior walls above or adjacent to the building openings and windows they serve. They improve the quality of light inside the building as well as help to reduce heat gain and cooling costs. Overhangs, awnings, trellises, and metal or glass fins are examples. Daylighting systems can hinder ladder positioning, roof access, and ventilation operations on the fireground. Inside the structure, each window facing the sun may have a sunlight reflector or light shelf installed. The shelf can be a mirror or a shiny metal designed to disperse sunlight toward the ceiling. It can be fixed or tiltable into multiple positions that enhance reflective properties. A light shelf will usually Disaster Response Solutions, Inc. Made by EMTs and Paramedics for EMTs and Paramedics™ We Understand the Needs of the EMS, Fire and Rescue Community Custom Built MCI Trailers - 8’ to 32’ Visit Our Web Site At www.mcitrailer.com The Bantam™ New Web Site Section: Incident Command and Mass Casualty Response Equipment Light In Size, But With A Heavy Punch. 513-831-4691 sales@mcitrailer.com w w w. m c i t r a i l e r. c o m Enter 164 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_74 74 1/7/09 9:35:47 AM
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  • 82. ● GREEN CONSTRUCTION (5) The Solaire, the first “green” residential high-rise building in the United States, has photovoltaic (PV) cell panels as an integral component of its front façade and doorway canopy. 5 be placed above the height of most people’s heads, but not always. It is important to know where these shelves are within a building; they could cause trauma injury, impair horizontal ventilation efforts, and hinder egress. The accepted use of atria in green building construction allows the builder to take advantage of available sunlight as well as to supply natural ventilation throughout the occupied area. An atrium is a challenging interior design feature for the fire service. It can provide a vertical flue for fire to spread quickly, endangering occupants who may be trapped in unprotected hallways, corridors, and passageways. Chief officers should review their fire code regulations pertaining to the protection of atria using automatic sprinklers, smoke detectors, fire alarms, fire partitions/ separations, and smoke-management equipment. Garden roofs. They are also called green or environmentally friendly and may contain shade trees, ornamen- 4 tal plants, grass, fruits, wild flowers, and vegetables. They can be found in all types of structures from highrise office buildings to private dwellings. Garden roofs can be open to the public or be private. They help to reduce the ambient temperature inside buildings and energy consumption. These roofs also help protect roofing materials from the elements, thereby extending the lifespan of the roof. From a firefighting perspective, garden roofs add weight to a structure, which can jeopardize the safety of all members operating at the scene of a fire. The foliage, growing media (natural soil, perlite, vermiculite, rockwool), and membrane components (root resistant layer, drainage layer, filter layer) all add to the live load of the structure. The growing media also tend to reduce rainwater runoff, which will increase the weight the roof must support. During fire operations, exterior high-caliber streams and hoselines will add more water weight to a garden roof whose structural elements may be seriously weakened by the fire. These conditions can lead to a full or partial collapse of the roof and subsequent failure of bearing walls and the floors below. It is imperative that the presence of Enter 166 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_76 76 1/7/09 9:35:51 AM
  • 83. GREEN CONSTRUCTION ● garden roofs be noted during building inspections and the information be archived in your department’s communications database for transmittal to responding units during fire response. Garden roofs will also make it more difficult to ladder the roof, access and egress the building, operate hoselines and tools and equipment, and vertically ventilate the roof. A garden roof can make it impossible to cut a primary vertical ventilation hole. This will cause conditions inside the building to worsen quickly, endangering firefighters, occupants, and the building’s structural elements. Alternate fuels. Ethanol, methanol, natural gas, propane/butane (LPG), hydrogen, and biodiesel are hazardous materials you may encounter during operations inside green buildings. These fuels can be used to provide energy for stoves, appliances, furnaces, machinery, engines, boilers, hot-water heaters, air-conditioners, and turbines. They can also be employed to generate electricity. Extinguish fires involving the flammable liquids ethanol and methanol with alcohol-resistant foam concentrates. Spill fires involving polar solvent liquids will quickly absorb the water content of the foam blanket created by standard foam concentrates and continue to burn. Alcohol liquid fires have undetectable flames and generate little or no smoke, making locating the seat of the fire all the more difficult. Natural gas (approximately 97 percent methane) is flammable and lighter than air. It is colorless and odorless, although the utility company adds an odorant when it is used domestically. These types of fires are also clean burning and can be difficult to see under certain conditions. Using a thermal imaging camera (TIC) is critical in detecting invisible flames generated by alternate fuels. Also employ combustible gas meters to check if the vapors are within their lower and upper explosive limits. Natural gas will ignite if its air-to-gas mixture is between five and 15 percent. Provide adequate vertical and high-point ventilation to allow the vapors to dissipate rapidly. LPG is a flammable, liquefied gas with vapors that are heavier than air. Explosive limits are between two and 10 percent LPG vapors in air. Ventilation fans may be needed to drive low-lying vapor out of cellar and subcellar areas. 5 www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_77 77 Hydrogen is an extremely flammable gas with a wide explosive range (four and 75 percent hydrogen gas in air). It is the lightest of all gases and will disperse quickly when adequate ventilation is performed. Like the alcohols and natural gas, hydrogen burns cleanly. In lieu of a TIC, extend a pike pole or corn straw broom at arm’s length to safely determine active flaming. Biodiesel is a combustible liquid with a flash point much higher than petroleum diesel fuel. It is a nonpetroleum-based fuel made from soybeans, vegetable oils, or animal fats. It can be used alone (B100) or blended with conventional petrodiesel (B20). It is immiscible with water. Use dry chemical portable fire extinguishers to eliminate active flaming and standard foam concentrate to produce a blanket to suppress vaporization and cool the liquid. You may also employ a fine water spray to dilute and cool the burning liquid below its ignition temperature if the spill can be contained. Be aware that improperly Knox MedVault™ Drug Locker ® SECURES NARCOTICS ON EMS VEHICLES Now Available! To learn more about the Knox MedVault ™ Call 800-566-9269 www.knoxbox.com Enter 167 at fireeng.hotims.com 1/7/09 9:35:57 AM
  • 84. Hoseless Engine Exhaust Removal ● GREEN CONSTRUCTION 6 AIRVAC 911®, the industries most effective, affordable hands free exhaust extraction system. (6) A roof garden affects firefighting strategy and tactics in multiple ways; you must include it in preplanning. Carlton-Harrell, Debera, “Seattle leads ‘green’ stored or handled rags soaked in biodiesel wave in building,” April 22, 2005. seattlepi. nwsource.com/local/221169_green22.html/. can spontaneously combust. All of these N o H oses! Fire Rescue East #425 s • Meets NFPA 1500 • AFG Grant Compliant • Fully Automatic • 1000’s of Systems Installed Engine Exhaust Removal System For more information and free site evaluation please contact: 800-540-7264 www.airvac911.com Enter 168 at fireeng.hotims.com 78 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_78 78 fuels are also being used in alternate fuel and hybrid vehicles, which may be parked in and around green structures. ••• Green building construction has become a global phenomenon. The U. S. green building market share is predicted to grow another five to 10 percent by 2010. New and existing technologies, combined with practical sustainable design, can substantially increase energy efficiency and decrease demand. This article provides only a brief description of some important sustainable design features that can have a tremendous impact on your fire/emergency operations. All chief and company officers, as well as firefighters, should seek first-hand knowledge on this construction trend. Building inspection, on-site training drills, familiarization visits, preplanning exercises, and fire critiques are ideal ways to gather additional pertinent information concerning green buildings in your fire district. ● BIBLIOGRAPHY Allen, Margaret, “Dallas going green,” Dallas Business Journal: www.bizjournals.com/dallas/ stories/2007/11/05/story2.html?t=printable, November 2, 2007. Ander, Gregg D. FAIA, “Daylighting,” Whole Building Design Guide, www.wbdg.org/resources/daylighting.php’/, May 12, 2008. Atlanta Green City Initiatives: www.atlantaga. gov/client_resources/greener%20atlanta/atlanta%20green%20city%20initiatives.pdf. Gowri, Krishnan, Ph.D., “Green Building Rating Systems: An Overview,” www.energycodes.gov/ implement/pdfs/Sustainability.pdf/, November 2004. Kamin, Blair, “Chicago, My Kind of Green,” GreenSource: greensource.construction.com/ features/0710_chicago.asp/, October 2007. Local Law 86 of 2005: www.nyc.gov/html/dob/ downloads/pdf/ll_86of2005.pdf/. Murray, Lynn. “Green Roofs Form Centerpiece to High-Profile Seattle Projects,” www.dcd.com/ bpr/bpr_novdec_2007_1.html/. NIOSH, “Preventing Injuries and Deaths of Fire Fighters Due to ...” www.cdc.gov/niosh/ docs/2005-132/. Proefrock, Philip, Photovoltaics and Firefighters; Green Building Elements greenbuildingelements.com/2008/01/25/photovoltaics-andfirefighters/. Stauder, John, “Fire Protection Engineering for Atria in ‘Green Building’ Designs,” NFPA Journal, www.architectmagazine.com/industry-news.as p?sectionID=1012articleID=649217/, January 1, 2008. U.S. Green Building Council, “Green Building Rating System”: www.usgbc.org/Docs/LEEDdocs/LEED_RS_v2-1.pdf/, November 2002. ● RONALD R. SPADAFORA is a 30-year veteran of the Fire Department of New York and serves as deputy assistant chief. He is an adjunct professor of fire science in the Department of Fire Protection Management at John Jay College (CUNY) and a senior instructor for Fire Technology Incorporated. He is an editor and frequent contributor to FDNY’s WNYF magazine. www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:35:58 AM
  • 85. The Impact of Solar Energy on Firefighting BY TIMOTHY KREIS S A NATION WITH RAPIDLY RISING ENERGY costs, we are desperately searching for ways to go green. The fire service must begin to address how the green initiative might affect our daily operations and safety. Solar energy has become one of the most widely employed of the options being considered as alternative energy sources. Solar energy technology has been around for a long time. The calculators on our desks and those funny looking solar-powered Jetson mobiles we see on TV come to mind. The recent sparked interest in solar energy is something I read about in the newspaper and heard tossed around in a political debate, but I never really considered how it might change my job as a firefighter until I received a phone call from a friend from the local power company here in Arizona. I had been working with the Arizona Public Service (APS) and the Salt River Project (SRP) on a program to identify high-voltage electrical vaults and substations within Phoenix. About a year ago, Phoenix Fire responded to a reported fire in the basement of a residential high-rise building in downtown Phoenix. After arriving on-scene, firefighters forced entry into an “unmarked basement” and began extinguishing a small fire involving what appeared to be electrical equipment. When the electrical company arrived, it was discovered that the “basement” our fire crews were working in was actually an electrical vault. In addition, the equipment involved was a highvoltage transformer. Fortunately, a lighting strike had damaged the transformers, and they were not energized. Had they been energized, discharging a dry chemical extinguisher on this equipment most certainly would have led to electrical injuries to our firefighters, at the very least. After that incident, we began working with the APS and the SRP. I’m proud to say all of their facilities throughout the state of Arizona are clearly marked with a standard warning sign for firefighters. In addition, we were able to get a list of all of their facilities and their locations. We input this information into our computer-aided dispatch system to alert units of these hazards while en route to an incident. A SOLAR CELL HAZARDS Fortunately, the APS and the SRP are very supportive of the fire service in Arizona, and things are getting better and safer www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_79 79 all the time. About a month after we finished the project, I received an e-mail from the APS asking if we had been looking at the firefighter safety issues associated with photovoltaic systems on homes and businesses. Before I even opened up my dictionary to find out what a photovoltaic (PV) system is, I asked the Operations chief if I could work on this project. What I didn’t know at the time was just how real an issue this is from the perspective of firefighter safety across America and how far behind we are in addressing it. Photovoltaic is the technology and research associated with using solar cells to create electrical energy by converting sunlight into electricity. Interest in solar energy technology has really taken off lately. PV production has been doubling every two years and is the world’s fastest growing energy technology. California is America’s leading producer of solar energy. In September 2006, Rodney Slaughter authored the comprehensive report “Fundamentals of Photovoltaics for the Fire Service.” This report, funded by the California Solar Energy Industries Association (CAL SEIA, http://calseia.org) and the Sacramento Municipal Utility District, clearly illustrates the issues associated with PV systems and the safety challenges they present to firefighters. It is available on request; call CAL SEIA at (916) 747-6987. According to the report, the United States, in 2005, produced three percent of the total solar energy worldwide, or 104 megawatts; California led the way. According to California Energy Commission (CEC) records, California now has more than 17,300 grid-connected commercial and residential systems. The goal is to have one million solar roofs by 2017. Although California firefighters would seem to have the greatest chances of responding to a structure fire with a PV system present, other communities around the nation, including Phoenix, are beginning to see PV systems on rooftops. SAFEGUARDING SAFETY How do the homes and businesses with PV systems affect our safety on the fireground, and what can we do about it? In 2002, a firefighter in Switzerland was injured as the result of an electrical shock he received from a PV; fortunately, the injuries were not serious. In 2007, a firefighter in Sedona, Arizona, received an indirect electrical shock while fighting a house fire. In this case, the home electricity was secured at the utility box. The firefighters operating at this incident FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 79 1/7/09 9:36:05 AM
  • 86. ● SOLAR ENERGY were unaware that the PV system was still energized. Multiple types of PV systems are available. Solar panels installed on the roof of a building soak up sunlight during the day and instantly convert it into direct current (DC) electrical energy. The electricity is then run into an inverter that converts the DC power into standard alternating current (AC) for use in the home. This electricity is synchronized with the utility power whenever the solar grid is producing. The electrical panel distributes the solar energy and utility power throughout the home. It is not uncommon during peak sunlight hours for the utility meter to spin backward when the solar electricity generated exceeds the home’s needs. In this case, the excess power can be sold back to the utility company for a credit. Utility power is automatically provided at night and during times when the home’s demand exceeds the solar production. Some systems include batteries that store electrical energy for use when the sun is not shining. The PV systems we are seeing today are pretty efficient; during peak sunlight hours, they can generate enough electrical energy to power a home or business, and you must be cautious when operating near them. When conducting fireground operations on a building with a PV system, assume the PV system is energized. We all know that when we shut down a building’s electrical utilities at the panel, everything above the utility box is still energized—in other words, the utility lines running into the box are still hot. After the building’s utilities are secured, we would not ladder the building near any power lines because we can’t shut them down and we know they are still energized. We should employ the same logic with regard to PV systems. For example, if we shut down the utilities on a home with a PV system, we must be aware that the solar panels are still generating electrical energy. Many factors can affect PV performance, and PV technology does not convert 100 percent of the sun’s energy into electricity. The most efficient PV systems installed on conventional buildings today convert only 10 to 20 percent of the sun’s energy. As the technology continues to improve and PVs become more cost effective, we can expect to see them on more rooftops in our communities. It’s also important to remember that environmental factors can affect a PV system’s performance. Cloud cover, smog, and temperature are just a few things that can reduce the amount of electrical energy created by a PV system. Although the time of day and the weather can affect PV performance, firefighters should always treat the system as if it were energized electrical equipment. Whenever the sun is shining, a PV system is creating electrical energy, and it can’t be turned off. A fire department in California attempted to black out a PV system by using a salvage cover to block out sunlight. The energy created by the system was reduced, but it did not completely block out the sun, and the system still produced enough electricity to Enter 169 at fireeng.hotims.com 80 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_80 80 www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:36:06 AM
  • 87. Your One Stop Stabilization Extrication Lifting Rescue Struts “Res-Q-Jack® struts and jacks deploy quicker than others out there. They’re much safer and the stabilization we get from them are great. It’s like 1-2-3, we get the quick extrication at any time and everytime!” - Christopher Dipierro Town Country FD NY NE W ST EE LX -ST RU T® www.AFGGRANT.com ‡67$%,/,=( ‡/,)7 ‡5(029( Enter 170 at fireeng.hotims.com Res-Q-Jack® Inc. 133 Philo Road West Elmira, NY 14903 ‡6$/(6#5(64-$.20 www.RES-Q-JACK.com 0901FE_81 81 1/7/09 9:36:14 AM
  • 88. ● SOLAR ENERGY shock a potential victim. Firefighters in Germany attempted to cover solar panels with foam to block out the sunlight, with a similar result. Sunlight was able to penetrate through the foam, and the PV system continued to create electrical energy. In this case, the foam kept sliding off the panels. The bottom line for the fire service is to treat the system as any other electrical equipment and assume it’s energized. When firefighters are conducting fire- ground support operations like vertical ventilation, they need to be aware of the safety issues associated with completing those critical fireground tasks. PV systems present some new challenges on the fireground; we need to be aware of them. The potential shock hazard is undoubtedly of the most concern, especially since the solar panels can’t be shut down. Firefighters conducting vertical ventilation must be aware of the dangers of HAVE SPECIFIC NEEDS? For years, CET fire pumps has set the industry standards by developing high performance equipment. Customized to satisfy your specific needs, our pumps, trucks, CAFS and drop-in units are built to provide an increased level of efficiency, reliability and ease of use. Designed, engineered and manufactured by CET. Let our experts guide you through the purchase and configuration of your new emergency equipment. Call us or visit our website to get what you really need. www.fire-pump.com Toll free: 1 800 567 .2719 Fax : 1 800 434.2613 sales@fire-pump.com POWER THAT MEETS YOUR REQUIREMENTS Enter 171 at fireeng.hotims.com 82 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_82 82 PV systems. For example, if a firefighter were to break the glass protecting a solar cell, this could potentially discharge all of the inherent energy in the system. We all know that the most effective vertical ventilation hole is cut directly over the fire and that if we can complete this task safely, we are going to do it. I don’t think it’s a stretch of the imagination that a company officer not familiar with PV systems might attempt to break or remove the solar cells from the roof to complete vertical ventilation, which could be a deadly mistake. Not only firefighters on the roof need to be aware of the hazards associated with PV systems. Be extremely cautious about sending firefighters into the attic to conduct overhaul operations of a structure with a PV system on the roof. Typically, we would ensure that the utilities are secure prior to starting overhaul. In the case of a building or a home with a PV system, we need to remember that during daylight hours the solar cells and the conduit of a PV system remain energized. Also, the “hot stick” many fire departments carry on their engines and ladders detects only alternating current; using a hot stick to determine if a PV system is energized will mislead firefighters into a false sense of security because everything between the solar cells and the inverter is direct current. Some PV systems include batteries that store the solar-generated electricity. Do not cut into these batteries, and keep in mind that if they are exposed to fire, they will release corrosive fumes and gases. Additionally, if these corrosive fumes come into contact with certain metals, they will produce explosive gases and toxic fumes. When responding to emergencies involving batteries, always wear full protective turnouts and SCBA. PVs pose other safety considerations as well. A PV system on the roof of a building adds an additional load to the roof—a residential PV system could weigh 1,000 pounds. This sounds like a lot, but the weight is spread across the roof at approximately 2.5 pounds per square foot, which is not exactly as significant a dead load as an air-conditioning unit. However, it will affect the www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:36:15 AM
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  • 90. ® GLOBAL Connections American manufacturing with concern for protecting people and environment. Hydrant Conversions LDH Supply Hose Adapters ● SOLAR ENERGY roof’s performance under fire conditions. In some installations, a PV system on the roof might make it more difficult to assess the condition of the roof. The manufacturing process of a photovoltaic cell includes the use of many hazardous chemicals. During a fire or an explosion, a solar cell can release these hazardous chemicals and present an inhalation hazard to firefighters working around them and the civilians downwind. In the case of a small residential system, the exposure hazard is very small. Larger arrays, like those found on some commercial buildings, are more likely to be an exposure hazard for firefighters and the public downwind. Firefighters should use their standard operating procedures to determine whether or not to evacuate nearby residents or shelter them in place. Pay special attention to children, the elderly, and people with existing respiratory conditions. The reality is that photovoltaic systems are here to stay. As green energy technology continues to develop, the fire service will have to unite on issues such as firefighter training and developing well-written code regulations and standard operating procedures. Even though PV systems are being installed on buildings across the nation at a rapid pace, the fire service can train and address this new challenge in a progressive manner. Training officers should become familiar with PVs. The International Fire Service Training Association has included PV systems in its new Fireground Support Operations Manual, Second Edition. ● ● TIMOTHY KREIS has been a member of the Phoenix (AZ) Fire Department since 2002. He is a firefighter on an engine company and previously was an inspector in the Fire Prevention Bureau. He is an adjunct instructor and an advisory board member of the fire science programs of Phoenix College and Paradise Valley Community College. He has been a member of the International Fire Service Training Association for two years. Valves SINCE 1977 Allows operator to engage/disengage tire chains without stopping via dashboard switch. Increase vehicle safety and productivity. Suction Hose Provides traction in forward or reverse for: 1/2 Ton to Class 8 Vehicles Strainers Resting Position Working Position DOT APPROVED • MADE IN USA FACTORY OPTION OR RETROFIT www.kochek.com 800-420-4673 QUALITY ONNECTIONS School Buses • Fire Trucks Ambulances • Utility Trucks Plow Trucks • Tractor Trailers For more information call 1-800-766-7768 onspot@onspot.com www.onspot.com Enter 174 at fireeng.hotims.com Enter 173 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_84 84 www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:36:19 AM
  • 91. Are You Preplanning Your Buildings? BY JACK J. MURPHY VER THE YEARS, THE NEED FOR PREINCIDENT building information has been cited in National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) line-of-duty death reports. NIOSH noted that the fire departments involved were deficient in conducting a preincident survey prior to the fatal incidents. Developing and improving building intelligence skills enhance firefighters’ tactical capabilities of anticipating fire behavior and water supply needs, preparing for search and rescue, meeting forcible entry challenges, placing hose and ladders, performing ventilation, containing the fire, and improving firefighter safety and survival. A preincident plan also gives the incident commander (IC) “inside information” about the structure and its contents and allows fire officers to use their resources more efficiently, improving overall fireground strategy, tactics, and the application of risk management. Each year the construction industry has been coming up with ways to lighten construction structural members, reduce fire protection redundancy through trade-offs, and limit safety enhancements to lower construction costs or make up for revenue lost by reduced rental spaces. This is a call for all fire departments to gather preincident intelligence by performing a building reconnaissance, so that firefighters can be prepared for emergency incidents that might occur in a structure. The preincident plan should address floor and roof assembly construction, live and dead loads, as well as obvious signs of deterioration or structural weakening. These conditions affect fire spread; personnel’s ability to access the building to rapidly and safely perform interior operations; the potential for collapse or falling materials such as glass, curtain walls, exterior ornamentation, parapets, and overhanging components; and exposures. O GATHERING BUILDING INTELLIGENCE Begin your preincident planning in buildings that present major life safety concerns for firefighters and occupants or a significant tactical challenge. Gathering this critical building information is similar to an Army squad’s gathering intelligence on the enemy before an attack: It gives firefighters the upper hand in the firefight. Prior to conducting a building reconnaissance survey, make an appointment with the building owner. Keep in mind that this is not a fire inspection, where the objective is to enforce www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_85 85 the fire code. The code inspection should be done on a separate visit, which is usually not preannounced to the facility. A visit facility fire inspection has due process protections for the building owner, including the right to refuse entry to the inspector. Gather information about the structure’s exterior and interior. Information about floor layouts, exits, and construction will enable firefighters to perform a search and rescue more efficiently and to improve their chance for survival. The key elements of a response intelligence plan include but are not limited to incident management system (IMS) fireground layout of the structure and the immediate exposures; the type of construction; the type of occupancy; life safety features such as building entrances, number of stairs (access to roof and basement), fire protection systems, window and door gates; and building features such as utility shutoffs, furnace room, ventilation systems, and elevators. Also include unique characteristics that may be potentially dangerous such as hazardous materials, lightweight construction, and an above-ground fuel tank in the basement area (existing buildings). EXTERIOR BUILDING RECON Begin with an exterior recon of the building. If possible, perform a 360° degree survey around the structure. Draw a square in your preplan; identify the four sides of the building in accordance with the incident management system (A, B, C, D). Note what is adjacent to each side of the structure and whether the exposure building is attached or detached (if detached, note the distance). Indicate the height of the building, the type of construction, the type of occupancy, and the topography on each side if it differs from side A. Indicate whether the side is adjacent to a vacant lot, a parking garage, a street, or a public park. Divide the building’s interior into divisions (floors)—for example, 7th Division). For large buildings, further divide the interior into sectors. Indicate the exposures—side A (236 Overlook Ave.), two-family house/2½ story/wood frame; side B, three-story detached (20 feet away) tenement (seven apartments)/ordinary construction; side C, one-story detached (50 feet away) mercantile stores (four)/noncombustible; and side D, public park. In addition to the address of the building, note the names of the cross streets and the vanity name of the building—the Pentagon, for example. Note also the following information: if the building has a fire department key box system for off-hour access or whether a “master key” system is readily available; FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 85 1/7/09 9:36:23 AM
  • 92. ● PREPLANNING BUILDINGS the condition of the exterior construction; any obstructions to the building— trees, land depressions, overhead wires, roof setbacks, cell towers, or vehicle barriers, for example; the number of stories of each exposure building; the building’s primary and secondary entrances; the basement’s exterior entrance, if present; the exterior fire escape/fire stairs; windows and door gates; the fuel tank fill pipe location, the tank capacity, whether the tank is above or below ground; the HVAC air intake locations; the primary and secondary hydrant locations as well as the size of the water mains or the nearest water supply for a rural area; and the type of fire department connections for a standpipe, sprinkler, or combination sprinkler/standpipe system. INTERIOR BUILDING RECON Once inside the recon building, confirm the building statistics: the number of stories, the levels above grade and below [[[EVKYWHMVIGXGSQ Who’s the toughest member of your battalion? SBOHFPGUIFSNBMDBNFSBTEFTJHOFE FTQFDJBMMZGPS¾ HIUFSTXJUI SF¾ JOOPWBUJWFGFBUVSFTUIBUDBOJODMVEF )JHISFTPMVUJPOYEFUFDUPS )JHIEF¾ OJUJPO-$%TDSFFO YUSFNFMZMJHIUMFTTUIBOMCT 3VHHFEBOEEVSBCMFDBTJOH 9BOE9[PPN 4DFOF4BWFŠJNBHFDBQUVSFGPSJNBHFT 4QPUBOEBNCJFOUUFNQFSBUVSFNFBTVSFNFOUT 8LIVYKKIHXSYKL QIQFIVSJ]SYVFEXXEPMSR 'EPPYWSR SVZMWMXSYVRI[[IFWMXIEX [[[EVKYWHMVIGXGSQ XS´ RHSYXQSVIEFSYXSYVVERKI Enter 175 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_86 86 grade, and the type of occupancy (assembly, business, education, factory, highhazard, institution, mercantile, residential, storage, utility, or miscellaneous). Refer to the building code chapter on “Use and Occupancy Classification.”1 For details on special requirements based on occupancy use, refer to the Fire Code 2 for fire service features, building services and systems, and fire-resistance and fire-rated construction. In multiple or mixed occupancy buildings—commercial, hotel, and residential under one roof—note and rank the highest threat to your response. Identify one of the five basic types of building construction: fire-resistive; noncombustible, ordinary, heavy timber, and wood frame. Refer to the building code chapter on “Types of Construction.”3 Note any preengineering construction methods. Indicate any alterations and renovations that may have affected construction, the means of egress, and fire protection systems.4 LIFE SAFETY FEATURES Confirm the occupant load for the daytime (normal business hours), night, and weekend hours. Note whether the building staircases are open or enclosed and which stairway leads to the roof and basement. If an access or convenience stairway is present, indicate the floors it serves. It is usually an open staircase located between two or more common tenant spaces. A disabled person may pose a challenge to firefighters. Knowing ahead of time the location of such a person within a building will enable you to plan for a more effective evacuation. In many new construction building groups, note the Area of Rescue Assistance, which enables a physically challenged person to seek refuge and await instructions or assistance during an emergency evacuation. For existing buildings, local fire departments may create a safe haven area for a person with special needs, to implement an effective rescue. When starting an interior risk assessment walk-through for tactical operations, start at the basement level and work your way up. Most building utility functions and systems are housed in the basement. If a building heating system is present, it may be powered by electricity, natural gas, liquefied petroleum (LP) gas, oil, highwww.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:36:24 AM
  • 93. PREPLANNING BUILDINGS ● (1) Access stairs in an old military drill hall at the entrance door represent a tactical consideration for performing search and rescue. Because of the very high ceilings, the room space is doubled. (Photos by author.) groove planking, plywood, or oriented strand board (OSB)? If the building has an elevator or a group of elevators, note the location of the elevator mechanical room (EMR), the pit room (usually found below the elevator). Some elevators may not have a pit room access port. At the lowest floor level, the elevator car needs to be lifted above floor level for access into the pit. Although the Firefighter Phase II Elevator Key access control is usually on the main floor, it could also be found elsewhere. For tall buildings, note the presence of blind shafts and sky lobby areas. A building may have MERs for motorized equipment such as heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC); air compressors; and chillers. 1 pressure utility steam lines, a combination gas/oil supply, or solar power energy with high direct current voltage. Locating the building’s main utility emergency shutoff valves and fuel tanks will assist in isolating the energy power supply source. Determine how to access the basement. Check for an interior staircase or an exterior access door. The fire department could access by both means. Note if the basement or other subbasement levels run the full length and width of the building or only part of the way. Also note any crawl space and entry locations. As you go upward in the building, identify the type of material that supports the horizontal load of the roof and floor, such as metal/wood (light/heavyweight) truss, cold-formed galvanized steel, poured concrete/rebar, precast concrete, solid wood rafter/joist, laminated wood I-beams, and steel I-beams. What is the type of floor or roof decking? Is it precast or poured concrete, metal decking, wood such as tongue-and- FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS The Fire Detection and Alarm System (FAS) is a building or local fire alarm system that provides an audible or visual signal. It may range from single-station smoke detectors found in residential occupancies to single and multipanel hardwire fire alarms present in various buildings. For the larger FAS, note the location of the main building panel and see how the Enter 176 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_87 87 1/7/09 9:36:26 AM
  • 94. ● PREPLANNING BUILDINGS (2) A dry sprinkler fire department connection (FDC). What is missing is a sign indicating the area of the building it covers (garage or loading dock, for example). This FDC is not on the street side of the building; it is on side C, down a driveway. 2 fire detection devices report to the panel; this information will help to locate the device that has activated. Note also the locations of any FAS subpanels that may monitor sections of the building should the main FAS fail. Determine the type of sprinkler system (wet, dry, deluge) in the building. Is it a full or partial system? If a partial sprinkler, note the areas it covers. Also note if there is a smaller, limited-area sprinkler system consisting of 20 or fewer sprinkler heads that may be connected off the domestic water line. Although a standpipe and hose system is usually within a building staircase, some auxiliary standpipe connections in larger buildings may be found within the floor area. In either case, identify the hose size and thread connection so firefight- ers can deploy hoselines. Firefighters can calculate the number of hose lengths needed to connect off the standpipe and make it onto the floor; for buildings not equipped with a standpipe system, calculate from the street.5 Where is the building’s main fire pump located? What is the gallons-per-minute (gpm) capability? Are there other fire pumps (a secondary pump or a jockey pump), particularly in a large complex? Other than for a limited-area sprinkler system, is there a fire department connection that augments the interior fire pipelines by supplying more water off supply hoselines connected to an engine company pumper? This extra water pressure will supply one of three types of systems: a sprinkler, standpipe, or combination sprinkler/standpipe. Also, note the information on the exterior FDC sign and verify that the building standpipe or sprinkler system confirms what is on the sign. To get the water supply needed to control a fire, approximate the structure’s measurement (length and width). This will provide you with the needed water flow for a fire on a floor— multiply length × width, and divide by three to get the total gpm per floor involved. This information will also enable a fire officer and pump operator to effectively supply the water flow. If less than the total floor is involved in fire, reduce accordingly—i.e., if 25 percent of the fire floor is involved, decrease the water supply needed. If more than one floor is involved, increase the fire flow accordingly. For each exposure problem Figure 1. Campus Buildings Fire Department Connections This campus is divided into five fire department response boxes. The campus consists of 20 interconnected buildings within a threeblock area. There are 26 FDCs; they vary from a sprinkler and a combination sprinkler/standpipe, to a fire boat four-inch supply connection along the river, to a 2½-inch FDC on Skinner Avenue. 88 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_88 88 www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:36:29 AM
  • 95. You know us. And you know our products. But did you know that our product Crusader® is made with Kevlar® Nomex®? Guardian ® with PBI Kevlar? Brigade ® with Nomex and Gladiator ® with Basofil®? And the company who makes these products is (PGI) Difco Performance Fabrics Inc. From 1905 to 1998, Difco Performance Fabrics operated as a division of Dominion Textile Ltd., providing Career Apparel fabrics and Workwear Uniforms. Difco Performance Fabrics today is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Polymer Group (PGI), a world leader in developing new technologies related to the manufacture and marketing of a broad range of woven, non-woven and polymer products. Through sheer dedication and commitment, Difco has become North America’s leading producer of flame-resistant fabrics for the Firefighter community and Industrial Workers worldwide. Difco Performance Fabrics Inc. Tel.: 1 800 668-4724 Nomex and Kevlar are registered trademarks of E.I. Dupont de Nemours and Company. Basofil is a registered trademark of McKinnon-Land, LLC. Crusader, Guardian, Brigade and Gladiator are registered trademarks of Difco Performance Fabrics Inc. Enter 177 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_89 89 1/7/09 9:36:36 AM
  • 96. ● PREPLANNING BUILDINGS (building), add 50 percent to a building involvement figure for the gpm discharge figure. Note if a chemical extinguishing system is present. These systems may be dry or wet chemical, carbon dioxide, clean agent, or halon. They protect kitchen cooking hood systems, computer data centers, rare book storage rooms, and electrical and electronic equipment. Identify the type of system, its location, and the hazard the chemical extinguishing system protects against. Are there fire walls and fire partitions? Knowing the locations of fire walls is helpful when devising tactical plans for restricting fire spread. The fire wall is intended to allow complete burnout and possibly collapse on one side, but it prevents the fire from affecting the other side of the wall. At the roof level, fire walls that begin at the foundation usually protrude no less than 18 inches above the roofline. A fire partition, on the other hand, is a fire-rated assembly designed to restrict the spread of fire from one area of the building to an adjacent area—i.e., a one hour-rated partition corridor wall below a drop ceiling. Fire walls and partitions have openings (fire doors, fire-rated glazing, fire-rated rolled gates) that are protected. What types of ventilation and air-cooling systems are in the building? Many buildings may be cooled or heated with an individual air-conditioning package unit (IACP) or an HVAC system. The IACP units usually cover a limited area or a floor. An HVAC system may cover a floor or several floors through a duct system; fire and smoke damper limit air movement. Some fire alarm systems may have a smoke-management system to purge a smoke condition from the fire floor and pressurize the HVAC zones around the fire area. This can be achieved once the IC has received reports from the fire companies on the conditions in the affected areas. Understanding how the building IAPC/HVAC system operates will further assist in controlling a fire. Other buildings may have a building management system (BMS) that automatically controls the warm and cool temperatures, lighting, and other building systems within a structure. The BMS system may assist the IC by shutting down the affected system from a remote location within the building or from off-site locations. Are hazardous materials present? The use, dispensing, and handling of hazardous materials within a building should be regulated by the fire department and restricted to storage and areas approved. Note the locations of and amounts of hazardous materials in the building—i.e., a building maintenance shop, flammable/combustible liquids, or fuel oil tank. Have your department’s hazmat unit assist in assessing the risk. Each hazardous material should have a material safety data sheet (MSDS) and other hazardous materials documents as required by the authority having jurisdiction. BUILDING TACTICAL INFORMATION POINT SYSTEM (TIPS) Create a TIPS evaluation system to list the unique characteristics within the building that are potential threats to firefight- All Class A Foams do not perform the same... That's why many respected Fire Departments all over the country have adopted this specification. Does your Fire Department Have a Class 'A' Foam Specification? A complete Class 'A' Specification should include: The Product Shall be on the USDA Forest Service Qualified Products List (QPL). (Outside test that ensures that the product has been tested for corrosion and for environmental, safety, and health). The Product shall Not Contain any EPA Listed Hazardous Materials such as Gylcol Ether. The Product Shall be a UL Listed Wetting Agent with a Use Rate of 0.25%. (Outside tests that prove the product penetrates and extinguishes a Class 'A' 'B' fire). The Product Shall not contain more then 50% water content. PHOS-CHEK WD 881 meets these stringent qualifications. For information that will assist you in making informed decisions, call 1-800-682-FOAM (3626) ICL Performance Products 810 E Main Street Ontario, CA 91761 Enter 178 at fireeng.hotims.com 90 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_90 90 www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:36:38 AM
  • 97. PREPLANNING BUILDINGS ● ers and occupants. Independently rank them according to their threat potential—i.e., truss roof—lightweight metal; 1,500-gallon above-ground oil tank in basement; side D, Sector 4 off Stair B, an open vertical roof shaft, for example. ROOF LEVEL How is the roof accessed? Check for an interior staircase or a roof hatch on the top floor. Exterior access may also be achieved by a fire escape gooseneck ladder. In some buildings, if a staircase does not enter into an attic space, look for an access port at the top-floor level for entering an attic or a cockloft area (void space between the roof and the top-floor apartment ceiling). When checking the roof areas, notice the condition of the parapet. Also look for automatic or manual smoke-removal vents; building exhaust vents; the staircase penthouse door; EMR; and other heavy equipment such as refrigeration, cell phone tower equipment, and HVAC units. New “green” roof materials may consist of several layers of membrane as well as several inches of dirt, along with grass and plants. While this type of roof effectively reduces cooling or heating, it adds a new challenge to ladder company crews venting the roof. COLLECTING DATA To collect the data for the preincident plan, develop a standard recon form on which to include the information gathered in the field. The data should include quickly made sketches of the building plot plan, primary and secondary access routes into the structure, fire department connections, stair and elevator locations, photographs of the four sides of the building, and the unique characteristics within the building that pose potential threats to firefighters. Do not limit building recon to occupied buildings. Vacant buildings present a high risk to responding firefighters. When feasible, enter a vacant building to perform an interior building reconnaissance. If the risk is too great, conduct an exterior ground-level recon and use a tower ladder to observe the structure from above. On completing the reconnaissance, mark the outside of the building accordingly: • If the building is unoccupied and is structurally sound, use bright reflective paint to paint a square (box) on the structure no higher than one story above street level on the street side. • If the building is unoccupied and a hazard exists, paint a square box with one diagonal line. • If the building is unoccupied and more than one hazard exists, defensive outside firefighting operations are permitted. This is denoted by a square with an “X” inside the box (two diagonal lines). Also, paint above the box (square) other markings to indicate additional hazards. Examples would include “R/O”—Roof open, “F/E”—Avoid fire escapes; S/M—Stairs, steps, and landing missing; H/F— Holes in floor. BUILDINGS UNDER CONSTRUCTION AND DEMOLITION These structures create a distinctive challenge to firefighters: The conditions foster fire’s rapidly spreading upward and www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_91 91 Enter 179 at fireeng.hotims.com 1/7/09 9:36:39 AM
  • 98. ● PREPLANNING BUILDINGS downward. During building reconnaissance, note how vehicles can access the structure and the location and accessibility of the fire department connection. Also determine the following: if the standpipe riser is within two floors of the highest work level; if the top of the standpipe riser is open and if the riser has a shutoff valve; if floor outlet valves are closed, especially at the below-grade level; if there are stored flammable and combustible liquids/gases or explosive materials; if there is temporary heating equipment; if cutting and welding operations are being conducted; and the floor level at which the staircase ends before you encounter makeshift ladders to access upper floors. Structural hazards are heightened by missing fire protection features such as spray-on fireproofing, lack of fire walls and partitions, temporary wooden mold forms, and steel bracing cables. Buildings undergoing floor renovations pose even a greater life safety threat to occupants and firefighters. Egress paths may be temporarily altered and must be maintained during this phase of construction. Fire protection systems may be temporarily out of service; higher combustible and flammable loads are usually present; and, in many cases, hot work cutting and welding are ongoing. FIRE DEPARTMENT RESPONSE By incorporating preincident building intelligence into a fire department management system for buildings that are occupied, vacant, and under construction or demolition, the local dispatch center can provide more information on the building firefighters can use as a base for making decisions while they are responding. This critical building information will enhance the fire officer’s “thinking-in-time” process for his initial size-up and expedite the assignment of crews’ tasks within a specific structure. A dispatch communications center will be able to provide incoming fire companies with information on key building essentials such as water supply, fire protection systems, life safety, and potential hazards. When the incident becomes a working Alarm Box, the IC will receive other building intelligence Enter 180 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_92 92 information. Since the fire service is a supportive organization by default, a department mission preparedness statement should include preincident building intelligence to further safeguard firefighter and occupant safety. ● ENDNOTES 1. International Building Code, 2006 Edition, Chapter 3 – “Use and Occupancy Classification” or the National Protection Fire Association (NFPA) 101 Life Safety Code®, 2006 Edition. 2. International Fire Code, 2006 Edition, and NFPA 1, Fire Code™, 2009 Edition. 3. International Building Code, 2006 Edition, Chapter 6—”Types of Construction” or the NFPA 5000 Building Construction and Safety Code®, 2006 Edition. 4. During a Bronx, New York, low-rise tenement building fire (2005), six firefighters became entrapped inside a dwelling unit while searching for people on the floor. They had to bail out a fourth-floor window. This action resulted in the deaths of two firefighters and critical injuries to four other firefighters. On further investigation, it was revealed that construction alterations made within the dwelling unit changed the apartment layout, thus preventing access from the room in which they were entrapped onto an exterior fire escape. 5. During a 2008 building recon, the local fire department discovered that all standpipe hose threads did not match the department’s hose couplings. Fortunately, this building, which was constructed in the 1950s, never had a fire. The department employed alternative response operations until the upgrade was completed. ● JACK J. MURPHY, MA, is the principal of JJM Associates, a safety preparedness group, and fire marshal (ret.)/former deputy chief of the Leonia (NJ) Fire Department. He has a master’s degree and several undergraduate degrees. He serves as a NJ state deputy fire coordinator (Bergen region), the vice chairman of the New York City High-Rise Fire Safety Directors Association, and a member of the NFPA High-Rise Safety Advisory and the Pre-Incident Planning Committees. Murphy is a member of the Fire Engineering and FDIC editorial advisory boards and is the author of Rapid Incident Command System (RICS), a field handbook, and Chapter 3, “Pre-Incident Planning” of the Firefighter I II series (Fire Engineering, soon to be released). www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:36:41 AM
  • 99. Firefighting Challenges in Converted Mills B Y D AV I D D E S T E F A N O N OLD MILL BUILDINGS, A STRUCTURE’S REHABILITAtion and change of occupancy can present a challenge. In the decades before 1900, mill buildings of varying sizes began to appear in the heavily industrialized areas of the United States. Many of these mammoth structures filled entire city blocks; some even had their own self-supporting villages outside city limits. Mill or Type IV (heavy timber) construction, according to National Fire Protection Association 5000, Building Construction and Safety Code, features, among other things, “interior structural members including columns, beams, girders, trusses, arches, floors, and roofs of solid or laminated wood without concealed spaces.” The structures had to be capable of holding heavy loads of manufacturing equipment and stock. However, by the early 1980s, manufacturing processes had changed. Many companies retooled, moved to new facilities in industrial parks, transferred manufacturing overseas where labor was cheaper, or simply closed their plants altogether. The behemoths of our first industrial base began to close and decay. Many of these structures sat idle for years, until housing markets improved, urban centers showed signs of rebirth, and small specialty manufacturers needed affordable work space. The makeover of mills for the 21st century is now in full swing. This recycling of century-old real estate poses many challenges for firefighters (photo 1). I ORIGINAL FEATURES Among our first concerns are the original features of the mill construction era. The massive size of the buildings and potential fire load can overburden even the largest fire department’s resources. Since these early mills relied heavily on water power, they were almost always built alongside rivers, obstructing access to at least one side of the building. Century-old construction means that there may be old neighborhoods with small municipal water mains and narrow streets, which may be mere alleys in some cases. Many of the oldest mills were constructed along swift-moving rivers outside what were then the city limits. This necessitated the building of “mill villages” surrounding the mill, containing many small multiple dwellings for the workers, a few “company stores,” and often a small church. Many of these structures may remain in various states of disrepair and become severe exposure hazards for any significant mill fire. Of course, the mill itself may have suffered the effects of long exposure to the effects of weather. No matter how well the main structural components are rehabbed, they are still 100 years old. 1 2 (1) The large scale of mills dictates that makeover projects evolve in phases, usually over several years. A portion of a building may be occupied while major renovations are underway in other areas. (Photos by author.) (2) A fourth-floor opening to nowhere found on a mill makeover site. www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_93 93 FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 93 1/7/09 9:36:45 AM
  • 100. ● CONVERTED MILLS 3 4 6 5 (3) A common corridor in a mill structure converted to condominiums. The conversion is below grade on the right side with the brick wall. These corridors will require long hose stretches and have limited access/egress points. (4) Many makeovers include complex layouts with living spaces accessible only from remote points to make use of all parts of the existing structure. (5, 6) Original mill construction had no concealed void spaces. During makeovers, voids are commonly created to accommodate modern systems. CHANGE OF OCCUPANCY Mill makeovers may take many forms, but they involve changing the occupancy type from industrial or commercial to one of the following: residential, multitenant commercial/ industrial, or mixed-use residential/ retail/office. The large scale of mills usually means that makeover projects evolve in phases, usually over several years. A Products Include: • Open Access Lockers • Standard Lockers • Vented Lockers • Extra Wide Lockers • Designer Lockers • Modular Lockers • Solid Oak Exec. Lockers • Plastic Lockers • Storage Lockers • Storage Cabinets • Locker Benches • Locker Options 1010 East 62nd Street, Los Angeles, CA 90001-1598 Phone: 1-800-562-5377 • Fax: 1-800-562-5399 Enter 181 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_94 94 Enter 182 at fireeng.hotims.com www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:36:48 AM
  • 101. CONVERTED MILLS ● portion of this building may be occupied while major renovations are underway in other areas. Remember the added dangers of construction zones, such as voids between floors and open walls and shafts (photo 2). Fire department involvement in these projects is crucial at all levels—from the fire prevention bureau down to the district companies—and should begin in the design phase and continue with regularly scheduled fire marshal and district fire company inspections. Although the marshals have a clear-cut agenda based on codes and plans, the companies protecting these buildings need to be familiar with demolition and renovation activities on the structure to update their tactical options as the building changes. Familiarity with construction methods will prove invaluable long after all the walls are boarded and the floor plan changes. Our options, priorities, and challenges may change based on the structure’s changes in occupancy. Originally, these buildings were usually constructed for and occupied by a single manufacturing company. However, one of the first changes in use for these mammoth buildings involves cutting them up into multitenant occupancies. These subdivided mills can pose many tactical firefighting problems. Often, the company that owns or manages the structure doesn’t have a physical presence on-site, which can make finding a responsible party difficult. Often the tenants don’t even have valid contact numbers for emergencies. Because mill space is generally less expensive to rent than space in modern industrial parks, some commercial tenants may be “fly by night” businesses that rent space, change floor plans, and divide up the original huge factory floors into much smaller spaces. They may create voids, eliminate exits, board up windows, and subdivide electrical service. Months later, they may fade away, one step ahead of municipal code enforcement, sometimes leaving hazardous waste from their operations in the deserted occupancy. ALTERATIONS Even when a mill is occupied and managed by legitimate parties, access to each small workspace, added interior partitions that create voids, and a multitude of manufacturing processes on-site can interfere with our ability to force entry, stretch lines, find the fire, and operate safely. Such occupancies may include an industrial supply warehouse or involve industrial processes such as jewelry plating, industrial welding, or computer assembly. All of these businesses may be found on a single floor of a mill makeover. Other changes of use may include a mix of residential units along with office or retail shops. In addition to the common hazards such as newly created voids and confusing floor plans, adding dwelling space greatly increases the life hazard. First-arriving companies may confront a fire involving several thousand square feet in the middle of a huge building that has been compartmentalized and may have hundreds of occupants. This is similar to confronting an The FIRE TRAINING ELEADER. R F I RIE ETTR A I I N IG LGATRAININGR E A DER A N I N FIRE L EA D E LEADER N E D ELEADER A F R R R NING L TEEX trains emergency response personnel from more than 30 countries each year. Each course can be tailored to meet your exact needs in a variety of areas: z z z z z z z z z z Industrial / structural firefighting Marine firefighting and spill response Hazardous materials response Weapons of mass destruction response Emergency medical services Search and rescue Incident management Aircraft rescue and firefighting Incident command LNG Visit our Web site www.teex.com/fire or call 1.866.878.8900 to schedule courses today. TEXAS ENGINEERING EXTENSION SERVICE A Member of The Texas AM University System Enter 183 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_95 95 1/7/09 9:36:56 AM
  • 102. ● CONVERTED MILLS (7) When part of a structure is converted to selfstorage units, firefighters are confronted with mazelike layouts. Units may contain tons of unknown and potentially hazardous contents. The enormous overall structure itself is an attached exposure. 7 average-sized private dwelling fully involved with attached exposures on all sides, as well as above and below. Additional challenges include long hose stretches; difficult access points; and newly created concealed voids, pipe chases, and HVAC systems (photos 3-6). Project designers are usually eager to retain the original high ceilings and exposed heavy timbers for aesthetic reasons. Although this is a selling point for buyers looking for authen- ticity, the buttoned-up units with their energy-efficient windows and tightly sealed doors can retain serious amounts of heat and have great potential for flashover with their high ceilings. In some noncompliant renovations, firefighters may find new ceilings installed below the original exposed heavy timber construction. Note this condition, and immediately inform the proper code enforcement officials. Some of these old buildings have been converted to public self-storage centers, which is quite easy for the property owners. With a ceiling height of 14 feet or higher, the lightweight corrugated steel and plastic storage dividers can be assembled easily with plenty of extra overhead room. Loading docks and freight elevators enhance construction and provide storage space renters with efficient means to move in large items for storage. Among the issues associated with creating self-storage units are the wide variety of unknown contents that may be stored. Also, the tops of the units are often covered with an open mesh or chain link-type covering, which allows penetration by sprinklers. However, if Enter 184 at fireeng.hotims.com 96 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_96 96 www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:37:01 AM
  • 103. People Helping People Build a Safer World™ COMING MARCH 2009 2009 International Codes® Building a Safer Tomorrow WHAT’S NEW IN THE 2009 IFC®? Key changes include: • Retroactively, all nonsprinklered Group I-2 occupancies will now require automatic sprinkler protection. • Emergency responder radio coverage is required inside of buildings. • New requirements address the use of liquid oxygen in a home health care setting. • All requirements for existing buildings have been compiled into a new chapter. • New requirements for ğre protection of marinas. • The requirements for ğre alarm and detection systems have been extensively revised and are now correlated to NFPA 72. • Retroactively, all existing and new high-rise buildings will require photoluminscent exit pathway markings inside of building stair shafts. • The IFC now addresses the design and construction of pressure vessels used for the storage of hazardous materials. ALSO COMING MARCH 2009 New tools to help you navigate the 2009 IFC 2009 IFC® TURBO TABS Index tabs that take you directly to the most commonly referenced sections. Soft Cover #0401TS09 Loose Leaf #0401TL09 2009 IFC® EXTENDEX: EXTENDED INDEX TO THE 2009 IFC® This helpful reference reaches much deeper into subject matter than the standard index included in the code making it easy to ğnd the speciğc section where a subject is covered. #4402S09 PRE-PURCHASE YOUR COPIES TODAY OR SIGN up to be notiğed when the 2009 I-Codes® are available! VISIT TODAY! www.iccsafe.org/2009icodes 08-01349 0901FE_97 97 Enter 185 at fireeng.hotims.com 1/7/09 9:37:06 AM
  • 104. ● CONVERTED MILLS the fire protection system is overwhelmed or not functional, it will allow fire in one storage unit to spread unimpeded to the exposed mill structure above (photo 7). PREPLANNING SITE VISITS When confronted with mill conversions, the district fire companies must take a proactive stance to operate safely and effectively in these structures. Preplanning and reconnaissance are the first steps to win any battle. Company officers should meet with the fire prevention bureau and obtain any information available on renovations in progress. A briefing from the fire marshal who has been in direct contact with the property’s responsible parties is always helpful. The marshal can give you his impressions as to the level of cooperation you can expect when conducting on-site preplanning. In preplanning the building, the first-due engine and truck companies should make an initial visit. Establishing contact with onsite responsible parties, such as construction supervisors involved in the makeover project or a building manager at an existing occupancy, will help pave the way for the rest of your preplanning. A low-key approach is usually the most effective. By explaining that you are from the nearest fire company that normally responds to the property and mentioning your general goals and objectives and the fact that this is not a “code inspection,” the responsible parties will almost always be receptive to your visit. When performing this recon while a mill is undergoing renovation, you have the added benefit of looking “behind the scenes” at the construction methods used, the new voids created, the closure of old shafts, and corridor layouts. You are also able to talk to the tradespeople such as plumbers, electricians, and carpenters working on the project. I have always had positive experiences when asking any of the trades on these projects questions about construction methods. Consider photographing important features and potential trouble areas. Developing a photo file of large makeover projects will serve as a great training aid and help members working other shifts or in fire companies across the city benefit from your efforts. ••• The gargantuan structures that housed the industrial muscle of a bygone era have been reinvented for a new century of service. Firefighters responsible for protecting these buildings in whatever state they exist must be resourceful and vigilant in preparing for and responding to emergencies in these structures. ● ● DAVID DESTEFANO, an 18-year veteran of the North Providence (RI) Fire Department, is a lieutenant in Ladder 1. He previously served as a lieutenant in Engine 3 and a firefighter in Ladder 1 for 13 years. He is an instructor for the Rhode Island Fire Academy, where he teaches various topics, including FAST operations and a ladder company program he codeveloped. Enter 186 at fireeng.hotims.com 98 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_98 98 www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:37:07 AM
  • 105. Capnography: A Tool for Every Patient B Y J I M D AV I S EFINED AS A GRAPHICAL OR NUMERICAL WAVEform that shows the continual presence of carbon dioxide (CO2) throughout ventilation, waveform capnography is considered the gold standard for assessing airway patency in intubated or spontaneously breathing patients. Unlike pulse oximetry, which measures how well available hemoglobin molecules are saturated with oxygen, capnography tells us how well CO2 gas is exchanging during ventilation. Originally developed in Holland, this technology became a standard of care in U.S. hospital operating rooms in the early 1990s. It is used today extensively in critical care and in procedural sedation and has evolved to field use. Capnography has been found to be easy and reliable to use and provides the earliest warning of respiratory depression, long before a decrease in pulse oximetry. It also gives objective data on the effects of treatment during the course of patient care (Figure 1).1 The ventilation process requires the body to bring in oxygen and exhale CO2. For adequate gas exchange to occur, the body has to be able to produce, transport, and eliminate CO2. This depends on adequate oxygenation, adequate blood pressure, adequate circulating volume, and good ventilation. Any variance in these parameters will affect the ability to exchange gases. The amount of CO2 in exhaled breath is recorded as end tidal CO2 (EtCO2), which normally ranges between 35 and 45 mmHg and correlates very well with arterial blood gas levels.2 It is important for fire/EMS providers to recognize that although achieving a normal CO2 level is optimal, knowing why the values are out of line is much more important. In some situations, you may never get a value within normal limits. D During your assessment, the patient is placed on supplemental oxygen and a cardiac monitor. When placed on capnography using an EtCO2 cannula (designed for the spontaneously breathing patient), you find her EtCO2 at 14. While preparing for transport, you initiate intravenous access. You ask the physician about blood glucose; his staff opted not to check since the patient had no prior medical history. The crew packages the patient, thanks the office staff, and begins transport to a local emergency department. En route, the medic crew reassesses the patient, concerned that she still is tachypneic, is slightly tachycardic, and continues to have an EtCO2 reading of 14 (meaning she is blowing off CO2). A finger stick blood glucose reads “high,” indicating a sugar greater than 500 mg/dl. A working diagnosis is now in focus. The crew increases the patient’s fluids to offset apparent dehydration and arrives at the emergency department without complications. This crew used waveform capnography to diagnose a new onset case of diabetes with ketoacidosis (DKA) that the family physician missed. But how did they do it? When patients are in DKA, they mildly hyperventilate to blow off excess acid. This is referred to as Kaussmaul, or rapid and deep respirations—hence, this patient’s respiratory distress. Remember, CO2 is normally between 35 and 45 mmHg. When a patient blows off CO2, as in this case, the level will decrease. Fluid shifts from the extracellular space to the intracellular space to combat dehydration caused by the elevated sugar levels. As the patient becomes more dehydrated, she will become increasingly tachycardic and her perfusion will worsen, further decreasing EtCO2. CASE SCENARIOS Consider the following case scenarios: Shortness of breath. Your engine rescue (Above) Figure 1. A normal end tidal CO2 waveform. (Figures courtesy of arrives at a physician’s office for a report of short- Oridion Capnography.) (Below) Figure 2. Low end tidal CO2 levels seen in poor ness of breath. You are presented with a 49-year- perfusion states. old female who the doctor reports arrived in mild respiratory distress. She denies chest pain. She appears comfortable as you begin your assessment. Her vital signs are blood pressure 148/80, heart rate 100, and respiratory rate 26 with a pulse oximetry of 100 percent on room air. www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_99 99 FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 99 1/7/09 9:37:10 AM
  • 106. ● CAPNOGRAPHY Although this patient was a new onset diabetic, fire/EMS providers are more likely to encounter ill patients with diabetes for whom worried family or friends have called EMS. Quite frequently, these patients refuse aid. They have managed their diabetes for years and believe that they are quite capable of taking care of themselves. In (Above) Figure 3. Elevated CO2 seen prior to ROSC during cardiac arrest resuscitation. (Below) Figure 4. Shark-fin like appearance seen in patients with these situations, waveform capnography is an bronchospasm, asthma, and pregnancy. excellent assessment tool to differentiate hyperglycemia from DKA. A Philadelphia study found that patients with elevated blood glucose and an EtCO2 of less than 29 are acidotic and in DKA 95 percent of the time.3 No patient with an EtCO2 greater that 36 was acidotic. These patients are beyond being able to take care of themselves at home by adjusting their insulin dosing. They need pletely secure airway (i.e., endotracheal tube through the vomedical attention for insulin, fluids, and a determination of cal cords) but serves only to ensure that the tube is in proper why they are in DKA. Infection is frequently the cause. A fire/ position to ventilate the patient. The possibility remains, even EMS crew can use this technology to persuade a patient to with a good capnography waveform, that the ET tube is in the accept transport. hypopharynx, allowing for adequate gas exchange, but not a Cardiac arrest. A rescue company responds to a 54-year-old completely secured airway. male in cardiac arrest. As care is initiated, the medic and his The patient has an initial EtCO2 of 26. Principles of capnogfield intern secure the patient’s airway. After visualization, the raphy used with cardiac arrest patients include the following: medic student, recognizing that waveform capnography is the • Patients in cardiac arrest will generally have low EtCO2 gold standard for confirming placement of the endotracheal values because perfusion is poor (Figure 2). CPR offers tube (ET), attaches the circuit to capnography. The medic roughly 30 percent of normal circulation, producing only onereminds the intern that capnography does not confirm a comthird the normal exhaled carbon dioxide. In patients receiving Enter 187 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_100 100 1/7/09 9:37:12 AM
  • 107. CAPNOGRAPHY ● good cardiac compressions, the value will be slightly higher. As rescuers tire, end tidal values decrease—a good indication of when it is time to switch compressors. As a fresh rescuer takes over, you should see EtCO2 levels rise. • Patients with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) often have a rapid rise in EtCO2 values several minutes before pulses become palpable (Figure 3).4 Metabolism is to CO2 what your thermostat is to your house. The higher you turn it up, the more production you get. As the patient’s own metabolism kicks in and excess CO2 is washed out of previously underperfused tissue, the value will rise. Noted EMS researcher Dr. Ray Fowler from Dallas, Texas, describes CO2 as “the smoke from the flame of metabolism.”(1) Note that administration of intravenous sodium bicarbonate produces CO2, causing dramatic increases in EtCO2 that mimic ROSC. • In cardiac arrest patients with sustained end tidal CO2 values of 10 or less despite advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) therapy, resuscitation can be stopped. These patients are clinically dead, and one study found an EtCO2 cutoff of 10 made the difference between survivors and nonsurvivors both dramatic and obvious. (1) Of interest is the recent introduction of the impedance threshold device (ITD), used to improve perfusion during CPR. It remains to be seen what impact the ITD might have on using capnography to determine clinical death. Asthma. Your medic unit responds to a 26-year-old asthmatic in obvious distress. The patient has limited air movement and diffuse wheezing is noted. When placed on capnography, the patient’s tracing has a shark-fin appearance instead of the nice gradual upslope found on normal tracings. Patients whose waveform has a shark-fin appearance require bronchodilator therapy (Figure 4). (1) Continued observation of the waveform allows paramedics to gauge effectiveness of their treatment. In a patient responding well to treatment, the shark-fin waveform should return to a baseline normal waveform. In patients not responding to treatment, no improvement in the shark-fin waveform is seen. You may see continued increases in CO2 levels if the patient begins to hypoventilate, retains CO2, and gets tired. Shark-fin waves accompanied by rising CO2 values tell providers when to move on to other treatment options such as continuous positive airway pressure CPAP or intubation. Patients without a shark-fin waveform and no evidence of wheezing may well be hyperventilating because of acute onset anxiety. Fire/EMS providers should remember that hyperventilation can signal serious illness as in the case of DKA or in patients with increased intracranial pressure. Also note that the capnography of pregnant patients may normally show a sharkfin waveform because the weight of the fetus does not allow the diaphragm to flatten out. MVA with leg entrapment. As your busy day continues, you respond to a motor vehicle accident with entrapment. A female driver is alert and responsive on arrival, crying in pain. Her legs are pinned under the dash, and the vehicle has heavy front-end damage. As you assess her, you suspect multiple long bone fractures and decide that pain management and sedation are appropriate for the extrication. You know that narcotic pain medication and benzodiazapines are appropriate but have a propensity www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_101 101 UMUC FIRE SCIENCE Public blic protection. otection. Professional ofessional potential. tential. University of Maryland University College (UMUC) fire science degree and certificate programs are respected throughout the nation’s professional fire service community. Our state-of-the-art courses provide the skills you’ll need to advance to a senior leadership position in this high-demand field. National Fire Academy payment plan available Enroll now. Call 800-888-UMUC or visit umuc.edu/leaderstoday Copyright © 2008 University of Maryland University College Enter 188 at fireeng.hotims.com 1/7/09 9:37:13 AM
  • 108. ● CAPNOGRAPHY for causing respiratory depression. As the rescue crew works on extrication, space is limited and you need a means to continually monitor your patient’s respiratory status and airway. Waveform capnography enables you to place the patient on the EtCO2 cannula used with the spontaneously breathing patient and monitor her respiratory effort while not physically watching her. Your only concern is to make sure the patient is not trapped in a position where managing her airway would be impossible if necessary. Waveform capnography is also prudent in the seizure patient given benzodiazepines to stop seizures. Since capnography has been shown to provide the earliest warning of respiratory depression, it is preferred over pulse oximetry for monitoring respiratory status.5 Multiple trauma. The next case involves a 20-year-old male involved in a motor vehicle crash. He was the restrained driver of a high-speed single vehicle that crashed into a utility pole. There is obvious mechanism of injury and the patient is slightly tachycardic at 114. His blood pressure is 100/70. You place him on capnography and find an EtCO2 of 18. You know that hyperventilation results in a low CO2, so you assess his respiratory rate and find it at 16. Why is he breathing normally and yet has a low EtCO2? In this case, the patient has significant hypovolemia. Even though he is compensating at this point, his circulating volume is inadequate to transport CO2 back to the heart and lungs, where it can be eliminated. This concept applies to all situations involving hypoperfusion. Correcting the cause of the poor perfusion should produce a rise in the CO2 value. It is worth noting that patients with low EtCO2 values and hypotension have been found to fare worse in cases of blunt traumatic injury. In a 2004 study, only five percent of patients survived when their EtCO2 was 26 or less measured 20 minutes after intubation. (1) Older medics probably recall when hyperventilation of head-injured patients was standard protocol. Today, we keep ventilations toward the low end of normal unless herniation is imminent. Hyperventilation decreases cerebral vessel size, which leads to decreased cerebral blood flow and increasing anoxia. Capnography assists with preventing inadvertent hyperventilation. In a study of 291 intubated head-injured patients, 5.6 percent of patients with EtCO2 monitoring were hyperventilated compared to 13.4 percent without.6 Morbid obesity. The next scenario illustrates a point that I cannot overemphasize. Your crew responds to a cardiac arrest. The intubation is difficult because of morbid obesity. The tube is visualized passing through the cords, and bilateral breath sounds are confirmed. You move the patient to the ambulance to initiate transport. On your arrival in the emergency department, the attending physician visualizes the endotracheal tube in the esophagus, and the patient is reintubated. Despite full ACLS, the patient expires. During the quality assurance process, the medical director reviews the run with the paramedics involved. They state that they really didn’t have time to get the patient on the capnography and that the tube must have dislodged when they Enter 189 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_102 102 1/7/09 9:37:14 AM
  • 109. CAPNOGRAPHY ● were pulling him out of the ambulance on arrival in the emergency department because they knew it was in. Sound familiar? There are several studies of esophageal placement of endotracheal (ET) tubes by EMS. Esophageal intubations are not the problem; every person who has ever intubated places an occasional tube in the stomach. The problem is failing to immediately detect and correct esophageal misplacements. A 2001 study in Orlando sent shock waves through EMS and led some EMS systems to stop intubating patients. Of 108 intubations, 25 percent were somewhere other than directly below the vocal cords.7 The authors determined that, with one exception, every patient with an incorrectly located endotracheal tube presented with the absence of CO2 exchange when placed on capnography. The single exception was a nasally intubated patient still spontaneously breathing with CO2 exchange. Medics in the study system received additional training and education on airway management, and a protocol was implemented requiring the use of www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_103 103 waveform capnography. One year later, a review demonstrated that they had completely eliminated the problem. A review of available research shows the following pattern: • ET tubes can migrate up to five cm as a result of usual movements performed in the EMS environment. No other health care setting encounters this degree of tube migration simply because they do not move patients the way EMS providers do. (1) • Capnography was 100-percent sensitive compared to colorimetric detectors (88-percent sensitivity) in a 2002 study by Grmec. Capnography continues to outperform other confirmation devices in every test. (1) • The American College of Emergency Physicians has recommended the use of EtCO2 monitoring since 2001.8 Other devices are useful for confirmation of placement but do not offer the diagnostic and patient care information that waveform capnography does. • Bad outcomes occur with esophageal intubations. In one study, 81 Enter 190 at fireeng.hotims.com Enter 191 at fireeng.hotims.com 1/7/09 9:37:15 AM
  • 110. ● CAPNOGRAPHY percent of patients with missed esophageal intubation died, 17 percent had permanent brain damage, two percent had some other permanent or partial injury, and 0 percent suffered no injury. (1) • Missed esophageal intubations continue to plague EMS despite these recommendations, specifically in agencies that do not have waveform capnography. Other methods of confirmation are not always reliable. For example, abdominal distension was rated as normal in 90 percent of esophageal intubations, condensation of the ET tube was present 85 percent of the time, and breath sounds failed to identify 15 percent of esophageal intubations. (1) The false positive rate for waveform capnography in detecting esophageal tube placements is extremely low and occurs generally in spontaneously breathing patients. Alcohol and antacids are both known to produce CO2. In this situation, an ET tube placed in the esophagus of a patient may briefly demonstrate an EtCO2 value until the stomach is washed out with 100-percent oxygen.9 ••• When pulse oximetry was introduced, it took quite some time to understand its benefits and uses. It took longer to remember to use the new technology; today we wouldn’t think of going on a run without using pulse oximetry. Capnography occupies much the same place as pulse oximetry did some 20 years ago. It will become a mandatory part of advanced airway management for all practitioners and will be considered the ventilation vital sign of the future. ● ENDNOTES 1. Jaffe, MB, DA Paulus. Capnography: Clinical Aspects. Cambridge University Press. 2004. 2. Levine RL, MA Wayne, CC Miller. “End-Tidal Carbon Dioxide and Outcome of Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest,” New Eng Journ Med. July 1997, 337:301-306. 3. Fearon, DM, DW Steele. “End-tidal Carbon Dioxide Predicts the Presence and Severity of Acidosis in Children with Diabetes.” Acad Emerg Med. December 2002; 9(12):1373-1378. 4. Deakin CD, DM Sado, TJ Coats, G Davies. “Prehospital End-Tidal Carbon Dioxide Concentration and Outcome in Major Trauma,” J Trauma. July 2004;57:65-68. 5. Krauss B, P Carroll. “Procedural Sedation and Analgesia: An Evolving Role for RCPs,” RT Magazine. June/July 2000. 6. Davis DP, JV Dunford, et al. “The use of quantitative capnometry to avoid inadvertent severe hyperventilation in patients with head injury after paramedic rapid sequence intubation,” J Trauma 2004; 56:808-814. 7. Katz SH, JL Falk. “Misplaced Endotrachael Tubes by Paramedics in an Urban Emergency Medicine System. Annal Emerg Med. 2001;37: 32-37. 8. American College of Emergency Physicians, Verification of Endotracheal Tube Placement, policy statement, October 2001. 9. Woods J., C Hsu. “The Effect of Antacid on Colorimetric End Tidal Carbon Dioxide,” Acad Emerg Med. 2002; 9(5): 403. ● JIM DAVIS, RN, EMT-P, is a captain/paramedic and an EMS supervisor with the Columbus (OH) Fire Department. He is a flight nurse for Medflight of Ohio, an adjunct faculty member at Columbus State Community College, and a member of the Ohio State Board of EMS. Inside your station, your firefighters are your most valuable asset. Therefore it is mission critical that you make every effort to remove hazardous diesel exhaust from your station. PlymoVent® Source Capture Systems offer the most proven and time-tested features of any system built today – including our Grabber® nozzle which attaches to the tailpipe eliminating virtually all exhaust fumes. PlymoVent has over 20 years of experience in source capture with over 50,000 systems installed! Call us at 800.644.0911 or 609.395.3500 for more information PlymoVent - new logo same quality systems Enter 192 at fireeng.hotims.com www.plymoventfire.com 0901FE_104 104 1/7/09 9:37:18 AM
  • 111. Firefighter Involvement Helps Pass ICC Codes BY SEAN DECRANE ECENTLY, MANY MEMBERS OF THE FIRE SERVICE have made a concerted effort to increase their participation in the building and fire code processes. This past September, at the International Code Council’s Final Action Hearings, we saw the positive results of this increased participation. Two of the goals of this increased participation are to secure a safer living and workplace for the civilian population and to create a safer work environment for fellow firefighters. Let’s face it: Our stations are a staging area. The built community serves as our work environment. We need to exert our influence to secure the safety of this work environment. R SEPTEMBER MEETING In September, hundreds of fire and building officials and construction industry representatives gathered in Minneapolis to debate the merits of hundreds of code change proposals to the building, fire, plumbing, and residential codes. The code cycle is a multiple-step system; the initial Code Action Hearings were held in February. That is the session at which committees determined the fate of the code change proposals. Traditionally, industry has played a large role in these committees, and safety is not always the deciding factor in the committee’s actions. If a committee rejects a proposal, it can be modified and brought back under the Final Action Hearings; it requires a two-thirds majority to overturn the committee. There were a number of issues on which the fire service had a majority but could not muster the two-thirds majority required to reverse the committee action. Keep in mind that only fire and building officials can vote at the Final Action Hearings, so every vote is important. I will review a number of the most important changes approved that directly impact the fire service. NIST RECOMMENDATION RESULTS Following the tragedy of the World Trade Center (WTC) collapse in 2001, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) commissioned a study on the collapse. This investigation generated a number of code proposals for improving the safety of buildings through the application of the building and fire codes. The following are a few of these code proposals that were adopted because of the support of the fire service. Overall Building Safety • High-Rise Sprinkler Redundancy in High-Rise Buildings: The fire service and a number of industries supported this proposal, whose goal is to provide a redundancy to the risers in a high-rise building should a riser supplying the sprinklers on the upper floors be compromised. • Stairwell Remoteness: One of the findings in the NIST www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_105 105 study was that the central means of egress were compromised by a single event, the airplane’s hitting the respective towers. This proposal requires that the means of egress be separated so that a means of egress would be maintained if one should be compromised. • Photoluminescent Exit Path Markings: After the 1993 WTC bombing, the New York/New Jersey Port Authority installed photoluminescent markings in the stairwells. Many survivors credited these markings with helping them to evacuate the towers. This requirement will now apply to all buildings 75 feet and taller. • Hardening of the Stairwells and Hoistways: This code change will require more robust protection for stairwells and elevator hoistways, to provide a safer means of egress and also help to maintain the stairwells firefighters use to stage interior operations. • Increased Bonding of Fireproofing: One of the theories concerning the collapse of the towers is that the planes’ impact caused the fireproofing on the towers’ steel structural members to separate from the steel, thereby exposing the steel to the extreme temperatures of the fuel-induced fires and further leading to the collapse of these structural members. Fireproofing will have to meet a more stringent adherence standard. • Extra Stairwell in High-Rises: The fire service overwhelmingly supported the proposal in the previous cycle, and there was an effort to repeal this requirement in this cycle. The requirement calls for an additional stairwell to be constructed in buildings 420 feet and taller. This will allow for a more rapid evacuation in these structures. It also provides a means of staging interior operations without eliminating a means of egress for occupants. • Occupant Egress Elevator: Although a controversial issue, this was also based on the NIST study, which identified the need for rapid occupant evacuation. These elevators specifically designated for occupant egress will expedite evacuation and decrease the impact on the stairwell firefighters use. The fire service also addressed the concerns of industry and the costs involved: A provision was added to eliminate the need for the extra stairwell if an occupant elevator is installed. Impacting the Fire Service • Furniture Store Sprinklers: It was interesting when the furniture industry itself proposed to lower the sprinkler threshold from 12,000 square feet for mercantile occupancies that are used primarily for the display and sale of upholstered furniture. The fire service did not believe this went far enough, however, and modified the proposal to require that all furniture stores (Group M occupancies) selling upholstered furniture, primarily or not, be sprinklered regardless of size. • Story Reduction in Nonprotected Construction: After a numFIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 105 1/7/09 9:37:22 AM
  • 112. February 4–5, 2009 Wednesday, February 4 • Thursday, February 5 9am ET to 5pm ET • 9am ET to 5pm ET The FDIC Experience is Only a Click Away Online Education Opportunities Include: Aerial and Tower Ladder Operations Lieutenant Mike Wilbur, Fire Department of New York High-rise Firefighting Operations District Chief Dave McGrail, Denver (CO) Fire Department Truck Company Operations: A Hundred Things To Do Lieutenant Michael Ciampo, Fire Departmentof New York Five Alarm Leadership Chief Rick Lasky Lewisville (TX) Fire Department Battalion Chief John Salka, FDNY FDIC and Fire Engineering Magazine present the 2nd FDIC Online Tradeshow and Conference! • Listen to our keynote speaker and conference sessions • Network with fire industry professionals • Visit the interactive exhibit floor filled with top exhibitors • Meet vendors • Win prizes For more information and to register, visit www.fdiconlineevent.com Flagship Media Sponsors: Owned Produced by: TRAINING THE FIRE SERVICE FOR 130 YEARS 0901FE_106 106 1/7/09 9:37:22 AM
  • 113. ICC CODES ● ber of years, the Balanced Fire Protection Study Group, with fire service representation, proposed reducing the stories permitted in mercantile, business, and storage occupancies in structures with nonprotected construction. Somehow, the reduction in residential occupancies, where people live and sleep, failed to gain the two-thirds majority to overturn the committee’s action. • Travel Distance in Factory and Storage Occupancies: In the current code, factory or storage occupancies can have a travel distance of 400 feet if they have installed roof vents. This means our members may be required to travel 400 feet in and out from any point in that structure. This is quite a distance in extreme conditions when wearing full personal protective equipment. With the support of the fire service, this travel distance trade-off was eliminated. • Carbon Monoxide Detectors: The fire service impacted citizen safety when it overwhelmingly supported the requirement of carbon monoxide detectors in newly constructed homes. • Radio Operability: For many years, the fire service has experienced problems with communications, specifically our radio communications inside structures. The 9/11 report brought this issue to the forefront. A number of individuals and industries addressed it. It became an example of across-the-aisle cooperation. Fire service representatives insisted this issue be addressed in this cycle. This code stipulates that all buildings, existing and newly constructed, will be required to install a booster system to ensure fire department radios operate in all areas of the structure. In my opinion, this is a huge victory for the members of the fire service. This requirement will impact firefighter and occupant safety, since we will be able to communicate on the emergency scene. Additional Issues The fire service supported a number of smaller issues that will increase the safety of citizens and firefighters. These proposals concerned restricting the use of polyethylene dumpsters and laundry carts, factory occupancy drills, buildings being constructed under high-voltage lines, increased fire command center size, eliminating furniture in fire service elevator lobbies, test standards for interior finishes, smoke exhaust removal in high-rise buildings, institutional occupancy sprinkler requirements, and many more. Residential Sprinklers This drew a record number of voters to the Final Action Hearings. With a 73-percent majority, the fire service led the charge and passed the requirement for sprinklers in one- and two-family dwellings. This will not only reduce the number of civilians lives lost and injuries sustained, but I believe it will have a significant impact on firefighter safety. Residential sprinklers are not designed to prevent the ignition of fires, nor are they designed to extinguish fires. Residential sprinklers are designed to give occupants time to evacuate; this translates into time for the fire service to initiate interior operations and search and rescue operations before structural compromise. With a simple raise of their hands, the voting fire service members saved more firefighter lives than any rapid intervention team. Reliable Portable Power TEU1000D/TEU2000D • Honda EU1000i or EU2000i Generator • 500W Quartz Light • 4 to 8 hrs run time • Clean Power • Super Quiet • Simultaneous AC/DC Safety at the Flip of a Switch Nova-EU6500 • Honda EU6500iSA generator • 4.7 to 14 hrs run time • (2) 500w Quartz Lights • Raises to 10 feet • Easily mounts/detaches Rochester, New York 1-800-538-0022 www.tele-lite.com Tradition in Leadership Phone: 800-553-7993 Fax: 877-512-7209 www.rud.com Enter 193 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_107 107 For optimum performance and safety, we recommend you read the Owner’s Manual before operating your Honda Power Equipment. Connection of generators to house power requires transfer device to avoid possible injury to power company personnel. Consult a qualified electrician. Enter 194 at fireeng.hotims.com FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 107 1/7/09 9:37:39 AM
  • 114. ● ICC CODES LESSONS LEARNED One of the lessons the fire service needs to take from this Final Action Hearing is the importance of participation. As mentioned, there was a record participation of the fire service in this Final Action Hearing—most of it in anticipation of the residential sprinkler vote. The proposal heard right after the residential sprinkler issue was the proposed requirement to protect lightweight construction in one- and two-family construction. There has been an increase in the use of lightweight construction products and in firefighter injuries and deaths per incident. Many fire tests conducted recently have shown that lightweight construction products tend to collapse earlier in a fire. After the sprinkler vote, more than 500 votes walked out of the room. The proposal failed to get the two-thirds majority by 50 votes. By understanding the agendas, we could have ensured that this type of construction was protected. As a follow-up, the evening before the sprinkler vote, the fire service was trying to restore the corridor ratings traded off in previous cycles. We had a number of firefighters in town, but they were not aware of the voting schedule. An additional lesson learned is that victories are short-lived in this arena. This was demonstrated by the code proposals we supported during the Final Action Hearings in Rochester, New York. The very next cycle, we spent time and effort to retain these safety features because industry was attempting to remove them. I believe we will face the same situation next cycle. We need more members of the fire service to get involved in the code process to ensure that we protect the safety features in the buildings being constructed and maintained. CALL TO ACTION As this current code cycle has demonstrated, the fire service, when motivated, can make a positive impact in the built environment. How do we sustain this effort? We continue to remain involved. The deadline to submit code change proposals for the next cycle is March 24, 2009. The initial Code Action Hearing is scheduled for October 2009. One of the goals of Vision 20/20: The National Fire Loss Prevention Agenda is to increase the fire service’s participation. We will continue this effort, but we need your involvement. If you are interested in improving the built environment and ensuring that civilian and firefighter safety are considered in the code change discussions, you need to be involved. We cannot expect others to ensure our safety; we are the only individuals responsible for protecting firefighters. ● ● SEAN DECRANE is an 18-year veteran of the Cleveland (OH) Fire Department, where he is a battalion chief in the suppression division, and an adjunct instructor at the Cleveland Fire Academy. He has represented the International Association of Fire Fighters in the International Code Council’s code process for the previous two cycles and serves on the Vision 20/20 National Fire Loss Prevention Agenda’s Steering Committee. DeCrane also served on the ICC Fire Code Committee in the previous cycle and on the ICC Balanced Fire Protection Study Group. He is an Ohiocertified fire life safety inspector. Innovators in Voice and Data Communication Solutions for Emergency Apparatus, Haz-Mat, Rescue and On-Scene Command - Bone Conduction, Throat and Ear Mics - Headsets - Push-To-Talks Enter 195 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_108 108 1/7/09 9:37:46 AM
  • 115. FIRE PREVENTION BUREAU Chief Must Advocate Building Fire Safety BY MIKE LOVE I “ AM NOT CONVINCED THAT FIRE inspections prevent fires,” said the operations deputy, reflecting on all the demands for a fire company’s time. As a result of that statement and later actions, the entire Operations Division quickly stopped doing in-service inspections. Although the deputy of fire prevention strongly resisted this move, he was unable to convince the fire chief, as he, too, doubted the benefits of the inspection program. Consequently, fire company in-service inspections went away 15 years ago without any analysis of what the true impact or the unintended consequences would be. The above scenario is fictional, but it is not difficult to imagine its occurring. It has happened at many fire departments that have limited time to get everything done or do not understand the full scope of protecting their communities from risk. After all, it is difficult to measure how effective you may be at preventing fires. The important point these chiefs in the scenario missed is that the goal of fire inspections isn’t necessarily just preventing fires: It’s maintaining life safety. With regular building fire inspections, the fire department can discover locked and blocked exits, question and challenge building renovations, learn the building’s layout, and ensure that all of the building’s life safety features are in place and functioning. It bears mentioning here that some exit doors in Charleston’s Sofa Super Store were locked. To our horror, we have to wonder if any of those nine firefighters found one of those doors, only to discover it was useless for saving his life. The fire inspection is one of the important focus areas for overseeing overall firefighter and occupant safety. Some may see a fire department’s work in fire and life safety just as an extra layer of work that gets in the way of preparing for the next alarm. However, national recommendations have identified the fire department chief as the primary advocate for fire and life safety in his district. In analyzing past fire tragedies, regular fire inspections and strict code enforcement are repeatedly recommend- www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_109 109 ed. For fire department accreditation, fire code enforcement is an important criterion for excellence. In Texas, it is required to consider organized fire prevention efforts in the grading for insurance rates, so there really is a “standard of care” that requires every fire department to maintain some fire and life safety and inspection program. ENFORCEMENT ESSENTIAL TO MANAGING RISK Fire inspection and code enforcement are necessary to manage risk. Under normal conditions, buildings lose their built-in safety as time passes. Even with regular maintenance and proper upkeep, a building rarely remains as safe as it was when it was new. The building occupant’s behavior and all the materials and contents that come with the building’s use tend to increase risk. Consider the old saying, “If you’re not getting better, you’re getting worse.” This critical area of risk management is directly related to the department chief’s job of maintaining a safe environment for firefighters, but many departments let the opportunity and responsibility for building life safety slip away in their districts. Although most chiefs have the authority to maintain building life safety in their jurisdictions, for many reasons, they neglect to use it. Many departments may once have had complete responsibility for ensuring building life safety but neglected it over time. The department’s chief and leadership must recognize that doing nothing allows the buildings’ life safety features to decline at an undeterminable rate. At the same time, as the department neglects this responsibility more and more, it loses the sense of urgency of these life safety activities. The farther the department drifts away from performing inspections, the harder it will be for it to resume this activity even if it wants to. A revival of the existing building inspection program in my department uncovered many safety problems in existing buildings that, if left uncorrected, could have resulted in serious fires. As the business changes, occupancies evolve to meet customer needs and maintain competitiveness. To avoid losing income, a business may create a new look or theme, and a restaurant may squeeze in more tables. You must be able to anticipate, detect, and evaluate these hazards as often as necessary. You can assess hazards only if you can find them, and that means you have to look for them. Once inside a building for a fire inspection, you can evaluate conditions to determine if the building complies with codes and, if not, what action is needed before something bad happens. It should be easy to imagine the degree of code compliance in buildings that have not been inspected in a long time. Although most firefighters enjoy the challenge of fighting and suppressing the toughest fires, we cannot rely only on reacting to emergencies to keep the community safe. We must recognize that performing regular building inspections and hazard evaluations in our districts makes building owners more aware of our presence. Conversely, deferring inspections reduces our presence, and building operators would become complacent and indifferent. Ensuring buildings are code compliant and safely maintained reduces firefighters’ exposure to greater risks resulting from unsafe conditions. The United States has one of the worst fire records per capita among the industrial nations. This is the result of our refusal to perform regular fire and life safety inspections. SOFA SUPER STORE TRAGEDY Reacting to fire only when it happens will not reduce risk or improve safety. Ignoring buildings as they age and evolve permits the existence of increasingly dangerous conditions that could lead to disaster. The most recent and obvious example in which a building’s poor record of code compliance resulted in a catastrophe was the Sofa Super Store fire in Charleston, South Carolina, on June 18, 2007. Nine firefighters died fighting a well-advanced fire. In many ways, comFIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 109 1/7/09 9:37:49 AM
  • 116. FIRE PREVENTION BUREAU placency and disregard for code compliance increased the risk to the firefighters. To begin with, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited the Sofa Super Store’s owner with willful violations that put store employees at risk. A trapped store employee called 911 for help. Knowledge of a trapped occupant changes the focus of firefighters. As mentioned earlier, numerous padlocked store exits reduced the safe egress of employees and customers as well as the doomed firefighters. Do you think the op- and how to reduce them, they would be more inclined to maintain a safe environment. It is up to us to keep them expecting a visit at any time from the fire inspector. If we can educate the building owners so they are constantly aware of the life safety risks and the potential impact, this alone is worth our visit to the building. If we ignore them, they will ignore us. Just look at one area of risk identified at the Sofa Super Store, the area of fire origin. The risk of storing highly combustible waste that ranged from discarded conditions just waiting for the right opportunity. Firefighters can face an additional extraordinary hazard in an already dangerous occupation brought about and sustained by their leaders’ inaction. This unsafe trend among many fire departments must be changed through dedicated efforts of inspection and enforcement. ••• There really is no good excuse not to start an in-service inspection program. However, you should first understand your legal authority. If none exists or the Chief, if you don’t advocate for the safety of firefighters and building occupants in your district, who will? erator was any more concerned about the firefighters’ safety? The firefighters took extraordinary measures to save the occupant. News reports later offered the store owner’s regrets, “The owner of a furniture store where nine firefighters died has told a Charleston newspaper he wishes he had put sprinklers in the building ....” The owner also said no one pointed out possible fire hazards in his building and that he would have fixed anything that was wrong.1 It should also be noted that the owner of Boston’s Cocoanut Grove Nightclub, convicted criminally for willful violations that resulted in the deaths of 492 people in a 1942 fire, reflected that he wished he had died with the others. We can avoid or better manage risk ahead of time to avoid such regrets. If a fire department ignores the buildings in its district, building operators either assume that they are safe or that that they will not be held accountable if they knowingly avoid code compliance. Ultimately, the building operators (following the fire department’s example) will become indifferent to and complacent regarding hazards that can slowly evolve. Safe conditions result from code compliance, regular hazard evaluation, and code enforcement. If the building owner and operators anticipate regular evaluation of fire code compliance and the fire department has made them aware of fire hazards 110 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_110 110 upholstered furniture to furniture packing materials in an area where the employees were allowed to take smoke breaks is a graphic example of how indifference can lead to risk. This is a root cause—behavior that enabled some near-perfect fire conditions to come together to create the fire. The area of fire origin of the Sofa Super Store was the covered loading dock between the store and the warehouse. The availability of combustible waste material in the covered loading dock area allowed the developing fire and hot gases to accumulate under the roof adjacent to the store and quickly gain access at the eaves to the truss void just under the roof of the rest of the building. Fighting a fire involving materials and contents contained in a compartmented area is a pretty straightforward operation. However, it is a completely different operation to try to catch up to and control a fire that has gained access to the building’s structure. Regular evaluation and correction of hazards and risky behavior should eliminate these obvious conflicting conditions. Fire inspectors are trained to envision and predict risk based on combinations of hazards. The Sofa Super Store had a significant number of conditions that could have been identified and corrected through proper code enforcement. Many of our fire districts have similar and worse present one is weak, the next step should be to push for the necessary local legislation to adopt a fire prevention code such as National Fire Protection Association’s Uniform Fire Code (NFPA 1) or the International Code Council’s International Fire Code (IFC). Either of these codes will provide the foundation and guidance for helping you to develop your fire and life safety program. Some areas of the country have local or state laws that provide the basis for authorizing an enabling process for eliminating fire risks. Chief, if you don't advocate for the safety of firefighters and building occupants in your district, who will? ● ENDNOTE 1. “Store Owner Where Nine Firefighters Died Wishes He Had Sprinklers,” Associated Press, as reported in InternationalFirefightingNews.Com, September 5, 2007, www.firefightingnews.com/ article.cfm?articleID=37318. ● MIKE LOVE is a 31-year veteran of and division chief with the Montgomery County (MD) Fire and Rescue Service. He oversees all functions of life safety, community outreach and information, planning, and recruiting and serves as the Montgomery County fire marshal. He is a graduate of the University of Maryland and the National Fire Academy’s Executive Fire Officer Program and is a certified public manager. www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:37:50 AM
  • 117. FIRE COMMENTARY Alarm Response Policies: To Go or Not To Go? B Y PA U L L . D O V E N ARTICLE IN THE FEBRUARY 18, 2008, edition of the Las Vegas Sun, “Fire alarm doesn’t mean fire department is coming,” reports on a new policy of the Henderson (NV) Fire Department stating that it will no longer respond to residential fire alarms unless a secondary means of verification is reported (e.g., visible fire) or a waterflow device has been activated.1 Such a policy should not be a total surprise to many fire departments around the country. The Henderson Fire Department is following a growing trend in which many departments are examining data, developing modified response plans, and initiating similar policies. Henderson is not alone in this practice in the metropolitan Las Vegas area. According to the article, the Las Vegas Fire Rescue Department adopted a similar policy in 2003. As a fire prevention and investigation specialist, I can fully understand the fire departments’ position. As they study and document false alarm response data, they reconsider their own risk evaluation and the personnel and equipment hours devoted to responding to such calls. Many U.S. departments face a similar degree of difficulty in considering whether to establish similar policies. I do not defend any one position, since I believe the public has a right to expect the best level of service in a time of need. However, I also believe fire departments have a right to minimize the risk to responding personnel and the public they serve and to reduce the taxpayer monies spent responding to situations where services are not needed. This is especially true in these times of economic shortfalls, station closings, and layoffs. The difficult question the fire service should ask is, How can we provide the public the service it expects and deserves while minimizing the department’s exposure risks and financial loss? A www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_111 111 FIRE ALARM AND DETECTION SYSTEMS Before I address this question further, I should elaborate on fire alarm and detection systems and their historic relationship with residential security systems. Historically, fire alarm and detection devices have been viewed as supplemental attachments to residential security systems. Presently, security systems are unregulated, but separate national standards for security systems and for combination systems with fire alarm warning device attachments are being developed. Although there are currently no national standards for security systems, some jurisdictions have created local ordinances to regulate false alarm conditions. The standard residential security system will typically incorporate motion detectors; laser beam detectors; and glass break, door/window, and thermal sensors. On combination security/fire alarm systems, there may be a couple of supervised smoke detectors. Does adding a few smoke detectors meet the legal regulations or definitions of a household fire alarm system? I say no. Unfortunately, most existing combination security/fire alarm system installations do not meet specific fire alarm code requirements for household fire alarm systems. National Fire Protection Association 72, The National Fire Alarm Code®, referenced by all building and fire codes, has specific requirements for household fire alarm equipment installation; such equipment must comply with the code’s installation, operation, testing, service, and maintenance requirements. On occasion, jurisdictions may modify specific code requirements through ordinance development, but the code is still the code. Note the sections I italicized below: NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm Code®, 2007 Edition Chapter 11: Single- and Multiple-Station Alarms and Household Fire Alarm Systems 11.3 Basic Requirements. 11.3.1 All devices, combinations of devices, and equipment to be installed in conformity with this chapter shall be approved or listed for the purposes for which they are intended. 11.3.3* The installation of smoke alarms or fire alarm systems or combinations of these shall comply with the requirements of this chapter and shall satisfy the minimum requirements for number and location of smoke alarms or smoke detectors by one of the following arrangements: (1) The required minimum number and location of smoke detection devices shall be satisfied (independently) through the installation of smoke alarms. The installation of additional smoke alarms shall be permitted. The installation of additional system-based smoke detectors including partial or complete duplication of the smoke alarms satisfying the required minimum shall be permitted. (2) The required minimum number and location of smoke detection devices shall be satisfied (independently) through the installation of system smoke detectors. The installation of additional smoke detectors shall be permitted. The installation of additional smoke alarms including partial or complete duplication of the smoke detectors satisfying the required minimum shall be permitted. 11.4.3* Equipment. The performance of fire-warning equipment discussed in this chapter shall depend on such equipment being properly selected, installed, operated, tested, and maintained in accordance with the provisions of this Code and with the manufacturer’s published instructions provided with the equipment. Author’s Note: Section A.11.3.3 below is found in the NFPA 72 Appendix and is intended as explanatory material for code users. Appendix language is not enforceable unless specifically adopted by a jurisdiction; it only serves as a clarification of the code requirement’s intent. A.11.3.3 This Code establishes minimum standards for the use of fire-warning equipment. The use of additional alarms or detectors over and above the minimum standard is encouraged. The use of additional devices can result in a combination of equipment (e.g., a combination of single- and multiple-station alarms or a combination of smoke alarms or smoke detectors that are part of a security/ fire system and existing multiple-station alarms). Though a combination is allowed, one type of equipment must independently meet the requirements of the Code. Compliance with the requirements of the Code cannot rely FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 111 1/7/09 9:55:39 AM
  • 118. FIRE COMMENTARY on the combination of the following fire-warning equipment: (1) Single-station alarms (2) Multiple-station alarms (3) Household fire alarm system (includes a security/fire system with smoke alarms or smoke detectors) It is encouraged that the highest level of protection be used where possible. For example, if multiple-station alarms are added to an occupancy with compliant single-station alarms, the multiple-station alarms should be installed to replace all of the single-station alarms. Similarly, if a monitored household fire alarm system is added to a house that has compliant multiple-station alarms, monitored smoke alarms or smoke detectors should be installed to replace the multiple-station alarms or be installed to provide the same required coverage. 11.10 Maintenance and Tests. Fire-warning equipment shall be maintained and tested in accordance with the manufacturer’s published instructions and per the requirements of Chapter 10. Typically, security alarm-monitoring facilities monitor combination security and fire alarm systems for alarm device initiation signals. Once received, the standard operating practice is to contact the homeowner first and then contact emergency services. If the facility does not make contact with the homeowner or the secondary contact person, it contacts the appropriate agency—the police department for security alarms, the fire department for fire alarms. Emergency agencies are normally notified through a local central dispatch center or, in some jurisdictions, by a direct call to the emergency agency. In most false fire alarm responses to locations equipped with combination security/fire alarm systems, responders found that Reliable High-Output Power Designed for Fire Apparatus C656 14 Volt 400 Amp 6.9 Custom Hinge Mount C657 14 Volt 400 Amp 4 Hinge Mount C671 14 Volt 400 Amp Rail Mount FEATURES: High Ef¿ciency • Long Life Bearings Overvoltage Protection • Stationary Field and Stator Winding A manufacturer of custom alternators, we are dedicated to meeting the speci¿c needs of our OEM Aftermarket customers. We can ¿t your power needs, call us today! 30-570 Amps 14-700 Volts 2021 Lee Street, Evanston IL, 60202 USA Phone: (847) 866–1536 Fax: (847) 492–1242 E-Mail: sales@CENiehoff.com www.CENiehoff.com Enter 196 at fireeng.hotims.com Thankfully, not all fire service professionals believe the frequency of residential false alarms is at the point at which response should be compromised. the alarm resulted from nonfire cooking or alarm device errors as a result of poor installation, improper device selection, incorrect placement, or neglect of fire alarm component maintenance. Some unwarranted alarms can be avoided by selecting the appropriate alarm-initiating device for the particular hazard or protected area (e.g., a photoelectric-type smoke detector or heat detector for an area near cooking appliances). Jurisdictions that investigate the causes of false fire alarms thoroughly can develop ordinances that address unwarranted activations and establish standard operating guidelines or procedures for future response based on their findings. The fire service should rethink and view these combination systems primarily as fire alarm and detection systems with supplemental security device attachments. We should then use the NFPA 72 standard to confirm that the household fire alarm and warning equipment meet the code’s intent for installation, testing, and maintenance. In new construction, we can do this in cooperation with the local building department to achieve compliance prior to occupancy. In existing construction, the fire service should promote or expand public education efforts aimed at problematic occupancies in its jurisdiction. WHAT’S NEXT? Where does this leave us in the fire service? Should we give up on residential fire detection technology by developing nonresponse policies to dwelling fire alarms? Again, I say no. Implementing policies that give the public the impression that the fire service will ignore residential fire alarms unless there are other confirming cues showing (i.e., smoke or flame) is counterproductive and further exposes us to risk. Thankfully, not all fire service professionals believe the frequency of residential false alarms is at the point at which response should be compromised. The fire service should be proactive when encountering numerous false alarms at any location, regardless of occupancy. Thoroughly investigate events to discover why an alarm is false, what/who is responsible, and how to rectify the problem. This is just good customer service. Create public education programs on fire alarm and detection technology and why it’s important to use the fire service’s expertise to ensure that the appropriate devices are properly installed, inspected, tested, and maintained in accordance with NFPA 72. The fire service and homeowners should not accept security companies’ sales pitches that sell combination systems that include only limited fire coverage. Our department has received complaints from citizens about security and alarm providers who have invited potential customers out for a free dinner while www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_112 112 1/7/09 9:55:40 AM
  • 119. FIRE COMMENTARY attending the company’s sales training seminar. During the training presentation, some customers signed contracts and purchased fire alarm equipment not necessarily compliant for household installations (e.g., heat detection equipment in lieu of code-required smoke detection or smoke alarm devices). During our investigations, we witnessed questionable high-pressured sales tactics regarding fire protection. Thankfully, not all companies operate this way. Typically, security companies that earn the majority of their profits do so with security equipment and associated sales on security systems. Some companies, although they are familiar with security installation and protection, are not as familiar with fire alarm equipment installation, secondary power, and audible warning and spacing requirements within the codes. The result can be inadequate fire protection. This gives the homeowner a false sense of security with regard to fire. Use the National Fire Alarm Code as referenced by your building, residential, and fire codes for household fire alarm systems in residential dwellings. In areas where there is limited fire service availability, promote residential self-inspection programs to empower and allow homeowners to partner with the fire service to minimize their exposure and risk of fire. Hold installation contractors accountable for noncompliant installations of fire alarm and detection components, wiring, and power supplies. The fire service could explore the possibility of creating partnerships with other code enforcement agencies or law enforcement to initially investigate residential fire alarm calls before rolling the trucks. If we want to create policies regarding residential alarm response, maybe we should consider initially responding nonemergency to a call with a staff vehicle and step it up if a secondary cue is observed. But only as a last resort should we consider fining homeowners and implementing nonresponse policies when these and other possibilities are exhausted. ••• Public education, customer service, and using NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm Code, may prove to be successful coun- termeasures in reducing household false fire alarm calls and ensuring equipment is installed properly in all residences. ● ENDNOTE 1. Trask, Mike, “Fire alarm doesn’t mean fire department is coming,” The Las Vegas Sun, February 18, 2008, http://www.lasvegassun.com/ news/2008/feb/18/fire-alarm-doesnt-mean-firedepartment-coming/. ● PAUL L. DOVE is a fire marshal with the Coldwater (MI) Fire Department and a 22-year veteran of the fire service. He is a past president of the Michigan Fire Inspector’s Society and served as Code Committee chairman for 10 years. Dove is a former principal member of the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Life Safety Code and Building Code Technical Committee on Fire Protection Features and a former member of the NFPA North Central Fire Code Development Committee. He holds and maintains 18 national and multistate professional certifications, including fire officer, inspector, plan reviewer, and investigator. See us at the NFPA Expo in Chicago, June 2009, booth 353 And at FDIC in Indianapolis, April 2009, booth 306 How do you improve on The Hose Monster ? ® PITOTLESS NOZZLETM Pitotless Nozzle and gauge. HYDRO FLOW PRODUCTS, INC. www.hosemonster.com Service@FlowTest.com 888-202-9987 Learn more at: 6 lbs. Enter 197 at fireeng.hotims.com 0901FE_113 113 Enter 198 at fireeng.hotims.com 1/7/09 9:55:42 AM
  • 120. BECAUSE NOT ALL OF YOUR TRAINING CAN COME FROM BOOKS All fire departments face operating in structure fires and the best training for structure fires is using acquired buildings. In his new DVD, Jim Kirsch, along with Frank Ricci, presents detailed information about locating, acquiring, inspecting, and preparing structures for fire department drills. Live Fire Training in Acquired Structures looks at the roles of all participants and their responsibilities in creating a safer live fire training atmosphere that follows nationally accepted safety standards. Viewers will learn how to: • Obtain structures for training. • Safely evaluate a structure for training by conducting walk-through inspections. • Establish training scenarios using an acquired structure. 0901FE_114 114 25 Minutes/DVD/March 2008 ISBN 978-1-59370-140-6 Price $79.00 US Order Your Copy Today! www.fireengineeringbooks.com ® ® 1/7/09 9:55:44 AM
  • 121. TECHNOLOGY TODAY Homes That Won’t Burn? BY TERAN MOORE ITH MORE FIREFIGHTERS falling victim to “bread and butter” fires (single-family, type V construction), residential homes must be safer for the families who live in them and for firefighters. The contents of today’s homes burn hotter and faster, and the structures are built with lighterweight materials (i.e., prefab trusses and gusset plates). The most obvious solution is residential fire sprinklers, which firefighters strongly favor. Sprinklers undoubtedly save lives. However, there has been an ongoing battle with the homebuilding industry regarding their use. What if homebuilders concentrated on prevention as opposed to suppression? What if homes were built to prevent fires? What if the home’s structure was the fire protection system? The gap between the homebuilders and the fire service has begun to close and move in the right direction. Fire retardants have become a viable option for the homebuilding industry. Third-party tested Class A-rated fire retardants are accepted nationwide in many areas that have the most stringent fire codes. The first step in the protective process is to treat the entire wood-frame structure with a Class A-rated fire retardant, including the underside of roof decking, the attic area, the bottom side of floor trusses, stairs, all interior walls, and so on. The wood product is a single application penetrant that dries clear and bonds to the wood’s cellular structure, making it a wood preservative as well. It also takes out the fuel aspect of the fire triangle or tetrahedron. It is odorless, is nontoxic, is noncarcinogenic, contains no volatile organic compounds, and can be applied by an airless sprayer. The treatment lasts indefinitely (unless it is damaged) and requires no maintenance. It is also resistant to mold, mildew, and termites. This treatment gives all treated W www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_115 115 lumber a Class A rating when applied properly. The second step uses “intumescent” (to swell and protect) paint on the gypsum board instead of the builder’s usual base coat of paint. You have now given your interior walls a Class A rating as well. These combined treatments make the entire structure its own fire protection system; the building could actually stop the spread of fire. The interior structure, attic, between all walls, and all seen and unseen places are protected. Once your home is treated, it is now fire resistant, and there is no required maintenance. The cost for this protection is around one to two percent of the home’s cost. This is another viable option for residential fire protection. No one product treats everything. Different substrates require different formulations. Fire retardants are separated into two main categories: penetrants and coatings. Penetrants penetrate into the substrate and bond to the cellular structure, giving a deeper and better protection. Coatings, on the other hand, protect only the subtrate’s surface. If the coating wears off or deteriorates, which eventually will happen, so does the protection. Therefore, penetrants are preferable to coatings. Make sure fire retardant companies have test data to back up their claims. Some companies may claim that their products are single-coat Class A while their test reports show the products have a two-coat Class B rating. When asking for test data, make sure their tests are done by a nationally recognized third-party testing agency such as Underwriters Laboratories, Underwriters Laboratories of Canada, Southwest Research, Commercial Testing, SGS U.S. Testing, and Intertek. Ask for material safety data sheets and product data sheets. Ensure that the product is nontoxic, nonhazardous, and noncarcinogenic and contains no polybro- minated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) or bromides. There are also two-part fire retardants that require mixing. Ensure that the product is not hazardous in separate parts or when combined as one. A few products are nontoxic when separated but become hazardous when combined or mixed to make the fire retardant. Is the treatment documented? My company, PyroLogics, Inc., offers a certificate of flame resistance for inspection and code officials, signed by the builder and the installer, attached to a product data sheet and material safety data sheet. Know the product’s coverage rate. To test and have a consistent rating, a coverage rate must be followed (e.g., 125 sq.ft./gallon). If there is no coverage rate, how do you know how much to put on to achieve the desired rating? One way to accomplish this is by calculating the coverage based off blueprints. For example, if our builders supply us with a set of blueprints, we will calculate and give them a final amount of product needed at a given coverage rate. Today, homeowners, homebuilders, and the fire service are becoming more aware of the availability of residential fire protection. As firefighters, we know this is where the protection is needed. If we can keep the integrity of the structure intact, prevent the fire from starting in the first place, and prevent collapse, then why wouldn’t we? ● ● TERAN MOORE is a 10-plus-year fire service veteran and is a firefighter with the Lewisville (TX) Fire Department. He has several Texas certifications, including fire officer II, fire service instructor II, intermediate firefighter, and pumper driver/ operator. He owns PyroLogics, Inc., which supplies the residential and commercial building industries with code-specific fire retardants and fire stops. FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 115 1/7/09 9:55:49 AM
  • 122. TECHNOLOGY TODAY Metal Buildings for Firehouses BY CHARLES PRAEGER ITH ALL THE CONSTITUtion to make the buildings airtight and ents involved in the decienergy efficient. Cool metal roofs help sion-making process and keep energy costs low in warmer clithe concerns that have to be addressed, mates, and metal panels provide a range getting a new firehouse can take longer of exterior looks to make the building fit than potentially expected. In recent in with the architectural style of a comyears, green or sustainable issues have munity. Municipal budgets and funds for also become factors when considering new construction are always very tight, new construction. Fortunately, for many and that is truer today than ever. Getting fire districts and communities, metal the most building for the money is vital. building systems offer cost- and timeThe West Peculiar (MO) Fire District effective solutions. Over the past few recently voted for $975,000 in bond years, hundreds of firehouses and emergency response facilities around the country have been built using metal building systems. When developing a new firehouse or an addition to an existing building, planners must consider many issues, from defining the Photo by author. space and efficiently housing all the equipment to designing an funds to pay for a new fire/EMS station easily maintained exterior. Budgets are (pictured). That’s a very tight budget unalways paramount, particularly when the der any circumstance, and the building construction costs are predetermined by the district wanted was reasonably large bonds. Metal buildings, which encomat 13,700 square feet. The project’s first pass more than 40 percent of the lowdesigner was unable to fit the building rise building construction market in the within its budget. country, have achieved such high market The fire district then turned to a comshare because they are cost-effective, pany that specialized in public building can be constructed on tight schedules, construction management and looked to and can be built in all kinds of weather. a metal building system. The new plans Many municipalities, organizations, com- called for a building to fit the budget panies, and fire districts have turned to with a 27-kw generator for backup metal building systems to get the most power. They also added a retention pond building for their money. to hold water runoff—a vital component Metal building systems are also well of green facilities. This pond, which is accepted for their green attributes. Steel about 15 feet deep and 60 feet wide, is the most recycled and recyclable allows the fire station to use its water for building material available, making it practice and training exercises without inherently green, and it easily fits in extracting city water resources. with other green building products and The new station was needed quickly, processes to help meet community susas the old building was overcrowded tainability standards or achieve LEED® and was promised to a new tenant. certification credits. Metal buildings, in addition to being In addition to the highly recyclable cost effective, can be constructed more content in the steel, these systems can quickly than conventional construction, hold virtually any amount of insulaand completion is generally not affected W 116 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_116 116 by inclement weather conditions. From the time the construction managers were hired to the day the building was completed, the whole process, including the building redesign, took just six months. The construction itself took only four months, allowing the new building to open two months ahead of schedule. The final cost was $71 per square foot—an amazing price under any conditions. The metal building used for the new West Peculiar Fire Station has a number of green and sustainable properties in addition to the retention pond. The metal building system has welded steel frames. It also has a standing seam metal roof and metal walls, both of which have long life cycles and, over time, require very little maintenance. The easy-care attributes of the metal walls and roof help keep the building maintenance costs low. And, as mentioned above, the metal itself is 100-percent recyclable and can be reused at the end of its life cycle. In addition to the West Peculiar Fire Station, other prominent metal building systems projects are the 10,000 squarefoot Plainfield (MA) Public Safety Complex and the new Galesburg Freemont (IL) Fire Station. These new and recently completed fire/EMS stations are just a few of the many that have been constructed in recent years. They offer cost-effective design and construction, have visual appeal, and use varying degrees of green building materials. One thing that is constant in the use of metal building systems is that every application can provide a durable, attractive, energy-efficient green structure—attributes that city and county officials value and respect. ● ● CHARLES PRAEGER is the assistant general manager of the Metal Building Manufacturers Association and the past chairman of the Cool Metal Roofing Coalition. www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:55:50 AM
  • 123. ® 2009 BUYERS GUIDE 118 MANUFACTURER DIRECTORY: Alphabetical listing of companies with their address, telephone, fax, e-mail and Web address 134 SERVICES: Alphabetical listing of companies with their address, telephone, fax, e-mail, and Web address within each service category SERVICES ...........................................................134 Apparatus/Equipment ..................................134 Benefits Programs .....................................134 Codes/Third-Party Testing ............................134 Communications .......................................134 Consulting/Research...................................134 Design/Architecture ....................................134 Emergency Medical Services ........................134 Employment .............................................135 Financial.................................................135 Insurance ................................................135 Municipal Lease/Purchase ...........................135 Software .................................................135 Testing, Personnel .....................................135 INSTRUCTION/TRAINING .........................................135 AGENCY, ASSOCIATION OR ORGANIZATION ..................136 MEDIA...............................................................137 Books.....................................................137 Book Wholesalers ......................................137 Television ...............................................137 Videos....................................................137 138 MANUFACTURERS BY PRODUCT CATEGORY Alphabetical listing of products available in the industry 159 DEALERS Companies listed by State with their phone, Web address and products 0901FE_117 117 BUYERS GUIDE DEPARTMENT Monica Gauba Buyers Guide Director Jessica Ross Production/Database Manager Lisa Hollis Production/Database Specialist Tammy Croft Database Product Supervisor Jean Gallagher Editorial Assistant Heidi Seiders Senior Input Processor Linda Smith-Quinn Database Administrator Sandy Taylor Database Administrator Christine Algie Database Administrator Contact us at: 603-891-9370 or FireBG@pennwell.com 1/7/09 9:58:29 AM
  • 124. 3M MANUFACTURER DIRECTORY 3M 3M Center, Bldg 0235-02-W-70, St Paul, MN 55144, 800-328-1667, Fax: 651-736-2555, URL: www.3m.com/detection 3M Intelligent Transportation Systems 3M Center, Bldg 225-5S-08, St Paul, MN 55144-1000, 651-733-3879, Fax: 651-737-1652, E-Mail: its@mmm.com, URL: www.3m.com/opticom 3M Visibility and Insulation Solutions 3M Center, Bldg 235-2F-06, St Paul, MN 55144, 800-328-7098, Fax: 651-737-7659, URL: www.scotchlite.com AA Manufacturing Co Inc Airboss-Defense All A Board Inc American LaFrance LLC Aircraft Dynamics Corp (Robopaks) Allegro Industries American Pacific Corp 418 E Kiracofe Ave, Elida, OH 45807, 800-874-4702, Fax: 800-456-9244, E-Mail: mike@aircraftdynamics.com, URL: www.aircraftdynamics.com 7221 Orangewood Ave, Garden Grove, CA 92841, 714-899-9855, Fax: 800-362-7231, E-Mail: custsvc@allegrosafety.com, URL: www.allegrosafety.com Air HAWK Air Purification Systems Alliance Fire and Rescue American Safety Health Institute (ASHI) 881 Landry, Acton Vale, Quebec, Canada J0H 1A0, 450-546-0283, Fax: 450-546-0213, E-Mail: fire@airbossdefense.com, URL: www.airbossdefense.com 11449 Deerfield Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45242, 513-489-4440, Fax: 513-247-2502, E-Mail: info@airhawksystems.com, URL: www.airhawksystems.com 395 Dabbs House Rd, Richmond, VA 23116, 804-652-0020, Fax: 804-652-0016, E-Mail: allaboardinc@aol.com, URL: www.allaboardinc.com Northeastern Industrial Park, Bldg 4, PO Box 426, Guilderland Center, NY 12085, 518-861-0133, Fax: 518-861-0144, E-Mail: sales@alliancefireandrescue.com, URL: www.alliancefireandrescue.com 2300 S Calhoun Rd, New Berlin, WI 53151, 262-786-1500, Fax: 262-786-3280, E-Mail: sales@gortite.com, URL: www.gortite.com Air Knife America 5525 Oakdale Ave, Suite 165, Woodland Hills, CA 91364, 818-702-9731, Fax: 818-702-8752, URL: www.supersonicairknife.com Allison Transmission ACC Climate Control Air Systems International Allmand Bros Inc 22428 Elkhart E Blvd, PO Box 1905, Elkhart, IN 46514, 574-264-2190, Fax: 574-266-6744, E-Mail: sales@accclimatecontrol.com, URL: www.accclimatecontrol.com 829 Juniper Crescent, Chesapeake, VA 23320, 800-866-8100, Fax: 800-247-5850, E-Mail: sales@airsystems.com, URL: www.airsystems.com PO Box 281, Pittsford, NY 14534, 585-264-9080, Fax: 585-264-9844, E-Mail: info@alpinesoftware.com, URL: www.alpinesoftware.com 1407 80th St SW, Everett, WA 98203, 201-438-6400, Fax: 201-438-2618, E-Mail: boats@achillesusa.com, URL: www.achillesboats.com 1040 NE Hostmark St, #100, Poulsbo, WA 98370-7337, 800-755-1440, Fax: 800-943-6288, E-Mail: info@action-training.com, URL: www.action-training.com Advanced Lighting Corp 30 Raynor Ave, Ronkonkoma, NY 11779, 631-467-4877, Fax: 631-467-4896, E-Mail: info@alcorp.com, URL: www.alcorp.com Advanced Rescue Systems/KMP Fire 2810 Highway 32, Chico, CA 95973, 530-894-5663, Fax: 530-895-1741, E-Mail: jr@arsrescue.com, URL: www.arsrescue.com Aerial Inspection 701 S Lincoln Ave, PO Box 1067, Lebanon, PA 17042, 717-272-2679, Fax: 717-270-1085, URL: www.aerialtesting.com AH Stock Manufacturing Corp 8402 Center Rd, Newton, WI 53063, 920-726-4211, Fax: 920-726-4214, E-Mail: sales@ahstockmfg.com, URL: www.ahstockmfg.com Ahura Scientific Inc n Air Vacuum Corp 6 Faraday Dr, PO Box 517, Dover, NH 03821-0517, 603-743-4332, Fax: 603-743-3111, E-Mail: sales@airvacuumcorporation.com, URL: www.airvac911.com (See ad page 78) Ajax RescueTools 10801 Franklin Ave, Franklin Park, IL 60131, 847-455-5420, Fax: 847-455-9242, E-Mail: info@ajaxtools.com, URL: www.ajaxrescuetools.com Akron Brass Co 343 Venture Blvd, PO Box 86, Wooster, OH 44691, 800-228-1161, Fax: 800-531-7335, E-Mail: custserv@akronbrass.com, URL: www.akronbrass.com Alert-All Corp 164 Orlan Rd, New Holland, PA 17557, 800-253-7825, Fax: 800-445-7523, URL: www.alertall.com Alexeter Technologies 830 Seton Ct, Suite 6, Wheeling, IL 60090, 877-591-5571, Fax: 847-419-1648, URL: www.alexeter.com Alexis Fire Equipment Co 109 E Broadway, PO Box 549, Alexis, IL 61412, 309-482-6121, Fax: 309-482-6127, E-Mail: sales@alexisfire.com, URL: www.alexisfire.com 46 Jonspin Rd, Wilmington, MA 01887, 978-657-5555, Fax: 978-657-5921, E-Mail: sales@ahurascientific.com, URL: www.ahurascientific.com 118 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_118 118 1502 W 4th Ave, PO Box 888, Holdrege, NE 68949, 308-995-4495, Fax: 308-995-5887, E-Mail: info@allmand.com, URL: www.allmandss.com 3883 Howard Hughes Pkwy, Suite 700, Las Vegas, NV 89169, 702-735-2200, Fax: 702-735-4876, E-Mail: halotron@apfc.com, URL: www.halotron-inc.com 4148 Louis Ave, Holiday, FL 34691, 800-246-5101, Fax: 727-943-2361, E-Mail: info@ashinstitute.org, URL: www.ashinstitute.org American Safety Health Promotions Ltd 513 Stewart St, Suite G, Charlottesville, VA 22902-5473, 434-977-2700, Fax: 434-977-0111, E-Mail: ashp@smokemaker.com, URL: www.americansafetyashp.com Alpine Software Corp/RedAlert Achilles Inflatable Craft Action Training Systems Inc 4700 W 10th St, Indianapolis, IN 46222, 317-242-5000, Fax: 317-242-3626, URL: www.allisontransmission.com 64 Cocalico Creek Rd, Ephrata, PA 17522, 717-859-1176, Fax: 717-859-2774, E-Mail: ephratasales@americanlafrance.com, URL: www.americanlafrance.com Aluminum Ladder Co PO Box 5329, Florence, SC 29502, 800-752-2526, Fax: 843-661-0972, E-Mail: sales@fireladder.com, URL: www.fireladder.com AMDOR Inc PO Box 810, Lewiston, NY 14092, 877-462-6367, Fax: 877-462-6300, E-Mail: info@amdor.com, URL: www.amdor.com American Airworks 578 Robert C Byrd Dr, PO Box 1000, Sophia, WV 25921-1000, 304-683-4595, Fax: 304-683-3257, E-Mail: sales@americanairworks.com, URL: www.americanairworks.com American Emergency Vehicles 165 American Way, Jefferson, NC 28640, 336-982-9824, Fax: 336-982-9826, E-Mail: vicki.sansbury@aev.com, URL: www.aev.com American Firewear PO Box 798, Ohatchee, AL 36271, 800-264-3333, Fax: 256-892-4644, E-Mail: info@totalfiregroup.com, URL: www.totalfiregroup.com American LaFrance LLC 1090 Newton Way, Summerville, SC 29483-7430, 843-486-7400, Fax: 843-486-7580, E-Mail: customersupport@americanlafrance.com, URL: www.americanlafrance.com n American Trade Mark Co 2 Bohnert Pl, PO Box 35, Waldwick, NJ 07463, 201-652-1900, Fax: 201-447-8867, E-Mail: sales@firecommand.org, URL: www.firecommand.org (See ad page 94) AMKUS Rescue Systems 2700 Wisconsin Ave, Downers Grove, IL 60515, 630-515-1800, Fax: 630-515-8866, E-Mail: experts@amkus.com, URL: www.amkus.com AMREL (American Reliance Inc) 3445 Fletcher Ave, El Monte, CA 91731, 626-443-6818, Fax: 626-456-8099, E-Mail: cdinfo@amrel.com, URL: www.amrel.com Andax Industries LLC 613 W Palmer St, Saint Marys, KS 66536, 800-999-1358, Fax: 888-443-4732, E-Mail: customerservice@andax.com, URL: www.andax.com Ansul Inc One Stanton St, Marinette, WI 54143, 800-346-3626, Fax: 715-732-3608, URL: www.ansulinfo.com/99 Archimedes Products Inc 21 Floyds Run, Bohemia, NY 11716-2155, 631-589-1215, Fax: 631-589-1216, URL: www.thedehydrator.com ARI-HETRA (Automotive Resources Inc) 12775 Randolph Ridge Ln, Manassas, VA 20109-5207, 703-359-6265, Fax: 703-359-6405, E-Mail: webmaster@ari-hetra.com, URL: www.ari-hetra.com www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:58:34 AM
  • 125. BW Technologies by Honeywell-America AristaTek 710 Garfield St, Suite 220, Laramie, WY 82070, 307-721-2126, Fax: 307-721-2337, E-Mail: sbking@aristatek.com, URL: www.aristatek.com Bascom-Turner Instruments Armored Textiles Inc 9 Vose Farm Rd, Peterborough, NH 03458, 603-924-2122, Fax: 603-924-2322, E-Mail: ati@armtexinc.com, URL: www.armtexinc.com ArvinMeritor 2135 W Maple Rd, Troy, MI 48084, 248-435-1000, Fax: 248-435-1393, E-Mail: contact.us@arvinmeritor.com, URL: www.arvinmeritor.com AS America 130 Zenker Rd, Lexington, SC 29072, 803-695-8850, Fax: 803-695-8851, URL: www.hansen-online.com Base-X Inc 6051 N Lee Hwy, Fairfield, VA 24435, 540-887-4718, Fax: 540-377-5002, E-Mail: sales@base-x.com, URL: www.base-x.com Basofil Fibers LLC PO Box 1238, Enka, NC 28728, 828-667-7900, Fax: 828-667-7918, E-Mail: sales@basofil.com, URL: www.basofil.com Astra Software Corp 18127 W Catawba Ave, Cornelius, NC 28031, 704-896-3505, Fax: 704-896-3464, E-Mail: mwelt@astrasoftware.net, URL: www.astrasoftware.net Austin Hardware Supply Inc 950 NW Technology Dr, Lees Summit, MO 64086, 816-246-2800, Fax: 816-246-2891, E-Mail: sales@austinhardware.com, URL: www.austinhardware.com Avionic Structures Inc 1429 N State College Blvd, Anaheim, CA 92806, 714-772-9950, Fax: 714-758-1546, URL: www.avionicstructures.com Avon-ISI 922 Hurricane Shoals Rd, Lawrenceville, GA 30043, 678-495-3700, Fax: 678-495-3875, E-Mail: customer_service@avon-rubber.com, URL: www.avon-isi.com Axsys Technologies Inc 24 Simon St, Nashua, NH 03060, 603-864-6300, Fax: 603-864-6350, E-Mail: inquire@axsys.com, URL: www.axsys.com n Bauer Compressors Inc 1328 Azalea Garden Rd, Norfolk, VA 23502, 757-855-6006, Fax: 757-857-1041, E-Mail: sls@bauercomp.com, URL: www.bauercomp.com (See ad page 72) Benchmade Knife Co Inc 300 Beavercreek Rd, Oregon City, OR 97045, 503-655-6004, Fax: 503-655-6223, E-Mail: info@benchmade.com, URL: www.benchmade.com Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems LLC 901 Cleveland St, Elyria, OH 44035, 440-329-9000, Fax: 440-329-9203, E-Mail: info@bendix.com, URL: www.bendix.com Bendix Spicer Foundation Brakes LLC 901 Cleveland St, Elyria, OH 44035, 440-329-9709, Fax: 440-329-9203, E-Mail: info@foundationbrakes.com, URL: www.foundationbrakes.com Berkeley Nucleonics 2955 Kerner Blvd, San Rafael, CA 94901-5533, 415-453-9953, Fax: 415-453-9956, E-Mail: info@berkelynucleonics.com, URL: www.berkelynucleonics.com Biomedix Inc Banner Guard Division of Reef Industries Inc 9209 Almeda Genoa, Houston, TX 77075, 800-231-6074, Fax: 713-507-4295, E-Mail: ri@reefindustries.com, URL: www.reefindustries.com Barricade International Inc 12848 SE Suzanne Dr, Hobe Sound, FL 33455, 772-546-5364, Fax: 772-546-0465, E-Mail: jbartlett@barricadegel.com, URL: www.barricadegel.com www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_119 119 Bright Star Lighting Products 111 Downey St, Norwood, MA 02062, 781-769-9660, Fax: 781-769-2099, E-Mail: dcrouse@bascomturner.com, URL: www.bascomturner.com 3895 W Vernal Pike, Bloomington, IN 47404, 812-355-7000, Fax: 812-355-7001, E-Mail: biomedix@biomedix-inc.com, URL: www.biomedix-inc.com Biosystems (please refer to Sperian Fire) Middletown, CT 06457 Biosystems (please refer to Sperian Fire) Smithfield, RI 02917 BKA 207 General Roberts Dr, Columbia, TN 38401, 615-504-4456, Fax: 931-381-2568, E-Mail: bkopta@bellsouth.net n Black Diamond 1005 W Fayette St, Syracuse, NY 13204, 315-425-1592, Fax: 315-425-1760, E-Mail: sales@bdfire.com, URL: www.bdfire.com (See ad page 92) VH Blackinton Co Inc 221 John L Dietsch Blvd, PO Box 1300, Attleboro Falls, MA 02763-0300, 508-699-4436, Fax: 508-695-5349, E-Mail: badges@blackinton.com, URL: www.blackinton.com The Blackjack 3526 N Rose Circle Dr, Scottsdale, AZ 85251, 888-222-9118, Fax: 480-209-1787, E-Mail: blackjackholder@gmail.com, URL: www.blackjackholder.com 380 Stewart Rd, Hanover Township, PA 18706, 570-825-1900, Fax: 570-825-7108, E-Mail: bandricks@kbs-inc.net, URL: www.flashlight.com Bristol Fire Apparel Inc 2516 E State Rd 14, PO Box 750, Rochester, IN 46975, 800-565-5483, Fax: 574-223-8622, E-Mail: info@bristolfireapparel.com, URL: www.bristolfireapparel.com Broco Inc 10868 Bell Ct, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730, 909-483-3222, Fax: 909-483-3233, E-Mail: sales@brocoinc.com, URL: www.brocoinc.com Bronto Skylift Teerivuorenkatu 28, FI-33300 Tampere, Finland, 358-20-792-7111, Fax: 358-20-792-7300, E-Mail: sales@bronto.fi, URL: www.bronto.fi Brunswick Commercial Government Products 420 Megan Z Ave, Edgewater, FL 32132, 386-423-2900, Fax: 386-423-9187, URL: www.brunswickcgboats.com n Blauer Manufacturing Co 20 Aberdeen St, Boston, MA 02215, 800-225-6715, Fax: 617-536-6715, E-Mail: info@blauer.com, URL: www.blauer.com (See ad page 53) Buell Air Horns 8125 W 47th St, Lyons, IL 60534, 800-422-8355, Fax: 708-447-6387, E-Mail: sales@buellairhorns.com, URL: www.buellairhorns.com Bullard 1898 Safety Way, Cynthiana, KY 41031, 859-234-6616, Fax: 859-234-8987, E-Mail: sales@bullard.com, URL: www.bullard.com BlazeMaster Fire Sprinkler Systems 9911 Brecksville Rd, Cleveland, OH 44141, 216-447-5000, Fax: 216-447-5750, E-Mail: blazemaster@blazemaster.com, URL: www.blazemaster.com Boston Leather Inc 1801 Eastwood Dr, PO Box 1213, Sterling, IL 61081, 815-622-1635, Fax: 800-856-1650, E-Mail: info@bostonleather.com, URL: www.bostonleather.com Braun Industries Inc 1170 Production Dr, Van Wert, OH 45891, 419-232-7020, Fax: 419-232-7070, E-Mail: contactus@braunambulances.com, URL: www.braunambulances.com Braun Northwest Inc PO Box 1204, Chehalis, WA 98532, 360-748-0195, Fax: 360-748-0256, E-Mail: sales@braunnorthwest.com, URL: www.braunnorthwest.com n BullEx Digital Safety 20 Corporate Cir, Albany, NY 12203, 518-689-2023, Fax: 518-689-2034, E-Mail: info@bullexsafety.com, URL: www.bullexsafety.com (See ad page 46) Bumperchute Co 8815 SE 74th Pl, Mercer Island, WA 98040, 866-232-8189, Fax: 206-230-4294, E-Mail: info@bumperchute.com, URL: www.bumperchute.com BurnFree Products 9382 S 670 West, Sandy, UT 84070, 801-569-9090, Fax: 807-569-3733, E-Mail: info@burnfree.com, URL: www.burnfree.com Breathing Air Systems 8855 E Broad St, Reynoldsburg, OH 43068, 614-864-1235, Fax: 614-864-0071, E-Mail: cmckee@breathingair.com, URL: www.breathingair.com n BW Technologies by Honeywell-America 3279 W Pioneer Pkwy, Arlington, TX 76013, 888-749-8878, Fax: 817-274-8321, E-Mail: info@gasmonitors.com, URL: www.gasmonitors.com (See ad page 45) FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 119 1/7/09 9:58:35 AM
  • 126. Capital Safety (DBI/SALA Protecta) Capital Safety (DBI/SALA Protecta) 3833 SALA Way, Red Wing, MN 55066-5005, 651-388-8282, Fax: 651-388-5065, E-Mail: info@capitalsafety.com, URL: www.capitalsafety.com Card Imaging 2400 Davey Rd, Woodridge, IL 60517, 630-739-6546, Fax: 630-739-6536, E-Mail: billr@cardimaging.com, URL: www.cardimaging.com Cardinal Industries Inc 19517 Riverside Dr, PO Box 1430, Grundy, VA 24614-1430, 276-935-4545, Fax: 276-935-4970, E-Mail: info@cardinal-industries.com, URL: www.cardinalemblems.com Cardionics Inc 910 Bay Star Blvd, Webster, TX 77598, 281-488-5901, Fax: 281-488-3195, URL: www.cardionics.com Carson Sirens 5451 N Rural St, PO Box 20464, Indianapolis, IN 46220, 888-577-6877, Fax: 317-254-2667, E-Mail: sales@carson-mfg.com, URL: www.carsonsirens.com Caterpillar Inc PO Box 0610, Mossville, IL 61552-0610, 309-578-7309, Fax: 309-578-7267, URL: www.cattruckengines.com CAT PUMPS-High Pressure Pumps Systems Code 3 Inc 10986 N Warson Rd, St Louis, MO 63114, 314-426-2700, Fax: 314-426-1337, URL: www.code3pse.com n Champion Rescue Tools 1495 W 9th St, Suite 101, Upland, CA 91786, 909-982-1126, Fax: 909-982-0050, E-Mail: alan@championrescuetools.com, URL: www.championrescuetools.com (See ad page 17) Checkers Industrial Products Inc PO Box 310, Louisville, CO 80027, 720-890-1187, Fax: 720-890-1191, E-Mail: info@checkersindustrial.com, URL: www.checkersindustrial.com Chiefs Choice 17100 W Ryerson Rd, New Berlin, WI 53151, 262-796-8448, Fax: 262-796-8449, E-Mail: email@firechiefschoice.com, URL: www.firechiefschoice.com Chieftain Safety Manufacturing 14040 NW 58th Ct, Miami Lakes, FL 33014, 305-820-4250, Fax: 305-820-4290, E-Mail: info@chieftainsafety.com, URL: www.chieftainsafety.com Circle D Lights 339 13th St, Carlstadt, NJ 07072, 201-933-5500, Fax: 201-933-8146, E-Mail: customerservice@circle-d.com, URL: www.circle-d.com 1140 Chess Dr, Foster, CA 94404, 650-571-9411, Fax: 650-571-9412, E-Mail: info@cetacea.corp.com, URL: www.cetaceacorp.com Cole Hersee Co 20 Old Colony Ave, Boston, MA 02127, 617-268-2100, Fax: 617-268-9490, E-Mail: info@colehersee.com, URL: www.colehersee.com Columbia Weather Systems Inc 2240 NE Griffin Oaks St, Suite 100, Hillsboro, OR 97124, 503-629-0887, Fax: 503-629-0898, E-Mail: info@columbiaweather.com, URL: www.columbiaweather.com Command Light 1303 E 11th St, Loveland, CO 80537, 800-797-7974, Fax: 970-667-4296, E-Mail: info@commandlight.com, URL: www.commandlight.com CommandSim 221 Headhouse Ct, PO Box 63684, Philadelphia, PA 19147, 215-627-8146, Fax: 215-627-8150, E-Mail: info@commandsim.com, URL: www.commandsim.com Companion Fire Equipment LLC Comtronics Inc n Class 1 607 NW 27th Ave, Ocala, FL 34475, 352-629-5020, Fax: 352-629-2902, URL: www.class1.com (See ad page 41) Cetacea Corp 14 Faraday Dr, Dover, NH 03820, 603-749-6896, Fax: 603-749-6958, E-Mail: mica@cogebiusa.com, URL: www.cogebi.com PO Box 5807, Beaverton, OR 97006, 503-259-0950, Fax: 503-642-9108, URL: www.waterlance.com 1681 94th Ln NE, Minneapolis, MN 55449, 763-780-5440, Fax: 763-780-2958, E-Mail: foam@catpumps.com, URL: www.catpumps.com/foam n CE Niehoff Co 2021 Lee St, Evanston, IL 60202, 847-866-1536, Fax: 847-492-1242, E-Mail: sales@ceniehoff.com, URL: www.ceniehoff.com (See ad page 112) Cogebi Inc Clayton I D S 1495 Old Henderson Rd, Columbus, OH 43220, 614-884-7300, Fax: 614-884-7306, E-Mail: sales@claytonids.com, URL: www.claytonids.com Climatronics Corp 140 Wilbur Pl, Bohemia, NY 11716, 631-567-7300, Fax: 631-567-7585, E-Mail: sales@climatronics.com, URL: www.climatronics.com 2456 Fortune Dr, Lexington, KY 40509, 859-299-9494, Fax: 859-299-9334, E-Mail: sales@cobaltav.com, URL: www.cobaltav.com Concept Engineering Group Inc Air-Spade n CMC Rescue Inc PO Box 6870, Santa Barbara, CA 93160-6870, 805-562-9120, Fax: 805-562-9870, E-Mail: info@cmcrescue.com, URL: www.cmcrescue.com (See ad page 69) Cobalt Audio Video 2456 Fortune Dr, Lexington, KY 40509, 859-299-9494, Fax: 859-299-9334, E-Mail: sales@cobaltav.com, URL: www.cobaltav.com 120 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_120 120 Cummins Inc 500 Jackson St, PO Box 3005, Columbus, IN 47202-3005, 812-377-3205, Fax: 812-377-7897, URL: www.everytime.cummins.com Custom Fiberglass Products LLC 1052 Centre Tpke, Route 61, Orwigsburg, PA 17961, 570-366-0282, Fax: 570-366-1281, URL: www.cfpfiretanks.com CustomFIRE Apparatus Inc 509 68th Ave, Osceola, WI 54020, 715-294-2555, Fax: 715-294-2168, E-Mail: sales@customfire.com, URL: www.customfire.com Cutters Edge 1435 Manzanita Dr, PO Box 1179, Julian, CA 92036-1179, 760-765-0597, Fax: 760-765-0594, E-Mail: tom@cuttersedge.com, URL: www.cuttersedge.com Danhard Inc 3839 Dilido Rd, Dallas, TX 75228, 214-328-8541, Fax: 214-320-0965, E-Mail: sales@danhard.com, URL: www.danhard.com Danko Emergency Equipment 302 E 4th St, PO Box 218, Snyder, NE 68664-0218, 402-568-2200, Fax: 402-568-2278, E-Mail: info@danko.net, URL: www.danko.net 15 Plum St, Verona, PA 15147, 412-826-8800, Fax: 412-826-8601, E-Mail: ricksweet@air-spade.com, URL: www.air-spade.com CON-SPACE Communications Ltd 1160 Yew Ave, PO Box 1540, Blaine, WA 98231-1540, 800-546-3405, Fax: 800-546-3410, URL: www.con-space.com Conterra Inc 1600 Kentucky St, Suite A-3, Bellingham, WA 98229, 360-734-2311, Fax: 360-738-2241, E-Mail: info@conterra-inc.com, URL: www.conterra-inc.com Continental Girbau Inc n CET Fire Pumps Manufacturing 75 Hector St, PO Box 90, Pierreville, Quebec, Canada J0G 1J0, 800-567-2719, Fax: 800-434-2613, E-Mail: sales@fire-pump.com, URL: www.fire-pump.com (See ad page 82) n Crimson Fire Inc 907 7th Ave, Brandon, SD 57005, 605-582-4000, Fax: 605-582-4001, E-Mail: salesrequest@crimson-fire.com, URL: www.crimson-fire.com (See ad page 35) 2500 State Rd 44, Oshkosh, WI 54904, 920-231-8222, Fax: 920-231-4666, E-Mail: info@continentalgirbau.com, URL: www.continentalgirbau.com Council Tool Co 345 Pecan Ln, PO Box 165, Lake Waccamaw, NC 28450, 910-646-3011, Fax: 910-646-4414, URL: www.counciltool.com n WS Darley Co 325 Spring Lake Dr, Itasca, IL 60143, 708-345-8050, Fax: 708-345-8993, E-Mail: darley@wsdarley.com, URL: www.darley.com (See ad page 31) David Clark Co Inc 360 Franklin St, PO Box 15054, Worcester, MA 01615-0054, 508-751-5800, Fax: 508-753-5827, E-Mail: sales@davidclark.com, URL: www.davidclark.com Dayton Industrial Corp 2237 Industrial Blvd, Sarasota, FL 34234, 941-351-4454, Fax: 941-351-6081, E-Mail: sales@daytonindustrial.com, URL: www.daytonindustrial.com Defense Group Inc-COBRA Software 2034 Eisenhower Ave, Suite 290, Alexandria, VA 22314, 877-233-5789, Fax: 703-519-8511, E-Mail: cobra@defensegp.com, URL: www.defensegroupinc.com/cobra www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:58:36 AM
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Entenmann-Rovin Co Detroit Diesel Corp 13400 Outer Dr W, Detroit, MI 48239, 313-592-5000, Fax: 313-592-8176, URL: www.detroitdiesel.com DE Williams Shields DQE Inc 4439 El Paso Rd S, Bullhead City, AZ 86429, 928-754-1922, Fax: 928-754-1522, E-Mail: info@dewilliamsshields.com, URL: www.dewilliamsshields.com Digital Combustion 9121 Atlanta Ave, Suite 705, Huntington Beach, CA 92311, 949-348-1120, Fax: 949-582-5549, E-Mail: nfo@digitalcombustion.com, URL: www.digitalcombustion.com Digital Paging Co 10825 Burbank Blvd, North Hollywood, CA 91601, 800-540-5700, Fax: 818-508-5800, E-Mail: ken@apollowireless.com, URL: www.apollowireless.com Digitech Computer Inc 555 Pleasantville Rd, Suite 110, North Bldg, Briarcliff Manor, NY 10510, 914-741-1919, Fax: 914-741-2818, E-Mail: jcrum@digitechcomputer.com, URL: www.digitechcomputer.com n Draeger Safety Inc 101 Technology Dr, Pittsburgh, PA 15275, 412-787-8383, Fax: 412-787-2207, E-Mail: prodinfo@draeger.com, URL: www.draeger.com (See ad page 11) Dragon Fur PO Box 28789, Seattle, WA 98118, 206-723-0735, Fax: 206-723-1890, E-Mail: info@dragonfur.com, URL: www.dragonfur.com DRI-DEK PO Box 8656, Naples, FL 34101, 800-348-2398, Fax: 800-828-4248, E-Mail: info@dri-dek.com driFIRE LLC 50 N Gary Ave, Suite B, Roselle, IL 60172, 630-339-8039, Fax: 630-339-8097, E-Mail: mpena@drifire.com, URL: www.drifier.com Duo-Safety Ladder Corp Digitize Inc 158 Edison Rd, Lake Hopatcong, NJ 07849-2217, 800-523-7232, Fax: 973-663-4333, E-Mail: info@digitize-inc.com, URL: www.digitize-inc.com Emergency Film Group 8112 Woodland Dr, Indianapolis, IN 46278, 800-355-4628, Fax: 317-295-9822, E-Mail: info@dqeready.com, URL: www.dqeready.com 513 W 9th Ave, PO Box 497, Oshkosh, WI 54902, 920-231-2740, Fax: 920-231-2460, E-Mail: mail@duosafety.com, URL: www.duosafety.com n Eagle Compressors Inc 3003 Thurston Ave, Greensboro, NC 27406, 336-398-8000, Fax: 336-398-8003, E-Mail: lwilson@eaglecompressors.com, URL: www.eaglecompressors.com (See ad page 26) Eagle Gear 8865 Airport Rd, Suite J, Redding, CA 96002, 530-221-6140, Fax: 530-222-0464, E-Mail: sales@eaglegear.com, URL: www.eaglegear.com ECCO 833 W Diamond St, Boise, ID 83705, 800-688-3226, Fax: 800-635-5900, E-Mail: sales@eccolink.com, URL: www.eccolink.com Eco-Tech Alternators 4 Industrial Cir, Hamden, CT 06517, 203-230-3000, Fax: 203-230-3200, E-Mail: sales@ecoair.com, URL: www.ecoair.com n Disaster Response Solutions Inc 1451 State Route 28, Warehouse FG, PO Box 193, Milford, OH 45150, 513-831-4691, Fax: 513-831-0489, E-Mail: sales@mcitrailer.com, URL: www.mcitrailer.com (See ad page 74) Dispensing Technology Corp 5345 N Commerce Ave, #1, Moorpark, CA 93021, 800-529-7733, Fax: 805-529-7732, E-Mail: sales@dispensingtech.com, URL: www.dispensingtech.com Dive Rescue International 201 N Link Ln, Fort Collins, CO 80524, 970-482-0887, Fax: 970-482-0893, E-Mail: training@diverescueintl.com, URL: www.diverescueintl.com Dodgen Mobile Technologies 1505 13th St N, Highway 169 N, PO Box 39, Humboldt, IA 50548, 515-332-3755, Fax: 515-332-3756, E-Mail: info@dodgen-bornfree.com, URL: www.dodgenmobiletech.com Dove Designs Route 1, PO Box 275-G, Monticello, KY 42633, 606-340-9189, Fax: 606-340-9372, E-Mail: contact@dovedesigns.com, URL: www.dovedesigns.com www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_121 121 851 Coho Way, Suite 307, Bellingham, WA 98225, 360-647-6003, Fax: 360-676-7128, E-Mail: sales@emergencyreporting.com, URL: www.emergencyreporting.com Emergency Technologies Inc 7200 Stonehenge Dr, Suite 308, Raleigh, NC 27613-1620, 800-485-0202, Fax: 919-870-7447, E-Mail: sales@emergencytechnologies.com, URL: www.emergencytechnologies.com Emergency Training Solutions LLC 38 Meadowview Dr, Suite 12, Harwinton, CT 06791, 860-485-1161, Fax: 860-485-0169, URL: www.etsrescue.com Emergency Vehicles Inc 705 13th St, Lake Park, FL 33403-2303, 561-848-6652, Fax: 561-848-6658, E-Mail: evi@evi-fl.com, URL: www.evi-fl.com 13900 CR 455, Suite 107, #147, Clermont, FL 34711, 888-853-0220, Fax: 888-853-0220, E-Mail: information@ecxeng.com, URL: www.ecxeng.com Edwards Cromwell Spill Control 11519 Investor Ave, Bldg B, Baton Rouge, LA 70809, 225-292-3377, Fax: 225-751-3363, URL: www.edwardsandcromwell.com 329 W Melinda Ln, Phoenix, AZ 85027 5401 Jefferson Davis Hwy, Richmond, VA 23234, 800-931-3456, E-Mail: personalprotection@usa.dupont.com, URL: www.personalprotection.dupont.com Emergency Reporting ECX Engineering Corp eFiberTools.com DuPont 140 Cooke St, PO Box 1928, Edgartown, MA 02539, 508 627-8844, Fax: 508-627-8863, E-Mail: info@efilmgroup.com, URL: www.efilmgroup.com Elbeco Inc PO Box 13099, Reading, PA 19612, 610-921-0651, Fax: 610-921-8651, URL: www.elbeco.com n Emergent Respiratory Products Inc 5130 E La Palma, Suite 208, Anaheim, CA 92807, 714-263-3777, Fax: 714-263-3788, URL: www.eresp.com (See ad page 98) EMS Innovations Inc PO Box 239, Pasadena, MD 21122, 410-255-3314, Fax: 410-255-1299, E-Mail: information@emsinnovations.com, URL: www.emsinnovations.com Durable Corp 75 N Pleasant St, PO Box 290, Norwalk, OH 44857, 419-668-8138, Fax: 419-668-8068, E-Mail: sales@durablecorp.com, URL: www.durablecorp.com Dur-A-Flex Inc 95 Goodwin St, East Hartford, CT 06108, 860-528-9838, Fax: 860-528-2802, E-Mail: info@dur-a-flex.com, URL: www.dur-a-flex.com DW Digital Wireless Inc 11920 Forge Pl, Richmond, British Columbia, Canada V7A 4V9, 604-241-1420, Fax: 604-241-1440, E-Mail: sales@dw-wireless.com, URL: www.dw-wireless.com n Elkhart Brass 1302 W Beardsley Ave, Elkhart, IN 46514, 800-346-0250, Fax: 574-293-9914, E-Mail: info@elkhartbrass.com, URL: www.elkhartbrass.com (See ad page 15) Elmridge Protection Products 6615 W Boynton Beach Blvd, #320, Boynton Beach, FL 33437, 561-244-8337, Fax: 561-244-8339, E-Mail: info@elmridgeprotection.com, URL: www.elmridgeprotection.com 200 E Elm St, River Falls, WI 54022, 715-426-5550, E-Mail: info@emsmanager.net, URL: www.emsmanager.net End of the Road Inc 1209 Beddington Park, Nashville, TN 37215, 615-828-2600, Fax: 615-661-6413, E-Mail: info@endroad.com, URL: www.endroad.com Emergency Books and Training Inc 4801 SW 195th Terrace, Southwest Ranches, FL 33332-1235, 317-869-0740, Fax: 317-869-0742, E-Mail: sales@ebtinc.com, URL: www.ebtinc.com n E2V Technologies Inc 4 Westchester Plaza, Elmsford, NY 10523, 914-592-6050, Fax: 914-592-5148, URL: www.argusdirect.com (See ad page 86) EMS Manager n Entenmann-Rovin Co 2425 S Garfield Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90040-1811, 323-278-1999, Fax: 323-278-1980, E-Mail: sales@entenmann-rovin.com, URL: www.entenmann-rovin.com (See ad page 71) FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 121 1/7/09 9:58:36 AM
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Environmental Compliance Products (ECP) Environmental Compliance Products (ECP) 8907 Warner Ave, Suite 122, Huntington Beach, CA 92647-5080, 714-847-4474, Fax: 714-847-7554, URL: www.ecpenvironmental.com EZEM/RSDecon 1111 Marcus Ave, Suite M-60, Lake Success, NY 11042, 516-333-8230, Fax: 516-302-2904, E-Mail: info@rsdecon.com, URL: www.rsdecon.com Fire and Cop Shop 24070 Postal Ave, Moreno Valley, CA 92553, 951-485-6828, Fax: 951-485-6838, E-Mail: fireandcopshop@aol.com, URL: www.fireandcopshop.com FAAC Inc Equipment Innovators 800 Industrial Park Dr, Marrieta, GA 30062, 770-427-9467, Fax: 770-425-2350, E-Mail: dlindsey@equipmentinnovators.com, URL: www.equipmentinnovators.com ERT Systems LLC 305 E Eisenhower, Suite 112, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, 800-786-1387, URL: www.onsiteert.com ESRI 380 New York St, Redlands, CA 92373-8118, 909-793-2853, Fax: 909-793-5953, E-Mail: info@esri.com, URL: www.esri.com Essex PBR Corp 2300 Locust Ave, St Louis, MO 63103, 314-351-6116, Fax: 314-351-7181 Fabco Power Fascut Industries Inc 7248 Inama Rd, Sauk City, WI 53583, 608-643-6678, Fax: 608-643-2682, URL: www.fascut.com FDM Software Ltd 949 W 3rd St, Suite 113, North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V7P 3P7, 604-986-9941, Fax: 604-986-7130, E-Mail: info@fdmsoft.com, URL: www.fdmsoft.com FDNY Artist 6 Genesee Ave, Staten Island, NY 10308, 718-317-5025, E-Mail: fdartistny@aol.com, URL: www.fdartistny.com Fechheimer Brothers Co n ESS/Eye Safety Systems Inc PO Box 1017, Sun Valley, ID 83353, 208-726-4072, Fax: 208-726-4563, E-Mail: ess@esseyepro.com, URL: www.esseyepro.com (See ad page 67) EURAMCO Safety 2746 Via Orange Way, Spring Valley, CA 91978, 619-670-9590, Fax: 619-670-7345, E-Mail: sales@euramcosafety.com, URL: www.euramcosafety.com EXCELLANCE INC 453 Lanier Rd, Madison, AL 35758, 256-772-9321, Fax: 256-772-8792, E-Mail: dale@excellance.com, URL: www.excellance.com 4545 Malsbary Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45242, 513-793-5400, Fax: 513-793-7819, E-Mail: info@fechheimer.com, URL: www.fechheimer.com Federal Signal Corp 2645 Federal Signal Dr, University Park, IL 60466, 708-534-3400, Fax: 800-682-8022, E-Mail: fireinfo@fedsig.com, URL: www.fedsig.com/fire Feecon (Kidde Fire Fighting) 150 Gordon Dr, PO Box 695, Exton, PA 19341-1350, 610-363-1400, Fax: 610-524-9073, E-Mail: webmaster@kidde-fire.com, URL: www.kidde-fire.com Ferno 70 Weil Way, Wilmington, OH 45177, 937-382-1451, Fax: 937-382-1191, E-Mail: info@ferno.com, URL: www.ferno.com Ferrara Fire Apparatus Inc n Extendo Bed Company Inc 2223 Roedel Ave, Caldwell, ID 83605, 208-455-2707, Fax: 208-286-0925, E-Mail: sales2@extendobed.com, URL: www.extendobed.com (See ad page 49) 12525 Skyline Dr, Jenks, OK 74037, 918-299-5671, E-Mail: morgansk@swbell.net, URL: www.firehousetreasures.com n Firecom 7340 SW Durham Rd, Portland, OR 97224, 503-608-3440, Fax: 503-620-2943, URL: www.firecom.com (See ad page 61) 1570 Kings Hwy, PO Box 582, Chester, NY 10950, 845-469-9151, Fax: 845-469-7871, E-Mail: mail@fabcopower.com, URL: www.fabcopower.com 27855 James Chapel Rd, PO Box 249, Holden, LA 70744, 225-567-7100, Fax: 225-567-5260, URL: www.ferrarafire.com Fieldsoft Inc 610 N Alma School Rd, #18, PMB 305, Chandler, AZ 85224, 480-899-2128, Fax: 480-899-8123, URL: www.fieldsoft.com 0901FE_122 122 Fire Innovations 2456 E Washington St, PO Box 2111, Petaluma, CA 94953, 707-763-9900, Fax: 707-763-9996, E-Mail: info@fireinnovations.com, URL: www.fireinnovations.com Fire Interface Research Equipment Inc Fire Department Instructors Conference (FDIC) 1421 S Sheridan, Tulsa, OK 74112, 918-832-9239, Fax: 918-831-9729, E-Mail: fdicinfo@pennwell.com, URL: www.fdic.com Fire-Dex 780 S Progress Dr, Medina, OH 44256, 330-723-0000, Fax: 330-723-0035, E-Mail: info@firedex.com, URL: www.firedex.com FireDog Jewelry 5628 Airport Way S, Seattle, WA 98108, 206-763-6115, E-Mail: info@firedogjewelry.com, URL: www.firedogjewelry.com Fire Engineering 21-00 Route 208 S, Fair Lawn, NJ 07410-2602, 973-251-5040, Fax: 973-251-5065, URL: www.fireengineering.com Fire Equipment Services 1665 Stanley Livestock Rd, PO Box 2542, Sumter, SC 29151, 803-494-6000, Fax: 803-778-1630, URL: www.fes-gg.com 323 Florida St SE, Albuquerque, NM 87108, 505-266-5425, Fax: 505-266-8224, E-Mail: firetyke@spinn.net, URL: www.firetyke.com Firemans Friend Engineering Inc 5735 Babe Smith Rd, Silver Point, TN 38582, 931-261-6132, Fax: 309-414-0181, E-Mail: slarson404@earthlink.net, URL: www.firetruckvalves.com Firemark Tool Co Inc PO Box 494, Lothian, MD 20711-0494, 301-574-5312, Fax: 301-574-5313, E-Mail: firemarktools@hotmail.com, URL: www.firemarktools.com Fire Master 57 Stoffel Dr, PO Box 185, Tallapoosa, GA 30176, 800-341-6189, Fax: 770-574-9663, E-Mail: firemasterga@aol.com, URL: www.firemasterturnoutgear.com Firematic International 10 Ramsay Rd, PO Box 187, Yaphank, NY 11980-0187, 631-924-3181, Fax: 631-924-5202, E-Mail: khorton@firematic.com, URL: www.firematic.com Fire Facilities Inc 216 Wilburn Rd, Sun Prairie, WI 53590, 608-327-4100, Fax: 866-639-7012, E-Mail: info@firefacilities.com, URL: www.firefacilities.com Fire Fighter Exam 1909 W James Crowe Dr, Hayden, ID 83835, 435-630-3640, E-Mail: firehelp@fire-fighter-exam.com, URL: www.fire-fighter-exam.com Fire Hooks Unlimited Inc 1827 Old Mill Rd, Wall, NJ 07719, 732-280-7737, Fax: 732-280-7792, E-Mail: hydra-ram@aol.com, URL: www.firehooksunlimited.net FirehouseDecalsAndMore.com PO Box 498401, Cincinnati, OH 45249-7401, 888-771-3124, Fax: 513-677-3624, E-Mail: sales@firehousedecals.com, URL: www.firehousedecals.com Firehouse Floors Inc 1300 Russell St, Baltimore, MD 21230, 410-783-9992, Fax: 410-783-2604 122 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 1045 N Armando St, Suite D, Anaheim, CA 92806, 714-688-1575, Fax: 714-688-1577, E-Mail: sales@fhmed.com, URL: www.fhmed.com Firehouse Treasures 1229 Oak Valley Dr, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, 734-761-5836, Fax: 734-761-5368, E-Mail: info@faac.com, URL: www.faac.com n E-ONE 1601 SW 37th Ave, Ocala, FL 34474, 352-237-1122, Fax: 352-237-1151, E-Mail: info@e-one.com, URL: www.e-one.com (See ad page 29) Firehouse Medical Inc n FirePrograms Software 4773 N Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills, FL 34465, 352-447-5000, Fax: 352-447-5083, E-Mail: info@fireprograms.com, URL: www.fireprograms.com (See ad page 57) Firequip Fire Hose PO Box 2598, Burlington, NC 27216, 800-334-6823, Fax: 336-227-5015, E-Mail: sam@firequip.com, URL: www.firequip.com Fire Research Corp 26 Southern Blvd, Nesconset, NY 11767, 631-724-8888, Fax: 631-360-9727, E-Mail: sales@fireresearch.com, URL: www.fireresearch.com Firl Industries Inc 321 W Scott St, Fond du Lac, WI 54937, 800-558-4890, Fax: 920-921-7329, E-Mail: firl@dotnet.com, URL: www.firlindustries.com www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:58:37 AM
  • 129. Globe Firefighter Suits Firovac-Reberland 5963 Fountain Nook Rd, Apple Creek, OH 44606, 330-698-5883, Fax: 330-698-7723, E-Mail: ibreber@yahoo.com, URL: www.firovac.com First-In by Westnet 16581 Burke Ln, Huntington Beach, CA 92647, 714-841-3000, Fax: 714-841-3008, URL: www.firestationalerting.com FirstLine LLC Futurecom Systems Group Inc n FoamPro 375 Fifth Ave NW, New Brighton, MN 55112, 651-766-6300, Fax: 651-766-6614, E-Mail: fireservices@hypropumps.com, URL: www.foampro.com (See ad page 36) Louisiana Bus Tech Ctr, S Stadium Dr, Bldg D-124, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, 225-578-0333, Fax: 225-578-7915, E-Mail: jbeam@firstrst.com, URL: www.firstrst.com First Strike Technologies Inc Fyrepel Products 2401 South West Pkwy, St Joseph, MO 64503, 816-390-8086, Fax: 816-390-8224, E-Mail: info@fyrepel.com, URL: www.fyrepel.com Galen Press Ltd PO Box 1628, Buellton, CA 93427, 888-688-6768, Fax: 805-688-5218, E-Mail: colette@glovegirls.com, URL: www.glovegirls.com First Responder Systems Technology 3277 Langstaff Rd, Concord, Ontario, Canada L4K 5P8, 905-660-5548, Fax: 905-660-6858, E-Mail: mikew@futurecom.com, URL: www.futurecom.com PO Box 64400, Tucson, AZ 85728-4400, 520-577-8363, Fax: 520-529-6459, E-Mail: sales@galenpress.com, URL: www.galenpress.com n Fol-Da-Tank Co 1275 W 11th St, PO Box 110, Milan, IL 61264, 309-787-3500, Fax: 309-787-3635, E-Mail: info@fol-da-tank.com, URL: www.fol-da-tank.com (See ad page 38, 76) PO Box 593, Kansas, IL 61933, 217-948-5780, Fax: 217-948-5180, E-Mail: info@1ststriketech.com, URL: www.1ststriketech.com Fort Garry Fire Trucks Fisher Sportswear Gamewell-FCI 12 Clintonville Rd, Northford, CT 06472, 203-484-7161, Fax: 203-484-7118, E-Mail: gamewell-fci@honeywell.com, URL: www.gamewell-fci.com GearGrid 6806 Anthony Hwy, PO Box 188, Waynesboro, PA 17268, 717-762-8400, Fax: 717-762-5656, E-Mail: bruce@fosterrescue.com, URL: www.fosterrescue.com Four Guys Stainless Tank Equipment Inc n 5.11 Tactical Series 4300 Spyres Way, Modoesto, CA 95356, 209-527-4511, Fax: 209-527-1511, E-Mail: info@511tactical.com, URL: www.511tactical.com (See ad page 19) Flamefighter Corp 208 Industrial Blvd, Waconia, MN 55387, 952-442-2977, Fax: 952-442-4106, E-Mail: custservice@flamefighter.com, URL: www.flamefighter.com Flame Shield Consulting Fouts Brothers Inc Gemtor Inc Foxfury Personal Lighting Solutions 2091 Elevado Hills Dr, Vista, CA 92084, 760-945-4231, Fax: 760-758-6283, E-Mail: fox@foxfury.com, URL: www.foxfury.com Fox International 23600 Aurora Rd, Bedford Heights, OH 44146, 800-369-4685, Fax: 800-369-9110, URL: www.fox-intl.com Flitz International LTD 3440 Industrial Dr, Durham, NC 27704, 919-620-7411, Fax: 919-620-3945, E-Mail: fireblockerusa@freudenberg-nw.com, URL: www.freudenberg.com Flotec Inc 7625 W New York St, Indianapolis, IN 46214, 317-273-6960, Fax: 317-273-6979, E-Mail: flotec@floteco2.com, URL: www.floteco2.com www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_123 123 Safety Group Inc) 104 Independence Way, Coatesville, PA 19320-1653, 610-857-8070, Fax: 888-335-9800, E-Mail: sales@gearmasters.com, URL: www.gearmasters.com (See ad page 18, 87) 24 Becket Ln, Palm Coast, FL 32137, 368-597-1057, Fax: 368-597-1057, E-Mail: info@flameshieldconsulting.com, URL: www.flameshieldconsulting.com 821 Mohr Ave, Waterford, WI 53185, 262-534-5898, Fax: 262-534-2991, E-Mail: info@flitz.com, URL: www.flitz.com n Gearmasters (Witmer Public 230 Industrial Park Rd, PO Box 90, Meyersdale, PA 15552, 814-634-8373, Fax: 814-634-0076, E-Mail: albright@4guysfire.com, URL: www.4guysfire.com 2158 Atlanta Rd, Smyrna, GA 30080, 800-948-5045, URL: www.foutsbrosinc.com Freudenberg Nonwovens LLC Frontline 12770 44th St N, Clearwater, FL 33762, 727-573-0400, Fax: 727-571-3295, URL: www.frontlinecomm.com FSI North America 311 Abbe Rd, Sheffield Lake, OH 44054, 440-949-2400, Fax: 440-949-2900, E-Mail: sales@fsinorth.com, URL: www.fsinorth.com 8192 W 700 N, Fairland, IN 46126-9507, 317-835-7824, Fax: 317-835-2992, E-Mail: info@glasmaster.com, URL: www.glasmaster.com Glide-Rite Products of North America 995 S 1950 W, Suite B, Springville, UT 84663, 801-489-5396, Fax: 801-489-9797, E-Mail: info@glide-ritenorthamerica.com, URL: www.glide-ritenorthamerica.com Global Software Corp 5001 N Pennsylvania Ave, Suite 100, Oklahoma City, OK 73112, 405-810-8008, Fax: 405-810-8018, E-Mail: info@globalsoftwarecorp.com, URL: www.globalsoftwarecorp.com 670 SW 15th St, Forest Lake, MN 55025, 888-643-6694, Fax: 651-464-4780, E-Mail: mail@geargrid.com, URL: www.geargrid.com Foster Rescue Products 6672 Lincoln Dr, Philadelphia, PA 19119, 215-755-8565, Fax: 215-755-8135, URL: www.fishersportswear.com 2525 Inkster Blvd, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3C 2E6, 204-594-3473, Fax: 204-694-3230, URL: www.fgiltd.com Glas-Master/Wehr Engineering One Johnson Ave, Matawan, NJ 07747, 732-583-6200, Fax: 732-290-9391, E-Mail: sales.info@gemtor.com, URL: www.gemtor.com n Globe Cairns 37 Loudon Rd, Pittsfield, NH 03263, 800-232-8323, Fax: 800-442-6388, E-Mail: info@globefiresuits.com, URL: www.globecairns.com (See ad page 2, 3) n Globe CARES 37 Loudon Rd, Pittsfield, NH 03263, 800-232-8323, Fax: 800-442-6388, E-Mail: info@globefiresuits.com, URL: www.globefiresuits.com (See ad page 2, 3) Genesis Rescue Systems/American Rescue Technology Inc 2780 Culver Ave, Kettering, OH 45429, 937-293-6240, Fax: 937-293-7049, E-Mail: toolinfo@genesisrescue.com, URL: www.genesisrescue.com Gerber Outerwear 229 Red Coach Dr, Suite 103, Mishawaka, IN 46545, 800-437-2371, Fax: 888-437-2372, E-Mail: sales@gerberouterwear.com, URL: www.gerberouterwear.com n Globe CB Ready 37 Loudon Rd, Pittsfield, NH 03263, 800-232-8323, Fax: 800-442-6388, E-Mail: info@globefiresuits.com, URL: www.globecbready.com (See ad page 2, 3) GfG Instrumentation Inc 1194 Oak Valley Dr, Suite 20, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, 734-769-0573, Fax: 734-769-1888, E-Mail: info@gfg-inc.com, URL: www.gfg-inc.com Gibson Barnes dba Flight Suits 1900 Weld Blvd, #140, El Cajon, CA 92020, 800-440-5904, Fax: 800-748-6694, E-Mail: mailbox@gibson-barnes.com, URL: www.gibsonbarnes.com n Globe Firefighter Suits 37 Loudon Rd, Pittsfield, NH 03263, 800-232-8323, Fax: 800-442-6388, E-Mail: info@globefiresuits.com, URL: www.globefiresuits.com (See ad page 2, 3) FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 123 1/7/09 9:58:38 AM
  • 130. Globe FootGear GreCon Inc Hendrickson Trailer Suspension Systems 15875 SW 74th Ave, Tigard, OR 97224, 503-641-7731, Fax: 503-641-7508, E-Mail: sales@grecon-us.com, URL: www.grecon-us.com n Globe FootGear 37 Loudon Rd, Pittsfield, NH 03263, 800-232-8323, Fax: 800-442-6388, E-Mail: info@globefiresuits.com, URL: www.globefootgear.com (See ad page 2, 3) Greenwood Emergency Vehicles Inc 530 John Dietsch Blvd, North Attleboro, MA 02763, 508-695-7138, Fax: 508-699-6842, E-Mail: sales@greenwoodev.com, URL: www.greenwoodev.com Groves Inc n Globe LifeLine 37 Loudon Rd, Pittsfield, NH 03263, 800-232-8323, Fax: 800-442-6388, E-Mail: info@globefiresuits.com, URL: www.globelifeline.com (See ad page 2, 3) 818 Trakk Ln, Woodstock, IL 60098, 800-991-2120, E-Mail: sales@groves.com, URL: www.readyrack.com Haix North America Inc Halcyon Products Inc 10160 Queens Way, Suite 1, Chagrin Falls, OH 44023, 440-543-1518, Fax: 440-543-1522, E-Mail: kweamelink@halcyonproducts.com, URL: www.halcyonproducts.com Golight Inc 37146 Old Highway 17, Culbertson, NE 69024, 308-278-3131, Fax: 308-278-2525, E-Mail: shawna@golight.com, URL: www.golight.com n Hale Products Inc 700 Spring Mill Ave, Conshohocken, PA 19428, 610-825-6300, Fax: 610-825-6440, E-Mail: customerservice.hale@idexcorp.com, URL: www.haleproducts.com SALES OFFICES: Hale Products Inc, Neenah, WI, 920-380-0414, Fax: 920-380-0413 (See ad page 41) Hammerhead Industries Inc Hannay Reels Inc 553 State Route 143, Westerlo, NY 12193, 518-797-3791, Fax: 800-733-5464, E-Mail: info@hannay.com, URL: www.hannay.com Hansen Fire Safety Harrison Hydra-Gen LTD 10827 Tower Oaks Blvd, Houston, TX 77070, 281-807-4420, Fax: 281-807-4815, E-Mail: sales@harrisonhydragen.com, URL: www.harrisonhydragen.com 75 Jacksonville Rd, PO Box 2099, Warminster, PA 18974, 215-957-0720, Fax: 215-957-0729, E-Mail: sales@havis.com, URL: www.havis.com Haynes Manufacturing Co 24142 Detroit Rd, Westlake, OH 44145, 440-871-2188, Fax: 440-871-0855, E-Mail: sales@haynesmfg.com, URL: www.haynesmfg.com Hazard Control Technologies Inc 150 Walter Way, Fayetteville, GA 30214, 770-719-5112, Fax: 770-719-5117, E-Mail: info@hct-world.com, URL: www.hct-world.com Hazguide Software Solutions LLC Hansen International Hendrickson Bumper and Trim 124 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_124 124 High Angle Associates 6002 Calhoun Dr, Fredericksburg, VA 22407, 540-786-2102, Fax: 540-786-3367, E-Mail: highangleassoc@aol.com, URL: www.techrescue.biz 285 St Jean St W, East Angus, Quebec, Canada J0B 1R0, 888-832-4310, Fax: 819-832-4340, E-Mail: hoseman@mindspring.com, URL: www.highwaterhose.com HME Ahrens-Fox 1950 Byron Center Ave, Wyoming, MI 49519, 616-534-1463, Fax: 616-534-1967, E-Mail: info@hmetruck.com, URL: www.hmeahrensfox.com HO Bostrom Co Inc 818 Progress Ave, Waukesha, WI 53186, 262-542-0222, Fax: 262-542-3784, E-Mail: sales@hobostrom.com, URL: www.hobostrom.com n Holmatro Inc 505 McCormick Dr, Glen Burnie, MD 21061, 410-768-9962, Fax: 410-768-4878, URL: www.holmatro-usa.com (See ad page 5) Horton Emergency Vehicles 3800 McDowell Rd, Grove City, OH 43123, 614-539-8181, Fax: 614-539-8181, E-Mail: info@hortonambulance.com, URL: www.hortonambulance.com 4037 Avalon Park Blvd E, Orlando, FL 32828, 877-411-4294, Fax: 407-382-5420, E-Mail: sales@hazguide.com, URL: www.hazguide.com Hazmatshower.com 130 Zenker Rd, Lexington, SC 29072, 803-695-1500, Fax: 803-695-0873, URL: www.hansenint.com 800 S Frontage Rd, Woodridge, IL 60517, 630-910-2800, Fax: 630-910-2899, E-Mail: ccardillo@hendrickson-intl.com, URL: www.hendrickson-intl.com Havis-Shields Equipment Corp 1395 Grandview Ave, Columbus, OH 43212, 800-369-1800, Fax: 614-487-1688, E-Mail: sales@hansenent.com, URL: www.hansenent.com n Grace Industries Inc 305 Bend Hill Rd, Fredonia, PA 16124, 724-962-9231, Fax: 724-962-3611, E-Mail: info@graceindustries.com, URL: www.graceindustries.com (See ad page 32) Hendrickson Truck Suspension Systems Highwater Hose Inc n Harrington Inc 2630 W 21st St, Erie, PA 16506, 814-838-3957, Fax: 814-838-7339, E-Mail: daveh@harrinc.com, URL: www.harrinc.com (See ad page 83) 6100 Brittmoore Rd, Suite F, Houston, TX 77041, 832-467-4339, Fax: 281-759-2727, E-Mail: hart-a-gen@msn.com, URL: www.hydraulicgens.com 1501 Goodyear Ave, Ventura, CA 93003, 805-658-9922, Fax: 805-658-8833, E-Mail: info@gearkeeper.com, URL: www.gearkeeper.com n Gorman-Rupp Co 305 Bowman St, Mansfield, OH 44903, 419-755-1011, Fax: 419-755-1251, E-Mail: grsales@gormanrupp.com, URL: www.otspumps.com (See ad page 44) PO Box 111, Kentfield, CA 94914, 415-461-8111, Fax: 415-461-8133, E-Mail: firechief@harperpack.com, URL: www.harperpack.com Hart-A-Gen Systems Inc Mail Code 482-A25-D35, PO Box 100, Detroit, MI 48265-1000, 313-665-1665, Fax: 313-667-5001 PO Box 7, Baldwinsville, NY 13027, 877-727-6673, E-Mail: info@gloveholders.com, URL: www.gloveholders.com HARPER Rescue Pack 911 W 5th St, Washington, NC 27889, 800-763-0700, Fax: 252-975-8393, URL: www.hackneyev.com GM Fleet and Commercial Golfire Inc 3700 W Juneau Ave, PO Box 653, Milwaukee, WI 53201, 414-343-8603, Fax: 414-343-8781, E-Mail: misty.oelhafen@harley-davidson.com, URL: www.harley-davidson.com Hackney Emergency Vehicles 157 Venture Ct, Suite 11, Lexington, KY 40511, 866-344-4249, Fax: 859-281-0113, E-Mail: service-han@haix.com, URL: www.haix.com n Globe Manufacturing Co 37 Loudon Rd, Pittsfield, NH 03263, 800-232-8323, Fax: 800-442-6388, E-Mail: info@globefiresuits.com, URL: www.globefiresuits.com (See ad page 2, 3) Harley-Davidson Motor Co 2070 Industrial Pl SE, Canton, OH 44707, 866-743-3247, Fax: 330-489-1965, E-Mail: rideair@hendrickson-intl.com, URL: www.henrickson-intl.com PO Box 4687, Park City, UT 84060-4687, 801-255-6418, Fax: 801-255-6637, E-Mail: ryan@zodi.com, URL: www.hazmatshower.com 501 Caton Farm Rd, Joliet, IL 60435, 815-727-4031, Fax: 815-727-9697, E-Mail: swolfe@hendrickson-intl.com, URL: www.hendrickson-intl.com n Howell Rescue Systems Inc 2673 Culver Ave, Kettering, OH 45429, 937-290-0522, Fax: 937-290-0528, E-Mail: info@howellrescue.com, URL: www.howellrescue.com (See ad page 103) Humat Inc 201 E Jarrettsville Rd, Forest Hill, MD 21050, 800-638-2079, Fax: 410-836-5138, E-Mail: bjohnson@humat.com, URL: www.humat.com www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:58:38 AM
  • 131. Kidde Fire Trainers Inc Insta-Chain Inc n Hurst Jaws of Life 711 N Post Rd, Shelby, NC 28150, 800-537-2659, Fax: 704-487-7712, URL: www.jawsoflife.com (See ad page 55) Husky Airboats 490 Piercey Rd, Bolton, Ontario, Canada L7E 5B7, 905-857-5146, Fax: 905-857-7647, E-Mail: airboat@allstream.net, URL: www.huskyairboats.com n IMS Alliance 18024 72nd Ave S, Kent, WA 98032, 425-251-1670, Fax: 425-251-1894, E-Mail: sales@imsalliance.com, URL: www.imsalliance.com (See ad page 40) Inca Gold Products LLC 1450 W 135th St, Gardena, CA 90249, 310-808-9359, Fax: 310-808-9369, E-Mail: incagold@sbcglobal.net, URL: www.incagoldonline.com In Command n Husky Portable Containment 4444 E 146th St N, Skiatook, OK 74070, 918-217-3481, Fax: 918-217-3483, E-Mail: sales@huskyportable.com, URL: www.huskyportable.com (See ad page 64) Hydraulics International Inc 9201 Independence Ave, Chatsworth, CA 91311, 818-407-3400, Fax: 818-407-3428, E-Mail: sales@hiipumps.com, URL: www.hiipumps.com 12807 Cypress Pass Loop W, Cypress, TX 77429-2172, 713-681-1507, Fax: 713-429-4980, E-Mail: info@assetincommand.com, URL: www.assetincommand.com Industrial Scientific Corp 1001 Oakdale Rd, Oakdale, PA 15071, 412-788-4353, Fax: 412-788-8353, E-Mail: info@indsci.com, URL: www.indsci.com Infection Control/Emerging Concepts 7715 Knightshayes Dr, Manassas, VA 20111, 703-365-8388, Fax: 703-365-8405, E-Mail: info@ic-ec.com, URL: www.ic-ec.com iamresponding.com PO Box 93, DeWitt, NY 13214, 315-701-1372, Fax: 315-218-0253, E-Mail: errs@emergencysmc.com, URL: www.iamresponding.com ICS Toolbox LLC 19062 Airport Dr, Melfa, VA 23410, 757-302-0399, E-Mail: info@ics-toolbox.com, URL: www.ics-toolbox.com ICX Agentase 2240 William Pitt Way, Pittsburgh, PA 15238, 412-423-2107, Fax: 412-423-2139, E-Mail: info@agentase.com, URL: www.agentase.com Idaho Technology Inc 390 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, 801-736-6354, Fax: 801-588-0507, E-Mail: it@idahotech.com, URL: www.idahotech.com Image Trend Inc 20855 Kensington Blvd, Lakeville, MN 55044, 952-469-1589, Fax: 952-985-5671, E-Mail: sales@imagetrend.com, URL: www.imagetrend.com/ems www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_125 125 Intec Video Systems Inc 23301 Vista Grande, Laguna Hills, CA 92653, 949-859-3800, Fax: 949-859-3178, E-Mail: info@intecvideo.com, URL: www.intecvideo.com Intelagard Inc 590 Burbank St, Suite 220, Broomfield, CO 80020, 303-309-6309, Fax: 303-410-1562, E-Mail: info@intelagard.com, URL: www.intelagard.com International Fitness Testing 8 Ramblewood Dr, Branford, CT 06405, 203-315-0383, Fax: 203-488-9562, E-Mail: rpursel@visuallink.com, URL: www.4guysfire.com International Safety Equipment Inc PO Box 585, Devault, PA 19432-0585, 610-935-8866, Fax: 610-590-0108, E-Mail: ise99@comcast.net, URL: www.system99.com International Truck Engine Corp 4201 Winfield Rd, PO Box 1488, Warrenville, IL 60555-7488, 630-753-5000, Fax: 630-753-3049, E-Mail: bob.neitzel@navistar.com, URL: www.navistar.com Interspiro Hypres Equipment 7608 Melrose Ln, Oklahoma City, OK 73127, 405-440-2442, Fax: 405-440-2442, E-Mail: sales@hypresequip.com, URL: www.hypresequip.com 995 S 1950 W, Suite B, Springville, UT 84663, 801-489-9000, Fax: 801-489-9797, E-Mail: info@insta-chain.com, URL: www.insta-chain.com n Informed Publishing 7110 SW Fir Loop, Suite 110, Tigard, OR 97223, 503-624-8014, Fax: 503-639-1369, E-Mail: sales@informedguides.com, URL: www.informedguides.com (See ad page 50) 10225 82nd Ave, Pleasant Prairie, WI 53158-5801, 262-947-9901, Fax: 262-947-9902, E-Mail: sales@interspiro.com, URL: www.interspiro-us.com Intrado Inc 1601 Dry Creek Dr, Longmont, CO 80503, 720-494-5800, E-Mail: info@intrado.com, URL: www.intrado.com Inger Dog Inc 2410 Swede Rd, East Norriton, PA 19401-1738, 610-275-8560, Fax: 610-275-5438, URL: www.ingerdog.com Innotex Inc 275 Gouin St, PO Box 2980, Richmond, Quebec, Canada J0B 2H0, 819-826-5971, Fax: 819-826-5195, E-Mail: innotex@innotex.ca, URL: www.innotex.ca Innovative Controls Inc 560 Braddock Ave, East Pittsburgh, PA 15112, 412-824-2264, Fax: 412-824-2339, URL: www.innovativecontrolsinc.com n ISG Thermal Systems USA Inc 305 Petty Rd, Lawrenceville, GA 30043, 678-442-1234, Fax: 678-442-1295, E-Mail: info@isgfire.com, URL: www.isgfire.com (See ad page 65) ITT Night Vision 7635 Plantation Rd, Roanoke, VA 24019, 540-563-0371, Fax: 540-362-4979, E-Mail: les.hodges@itt.com, URL: www.nightvision.com J and N Enterprises Inc 851 Transport Dr, Valparaiso, IN 46383, 219-465-2700, Fax: 219-465-2701, E-Mail: info@gasleaksensors.com, URL: www.gasleaksensors.com J Neils Enterprises Inc/VENTRY Fans 14128 N Hauser Lake Rd, Hauser, ID 83854, 208-773-1194, Fax: 208-777-0360, E-Mail: info@ventry.com, URL: www.ventry.com/fe Junkin Safety Appliance Co 3121 Millers Ln, Louisville, KY 40216, 502-775-8303, Fax: 502-772-0548, URL: www.junkinsafety.com Junk Yard Dog Industries 440 Horsham Rd, Suites 45, Horsham, PA 19044, 267-803-1440, Fax: 267-803-1447, E-Mail: jydinfo@cavtel.net, URL: www.junkyardindustries.com KenMar Inc 2531 Willard Dairy Rd, High Point, NC 27265, 336-884-8722, Fax: 336-884-5477, URL: www.kenmar.net Kenwood USA Corp 3970 Johns Creek Ct, Suite 100, Suwanee, GA 30024, 800-950-5005, E-Mail: ecomm@kenwoodsa.com, URL: www.kenwoodusa.com Kenworth Truck Co 10630 NE 38th Pl, PO Box 1000, Kirkland, WA 98033, 425-828-5000, Fax: 425-828-5777, E-Mail: judy.mctigue@paccar.com, URL: www.kenworth.com Key Fire Hose Corp 1150 NW 72nd St, Miami, FL 33150, 305-696-1680, Fax: 305-696-1316, E-Mail: tmathews@keyfire.com, URL: www.keyfire.com n Kidde Fire Fighting 150 Gordon Dr, PO Box 695, Exton, PA 19341, 610-363-1400, Fax: 610-524-9073, E-Mail: webmaster@kidde-fire.com, URL: www.kidde-fire.com (See ad page 62) InPower LLC 3555 Africa Rd, Galena, OH 43021, 740-548-0965, Fax: 740-548-2302, E-Mail: sales@inpowerllc.com, URL: www.inpowerdirect.com Inspironix Inc 3400 Cottage Way, Suite L, Sacramento, CA 95825, 866-684-3669, Fax: 916-488-3210, E-Mail: info@inspironix.com, URL: www.inspironix.com n ISI 922 Hurricane Shoals Rd, Lawrenceville, GA 30043, 678-495-3700, Fax: 678-495-3875, E-Mail: customer_service@avon-rubber.com, URL: www.intsafety.com (See ad page 73) n Kidde Fire Trainers Inc 17 Philips Pkwy, Montvale, NJ 07645-1810, 201-300-8100, Fax: 201-300-8101, E-Mail: marketing@kiddeft.com, URL: www.kiddeft.com (See ad page 62) FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 125 1/7/09 9:58:39 AM
  • 132. KME Fire Apparatus KME Fire Apparatus One Industrial Complex, Nesquehoning, PA 18240, 800-235-3928, Fax: 570-669-5124, E-Mail: kme@kovatch.com, URL: www.kovatch.com Landa Water Cleaning Systems 4275 NW Pacific Rim Blvd, Camas, WA 98607, 800-547-8672, Fax: 800-535-9164, E-Mail: info@landa.com, URL: www.landa.com Larry Fox Co Ltd PO Box 729-FE, Valley Stream, NY 11582, 516-791-7929, Fax: 516-791-1022, E-Mail: larry911@earthlink.net, URL: www.larryfox.com n Knox Co 1601 W Deer Valley Rd, Phoenix, AZ 85027, 623-687-2300, Fax: 623-687-2299, E-Mail: info@knoxbox.com, URL: www.knoxbox.com (See ad page 77) Knoxville Glove Co PO Box 138, Knoxville, TN 37901, 865-573-4555, Fax: 865-573-4558, URL: www.knoxvilleglove.com Lawrence Factor Inc 4740 NW 157th St, Miami Lakes, FL 33014, 305-430-0550, Fax: 305-430-0864, E-Mail: l-factor@lx.netcom.com, URL: www.lawrence-factor.com PO Box 331, Pottsville, PA 17901, 570-429-0715, Fax: 570-429-1344, E-Mail: jim.krammes@krammesgroup.com, URL: www.krammesgroup.com Lighthouse Uniform Co 1532 15th Ave W, Seattle, WA 98119, 800-426-5225, Fax: 206-282-5662, E-Mail: light@lighthouseuniform.com, URL: www.lighthouseuniform.com Lion Apparel 6450 Poe Ave, Suite 300, Dayton, OH 45414, 937-898-1949, Fax: 937-415-1994, E-Mail: lionpsg@lionapparel.com, URL: www.lionapparel.com 180 Industrial Dr, Burlington, WI 53105, 262-763-0147, Fax: 262-763-0156, E-Mail: llaguardia@ldvusa.com, URL: www.ldvusa.com 203-18 Four Seasons Pl, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M9B 6E7, 416-695-3922, Fax: 416-695-3382, E-Mail: d.medved@ivodex.com, URL: www.lenzing-fr.com Krammes Kustom Body 1720 Sublette Ave, St Louis, MO 63110, 314-771-2400, Fax: 800-477-7701, URL: www.alliedhpi.com LDV Inc Lenzing/Ivodex n Kochek Company Inc 75 Highland Dr, Putnam, CT 06260-3010, 800-420-4673, Fax: 800-772-0255, E-Mail: sales@kochek.com, URL: www.kochek.com (See ad page 84) Life Support Products/Allied Healthcare Products Inc Liberty Art Works Inc PO Box 38, Dutzow, MO 63342, 888-411-7744, Fax: 636-433-2888, URL: www.libertyartworks.com Liberty Mountain 4375 W 1980 S, #100, Salt Lake City, UT 84104, 801-954-0741, Fax: 801-954-0766, URL: www.libertymountain.com Lifeguard Systems Inc PO Box 594, Shokan, NY 12481, 845-657-5544, Fax: 845-657-5549, E-Mail: lgs@teamlgs.com, URL: www.teamlgs.com n Locution Systems Inc 1626 Cole Blvd, Suite 325, Golden, CO 80401, 303-932-0014, Fax: 303-384-9014, E-Mail: info@locution.com, URL: www.locution.com (See ad page 51) Loughlin Enterprises Inc PO Box 385, Sayville, NY 11782, 631-589-0027, Fax: 631-589-0027, E-Mail: bcutrone@optonline.net, URL: www.ladderbeacon.com Luxfer Gas Cylinders 3016 Kansas Ave, Riverside, CA 92507, 951-341-2303, URL: www.luxfercylinders.com n Kussmaul Electronics Co Inc 170 Cherry Ave, West Sayville, NY 11796, 631-567-0314, Fax: 631-567-5826, E-Mail: sales@kussmaul.com, URL: www.kussmaul.com (See ad page 48) 1011 Pawtucket Blvd, Lowell, MA 01853, 978-442-5000, Fax: 978-442-4001, URL: www.macom.com Lab Safety Supply 401 S Wright Rd, PO Box 1368, Janesville, WI 53547-1368, 608-754-2345, Fax: 800-543-9910, E-Mail: custsvc@labsafety.com, URL: www.lss.com LaCrosse Footwear Inc 17634 NE Airport Way, Portland, OR 97230, 503-262-0110, Fax: 503-262-0115, E-Mail: info@lacrossefootwear.com, URL: www.lacrossefootwear.com Laerdal Medical Corp 167 Myers Corners Rd, Wappingers Falls, NY 12590, 845-297-7770, Fax: 800-227-1143, E-Mail: customerservice@laerdal.com, URL: www.laerdal.com MagneGrip Life Line Emergency Vehicles Majestic Fire Apparel Inc 1 Life Line Dr, PO Box 299, Sumner, IA 50674, 563-578-3317, Fax: 563-578-3305, E-Mail: dcole@lifelineambulance.com, URL: www.lifelineambulance.com Life-Pack Technologies Inc 211 W Ramsdell St, Marion, WI 54950, 715-754-5261, Fax: 715-754-5776, URL: www.marionbody.com Marque Inc 1110 DI Dr, Elkhart, IN 46514-8231, 574-534-9501, Fax: 574-534-9701, URL: www.marqueinc.com Marsars Water Rescue Systems Inc 155 Myrtle St, Shelton, CT 06484, 203-924-7315, Fax: 203-924-4198, E-Mail: robert.davis02@snet.net, URL: www.marsars.com MatJack 1441 Sadlier Cir, West Dr, Indianapolis, IN 46239, 317-359-3078, Fax: 317-359-3079, E-Mail: matjack@sprynet.com, URL: www.matjack.com MAX-AIR Compressors 2807 Peddler Ln, Kerrville, TX 78028, 830-257-5006, Fax: 830-257-3720, E-Mail: sales@max-air.com, URL: www.max-air.com Maytag Commerical Laundry 2901 Lakeshore Dr, St Joseph, MI 49085, 800-662-3587, Fax: 269-923-5838, URL: www.maytagcommerciallaundry.com McCoy Miller 1110 DI Dr, Elkhart, IN 46514, 574-264-7511, Fax: 574-262-9236, E-Mail: sales@mccoymiller.com, URL: www.mccoymiller.com M/A-Com Inc LifeGuard Technologies 18881 US 31 N, Westfield, IN 46074, 866-765-5835, Fax: 317-896-2142, E-Mail: info@imminet.com, URL: www.lifeguardtechnologies.com Marion Body Works Inc 11449 Deerfield Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45242, 800-875-5440, Fax: 513-247-2502, E-Mail: info@magnegrip.com, URL: www.magnegrip.com 255 Wagner St, PO Box 248, Lehighton, PA 18235, 610-377-6273, Fax: 610-377-6221, E-Mail: cs@majhoods.com, URL: www.majhoods.com Mako Compressors MDG Fog Generators Ltd 5639 Christophe-Colomb Ave, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2S 2E8, 514-272-6040, Fax: 514-722-3229, E-Mail: info@mdgfog.com, URL: www.mdgfog.com MDI Traffic Control Products 38271 W Twelve Mile Rd, Farmington Hills, MI 48331, 800-521-6776, Fax: 248-488-5700, E-Mail: gbleau@mdiworldwide.com, URL: www.mditrafficcontrol.com Medprotect Inc 1634 SW 17th St, Ocala, FL 34471, 352-732-2268, Fax: 352-351-5211, E-Mail: email@compairmako.com, URL: www.compairmako.com 1900 Preston Rd, Suite 267, Plano, TX 75093, 972-612-1515, Fax: 972-867-3063, E-Mail: medpro@medprotect-inc.com, URL: www.medprotect-inc.com Life Safety Systems Inc Mapping Solutions Inc Medtec Ambulance Corp Life Star Rescue Inc MarathonNorco Aerospace Inc 2301-B Computer Rd, Willow Grove, PA 19090, 215-784 5760, Fax: 215-784-5770, E-Mail: contact@life-pack.com, URL: www.life-pack.com 343 Soquel Ave, Suite 317, Santa Cruz, CA 95062, 831-728-9090, Fax: 831-728-1964, E-Mail: info@lifesafetysys.com, URL: www.lifesafetysys.com 1171 Production Dr, Van Wert, OH 45891-9390, 419-238-1459, Fax: 419-238-1479, E-Mail: admin@lifestarrescue.com, URL: www.lifestarrescue.com 19144 Molalla Ave, Suite A, PO Box 2425, Oregon City, OR 97045, 503-723-5011, Fax: 503-518-5015, E-Mail: info@mapsol.com, URL: www.mapsol.com 8301 Imperial Dr, Waco, TX 76712, 254-776-0650, Fax: 254-776-6558, E-Mail: marathon@mptc.com, URL: www.mnaerospace.com 2429 Lincolnway E, Goshen, IN 46526-6437, 574-534-2631, Fax: 574-534-3629, URL: www.medtecambulance.com Mentor Engineering Inc 10 2175 29th St NE, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T1Y 7H8, 403-777-3760, Fax: 403-777-3769, E-Mail: sales@mentoreng.com, URL: www.mentoreng.com Mar-Bal Inc 10095 Queens Way, Chagrin Falls, OH 44023-5495, 440-539-6595, Fax: 440-543-4691, URL: www.mar-bal.com 126 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_126 126 www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:58:40 AM
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On Scene Solutions LLC Mercedes Textiles Ltd 5838 Cypihot, Saint Laurent, Quebec, Canada H4S 1Y5, 514-335-4337, Fax: 514-335-9633, E-Mail: info@mercedestextiles.com, URL: www.mercedestextiles.com MERET 1641 East St, Andrew Pl, Santa Ana, CA 92705, 877-222-0200, Fax: 714-259-4749, E-Mail: info@cramerdeckermedical.com, URL: www.meretusa.com Meridian Medical Technologies Inc 6350 Stevens Forest Rd, Suite 301, Columbia, MD 21046, 443-259-7800, Fax: 443-259-7801, E-Mail: info@meridianmt.com, URL: www.meridianmeds.com Mermaid Manufacturing 2651 Park Windsor Dr, Suite 203, Fort Myers, FL 33901, 239-418-0535, Fax: 239-418-0538, E-Mail: info@mmair.com, URL: www.mmair.com Metalcraft Marine Inc 347 Wellington St, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7K 6N7, 613-542-1810, Fax: 613-542-6515, URL: www.metalcraftmarine.com METZ Aerials USA 584 E Cypress St, Kennett Square, PA 19348, 800-508-5899, Fax: 610-444-6724, E-Mail: steffen.kohleisen@metz-online.de, URL: www.rosenbaueramerica.com Midwest Fire 901 Commerce Rd, PO Box 524, Luverne, MN 56156, 507-283-9141, Fax: 507-283-9142, E-Mail: sales@midwestfire.com, URL: www.midwestfire.com Miller Fall Protection 1345 15th St, Franklin, PA 16323, 814-432-2118, Fax: 824-432-2415, URL: www.sperianprotection.com Modeltech International 348 State Route 11, PO Box 3422, Champlain, NY 12919, 800-686-8009, Fax: 514-255-9129, E-Mail: info@modeltech.com, URL: www.modeltech.com Modern Rescue Safety Equipment Inc 2406 Farm Gate Rd, Brown Summit, NC 27214, 336-508-3781, Fax: 336-375-6354, E-Mail: david@modernrescue.com, URL: www.modernrescue.com Montana Fire Works 5039 Love Ln, Bozeman, MT 59718, 406-586-2474, Fax: 406-388-5526, URL: www.montanafireworks.com Moore Industrial Hardware 77 Circle Freeway Dr, Cincinnati, OH 45246, 513-874-0700, Fax: 513-870-9771, E-Mail: sales@mooreindhardware.com, URL: www.mooreindhardware.com Morning Pride Manufacturing One Innovation Ct, Dayton, OH 45414, 800-688-6148, Fax: 937-264-2677, E-Mail: info@totalfiregroup.com, URL: www.totalfiregroup.com Morphix Technologies 2557 Production Rd, Virginia Beach, VA 23454, 757-431-2260, Fax: 757-216-6209, E-Mail: customerservice@morphtec.com, URL: www.morphtec.com Morrison Medical National Foam Inc (Kidde Fire Fighting) 150 Gordon Dr, PO Box 695, Exton, PA 19341-0695, 610-363-1400, Fax: 610-524-9073, E-Mail: webmaster@kiddefire.com, URL: www.kidde-fire.com National Safety Clean Inc 225 Birch St, Kennett Square, PA 19348, 610-444-1700, Fax: 610-444-0135, E-Mail: sales@natsafe.com, URL: www.natsafe.com Nautilus 16400 SE Nautilus Dr, Vancouver, WA 98683, 800-628-8458, URL: www.nautilus.com Nederman Inc 39115 Warren Rd, Westland, MI 48185, 734-729-3344, Fax: 734-729-3358, E-Mail: info@nedermanusa.com, URL: www.nedermanusa.com Neel Fire Protection Apparatus PO Box 20176, Waco, TX 76702, 254-799-9176, Fax: 254-799-9248, E-Mail: neel@texnet.net, URL: www.neelfire.com New England Ropes 848 Airport Rd, Fall River, MA 02720, 508-678-8200, Fax: 508-679-2363, E-Mail: neropes@neropes.com, URL: www.neropes.com Nextteq 8406 Benjamin Rd, Tampa, FL 33634, 877-312-2333 3735 Paragon Dr, Columbus, OH 43228, 614-461-4400, Fax: 614-469-9696, E-Mail: morr@morrisonmed.com, URL: www.morrisonmed.com Motorola Inc Mountain Fire Technologies Northwest Territorial Mint PO Box 2148, Auburn, WA 98071, 253-833-7780, Fax: 253-735-2210, E-Mail: sales@nwtmint.com, URL: www.nwtmint.com NOTIFIER 12 Clintonville Rd, Northford, CT 06472, 203-484-7161, Fax: 203-484-7118, E-Mail: contactus@notifier.com, URL: www.notifier.com Nupla Corp 11912 Sheldon St, Sun Valley, CA 91352, 800-872-7661, Fax: 800-546-8752, E-Mail: sales@nuplacorp.com, URL: www.nuplacorp.com Occupational Health Dynamics (OHD) 2635 Valleydale Rd, Suite 100, Birmingham, AL 35244, 888-464-3872, Fax: 205-980-5764, E-Mail: sales@ohdusa.com, URL: www.ohdusa.com Odyssey Automotive Specialty Inc 317 Richard Mine Rd, Wharton, NJ 07885, 973-328-2667, Fax: 973-328-2639, E-Mail: sales@odysseyauto.com, URL: www.odysseyauto.com Ogura HyPower Corp OHD LLC NICE Systems 11480 Commerce Park Dr, Suite 220, Reston, VA 20191, 800-553-8279, Fax: 703-464-1095, E-Mail: cj.elias-west@nice.com, URL: www.nice.com 1301 E Algonquin Rd, Schaumburg, IL 60196, 800-247-2346, Fax: 800-247-2347, E-Mail: er.team@motorla.com, URL: www.motorola.com/publicsafety Pellerin Milnor Corp 2000 Plainfield Pike, Cranston, RI 02921, 401-943-4400, Fax: 401-943-7974, URL: www.northsafety.com 3119 Sunset Terrace, San Mateo, CA 94403, 650-572-9230, Fax: 650-572-0264, E-Mail: info@ogurarescuetools.com, URL: www.ogurarescuetools.com MorTan Inc 329 E Pine St, PO Box 8719, Missoula, MT 59807, 406-728-2522, Fax: 406-728-9332, E-Mail: mortan@morganlens.com, URL: www.morganlens.com North Safety Products 2635 Valleydale Rd, Suite 100, Birmingham, AL 35244, 205-980-0180, Fax: 205-980-5764, E-Mail: acoats@ohdusa.com, URL: www.ohdusa.com Omnicron Electronics 581 Liberty Hwy, Putnam, CT 06260-0623, 860-928-0377, Fax: 860-928-6477, E-Mail: sales@omnicronelectronics.com, URL: www.omnicronelectronics.com PO Box 725, Sewanee, TN 37375, 931-968-1004, Fax: 931-967-9428, E-Mail: info@mountainfiretechnologies.com, URL: www.mountainfiretechnologies.com Niedner 13135 W Lisbon Rd, Brookfield, WI 53005, 800-729-3878, Fax: 800-638-9582, E-Mail: metcustomerservice@ milwaukeetool.com, URL: www.milwaukeetool.com MSA 3890 Hammer Dr, Bellingham, WA 98226, 360-738-6467, Fax: 360-738-8043, E-Mail: sales@nor-e.com, URL: www.nor-e.com MITI Manufacturing Company Inc Municipal Marketing Services 545 31st Rd, Grand Junction, CO 81504, 970-243-9500, Fax: 970-243-9200, E-Mail: services@mitico.com, URL: www.mitico.com 1038 Perry Hwy, Pittsburgh, PA 15237, 800-666-2274, Fax: 412-367-0189, E-Mail: sales@funddrive.com, URL: www.funddrive.com 1032 Stanbridge St, Norristown, PA 19404, 610-277-6100, Fax: 610-277-6106, E-Mail: rch@amatex.com, URL: www.norfab.com Mobile Concepts by Scotty My Channellock Tools Northline Coupling Systems Ltd PO Box 400, Kenner, LA 70063, 504-467-9591, Fax: 504-468-3094, E-Mail: mktg@milnor.com, URL: www.milnor.com Milwaukee Electric Tool Corp 480 Bessemer Rd, Mt Pleasant, PA 15642, 724-542-7640, Fax: 724-542-7648, E-Mail: adegre@mobileconcepts.com, URL: www.mobileconcepts.com www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_127 127 PO Box 426, Pittsburg, PA 15230, 412-967-3000, Fax: 877-672-3930, E-Mail: info@msanet.com, URL: www.msafire.com 498 Conklin Ave, Binghamton, NY 13903, 866-440-6062, Fax: 607-352-1488, E-Mail: info@mychannellocktools.com, URL: www.mychannellocktools.com PO Box 38, Norton, VT 05907, 819-849-2751, Fax: 819-849-7539, E-Mail: sales.niedner@tycoint.com, URL: www.niedner.com Nor E First Response Inc Onan - Cummins Onan Generators 1400 73rd Ave NE, Minneapolis, MN 55432, 800-888-6626, Fax: 763-528-7242, E-Mail: askpowergen@cummins.com, URL: www.cumminsonan.com Norfab Corp n On Scene Solutions LLC PO Box 270, Windsor, CO 80550, 970-461-8731, Fax: 970-669-2065, E-Mail: info@onscenesolutions.com, URL: www.onscenesolutions.com (See ad page 64) 6350-5 Netherhart Rd, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L5T 1B8, 800-786-9697, Fax: 905-564-8822, E-Mail: info@northlinecplgs.com, URL: www.northlinecplgs.com FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 127 1/7/09 9:58:40 AM
  • 134. Onspot of North America Inc Petro-Green Inc PO Box 814665, Dallas, TX 75381, 972-484-7336, URL: www.petro-green.com n Onspot of North America Inc 555 Lordship Blvd, Stratford, CT 06615-7124, 203-377-0777, Fax: 203-380-0441, E-Mail: onspot@onspot.com, URL: www.onspot.com (See ad page 84) Osage Ambulances 194 Twin Ridge Rd, PO Box 194, Linn, MO 63303, 573-897-3634, Fax: 573-897-3113, E-Mail: sales@osageind.com, URL: www.osageambulances.com n Paratech Inc 1025 Lambrecht Rd, PO Box 1000, Frankfort, IL 60423, 815-469-3911, Fax: 815-469-7748, E-Mail: paratech@paratech.us, URL: www.paratech.us (See ad page 21) 8225 Hacks Cross Rd, Olive Branch, MS 38654, 662-895-1011, Fax: 662-895-1015, E-Mail: chelseamarketing@parker.com, URL: www.parker.com/chelsea 2307 Oregon St, Oshkosh, WI 54902, 920-233-9400, Fax: 920-233-9670, E-Mail: tcihowiak@oshtruck.com, URL: www.oshkoshtruck.com 2 E Main St, Carpentersville, IL 60110, 847-428-7171, Fax: 847-555-1343, E-Mail: info@ottoeng.com, URL: www.ottoeng.com Our Designs Inc 1211 Cox Ave, Erlanger, KY 41018, 800-382-5252, Fax: 800-347-3367, E-Mail: sales@ourdesigns.com, URL: www.ourdesigns.com Oxygen Generating Systems International (OGSI) 814 Wurlitzer Dr, North Tonawanda, NY 14120, 716-564-5165, Fax: 716-564-5173, E-Mail: ogsimail@ogsi.com, URL: www.ogsi.com Pacific Helmets/Alliance Fire and Rescue Northeastern Industrial Park, Bldg 4, PO Box 426, Gulderland Center, NY 12085, 518-861-0133, Fax: 518-861-0144, E-Mail: sales@alliancefireandrescue.com, URL: www.alliancefireandrescue.com Pacific Helmets (NZ) LTD 315 Heads Rd, PO Box 866, Wanganui, 4540 New Zealand, 64-6-344-5019, Fax: 64-6-344-5376, E-Mail: sales@pacifichelmets.com, URL: www.pacifichelmets.com Pacific Safety Products Inc 2821 Fenwick Rd, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada V1X 5E4, 250-491-0911, Fax: 250-491-0930, E-Mail: marketing@pacsafety.com, URL: www.pacsafety.com Page Creations Inc PO Box 2539, Attleboro Falls, MA 02763, 800-766-2433, Fax: 508-695-8148, URL: www.pagecreationsinc.com Panasonic Computer Solutions Co 50 Meadowlands Pkwy, Secaucus, NJ 07094, 800-662-3537, Fax: 201-392-6618, E-Mail: government@p2c2.com, URL: www.panasonic.com/toughbook/fire_ems n PGI/Difco Performance Fabrics Inc 1411 Peel St, Suite 505, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 1S5, 514-989-6474, Fax: 514-989-6479, E-Mail: glionnad@pginw.com, URL: www.difcoperformance.com (See ad page 89) PGI Inc n Paul Conway Shields 14100 W Cleveland Ave, New Berlin, WI 53151, 800-955-8489, Fax: 262-782-4437, E-Mail: pconway@paulconwayshields.com, URL: www.paulconwayshields.com (See ad page 34) Paulson Manufacturing Corp 46752 Rainbow Canyon Rd, Temecula, CA 92592, 951-676-2451, Fax: 951-506-0652, E-Mail: kathys@paulsonmfg.com, URL: www.paulsonmfg.com 550 Commercial Ave, PO Box 307, Green Lake, WI 54941, 920-294-4300, Fax: 920-294-4307, E-Mail: mail@pgi-inc.com, URL: www.pgi-inc.com Phenix Technology 12391 Sampson Ave, Suite H, Riverside, CA 92503, 888-347-7838, Fax: 951-279-8399, E-Mail: phenix1500@aol.com, URL: www.phenixfirehelmets.com Phillips Environmental Products Inc 290 Arden Dr, Belgrade, MT 59714, 406-388-5999, Fax: 406-388-5987, E-Mail: info@thepett.com, URL: www.thepett.com n Physio-Control 11811 Willows Rd NE, Redmond, WA 98052, 800-442-1142, Fax: 425-867-4616, URL: www.physio-control.com (See ad page 23) n Pierce Manufacturing Inc PO Box 2017, Appleton, WI 54912-2017, 920-832-3231, Fax: 920-832-3084, URL: www.piercemfg.com (See ad page 13) Pigeon Mountain Industries Inc PO Box 803, Lafayette, GA 30728, 800-282-7673, Fax: 706-764-1531, E-Mail: info@pmirope.com, URL: www.pmirope.com Pigeon Mountain Industries Inc 490 S Slitrock Rd, Bennett, CO 80102, 303-644-5289 Plastisol Composites North America 101 Gerald L Moses Dr, PO Box 120, Groton, NY 13073, 607-898-3293, Fax: 607-898-3296, E-Mail: info@plastisolusa.com, URL: www.plastisolusa.com Phoenix Rescue Equipment Inc n PBI Performance Products Inc 9800-D Southern Pine Blvd, Charlotte, NC 28273, 704-554-3378, Fax: 704-554-3101, E-Mail: info@pbiproducts.com, URL: www.pbiproducts.com (See ad page CV4) Pelican Products Inc 23215 Early Ave, Torrance, CA 90505, 310-326-4700, Fax: 310-326-3311, E-Mail: sales@pelican.com, URL: www.pelican.com 208 Third Ave S, PO Box 436, Loretto, TN 38469, 800-394-5118, Fax: 931-853-7178, E-Mail: contact@phoenixrescue.com, URL: www.phoenixrescue.com Phoenix USA Inc 51 Borden St, PO Box Drawer 40, Cookeville, TN 38501, 931-526-6128, Fax: 931-526-1795, URL: www.phoenixusa.com Pelsue Co 2500 S Tejon St, Englewood, CO 80110, 303-936-7432, Fax: 303-934-5581, E-Mail: sales@pelsue.com, URL: www.pelsue.com Products) 810 E Main St, Ontario, CA 91761, 909-983-0772, Fax: 909-984-4770, E-Mail: karen.powell@icl.pplp.com, URL: www.phos-chek.com (See ad page 90) Persys Medical Photovac Inc 3050 Post Oak Blvd, Suite 1710, Houston, TX 77056, 713-723-6000, Fax: 713-723-6221, E-Mail: info@performancesystems.com, URL: www.ps-med.com Petrogen Inc 128 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING n PlymoVent Corp 115 Melrich Rd, Cranbury, NJ 08512, 609-395-3500, Fax: 609-655-0569, E-Mail: info@plymovent.com, URL: www.plymoventfire.com (See ad page 104) POK of North America Inc 5461 Moose Lodge Rd, Cambridge, MD 21613, 410-901-9900, Fax: 410-901-9160, E-Mail: info@pokfire.com, URL: www.pokfire.com PolyBrite International n Phos-chek (ICL Performance PO Box 306, Lancaster, NY 14086, 888-514-0083, Fax: 877-741-9206, E-Mail: info@pactoolmounts.com, URL: www.pactoolmounts.com Performance Advantage Co PO Box 75610, Colorado Springs, CO 80970-5610, 719-596-1175, Fax: 719-596-4721, E-Mail: torch@petrogen.com, URL: www.petrogen.com 0901FE_128 128 Freeport Center M-7, PO Box 160447, Clearfield, UT 84016, 801-926-1500, Fax: 801-926-1501, E-Mail: info@petzl.com, URL: www.petzl.com Parker Chelsea Oshkosh Truck Corp OTTO Petzl America 300 Second Ave, Waltham, MA 02451, 781-290-0777, Fax: 781-290-4884, E-Mail: tsmith@photovac.com, URL: www.photovac.com 1751 W Diehl Rd, Suite 110, Naperville, IL 60563, 630-717-6700, Fax: 630-717-5646, E-Mail: tula@polybrite.com, URL: www.polybrite.com Poseidon Air Systems 165 Heineberg Dr, Colchester, VT 05446, 802-862-0051, Fax: 802-865-0400, URL: www.poseidonair.com PowerArc Inc 7556 Watson Rd, Shrewsbury, MO 63119, 314-968-1115, Fax: 314-968-0488, E-Mail: kmenke@powerarc.net, URL: www.powerarc.net www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:58:41 AM
  • 135. Roberts-Gordon Power Electronic Systems Inc PyroLance NA Raytheon JPS Communications Rescue ONE Connector Boats QRP Gloves Inc 9 Morningside Dr, Lansdale, PA 19446, 215-412-4505, Fax: 215-412-0738, E-Mail: sales@poweresystems.com, URL: www.poweresystems.com RB Fabrications Inc Rescue Technology Quaker Safety Products Corp RealWheels Cover Co Inc 4643 S Ulster St, Denver, CO 80237, 720-228-4180, Fax: 720-228-4181, E-Mail: sales@pyrolance.com, URL: www.pyrolance.com PO Box 28802, Tucson, AZ 85726, 520-790-3533, Fax: 520-790-3530, E-Mail: laurie@qrpgloves.com, URL: www.qrpgloves.com n POWER HAWK Technologies Inc 300 Forge Way, Suite 2, Rockaway, NJ 07866, 973-627-4646, Fax: 973-627-4622, E-Mail: ph2@powerhawk.com, URL: www.powerhawk.com (See ad page 50) 103 S Main St, Quakertown, PA 18951-1119, 215-536-2991, Fax: 215-538-2164, E-Mail: info@quakersafety.com, URL: www.quakersafety.com Priority 1 Life Safety PO Box 3996, Hebron, CT 06248-3996, 800-937-3387, Fax: 860-228-0641, URL: www.priority1lss.com ProComm Americas Ltd 925 Golden Beech Dr, PO Box 392, Brookville, OH 45309, 937-770-1190, Fax: 937-770-1191, E-Mail: info@procommamericas.com, URL: www.procommamericas.com Pro Poly of America Inc 1821 NW 57th St, Ocala, FL 34475, 352-629-1414, Fax: 352-629-6049, URL: www.propolyamerica.com Pro Safe Fire Training Systems Inc 30 Woods Rd, Nobel, Ontario, Canada P0G 1G0, 705-342-5990, Fax: 705-342-5991, E-Mail: info@prosafefire.com, URL: www.prosafefire.com Pro-Tech Industries 14113 NE 3rd Ct, PO Box 933, Vancouver, WA 98666-0933, 360-573-6641, Fax: 360-573-6687, E-Mail: protech@protech.net, URL: www.protech.net Pro-Tuff Uniforms 2516 E State Rd 14, PO Box 608, Rochester, IN 46975, 800-547-0976, Fax: 800-468-9934, E-Mail: info@protuff.com, URL: www.protuff.com PRO-VISION Video Systems 20128 Road 138, Oakwood, OH 45873, 419-594-2743, Fax: 800-742-5345, E-Mail: info@rbfab.com, URL: www.rbfab.com 3940 Tannahill Dr, Gurnee, IL 60031, 847-662-7722, Fax: 847-662-7744, E-Mail: info@realwheels.com, URL: www.realwheels.com RectorSeal 2601 Spenwick Dr, Houston, TX 77055, 713-263-8001, Fax: 713-263-7577, E-Mail: marketing@rectorseal.com, URL: www.rectorseal.com Power Jamb LLC 64-19 65th St, Middle Village, NY 11379, 508-586-1423, Fax: 508-586-1423, E-Mail: fd176@aol.com, URL: www.powerjamb.com 5800 Departure Dr, Raleigh, NC 27616, 919-790-1011, Fax: 919-790-1456, E-Mail: sales@jps.com, URL: www.jps.com n Quala-Tel Communications 9925 Business Park Ave, Suite A, San Diego, CA 92131, 858-442-1504, Fax: 858-693-4109, E-Mail: info@qualatel.com, URL: www.qualatel.com (See ad page 108) Redback USA 920 S Andreasen Dr, #103, Escondido, CA 92029, 760-746-9632, Fax: 760-746-9605, E-Mail: charlie@redbackboots.com, URL: www.redbackboots.com Red Head Brass LLC 643 Legion Dr, Shreve, OH 44676, 800-321-3501, Fax: 330-567-2947, E-Mail: sales@redheadbrass.com, URL: www.redheadbrass.com Red Sled Inc n Quest Enterprises Inc 408 Russell St, Walsenburg, CO 81089, 719-738-2345, Fax: 719-738-2319, E-Mail: info@questhq.com, URL: www.questhq.com (See ad page 48) RAE Systems 3775 N 1st St, San Jose, CA 95134, 408-952-8200, Fax: 408-952-8480, E-Mail: raesales@raesystems.com, URL: www.raesystems.com Ram Air Gear Dryer 3397 SW 44th Ct, Ft Lauderdale, FL 33312, 954-322-6997, Fax: 954-983-9724 Reeves EMS LLC 1706 W 7th St, Frederick, MD 21702, 800-328-5563, Fax: 301-698-1599, E-Mail: info@reevesems.com, URL: www.reevesems.com The Reeves Group 4510A Metropolitan Ct, Frederick, MD 21704, 301-698-1596, Fax: 301-698-1599, E-Mail: info@reevesdecon.com, URL: www.reevesdecon.com 1502 Patricia Ave, Brandon, Manitoba, Canada R7A 7K7, 204-724-5188, Fax: 204-727-0561, E-Mail: ldornn@wcgwave.ca, URL: www.ramairgeardryer.com Reflexite Americas Ranger Footwear Relm Wireless Corp One Innovation Ct, Dayton, OH 45414, 800-688-6148, Fax: 937-264-2677, E-Mail: info@totalfiregroup.com, URL: www.totalfiregroup.com PO Box 8821, Grand Rapids, MI 49518, 616-583-1520, Fax: 616-583-1522, E-Mail: info@provsnusa.com, URL: www.provsnusa.com Rapid Rescue Extrication PRO-Warrington Footwear One Innovation Ct, Dayton, OH 45414, 800-688-6148, Fax: 937-264-2677, E-Mail: info@totalfiregroup.com, URL: www.totalfiregroup.com 14 Industrial Pkwy, Brunswick, ME 04011, 207-721-1044, Fax: 207-798-5060, E-Mail: abertocci@raventechpower.com, URL: www.raventechpower.com Pulsetech Products Corp 315 South St, New Britain, CT 06051, 860-223-9297, Fax: 860-832-9267, E-Mail: americas@reflexite.com, URL: www.reflexiteamericas.com 7100 Technology Dr, West Melbourne, FL 32904, 321-984-1414, Fax: 321-984-0434, E-Mail: sales@relm.com, URL: www.relm.com Raydan Manufacturing Inc 1100 S Kimball Ave, Southlake, TX 76092, 817-329-6099, Fax: 817-329-5914, E-Mail: ppc@pulsetech.net, URL: www.pulsetech.net www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_129 129 PO Box 142, Mauldin, SC 29662, 864-444-9940, Fax: 864-277-7576 Raven Technology 601 18th Ave, Nisku, Alberta, Canada T9E 7T7, 888-472-9326, Fax: 780-955-2386, E-Mail: info@raydanmfg.com, URL: www.raydanmfg.com RESCUE 1 2201 Atlantic Ave, Manasquan, NJ 08736, 732-223-1411, Fax: 732-223-8456, E-Mail: info@plcustom.com, URL: www.rescue1mfg.com 4500 Highway 77, Southside, AL 35907, 800-737-2831, Fax: 256-442-0219, E-Mail: info@rescueone.com, URL: www.rescueone.com 251 Beulah Church Rd, Carrollton, GA 30117, 770-832-9694, Fax: 770-832-1676, E-Mail: info@rescuetech1.com, URL: www.rescuetech1.com Response Biomedical Corp 1781 75th Ave W, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6P 6P2, 604-456-6010, Fax: 604-456-6066, E-Mail: info@responsebio.com, URL: www.responsebio.com Response Marine Inc 25 High St, Newburyport, MA 01950, 978-609-0525, Fax: 413-473-0390, E-Mail: boats@responsemarine.com, URL: www.responsemarine.com n Res-Q-Jack/Cepco Tool Co 133 Philo Rd W, Elmira, NY 14903, 800-466-9626, Fax: 607-739-4583, E-Mail: sales@res-q-jack.com, URL: www.res-q-jack.com (See ad page 81) RESQTEC Inc 3333 Foerster Rd, Bridgeton, MO 63044, 314-439-2890, Fax: 314-439-2895, E-Mail: info@resqtec.com, URL: www.resqtec.com Ricochet Manufacturing Co Inc 4700 Wissahickon Ave, Bldg 1, PO Box 112, Philadelphia, PA 19144, 215-849-1971, Fax: 215-849-1981, URL: www.ricochet-gear.com Ringers Gloves 335 Science Dr, Moorpark, CA 93021, 805-517-1061, Fax: 805-517-1071, URL: www.ringersgloves.com RIT Rescue and Escape Systems 2300 Edison Blvd, Twinsburg, OH 44087, 330-405-5444, Fax: 330-487-5521, E-Mail: info@ritrescuesystems.com, URL: www.ritrescuesystems.com RKI Instruments Inc 33248 Central Ave, Union City, CA 94587, 510-441-5656, Fax: 510-441-5650, E-Mail: mall4rki@rkiinstruments.com, URL: www.rkiinstruments.com Roadmaster Inc 5602 NE Skyport Way, Portland, OR 97218, 503-288-9898, Fax: 503-288-8900, E-Mail: info@roadmasterinc.com, URL: www.roadmasterinc.com Roberts-Gordon n Rescue 42 Inc PO Box 1242, Chico, CA 95927-1242, 530-891-3473, Fax: 530-891-9255, E-Mail: rescue42@rescue42.com, URL: www.rescue42.com (See ad page 42) 1250 William St, PO Box 44, Buffalo, NY 14206, 716-852-4400, Fax: 716-852-0854, URL: www.rg-inc.com FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 129 1/7/09 9:58:42 AM
  • 136. Robotronics Inc Safety Air Cushion Inc Sensible Products 450 31st St, Kenner, LA 70005, 504-464-6026, Fax: 504-464-5851, E-Mail: gloria@herecomesfun.com n Robotronics Inc 1610 West 1600 South, Springville, UT 84663, 801-489-4466, Fax: 801-489-8241, E-Mail: sales@robotronics.com, URL: www.robotronics.com (See ad page 113) Robwen Inc Safety Components 40 Emery St, Greenville, SC 29605, 864-240-2693, Fax: 864-240-2660, URL: www.safetycomponents.com Safety Corp of America 1200 Neville Rd, Pittsburgh, PA 15225, 800-683-8837, Fax: 412-331-8778 3834 Broadview Rd, Richfield, OH 44286, 330-659-4507, Fax: 330-659-2144, URL: www.sensible-products.com n Scott Health Safety 4320 Goldmine Rd, Monroe, NC 28110, 704-291-8300, Fax: 704-291-8420, E-Mail: scottmarketing.scotths.us@tycoint.com, URL: www.scotthealthsafety.com (See ad page 39) Rock-N-Rescue/JE Weinel Inc PO Box 213, Valencia, PA 16059, 724-898-7673, Fax: 724-898-3139, E-Mail: info@rocknrescue.com, URL: www.rocknrescue.com n RollNRack LLC PO Box 328, Mukwonago, WI 53149, 262-363-2030, Fax: 262-363-2034, E-Mail: info@rollnrack.com, URL: www.rollnrack.com (See ad page 96) R-O-M Corp 6800 E 163rd St, Belton, MO 64012, 816-318-8000, Fax: 816-318-8100, E-Mail: sales@romcorp.com, URL: www.romcorp.com Rosenbauer 100 Third St, PO Box 57, Lyons, SD 57041, 605-543-5591, Fax: 605-543-5593, E-Mail: sales@rosenbaueramerica.com, URL: www.rosenbaueramerica.com Royal Case Co 315 S Montgomery St, Sherman, TX 75090, 903-868-0288, Fax: 903-893-7984, E-Mail: sales@royalcase.com, URL: www.royalcase.com 6100 W Sam Houston Pkwy N, Houston, TX 77041, 713-896-6600, Fax: 713-896-6640, E-Mail: email@safetyvision.com, URL: www.safetyvision.com 404 N Gabbert St, PO Box 210, Monticello, AR 71655, 870-367-9755, Fax: 870-367-2120, E-Mail: sales@seaark.com, URL: www.seaark.com Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics 1989 Blake Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90039, 323-665-5633, Fax: 323-665-2588, E-Mail: support@robwen.com, URL: www.robwen.com Safety Vision SeaArk Marine Inc Seagrave Fire Apparatus LLC 701 Daniel Webster Hwy, Merrimack, NH 03054, 603-424-9000, Fax: 603-424-9044, E-Mail: protectivesystems.sgppl@ saint-gobain.com, URL: www.protectivesystems.saint-gobain.com Salamander Technologies Inc 122 W State St, Traverse City, MI 49684, 231-932-4397, Fax: 231-932-1606, E-Mail: info@salamandertechnologies.com, URL: www.salamandertechnologies.com n Salsbury Industries - Lockers.com 1010 E 62nd St, Los Angeles, CA 90001-1598, 323-846-6700, Fax: 323-846-6800, E-Mail: salisbury@lockers.com, URL: www.lockers.com (See ad page 94) SAM Medical Products 7409 Tech Center Dr, Suite 150, Portland, OR 97223, 800-818-4726, E-Mail: seaberg@samsplint.com, URL: www.samsplint.com Sav-A-Jake International Inc 2641 Micah Dr, Trinity, FL 34655, 727-709-6167, Fax: 727-372-3172, E-Mail: savajake@aol.com, URL: www.sav-a-jake.com SCBAS Inc 403 Peoria St, Washington, IL 61571, 309-444-7442, Fax: 309-444-3180, E-Mail: scbas@omnilec.com, URL: www.scbas.com Schaefer Ventilation Equipment n Rud Chain Inc 840 N 20th Ave, PO Box 367, Hiawatha, IA 52408, 319-294-0001, Fax: 319-294-0003, E-Mail: rick.ransom@rudchain.com, URL: www.rudchain.com (See ad page 107) Sabre Equipment Inc 802 Pennsylvania Ave, Coraopolis, PA 15108, 412-262-3080, Fax: 412-262-2779, E-Mail: info@sabreequipment.com, URL: www.sabreequipment.com One Industrial Blvd, Suite 101, PO Box 460, Sauk Rapids, MN 56379, 800-779-3267, Fax: 320-251-2922, E-Mail: sales@schaeferfan.com, URL: www.schaeferfan.com Scott/American Bristol Breathing Air Systems 4320 Goldmine Rd, Monroe, NC 28110, 704-291-8300, Fax: 704-291-8340, URL: www.scotthealthsafety.com 130 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_130 130 105 E 12th St, Clintonville, WI 54929, 715-823-2141, Fax: 715-823-5769, E-Mail: sales@seagrave.com, URL: www.seagrave.com Servus Footwear One Innovation Ct, Dayton, OH 45414, 800-688-6148, Fax: 937-264-2677, E-Mail: info@totalfiregroup.com, URL: www.totalfiregroup.com Setcom Corp 1400 N Shoreline Blvd, Suite B1, Mountain View, CA 94043-1385, 650-965-8020, Fax: 650-965-1193, E-Mail: sales@setcomsorp.com, URL: www.setcomcorp.com Seton Identification Products 20 Thompson Rd, Branford, CT 06405, 203-488-8059, Fax: 203-488-7259, URL: www.seton.com n Shafer Enterprises LLC / Cool Shirt n Search Systems Inc 1160 Yew Ave, PO Box 1540, Blaine, WA 93380-0307, 604-244-9323, Fax: 604-270-2138, E-Mail: sales@conspace.com, URL: www.searchsystems.com (See ad page 7) 170 Andrew Dr, Stockbridge, GA 30281, 678-289-4284, Fax: 678-289-4325, E-Mail: sales@coolshirt.net, URL: www.coolshirt.net (See ad page 68) Sico America Inc 7525 Cahill Rd, Minneapolis, MN 55439, 952-941-1700, Fax: 952-941-6688, E-Mail: sales@siconic.com, URL: www.siconic.com Sierra Instruments Inc n 911 Seats Inc 1515 Industrial St, PO Box 60, Reedsburg, WI 53959, 608-524-8261, Fax: 608-524-6004, E-Mail: tlaridaen@seatsinc.com, URL: www.seatsinc.com (See ad page 66) 5 Harris Ct, Bldg L, Monterey, CA 93940, 831-373-0200, Fax: 831-373-4402, E-Mail: info@sierrainstruments.com, URL: www.sierrainstruments.com Securitex - A Bacou Dalloz Co (please refer to Sperian Fire) Smithfield, RI 02917 Securitex Inc (please refer to Sperian Fire) Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2W 2R2 SEI Industries Ltd 7400 Wilson Ave, Delta, British Columbia, Canada V4G 1E5, 604-946-3131, Fax: 604-940-9566, E-Mail: sales@sei-ind.com, URL: www.sei-ind.com S E International Inc 436 Farm Rd, PO Box 39, Summertown, TN 38483-0039, 931-964-3561, Fax: 931-964-3564, E-Mail: radiationinfo@seintl.com, URL: www.seintl.com Semo Tank 456 Semo Ln, Perryville, MO 63775, 573-547-8348, Fax: 573-547-8420, E-Mail: firetruck@semotank.com, URL: www.semotank.com n Sigtronics Corp 178 E Arrow Hwy, San Dimas, CA 91773, 800-367-0977, Fax: 909-305-9499, URL: www.sigtronics.com (See ad page 49) Silent Knight One Fire-Lite Pl, Northford, CT 06472-1653, 203-484-7161, Fax: 203-484-1215, E-Mail: steven.rossi@honeywell.com, URL: www.honeywell.com Simfx Emergency Management Simulation 5590 50th St NW, Salmon Arm, British Columbia, Canada V1E 3A6, 250-832-2300, Fax: 250-832-2300, E-Mail: info@simfx.com, URL: www.simfx.com Sim Ops Studios 10 Bedford Sq, Suite 300, Pittsburgh, PA 15203, 412-904-5097, Fax: 302-372-1415, URL: www.code3d.com www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:58:43 AM
  • 137. Sutphen Corp Simulaids Inc 16 Simulaids Dr, Saugerties, NY 12477, 845-679-2475, Fax: 845-679-8996, E-Mail: info@simulaids.com, URL: www.simulaids.com Simulation Research Corp Southcombe Brothers Ltd Cole Ln, Stoke-Sub-Hamdon, Somerset, TA14 6QD UK, 44-1935-823567, Fax: 44-1935-822918, E-Mail: sales@southcombe.com, URL: www.southcombe.co.uk 174 Marine St, Farmingdale, NY 11735, 631-845-7033, Fax: 631-293-6978, E-Mail: pmott@sandjentrance.com, URL: www.sandjentrance.com PO Box 586, Ephrata, PA 17522, 717-738-2500, Fax: 717-738-2550, E-Mail: mail@stadcogen.com, URL: www.stadcogen.com Stanley Hydraulic Tools Structural Composites Industries (SCI) 325 Enterprise Pl, Pomona, CA 91768, 503-530-1430, Fax: 909-444-2516, E-Mail: sciscba@scicomposites.com, URL: www.scifireandsafety.com 3810 SE Naef Rd, Milwaukie, OR 97267, 503-659-5660, Fax: 503-652-1780, E-Mail: hydrlwebmail@stanleyworks.com, URL: www.stanley-hydraulic-tools.com PO Box 1678, Bozeman, MT 59771-1678, 406-585-8488, Fax: 406-585-8488, URL: www.simresearch.com SJ Forcible Entry Training Station (FETS) Stadco Products n Southern Mills Inc 6501 Mall Blvd, PO Box 289, Union City, GA 30291, 770-969-1000, Fax: 770-969-6846, E-Mail: inquiry@southernmills.com, URL: www.southernmills.com (See ad page 43) Stryker Stanley Tools 1219-A W Lebanon St, Mount Airy, NC 27030, 800-832-6517, Fax: 336-789-5667, E-Mail: oursuitsfit@aol.com, URL: www.oursuitsfit.com 480 Myrtle St, New Britain, CT 06053, 860-225-5111, Fax: 800-827-5926, E-Mail: gmorales2@stanleyworks.com, URL: www.stanleytools.com 3800 E Centre Ave, Portage, MI 49002, 800-669-4968, URL: www.ems.stryker.com Suits USA Inc Star Headlight Lantern Co Inc 455 Rochester St, Avon, NY 14414, 585-226-9787, Fax: 888-478-2797, URL: www.svp-inc.com Stearns Inc n Skedco Inc PO Box 3390, Tualatin, OR 97062, 503-691-7909, Fax: 503-691-7973, E-Mail: skedco@skedco.com, URL: www.skedco.com (See ad page 91) Smeal Fire Apparatus Co 610 W 4th St, PO Box 8, Snyder, NE 68664, 402-568-2224, Fax: 402-568-2346, E-Mail: sales@smeal.com, URL: www.smeal.com n Spartan Chassis Inc 1165 Reynolds Rd, Charlotte, MI 48813, 517-543-6400, Fax: 517-543-7728, E-Mail: info@spartanchassis.com, URL: www.spartanchassis.com (See ad page CV2, 1) Special Electronics Designs Inc 214 Bruce Ave, Kincardine, Ontario, Canada N2Z 2P3, 519-396-8555, Fax: 519-396-4045, E-Mail: marketing@sed.bz, URL: www.sed.bz PO Box 1498, St Cloud, MN 56301, 320-252-1642, Fax: 320-252-4425, E-Mail: safety@stearnsnet.com, URL: www.stearnssafety.com Stedfast USA 11016 Granite St, Charlotte, NC 28273, 704-588-1962, Fax: 704-588-6965, URL: www.stedfastusa.com Steele Inc PO Box 7304, Kingston, WA 98346, 360-297-4555, Fax: 360-297-2816, E-Mail: steeleinc@silverlink.net, URL: www.steelevest.com n Summit Fire Apparatus 11 Sperti Dr, PO Box 17128, Edgewood, KY 41017, 859-331-0360, Fax: 859-331-0399, E-Mail: sales@summitfireapparatus.com, URL: www.summitfireapparatus.com (See ad page 20) Superior Signal Co Inc PO Box 96, Spotswood, NJ 08884, 732-251-0800, Fax: 732-251-9442, E-Mail: info@superiorsignal.com, URL: www.superiorsignal.com Speedtech Instruments n Smiths Detection 21 Commerce Dr, Danbury, CT 06810, 203-207-9700, Fax: 203-207-9780, E-Mail: danbury@smithsdetection.com, URL: www.smithsdetection.com (See ad page CV3) Smiths Medical PM Inc N7-W22025 Johnson Rd, Waukesha, WI 53186, 262-542-3100, Fax: 262-542-0718, E-Mail: info.pm@smiths-medical.com, URL: www.smiths-medical.com Smith Warren 127 Oakley Ave, White Plains, NY 10601, 914-948-4619, Fax: 914-948-1627, E-Mail: contact@smithwarren.com, URL: www.smithwarren.com SM Smith Co 1105 Westwood Ave, Iron Mountain, MI 49801, 906-774-8258, Fax: 906-774-9966, E-Mail: steves@smsmithco.com, URL: www.smsmithco.com Snap-Tite Hose Inc 217 Titusville Rd, Union City, PA 16438, 814-438-7616, Fax: 814-438-8163, E-Mail: hose_sales@snap-tite.com, URL: www.snap-titehose.com SoundOff Signal 3900 Central Pkwy, PO Box 206, Hudsonville, MI 49426, 616-896-7100, Fax: 616-896-1286, E-Mail: sales@soundoffsignal.com, URL: www.soundoffsignal.com www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_131 131 45449 Severn Way, Suite 165, Sterling, VA 20166, 703-430-8055, Fax: 703-430-8066, URL: www.speedtech.com n Super Vacuum Manufacturing Co n Sterling Rope Co 26 Morin St, Biddeford, ME 04005, 207-282-2550, Fax: 207-282-2655, URL: www.sterlingrope.com (See ad page 59) Sperian Fire 900 Douglas Pike, PO Box 1874, Smithfield, RI 02917-1874, 800-343-3411, E-Mail: info@sperianfire.com, URL: www.sperianfire.com SportsArt Fitness 19510 144th Ave NE, Suite A-1, Woodinville, WA 98072, 800-709-1400, Fax: 425-488-8155, E-Mail: info@sportsartamerica.com, URL: www.sportsartamerica.com Spumifer American Co PO Box 684, Ridgefield Park, NJ 07660, 201-832-5551, Fax: 201-641-1482, E-Mail: sales@spumifer.net, URL: www.spumifer.net Stevens Fire Chemicals 5650 W Central Ave, Suite C1, PO Box 23312, Toledo, OH 43615, 419-536-0222, Fax: 419-531-6302, E-Mail: stevens_company@msn.com, URL: www.stevenscompanyusa.com Stihl 536 Viking Dr, Virginia Beach, VA 23452, 757-486-9212, Fax: 757-486-9288 Storm King Mountain Technologies Inc SS Fire Apparatus Co 4353 W 1900 N-48, Fairmount, IN 46928, 765-948-3366, Fax: 765-948-3370, E-Mail: info@ssfire.com, URL: www.ssfire.com 1511 E 11th St, Loveland, CO 80537, 970-667-5146, Fax: 970-667-4296, E-Mail: info@supervac.com, URL: www.supervac.com (See ad page 70) SureFire 18300 Mt Baldy Cir, Fountain Valley, CA 92708, 714-545-9444, Fax: 714-545-9537, URL: www.surefire.com Surrey Fire Safety House 222 E Front St, PO Box 388, Napoleon, OH 43545, 419-592-9806, Fax: 419-599-7417, E-Mail: surrey@bright.net, URL: www.firesafetyhouse.com Survivair 4725 Calle Alto, Camarillo, CA 93012, 805-484-7267, Fax: 805-484-8167, E-Mail: sales@stormkingmtn.com, URL: www.stormkingmtn.com SSCOR Inc 11064 Randall St, Sun Valley, CA 91352, 818-504-4054, Fax: 818-504-6032, E-Mail: marketing@sscor.com, URL: www.sscor.com Inc (please refer to Sperian Fire) Smithfield, RI 02917 Survivair Respirators Inc (please refer to Sperian Fire) Santa Ana, CA 92704 Sutphen Corp PO Box 158, Amlin, OH 43002, 614-889-1005, Fax: 800-848-5860, URL: www.sutphen.com n Streamlight Inc 30 Eagleville Rd, Eagleville, PA 19403, 610-631-0600, Fax: 610-631-0712, URL: www.streamlight.com (See ad page 47) FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 131 1/7/09 9:58:43 AM
  • 138. SVI Trucks Tempo Glove Manufacturing Inc SVI Trucks 1511 E 11th St, Loveland, CO 80537, 970-667-5146, Fax: 970-667-3343, E-Mail: bobs@svitrucks.com, URL: www.svitrucks.com Tactron Inc 15079 SW Gingko Ct, PO Box 87, Sherwood, OR 97140, 503-217-5016, Fax: 503-925-1047, E-Mail: customerservice@tactron.com, URL: www.tactron.com 3820 W Wisconsin Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53208, 414-344-1100, Fax: 414-344-4084, E-Mail: info@tempoglove.com, URL: www.tempoglove.com Total Fire Group 1 Innovation Ctr, Dayton, OH 45414, 800-688-6148, Fax: 937-264-2677, E-Mail: info@totalfiregroup.com, URL: www.totalfiregroup.com 15740 Park Row, Suite 450, Houston, TX 77084, 281-829-3300, Fax: 281-829-3320, E-Mail: info@taitmobile.com, URL: www.taitworld.com 349 Market St, PO Box 911, Berwick, PA 18603-0911, 866-866-0911, Fax: 866-752-1469, E-Mail: info@customad.com, URL: www.the911shop.com Thorogood Shoes by Weinbrenner 108 S Polk St, Merrill, WI 54452, 715-536-5521, Fax: 715-536-1172, E-Mail: wsc@weinbrennerusa.com, URL: www.weinbrennerusa.com 8830 Business Park Dr, Suite 200, Austin, TX 78759, 512-342-8800, E-Mail: generators@360partners.com, URL: www.360generators.com Thuemling Instrument 1225 Pearl St, PO Box 1625, Waukesha, WI 53186, 262-547-1789, Fax: 262-547-6493, E-Mail: thuemling@earthlink.com, URL: www.thuemling.com Tico Titanium Inc Task Force Tips Inc 2351 Industrial Dr, Valparaiso, IN 46383-9511, 800-348-2686, Fax: 219-464-7155, E-Mail: sales@tft.com, URL: www.tft.com SALES OFFICES: Cottrell Associates, Fuquay-Varnia, NC, 919-552-0205, Fax: 919-552-4798 Taylor Made Ambulances 30150 S Wixom Rd, Wixom, MI 48393, 800-521-4392, Fax: 248-446-1995, E-Mail: sales@ticotitanium.com, URL: www.ticotitanium.com SALES OFFICES: Tico Titanium Inc, Oak Ridge North, TX, 888-676-7575, Fax: 281-355-6676 TMS Medical Technologies n Toyne Inc 104 Granite Ave, PO Box 10, Breda, IA 51436-0010, 712-673-2328, Fax: 712-673-2200, URL: www.toyne.com (See ad page 56) Team Equipment TNT Rescue Systems Inc 2490 W Oak St, PO Box 347, Ashippun, WI 53003, 920-474-4101, Fax: 800-474-4477, E-Mail: thomasb@tntrescue.com, URL: www.tntrescue.com Tomar Electronics Inc n Tele-Lite Inc 80 Lowell St, Rochester, NY 14605, 800-538-0022, Fax: 585-546-6157, E-Mail: info@tele-lite.com, URL: www.tele-lite.com (See ad page 107) 2100 W Obispo Ave, Gilbert, AZ 85233, 480-497-4400, Fax: 480-497-4416, E-Mail: sales@tomar.com, URL: www.tomar.com Topps Safety Apparel Inc 2516 E State Rd 14, PO Box 750, Rochester, IN 46975, 800-348-2990, Fax: 574-223-8622, E-Mail: info@toppssafetyapparel.com, URL: www.toppssafetyapparel.com Torfino Enterprises Inc Tempest Technology Inc 4708 N Blythe Ave, Fresno, CA 93722, 800-346-2143, Fax: 559-277-7579, E-Mail: response@tempest-edge.com, URL: www.tempest-edge.com 11924 Forest Hill Blvd, Suite 22-339, Wellington, FL 33414, 561-790-0111, Fax: 561-790-0080, E-Mail: info@torfino.com, URL: www.torfino.com 132 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_132 132 n True North Gear PO Box 28789, Seattle, WA 98118, 206-723-0735, Fax: 206-723-1890, E-Mail: info@truenorthgear.com, URL: www.truenorthgear.com (See ad page 100) TSI Inc n Toyota Hybrid 19001 S Western Ave, Mail Stop #S203, Torrance, CA 90501, 310-468-2206, Fax: 310-381-6375, URL: www.toyota.com (See ad page 102) Trace Analytics Inc 15768 Hamilton Pool Rd, Austin, TX 78738, 512-263-0000, Fax: 512-263-0002, E-Mail: sales@airchecklab.com, URL: www.airchecklab.com TR Designs Inc PO Box 15044, Fort Wayne, IN 46885, 888-800-0780, Fax: 260-486-3315, E-Mail: info@trdesignsinc.com, URL: www.trdesignsinc.com 33 Steeplechase Dr, Turnersville, NJ 08012, 856-374-4359, Fax: 856-374-0419, E-Mail: rich.tootchen@tmsmedtec.com, URL: www.tmsmedtec.com 3704 Medallion Pl, Newport, AR 72112, 800-468-1310, Fax: 870-523-4835, URL: www.taylormadeambulance.com 6620 Orchid Lake Rd, New Port Richey, FL 34653, 727-848-2424, Fax: 727-845-5941, E-Mail: team@teamequipment.com, URL: www.teamequipment.com PO Box 734, Sedro Woolley, WA 98284, 800-967-8107, Fax: 360-855-2239, E-Mail: info@truckvault.com, URL: www.truckvault.com the911shop.com 360 Generators Tait Radio Communications TruckVault 500 Cardigan Rd, Shoreview, MN 55126, 800-874-2811, Fax: 651-490-3824, E-Mail: answers@tsi.com, URL: www.tsi.com TurboDraft by Schutte Koerting 2510 Metropolitan Dr, Trevose, PA 19053, 215-639-0900, Fax: 215-639-1597, E-Mail: turbodraft@s-k.com, URL: www.turbodraft.net Turtle Plastics 7400 Industrial Pkwy, Lorain, OH 44053, 440-282-8008, Fax: 800-437-1603, E-Mail: linda@turtleplastics.com, URL: www.turtleplastics.com TVI Corp 7100 Holladay Tyler Rd, Glenn Dale, MD 20769, 301-352-8800, Fax: 301-352-8818, E-Mail: sales@tvicorp.com, URL: www.tvi-corp.com Underwater Kinetics 13400 Danielson St, Poway, CA 92064, 858-513-9100, Fax: 858-513-9111, E-Mail: info@ukinternational.com, URL: www.ukinternational.com n Trelleborg Viking 290 Forbes Blvd, Mansfield, MA 02048, 774-719-1444, Fax: 508-261-1449, E-Mail: tvi.usa@trelleborg.com (See ad page 14) TRI Air Testing Inc 9063 Bee Caves Rd, Austin, TX 78733, 512-263-2101, Fax: 512-263-7039, E-Mail: sdudek@airtesting.com, URL: www.airtesting.com Trident Emergency Products LLC 2940 Turnpike Dr, Suite 9, Hatboro, PA 19040, 215-293-0700, Fax: 215-293-0701, E-Mail: sales@tridentdirect.com, URL: www.tridentdirect.com Underwriters Laboratories Inc 333 Pfingsten Rd, Northbrook, IL 60062, 847-272-8800, URL: www.ul.com/fes Unifire Inc 3924 E Trent Ave, Spokane, WA 99202, 509-535-7746, Fax: 509-535-9064, E-Mail: info@unifireusa.com, URL: www.unifireusa.com Unimac Shepard St, PO Box 990, Ripon, WI 54971, 920-748-3121, Fax: 920-748-4590, E-Mail: sales@alliancels.com, URL: www.unimac.com Trilex Ltd 104 Lexington Ave, Passaic, NJ 07055, 973-471-2488, Fax: 973-471-2311, E-Mail: davidtrilex@earthlink.net, URL: www.trilexfirefightingsales.com Tripod Data Systems PO Box 947, Corvallis, OR 97339, 541-750-9200, Fax: 541-758-7248, E-Mail: handhelds@trimble.com, URL: www.trimble.com/rugged n United Plastic Fabricating Inc 165 Flagship Dr, North Andover, MA 01845, 978-975-4520, Fax: 978-975-4522, E-Mail: info@unitedplastic.com, URL: www.unitedplastic.com (See ad page 58) Universal Life Safety Products PO Box 321, Verona, NJ 07044, 973-571-1150, Fax: 973-571-1154, URL: www.backstop-usa.com www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:58:44 AM
  • 139. ZUMRO Inc Unruh Fire Inc 100 Industrial Dr, Sedgwick, KS 67135, 316-772-5400, Fax: 316-772-5854, E-Mail: trichardson@unruhfab.com, URL: www.unruhfire.com UO Equipment Co VOGEL Lubrication Inc PO Box 924615, Houston, TX 77292, 713-686-1869, Fax: 713-688-0001, E-Mail: customerservice@uoequipment.com, URL: www.uoequipment.com US Alert LLC 164 W Royal Palm Rd, Boca Raton, FL 33432, 561-394-9969, Fax: 561-394-9986, E-Mail: info@usalertllc.com, URL: www.usalertllc.com n Ward Diesel Filter Systems 133 Philo Rd W, Elmira, NY 14903, 607-796-0149, Fax: 607-739-7092, E-Mail: laurie.miller@warddiesel.com, URL: www.warddiesel.com (See ad insert) Warn Industries 12900 SE Capps Rd, Clackamas, OR 97015, 800-543-9276, Fax: 503-722-3000, E-Mail: cs@warn.com, URL: www.warn.com n US Digital Designs Inc 1835 E Sixth St, #27, Tempe, AZ 85281, 602-223-4565, Fax: 602-296-0424, E-Mail: amacfarlane@usdd.com, URL: www.usdd.com (See ad page 103) WATER-JEL Technologies 50 Broad St, Carlstadt, NJ 07072, 201-507-8300, Fax: 201-507-8325, E-Mail: info@waterjel.com, URL: www.waterjel.com US Tanker-Fire Apparatus Inc 762 Brookview Ave, Burlington, WI 53105, 262-763-6220, Fax: 262-763-0905, E-Mail: sales@ustanker.com, URL: www.ustanker.com Valeo 19275 W Capitol Dr, Suite L01, Brookfield, WI 53045, 262-314-0070, Fax: 800-831-9642, E-Mail: valeoinfo@valeoinc.com, URL: www.valeoinc.com Vernon Software Systems Inc Workrite Uniform Co XRT Power Systems 7395 E Orchard Rd, Suite 300, Greenwood Village, CO 80111, 303-783-0011, Fax: 303-708-8631, E-Mail: sales@westmedinc.com, URL: www.westmedinc.com 2737 N Forsyth Rd, Winter Park, FL 32792, 407-677-7777, Fax: 407-679-1337, E-Mail: paul.holzapfel@wheeledcoach.com, URL: www.wheeledcoach.com n Waterous Co 125 Hardman Ave S, South St Paul, MN 55075, 651-450-5000, Fax: 651-450-5090, E-Mail: salesservice@waterousco.com, URL: www.waterousco.com (See ad page 25) Weeb Enterprises LLC PO Box 2142, McHenry, IL 60051, 815-861-2625, Fax: 815-344-7753, E-Mail: info@weebenterprises.com, URL: www.iceladder.com Weis Fire and Safety Equipment 30 Oakwood Ln, Tolland, CT 06084, 877-872-4266, Fax: 801-697-5139, E-Mail: support@vernonsoft.com, URL: www.vernonsoft.com Weldon Technologies Inc PO Box 891266, Temecula, CA 92589, 888-355-9111, Fax: 909-303-8836, E-Mail: info@diamondbackfire.com, URL: www.diamondbackfire.com Vibram 18 School St, North Brookfield, MA 01535-1920, 800-842-7267, Fax: 508-867-4600, E-Mail: info@vibram.com, URL: www.vibram.us VIDEX Inc 3656 Paragon Dr, Columbus, OH 43228, 614-529-7230, Fax: 614-527-3547, E-Mail: wtisales@weldoninc.com, URL: www.weldoninc.com Wells Cargo Inc PO Box 728, Elkhart, IN 46515, 574-264-9661, Fax: 574-264-5938, E-Mail: info@wellscargo.com, URL: www.wellscargo.com Western Shelter/Crew Boss 1105 NE Circle Blvd, Corvalis, OR 97330, 541-758-0521, Fax: 541-752-5285, E-Mail: sales@videx.com, URL: www.videx.com 830 Wilson St, PO Box 2729, Eugene, OR 97402, 800-971-7201, Fax: 541-284-2820, E-Mail: wss@westernshelter.com, URL: www.westernshelter.com Vizcon LLC n Whelen Engineering Co Inc 51 Withrop Rd, Chester, CT 06412, 860-526-9504, Fax: 860-526-4078, E-Mail: whelen@whelen.com, URL: www.whelen.com (See ad page 30) www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_133 133 2407 Railroad Ave, PO Box 100, Ceres, CA 95307, 209-605-0522, Fax: 209-537-1753, E-Mail: gbaley@west-mark.com, URL: www.west-mark.com Zephyr Industries Inc 600 Township Rd, 1500, Ashland, OH 44805, 419-281-4485, Fax: 419-281-0317, E-Mail: zephyrind@aol.com, URL: www.zephyrindustries.com WHP Trainingtowers 9121 Bond, Overland Park, KS 66214, 913-385-3663, Fax: 913-385-7078, E-Mail: info@trainingtowers.com, URL: www.trainingtowers.com 1100 Norman St, Suite 200, Lachine, Quebec, Canada H8S 1A6, 514-637-5572, Fax: 514-637-3985, URL: www.wildfire-equipment.com Will-Burt Co 169 S Main St, PO Box 900, Orrville, OH 44667, 330-682-7015, Fax: 330-684-1190, E-Mail: contact_us@willburt.com, URL: www.willburt.com Williams Direct Dryers 5778 Production Way, Unit 115, Langley, British Columbia, Canada V3A 4N4, 604-534-4696, Fax: 604-534-3674, E-Mail: dmayne@directdryers.com, URL: www.directdryers.com n Ziamatic Corp 10 W College Ave, PO Box 337, Yardley, PA 19067-8337, 215-493-3618, Fax: 215-493-1401, E-Mail: zservice@ziamatic.com, URL: www.ziamatic.com (See ad page 75) Zistos Corp 1736 Church St, Holbrook, NY 11741-5918, 631-434-1370, Fax: 631-434-9104, E-Mail: rlevine@zistos.com, URL: www.zistos.com Z-Medica 4 Fairfield Blvd, Wallingford, CT 06492, 203-294-0000, Fax: 203-294-0688, E-Mail: rhuebner@z-medica.com, URL: www.z-medica.com Zodiac of North America Inc 540 Thompson Creek Rd, Stevensville, MD 21666, 410-643-4141, Fax: 410-643-4491, URL: www.zodiac.com n Williams Fire Hazard Control Inc PO Box 1359, Mauriceville, TX 77626, 409-727-3232, Fax: 409-745-3021, E-Mail: info@williamsfire.com, URL: www.williamsfire.com (See ad page 80) WINSOL Laboratories 1417 NW 51st St, Seattle, WA 98107, 206-782-5500, Fax: 206-782-5848, E-Mail: info@winsol.com, URL: www.winsol.com West-Mark 4249 Andrea Dr, Cave Creek, AZ 85331, 480-502-3476, Fax: 480-502-3688, E-Mail: sales@viz-con.com, URL: www.viz-con.com 32 Tioga Way, PO Box 1106, Marblehead, MA 01945, 781-631-3282, Fax: 781-639-1467, E-Mail: info@xrtcombi.com, URL: www.xrtcombi.com 400 Sawgrass Corporate Way, Sunrise, FL 33325-6235, 770-831-4800, Fax: 847-955-8208 111 E Pacific, PO Box 3467, Salina, KS 67402-3467, 785-825-9527, Fax: 785-825-9538, E-Mail: mikew@weisfiresafety.com, URL: www.weisfiresafety.com Vetter GmbH Western Region Sales Service 1701 N Lombard St, Suite 200, Oxnard, CA 93030, 805-483-0175, Fax: 805-4830678, E-Mail: info@workrite.com, URL: www.workrite.com Zellweger Analytics WILDFIRE US Foam Technologies 800 E Cotton St, Longview, TX 75602, 903-753-3901, Fax: 903-753-3925, URL: www.usfoam.com Westmed Inc Wheeled Coach Industries Inc 1008 Jefferson Ave, Newport News, VA 23607, 757-380-8585, Fax: 757-380-0709, E-Mail: vogel@vogel-lube.com, URL: www.vogel-lube.com n ZOLL Data Systems 12202 Airport Way, Suite 300, Broomfield, CO 80021, 303-801-0000, Fax: 303-801-0001, E-Mail: info@zolldata.com, URL: www.zolldata.com (See ad page 27) ZOLL Medical Corp 269 Mill Rd, Chelmsford, MA 01824-4105, 978-421-9655, Fax: 978-421-0025, E-Mail: info@zoll.com, URL: www.zoll.com ZUMRO Inc n WL Gore Associates Inc 105 Vieves Way, PO Box 729, Elkton, MD 21921, 410-392-3600, Fax: 410-392-4452, E-Mail: crosstech@wlgore.com, URL: www.crosstech.com (See ad page 9) PO Box 696, Hatboro, PA 19040, 215-957-6502, Fax: 215-957-6501, E-Mail: info@zumro.com, URL: www.zumro.com FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 133 1/7/09 9:58:45 AM
  • 140. Services Products - Apparatus/Equipment, etc. SERVICES SERVICES PRODUCTS APPARATUS/EQUIPMENT, ETC. APPARATUS/EQUIPMENT 911 Vehicle DESIGN/ARCHITECTURE Modec Inc 4725 Oakland St, Denver, CO 80239, 303-373-2696, Fax: 303-373-2699, E-Mail: sales@deconsolutions.com, URL: www.deconsolutions.com 2130 E Winston Rd, Anaheim, CA 92806, 714-808-0911, Fax: 714-808-0916, E-Mail: dan@911vehicle.com, URL: www.911vehicle.com Savatech Corp Acme International PO Box 91129, Portland, OR 97291, 888-959-0911, Fax: 888-959-3112, E-Mail: info@sirennet.com 7061 S Tamiami, Sarasota, FL 34231, 941-926-1410, E-Mail: acmeintusa@aol.com, URL: www.acmeexportproducts.com Air Technology SERVICES 337 High St, Burlington, NJ 08016, 609-232-0700, Fax: 609-232-0712, E-Mail: air@pureair.com, URL: www.airtechnologysolutions.com Alpine Apparatus Inc 204 Park Ave, 2G, Basalt, CO 81621, 800-335-3473, Fax: 970-927-4243, E-Mail: sales@alpineapparatus.com, URL: www.alpineapparatus.com ECMS Inc 1809 Peralta St, Oakland, CA 94607, 510-986-0131, Fax: 510-986-0383, E-Mail: oakland@ecmsinc.biz, URL: www.ecmsinc.biz Fire Ground Technologies PO Box 534, Pompton Plains, NJ 07444, 201-206-9387, E-Mail: fireground1@aol.com, URL: www.firegroundtech.com Fireman’s Friend 10 Plaza Dr, Westmount, IL 60559, 630-887-7714, Fax: 630-887-1347, E-Mail: john@cleantools.net Firetec Apparatus Sales PO Box 177, Randolph, VT 05060, 800-347-3832, Fax: 802-728-9206, E-Mail: firetec@firetec.com, URL: www.usedfiretrucks.com Gloves Inc 1950 Collins Blvd, Austell, GA 30106, 770-944-9186, Fax: 770-944-0012, E-Mail: info@glovesinc.com, URL: www.glovesinc.com Hansen Fire Safety 1395 Grandview Ave, Columbus, OH 43212, 800-369-1800, Fax: 614-487-1688, E-Mail: sales@hansenent.com, URL: www.hansenent.com MagneGrip 11449 Deerfield Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45242, 800-875-5440, Fax: 513-247-2502, E-Mail: info@magnegrip.com, URL: www.magnegrip.com 413 Oak Pl, Bldg 5J, Port Orange, FL 32127, 386-760-0706, Fax: 386-760-8754 SIRENNET.COM Thermo Technologies LLC 400 E Broadway Ave, Suite 50, Bismarck, ND 58501, 701-258-8208, Fax: 701-258-7259, E-Mail: info@thermo-gel.com, URL: www.thermo-gel.com BENEFITS PROGRAMS National Fallen Firefighters Foundation PO Box 498, Emmitsburg, MD 21727, 301-447-1365, Fax: 301-447-1645, E-Mail: firehero@firehero.org, URL: www.firehero.org Provident 272 Alpha Dr, PO Box 11588, Pittsburgh, PA 15238, 800-447-0360, Fax: 412-963-0415, E-Mail: dweber@providentbenefits.com, URL: www.providentbenefits.com CODES/THIRD-PARTY TESTING Conam Inspection/National Testing 600 Kaiser Dr, Bldg 241, Heath, OH 43056, 740-788-9188, Fax: 740-788-9189, E-Mail: jim.kelker@conaminsp.com, URL: www.conaminsp.com Cole + Russell Architects Inc Pipo Communications Elliott LeBoeuf McElwain 1748 Independence Blvd, B-6, Sarasota, FL 34234, 941-360-2277, Fax: 941-360-2207, E-Mail: matt@pwservice.com, URL: www.pwservice.com 1516 Cassil Pl, Hollywood, CA 90028, 323-466-5444, E-Mail: pc@pipo.net, URL: www.pipo.cc CONSULTING/RESEARCH Fire Findings LLC PO Box 8637, Benton Harbor, MI 49023-8637, 269-925-2200, Fax: 269-925-2204, E-Mail: info@firefindings.com, URL: www.firefindings.com Fire Ground Technologies PO Box 534, Pompton Plains, NJ 07444, 201-206-9387, E-Mail: fireground1@aol.com, URL: www.firegroundtech.com Fire Service Testing Co Inc 6630 Odom Rd, Lakeland, FL 33809, 863-815-8287, Fax: 863-815-8358, E-Mail: info@fstc.com, URL: www.fstc.com Illinois Fire Service Institute University of Illinois 11 Gerty Dr, Champaign, IL 61820, 217-244-7131, Fax: 217-244-6790, E-Mail: hopper@fsi.uiuc.edu, URL: www.fsi.uiuc.edu Interact Business Group 29513 Anthony Rd, Valley Center, CA 92082, 949-588-1346, E-Mail: bbooth@interactbusinessgroup.com, URL: www.interactbusinessgroup.com 6630 Odom Rd, Lakeland, FL 33809, 863-815-8287, Fax: 863-815-8358, E-Mail: info@fstc.com, URL: www.fstc.com National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) One Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02269, 617-770-3000, Fax: 617-984-7130 Safety Equipment Institute 1307 Dolley Madison Blvd, McLean, VA 22101, 703-442-5732, Fax: 703-442-5756, E-Mail: info@seinet.org, URL: www.seinet.org COMMUNICATIONS Com-Tech Electronics 5 Krey Blvd, Renssealer, NY 12144, 518-283-0958, Fax: 518-283-0959, E-Mail: sales@com-tech.org, URL: www.com-tech.org 537 E Pete Rose Way, Suite 200, Cincinnati, OH 45202, 800-469-4949, Fax: 513-721-8181, E-Mail: cra@colerussell.com, URL: www.colerussell.com 8001 Forbes Pl, Suite 201, Springfield, VA 22151, 703-321-2100, Fax: 703-321-2112, URL: www.elaengineers.com Holzmacher MeLendon Murrell PC (H2M Group) 575 Broadhollow Rd, Melville, NY 11747, 631-756-8000, Fax: 631-694-4122, E-Mail: h2m@h2m.com, URL: www.h2m.com Interact Business Group 29513 Anthony Rd, Valley Center, CA 92082, 949-588-1346, E-Mail: bbooth@interactbusinessgroup.com, URL: www.interactbusinessgroup.com EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES (EMS) CentreLearn LLC 73 E Forrest Ave, Suite 140, Shrewsbury, PA 17361, 717-227-4655, Fax: 717-227-4655, E-Mail: information@centrelearn.com, URL: www.centrelearn.com Commission on Accreditation of Ambulance Services (CAAS) 1926 Waukegan Rd, Suite 1, Glenview, IL 60025, 847-657-6828, Fax: 847-657-6825, E-Mail: swarahm@tcag.com, URL: www.caas.org EmCert Inc 6700 Woodlands Pkwy, Suite 230-200, The Woodlands, TX 77382, 877-367-4376, Fax: 877-367-4376, E-Mail: info@emcert.com, URL: www.emcert.com Fire Service Testing Co Inc 134 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_134 134 Paging Wireless Service Center n International Code Council 5360 Workman Mill Rd, Whittier, CA 90601, 562-699-0541, Fax: 562-699-9721, URL: www.iccsafe.org (See ad page 97) Dennis A Joiner Associates 4975 Daru Way, Fair Oaks, CA 95628-5452, 916-967-7795, Fax: 916-967-7795, E-Mail: joinerda@pacbell.net University of Tennessee 226 Capitol Blvd, Suite 600, Nashville, TN 37219, 615-532-6827, Fax: 615-532-4963, E-Mail: ray.crouch@tennesse.edu, URL: www.mtas.utk.edu Vertical Aeronautics International PO Box 7570, Van Nuys, CA 91409, 818-996-0345, Fax: 818-996-0005, URL: www.heliports.com EMSAR Inc 1032 W Main St, Wilmington, OH 45177, 937-383-1052, Fax: 800-236-4666, E-Mail: info@emsar.com, URL: www.emsar.com Fire Service Testing Co Inc 6630 Odom Rd, Lakeland, FL 33809, 863-815-8287, Fax: 863-815-8358, E-Mail: info@fstc.com, URL: www.fstc.com National Medal of Honor 4 Carteret Ave, Carteret, NJ 07008, 732-541-8831, Fax: 732-541-8135, E-Mail: jwutkowski@verizon.net, URL: www.nationalmedalofhonor.com SIRENNET.COM PO Box 91129, Portland, OR 97291, 888-959-0911, Fax: 888-959-3112, E-Mail: info@sirennet.com www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:58:46 AM
  • 141. Instruction/Training CFS First Responders Financial Services CentreLearn LLC PO Box 778, Millbrae, CA 94030, 650-873-4045, Fax: 650-952-2592, E-Mail: cfs@firerecruit.com, URL: www.firerecruit.com 545 Fifth Ave, New York, NY 10017, 212-573-8700, Fax: 212-573-8097, E-Mail: info@firstresponders.com, URL: www.firstresponders.com 73 E Forrest Ave, Suite 140, Shrewsbury, PA 17361, 717-227-4655, Fax: 717-227-4655, E-Mail: information@centrelearn.com, URL: www.centrelearn.com Fire Service Testing Co Inc Provident DIS 6630 Odom Rd, Lakeland, FL 33809, 863-815-8287, Fax: 863-815-8358, E-Mail: info@fstc.com, URL: www.fstc.com Perfect Firefighter Candidate/Firecareers.com 4475 Dupont Ct, Suite 3, Ventura, CA 93003, 800-326-8401, Fax: 805-658-7128, E-Mail: info@firecareers.com, URL: www.firecareers.com 272 Alpha Dr, PO Box 11588, Pittsburgh, PA 15238, 800-447-0360, Fax: 412-963-0415, E-Mail: dweber@providentbenefits.com, URL: www.providentbenefits.com Rescom Sales Inc 214 Bruce Ave, Kincardine, Ontario, Canada N2Z 2P3, 519-396-8555, Fax: 519-396-4045, E-Mail: sales@rescom.ca, URL: www.rescom.us All American Investment Group LLC First Responders Financial Services 545 Fifth Ave, New York, NY 10017, 212-573-8700, Fax: 212-573-8097, E-Mail: info@firstresponders.com, URL: www.firstresponders.com Laurel Mountain Leasing Financial Services Inc 3720 Route 711, Suite 2, Ligonier, PA 15658, 800-214-4606, Fax: 724-238-3133, E-Mail: laurelmt@comcast.net Leasing 2 1720 W Cass St, Tampa, FL 33606, 813-258-9888, Fax: 813-258-9333, E-Mail: whitey@leasing2.com, URL: www.firetruckleasing.com Sovereign Bank 1031 Adams Dr, Colorado Springs, CO 80904, 719-475-0784, Fax: 303-967-2366, E-Mail: dmount@sovereignbank.com, URL: www.sovereignbank.com INSURANCE Ambulance Service Insurance Program 20 Church St, PO Box 5670, Cortland, NY 13045, 800-822-3747, Fax: 607-756-6225, E-Mail: info@mcneilandcompany.com, URL: www.mcneilandcompany.com Emergency Services Insurance Program 20 Church St, PO Box 5670, Cortland, NY 13045, 800-822-3747, Fax: 607-756-6225, E-Mail: info@mcneilandcompany.com, URL: www.mcneilandcompany.com www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_135 135 EmergiTech Inc 2545 Farmers Dr, Suite 250, Columbus, OH 43235, 614-866-6712, Fax: 614-866-9208, E-Mail: salesinfo@emergitech.com, URL: www.emergitech.com Fire Training Resources 607 Cherokee Ln, Pontiac, IL 61764, 866-966-9295, Fax: 815-844-3319, E-Mail: info@firetrainingresources.net, URL: www.firetrainingresources.net FINANCIAL 12 Alfred St, Suite 300, Woburn, MA 01801, 781-897-1776, Fax: 781-897-1777, E-Mail: jem@allaminv.com, URL: www.judymarshall.net 1700 George Bush E, #200, College Station, TX 77840, 979-846-4565, Fax: 979-268-8123, URL: www.disisit.com VFIS 183 Leader Heights Rd, York, PA 17402, 800-233-1957, Fax: 717-747-7030, E-Mail: inquiries@vfis.com, URL: www.vfis.com MUNICIPAL LEASE/PURCHASE All American Investment Group LLC 12 Alfred St, Suite 300, Woburn, MA 01801, 781-897-1776, Fax: 781-897-1777, E-Mail: jem@allaminv.com, URL: www.judymarshall.net Baystone Financial Group 1680 Charles Pl, Manhattan, KS 66502, 785-587-4050, Fax: 785-537-4806, E-Mail: bkaus@baystone.net, URL: www.baystone.net Sovereign Bank 1031 Adams Dr, Colorado Springs, CO 80904, 719-475-0784, Fax: 303-967-2366, E-Mail: dmount@sovereignbank.com, URL: www.sovereignbank.com SOFTWARE ACS Firehouse Software 2900 100th St, Suite 309, Urbandale, IA 50322, 800-921-5300, Fax: 515-288-4825, E-Mail: jason.trotter@acs-inc.com, URL: www.firehousesoftware.com ADASHI 100 Walter Ward Blvd, Suite 100, Abingdon, MD 21009, 410-569-6081, Fax: 410-569-6083, URL: www.adashi.org Asset Tracking Services Inc 12807 Cypress Pass Loop W, Cypress, TX 77427-2172, 713-681-1507, Fax: 713-429-4980, E-Mail: info@assetincommand.com, URL: www.assetincommand.com Rescom Sales Inc 214 Bruce Ave, Kincardine, Ontario, Canada N2Z 2P3, 519-396-8555, Fax: 519-396-4045, E-Mail: sales@rescom.ca, URL: www.rescom.us TESTING, PERSONNEL CentreLearn LLC 73 E Forrest Ave, Suite 140, Shrewsbury, PA 17361, 717-227-4655, Fax: 717-227-4655, E-Mail: information@centrelearn.com, URL: www.centrelearn.com Fire Department Safety Officers Association 30 Main St, Suite 6, PO Box 149, Ashland, MA 01721, 508-881-3114, Fax: 508-881-1128, E-Mail: membership@fdsoa.org, URL: www.fdsoa.org ARK Technical Rescue Training Services Inc 5630 Flagler Dr, Centreville, VA 20120, 703-378-0855, Fax: 703-378-0855, E-Mail: info@arktechnicalrescue.com, URL: www.arktechnicalrescue.com Bellevue University 1000 Galvin Rd S, Bellevue, NE 68005, 402-293-2000, Fax: 402-293-2020, E-Mail: info@bellevue.edu, URL: www.bellevueuniversity.com Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems LLC 901 Cleveland St, Elyria, OH 44035, 440-329-9000, Fax: 440-329-9203, E-Mail: info@bendix.com, URL: www.bendix.com Bendix Spicer Foundation Brakes LLC 901 Cleveland St, Elyria, OH 44035, 440-329-9709, Fax: 440-329-9203, E-Mail: info@foundationbrakes.com, URL: www.foundationbrakes.com CentreLearn LLC 73 E Forrest Ave, Suite 140, Shrewsbury, PA 17361, 717-227-4655, Fax: 717-227-4655, E-Mail: information@centrelearn.com, URL: www.centrelearn.com Chubb Insurance Co 15 Mountain View Rd, Warren, NJ 07059, 908-903-7172, URL: www.chubb.com/lcu SERVICES EMPLOYMENT CIMAT-Critical Incident Management And Training PO Box 646, North Bellmore, NY 11710, 516-316-3000, Fax: 516-785-5891, URL: www.cimat.net Fire Service Testing Co Inc 6630 Odom Rd, Lakeland, FL 33809, 863-815-8287, Fax: 863-815-8358, E-Mail: info@fstc.com, URL: www.fstc.com Dennis A Joiner Associates 4975 Daru Way, Fair Oaks, CA 95628-5452, 916-967-7795, Fax: 916-967-7795, E-Mail: joinerda@pacbell.net Colorado State University 1040 Campus Delivery, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1040, 970-491-5288, Fax: 970-491-7885, E-Mail: info@learn.colostate.edu, URL: www.learn.colostate.edu INSTRUCTION/TRAINING Airboat Safety and Training International PO Box 3442, Lake Wales, FL 33853, 863-537-1700, E-Mail: info@airboatsar.org, URL: www.airboatsar.org American Public University 111 W Congress St, Charles Town, WV 25414, 877-777-9081, Fax: 703-396-6433, E-Mail: info@apus.edu, URL: www.apu.apus.edu n Columbia Southern University 25326 Canal Rd, PO Box 3110, Orange Beach, AL 36351, 251-981-3771, Fax: 251-981-3815, E-Mail: admissions@columbiasouthern.edu, URL: www.columbiasouthern.com (See ad page 24) Commission on Accreditation of Ambulance Services (CAAS) 1926 Waukegan Rd, Suite 1, Glenview, IL 60025, 847-657-6828, Fax: 847-657-6825, E-Mail: swarahm@tcag.com, URL: www.caas.org FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 135 1/7/09 9:58:46 AM
  • 142. Agency, Association or Organization Connecticut Fire Academy 34 Perimeter Rd, Windsor Locks, CT 06096-1069, 860-627-6363, Fax: 860-654-1889, URL: www.ct.gov/cfpc DIS 1700 George Bush E, #200, College Station, TX 77840, 979-846-4565, Fax: 979-268-8123, URL: www.disisit.com Eastern Kentucky University Arson Resource Center Fire Training Resources 607 Cherokee Ln, Pontiac, IL 61764, 866-966-9295, Fax: 815-844-3319, E-Mail: info@firetrainingresources.net, URL: www.firetrainingresources.net Flashover Systems Inc 2198 Council Ring Rd, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L5L1B, 866-876-0014, URL: www.flashoversystems.com Fowler Fire Education 521 Lancaster Ave, Richmond, KY 40475, 859-622-1053, Fax: 859-622-1530, URL: www.fireandsafety.eku.edu 12632 SW 276th St, Vashon, WA 98070, 206-261-1137, E-Mail: shana@fowlerfire.com, URL: www.fowlerfire.com Eastern Kentucky University IFSTA/Fire Protection Publications 5401 S Kirkman Rd, Suite 200, Orlando, FL 32819, 407-573-2000 ECMS Inc SERVICES 1809 Peralta St, Oakland, CA 94607, 510-986-0131, Fax: 510-986-0383, E-Mail: oakland@ecmsinc.biz, URL: www.ecmsinc.biz EmCert Inc 6700 Woodlands Pkwy, Suite 230-200, The Woodlands, TX 77382, 877-367-4376, Fax: 877-367-4376, E-Mail: info@emcert.com, URL: www.emcert.com EMS Safety Services Inc 1046 Calle Recodo, Suite K, San Clemente, CA 92673, 800-215-9555, Fax: 949-388-2776, E-Mail: instructortraining@emssafetyservices.com, URL: www.emssafety.com Oklahoma State University, 930 N Willis, Stillwater, OK 74078, 405-744-5724, Fax: 405-744-8204, E-Mail: lorid@osufpp.org, URL: www.ifsta.org Illinois Fire Service Institute University of Illinois 1421 S Sheridan, Tulsa, OK 74112, 918-832-9239, Fax: 918-831-9729, E-Mail: fdicinfo@pennwell.com, URL: www.fdic.com Fire Findings LLC PO Box 8637, Benton Harbor, MI 49023-8637, 269-925-2200, Fax: 269-925-2204, E-Mail: info@firefindings.com, URL: www.firefindings.com Fire Ground Technologies PO Box 534, Pompton Plains, NJ 07444, 201-206-9387, E-Mail: fireground1@aol.com, URL: www.firegroundtech.com Fire Line Video Productions PO Box 432, Little Neck, NY 11363, 917-749-6200, E-Mail: firelinevideo@aol.com, URL: www.firelinevideo.com Fireproof Children/Prevention First One Grove St, Suite 235, Pittsford, NY 14534, 585-264-0840, Fax: 585-264-1754, URL: www.fireproofchildren.com Inner Circle Fire Training 1330 Perkins Ave NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49505, 616-581-5511, E-Mail: innercircle.fire@gmail.com, URL: www.innercirclefiretraining.com International Fire Marshals Association One Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02169, 617-984-7424, Fax: 617-984-7056, E-Mail: ifma@nfpa.org, URL: www.nfpa.org/ifma 3100 Fire Services Rd, Ames, IA 50011-3100, 515-294-6817, Fax: 515-294-2156, E-Mail: fstbinfo@ops.state.ia.us, URL: www.ops.state.ia.us/fm/fstb John Wood Community College-Fire Science Department 1301 S 48th St, Quincy, IL 62305, 217-224-6500, Fax: 217-224-4208, E-Mail: firescience@jwcc.edu, URL: www.jwcc.edu/instruct/fire Rescue Concepts Inc 9113 SH 146 S, Dayton, TX 77535, 800-422-1724, Fax: 936-257-1105, E-Mail: info@rescueconceptsinc.com, URL: www.rescueconcepts.com Roco Rescue 7077 Exchequer Dr, Baton Rouge, LA 70739, 800-647-7626, Fax: 225-754-7626, E-Mail: info@rocorescue.com, URL: www.rocorescue.com Search Rescue Foundation 36 Ketley, Princeton, NJ 08540, 732-713-6298, E-Mail: safetyshields@hotmail.com, URL: www.searchandrescuefoundation.org PO Box 498, Emmitsburg, MD 21727, 301-447-1365, Fax: 301-447-1645, E-Mail: firehero@firehero.org, URL: www.firehero.org National Fire Academy 16825 S Seton Ave, Emmitsburg, MD 21727, 301-447-1853, Fax: 301-447-1270, URL: www.usfa.fema.gov n TEEX Emergency Services Training Institute 301 Tarrow, College Station, TX 77840, 866-878-8900, Fax: 979-847-9304, E-Mail: esti@teexmail.tamu.edu, URL: www.teex.com/esti (See ad page 95) TSB Loss Control Inc 3940 Morton Bend Rd SW, Rome, GA 30161, 706-291-1222, Fax: 706-291-2255, E-Mail: info@tsblosscontrol.com, URL: www.tsblosscontrol.com 24-7 EMS PO Box 11292, Bainbridge Island, WA 98110, 206-855-4911, Fax: 206-855-9499, E-Mail: nicole@24-7ems.com, URL: www.24-7ems.com Ambulance Service Insurance Program 20 Church St, PO Box 5670, Cortland, NY 13045, 800-822-3747, Fax: 607-756-6225, E-Mail: info@mcneilandcompany.com, URL: www.mcneilandcompany.com American Fire Sprinkler Association 12750 Merit Dr, Suite 350, Dallas, TX 75251, 214-349-5965, Fax: 214-343-8898, E-Mail: afsainfo@firesprinkler.org, URL: www.firesprinkler.org California State Firefighters Association 2701 K St, Suite 201, Sacramento, CA 95816, 916-446-9880, Fax: 916-446-9889, URL: www.csfa.net 73 E Forrest Ave, Suite 140, Shrewsbury, PA 17361, 717-227-4655, Fax: 717-227-4655, E-Mail: information@centrelearn.com, URL: www.centrelearn.com Commission on Accreditation of Ambulance Services (CAAS) 1926 Waukegan Rd, Suite 1, Glenview, IL 60025, 847-657-6828, Fax: 847-657-6825, E-Mail: swarahm@tcag.com, URL: www.caas.org Congressional Fire Services Institute (CFSI) 900 Second St NE, Suite 303, Washington, DC 20002, 202-371-1277, Fax: 202-682-3473 Emergency Services Insurance Program 20 Church St, PO Box 5670, Cortland, NY 13045, 800-822-3747, Fax: 607-756-6225, E-Mail: info@mcneilandcompany.com, URL: www.mcneilandcompany.com Fire and Emergency Manufacturers and Services Association (FEMSA) n University of Maryland University College (UMUC) 3501 University Blvd E, Adelphi, MD 20783, 800-888-8682, E-Mail: enroll@umuc.edu, URL: www.umuc.edu (See ad page 101) PO Box 147, Lynnfield, MA 01940-0147, 781-334-2771, Fax: 781-334-2771, E-Mail: info@femsa.org, URL: www.femsa.org Fire Apparatus Manufacturers’ Association (FAMA) PO Box 397, Lynnfield, MA 01940-0397, 781-334-2911, Fax: 781-334-2911, E-Mail: info@fama.org, URL: www.fama.org Fire Department Safety Officers Association National Fire Services Office 1620 Airport Rd, Sylvania, GA 30467, 912-656-6703, Fax: 912-857-6710, E-Mail: mike@nfso.us, URL: www.nfso.us AGENCY, ASSOCIATION OR ORGANIZATION CentreLearn LLC National Fallen Firefighters Foundation 136 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_136 136 1141 Sibley St, Folsom, CA 95630, 916-353-2360, Fax: 916-353-2375, URL: www.networkenvironmental.com 11 Gerty Dr, Champaign, IL 61820, 217-244-7131, Fax: 217-244-6790, E-Mail: hopper@fsi.uiuc.edu, URL: www.fsi.uiuc.edu Iowa Fire Service Training Bureau Fire Department Instructors Conference (FDIC) Network Environmental Systems Inc VFIS 183 Leader Heights Rd, York, PA 17402, 800-233-1957, Fax: 717-747-7030, E-Mail: inquiries@vfis.com, URL: www.vfis.com 30 Main St, Suite 6, PO Box 149, Ashland, MA 01721, 508-881-3114, Fax: 508-881-1128, E-Mail: membership@fdsoa.org, URL: www.fdsoa.org www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:58:47 AM
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Media 575 Broadhollow Rd, Melville, NY 11747, 631-756-8000, Fax: 631-694-4122, E-Mail: h2m@h2m.com, URL: www.h2m.com National Fallen Firefighters Foundation PO Box 498, Emmitsburg, MD 21727, 301-447-1365, Fax: 301-447-1645, E-Mail: firehero@firehero.org, URL: www.firehero.org National Fire Services Office 1620 Airport Rd, Sylvania, GA 30467, 912-656-6703, Fax: 912-857-6710, E-Mail: mike@nfso.us, URL: www.nfso.us n Home Fire Sprinkler Coalition 342 N LaGrange Rd, Suite 300, Frankfort, IL 60423, 815-464-8001, Fax: 815-464-8040, E-Mail: peg@ppacom.com, URL: www.homefiresprinkler.org (See ad page 37) International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC) 4025 Fair Ridge, Fairfax, VA 22033-2868, 703-287-0911, Fax: 703-273-9363, URL: www.iafc.org International Fire Marshals Association One Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02169, 617-984-7424, Fax: 617-984-7056, E-Mail: ifma@nfpa.org, URL: www.nfpa.org/ifma International Rescue Emergency Care Association PO Box 431000, Minneapolis, MN 55443, 763-391-8519, Fax: 763-391-8501, E-Mail: rescuer@ireca.org, URL: www.ireca.org ISEA-International Safety Equipment Association 1901 N Moore St, Suite 808, Arlington, VA 22209, 703-525-1695, Fax: 703-528-2148, URL: www.safetyequipment.org National Association for Search and Rescue (NASAR) PO Box 232020, Centerville, VA 20120-2020, 703-222-6277, Fax: 703-222-6283, E-Mail: info@nasar.org, URL: www.nasar.org National Association of Fire Investigators 857 Tallevast Rd, Sarasota, FL 34243, 941-359-2800, Fax: 941-351-5849, E-Mail: info@nafi.org, URL: www.nafi.org National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians (NAEMT) PO Box 1400, Clinton, MS 39060, 800-346-2368, Fax: 601-924-7325, E-Mail: info@naemt.org, URL: www.naemt.org www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_137 137 National Safety Council 200 Salina Meadows Pkwy, Syracuse, NY 13212, 315-453-7462, E-Mail: eaglecompressors@mindspring.com, URL: www.eaglecompressors.com National Volunteer Fire Council 1050 17th St NW, Suite 490, Washington, DC 20036, 888-275-6832, Fax: 202-887-5291, E-Mail: nvfcoffice@nvfc.org, URL: www.nvfc.org VIDEOS Fire Engineering 21-00 Route 208 S, Fair Lawn, NJ 07410-2602, 973-251-5040, Fax: 973-251-5065, URL: www.fireengineering.com Firefighters Bookstore 18281 Gothard St, Suite 105, Huntington Beach, CA 92648-1205, 714-375-4888, Fax: 714-848-4566, URL: www.firebooks.com Fire Line Video Productions PO Box 432, Little Neck, NY 11363, 917-749-6200, E-Mail: firelinevideo@aol.com, URL: www.firelinevideo.com Fireproof Children/Prevention First One Grove St, Suite 235, Pittsford, NY 14534, 585-264-0840, Fax: 585-264-1754, URL: www.fireproofchildren.com New Jersey State Firemens Association Fire Training Resources New Jersey State Volunteer Firemen’s Association International Fire Fighter 50 Evergreen Pl, East Orange, NJ 07018, 973-677-9295, Fax: 973-677-7643, URL: www.njstatefiremensrelief.com 524 King St, Collingswood, NJ 08103, 850-854-7358 Ohio Society of Fire Service Instructors 269 W First St, Springfield, OH 45504-1844, 937-399-1477, Fax: 614-752-7111, E-Mail: tombeatty@woh.rr.com, URL: www.osfsi.org United States Fire Administration 16825 S Seton Ave, Emmitsburg, MD 21727, 301-447-1000, Fax: 301-447-1270, URL: www.usfa.fema.gov MEDIA BOOKS DMC Associates PO Box 1095, Dover, NH 03821-1095, 603-742-4218 EMS Safety Services Inc 1046 Calle Recodo, Suite K, San Clemente, CA 92673, 800-215-9555, Fax: 949-388-2776, E-Mail: instructortraining@emssafetyservices.com, URL: www.emssafety.com Fire Department Safety Officers Association 607 Cherokee Ln, Pontiac, IL 61764, 866-966-9295, Fax: 815-844-3319, E-Mail: info@firetrainingresources.net, URL: www.firetrainingresources.net The Abbey Manor Business Centre, Preston Rd, Yeovil, Somerset, TA13 SLN UK, 44-1935-426428, Fax: 44-1935-426926, E-Mail: mark.bathard@iffmag.com, URL: www.mdmpublishing.com Rescom Sales Inc 214 Bruce Ave, Kincardine, Ontario, Canada N2Z 2P3, 519-396-8555, Fax: 519-396-4045, E-Mail: sales@rescom.ca, URL: www.rescom.us BOOK WHOLESALERS Rescom Sales Inc 214 Bruce Ave, Kincardine, Ontario, Canada N2Z 2P3, 519-396-8555, Fax: 519-396-4045, E-Mail: sales@rescom.ca, URL: www.rescom.us TELEVISION Fire Line Video Productions PO Box 432, Little Neck, NY 11363, 917-749-6200, E-Mail: firelinevideo@aol.com, URL: www.firelinevideo.com Rescom Sales Inc 214 Bruce Ave, Kincardine, Ontario, Canada N2Z 2P3, 519-396-8555, Fax: 519-396-4045, E-Mail: sales@rescom.ca, URL: www.rescom.us CentreLearn LLC 73 E Forrest Ave, Suite 140, Shrewsbury, PA 17361, 717-227-4655, Fax: 717-227-4655, E-Mail: information@centrelearn.com, URL: www.centrelearn.com EMS Safety Services Inc 1046 Calle Recodo, Suite K, San Clemente, CA 92673, 800-215-9555, Fax: 949-388-2776, E-Mail: instructortraining@emssafetyservices.com, URL: www.emssafety.com Fire Department Safety Officers Association 30 Main St, Suite 6, PO Box 149, Ashland, MA 01721, 508-881-3114, Fax: 508-881-1128, E-Mail: membership@fdsoa.org, URL: www.fdsoa.org Fire Engineering 21-00 Route 208 S, Fair Lawn, NJ 07410-2602, 973-251-5040, Fax: 973-251-5065, URL: www.fireengineering.com Firefighters Bookstore 18281 Gothard St, Suite 105, Huntington Beach, CA 92648-1205, 714-375-4888, Fax: 714-848-4566, URL: www.firebooks.com Fire Line Video Productions PO Box 432, Little Neck, NY 11363, 917-749-6200, E-Mail: firelinevideo@aol.com, URL: www.firelinevideo.com SERVICES Holzmacher MeLendon Murrell PC (H2M Group) Fireproof Children/Prevention First One Grove St, Suite 235, Pittsford, NY 14534, 585-264-0840, Fax: 585-264-1754, URL: www.fireproofchildren.com Fire Training Resources 607 Cherokee Ln, Pontiac, IL 61764, 866-966-9295, Fax: 815-844-3319, E-Mail: info@firetrainingresources.net, URL: www.firetrainingresources.net Rescom Sales Inc 214 Bruce Ave, Kincardine, Ontario, Canada N2Z 2P3, 519-396-8555, Fax: 519-396-4045, E-Mail: sales@rescom.ca, URL: www.rescom.us 24-7 EMS PO Box 11292, Bainbridge Island, WA 98110, 206-855-4911, Fax: 206-855-9499, E-Mail: nicole@24-7ems.com, URL: www.24-7ems.com 30 Main St, Suite 6, PO Box 149, Ashland, MA 01721, 508-881-3114, Fax: 508-881-1128, E-Mail: membership@fdsoa.org, URL: www.fdsoa.org FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 137 1/7/09 9:58:48 AM
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Accountability Systems MANUFACTURERS BY PRODUCT CATEGORY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS n American Trade Mark Co (See ad page 94) Conterra Inc DE Williams Shields ERT Systems LLC n Grace Industries Inc (See ad page 32) iamresponding.com n IMS Alliance (See ad page 40) Mountain Fire Technologies Salamander Technologies Inc Tactron Inc n United Plastic Fabricating Inc (See ad page 58) Vernon Software Systems Inc AIR BAGS Leak Sealing and Plugging Edwards Cromwell Spill Control n Holmatro Inc (See ad page 5) n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) MatJack n Paratech Inc (See ad page 21) Safety Corp of America Team Equipment Vetter GmbH Western Region Sales Service ZUMRO Inc Lifting Genesis Rescue Systems/American Rescue Technology Inc n Holmatro Inc (See ad page 5) n Howell Rescue Systems Inc (See ad page 103) n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) MatJack n Paratech Inc (See ad page 21) RESQTEC Inc Safety Corp of America Team Equipment TNT Rescue Systems Inc Vetter GmbH Western Region Sales Service ZUMRO Inc AIR COMPRESSORS Allegro Industries ArvinMeritor n Bauer Compressors Inc (See ad page 72) Buell Air Horns Concept Engineering Group Inc Air-Spade MAX-AIR Compressors Phoenix USA Inc Sabre Equipment Inc n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) AIR CONDITIONING, APPARATUS Danhard Inc Sabre Equipment Inc Schaefer Ventilation Equipment AIR PURIFICATION SYSTEMS Air HAWK Air Purification Systems n Air Vacuum Corp (See ad page 78) n Bauer Compressors Inc (See ad page 72) Elmridge Protection Products Lawrence Factor Inc MagneGrip n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) n Ward Diesel Filter Systems (See ad insert) AIR QUALITY TESTING MAINTENANCE Bascom-Turner Instruments n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) Industrial Scientific Corp J and N Enterprises Inc Lawrence Factor Inc Poseidon Air Systems Scott/American Bristol Breathing Air Systems Trace Analytics Inc TRI Air Testing Inc AIRCRAFT Firefighting Simulator n Kidde Fire Trainers Inc (See ad page 62) Pro Safe Fire Training Systems Inc ALARM SYSTEMS Fire Station Alerting Systems First-In by Westnet Silent Knight n US Digital Designs Inc (See ad page 103) Industrial n BW Technologies by Honeywell-America (See ad page 45) Digitize Inc Gamewell-FCI Silent Knight Municipal n BW Technologies by Honeywell-America (See ad page 45) Digitize Inc Gamewell-FCI Silent Knight Personal Alert (PASS) Avon-ISI n BW Technologies by Honeywell-America (See ad page 45) Fox International n Grace Industries Inc (See ad page 32) MSA n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) n Smiths Detection (See ad page CV3) Vehicle Backup Code 3 Inc ECCO 138 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_138 138 PRO-VISION Video Systems Sabre Equipment Inc Star Headlight Lantern Co Inc Universal Life Safety Products ALTERNATORS/REGULATORS n CE Niehoff Co (See ad page 112) Eco-Tech Alternators Sabre Equipment Inc APPARATUS Aerial Ladder American LaFrance LLC Bronto Skylift n Crimson Fire Inc (See ad page 35) n WS Darley Co (See ad page 31) n E-ONE (See ad page 29) Ferrara Fire Apparatus Inc Fort Garry Fire Trucks Greenwood Emergency Vehicles Inc HME Ahrens-Fox KME Fire Apparatus Marion Body Works Inc METZ Aerials USA n Pierce Manufacturing Inc (See ad page 13) Plastisol Composites North America Rosenbauer Smeal Fire Apparatus Co Sutphen Corp n Toyne Inc (See ad page 56) Aerial Tower American LaFrance LLC n Crimson Fire Inc (See ad page 35) Ferrara Fire Apparatus Inc Fort Garry Fire Trucks HME Ahrens-Fox KME Fire Apparatus METZ Aerials USA n Pierce Manufacturing Inc (See ad page 13) Smeal Fire Apparatus Co Sutphen Corp n Toyne Inc (See ad page 56) Aerial Tractor Drawn Smeal Fire Apparatus Co Aerial Water Tower American LaFrance LLC Bronto Skylift n E-ONE (See ad page 29) Ferrara Fire Apparatus Inc n Pierce Manufacturing Inc (See ad page 13) Ambulances American Emergency Vehicles American LaFrance LLC Braun Industries Inc Braun Northwest Inc EXCELLANCE INC Foster Rescue Products Greenwood Emergency Vehicles Inc Horton Emergency Vehicles Life Line Emergency Vehicles Marque Inc McCoy Miller Medtec Ambulance Corp Osage Ambulances Taylor Made Ambulances Wheeled Coach Industries Inc Attack Pumpers American LaFrance LLC CustomFIRE Apparatus Inc n WS Darley Co (See ad page 31) Emergency Vehicles Inc n E-ONE (See ad page 29) Ferrara Fire Apparatus Inc Fire Equipment Services Fort Garry Fire Trucks Greenwood Emergency Vehicles Inc HME Ahrens-Fox Midwest Fire Montana Fire Works Neel Fire Protection Apparatus n Pierce Manufacturing Inc (See ad page 13) Plastisol Composites North America Rosenbauer SS Fire Apparatus Co n Summit Fire Apparatus (See ad page 20) n Toyne Inc (See ad page 56) Unruh Fire Inc Weis Fire and Safety Equipment West-Mark Brush Fire American LaFrance LLC CAT PUMPS-High Pressure Pumps Systems n CET Fire Pumps Manufacturing (See ad page 82) n Crimson Fire Inc (See ad page 35) Danko Emergency Equipment Emergency Vehicles Inc n E-ONE (See ad page 29) Ferrara Fire Apparatus Inc Fire Equipment Services Fire Interface Research Equipment Inc Firematic International Fort Garry Fire Trucks Four Guys Stainless Tank Equipment Inc Midwest Fire Montana Fire Works Neel Fire Protection Apparatus Rosenbauer Semo Tank SS Fire Apparatus Co n Summit Fire Apparatus (See ad page 20) n Toyne Inc (See ad page 56) Unruh Fire Inc Weis Fire and Safety Equipment West-Mark Command Vehicles American LaFrance LLC Braun Industries Inc Braun Northwest Inc Bumperchute Co CustomFIRE Apparatus Inc Dodgen Mobile Technologies www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:58:48 AM
  • 145. Apparatus Emergency Vehicles Inc n E-ONE (See ad page 29) Equipment Innovators EXCELLANCE INC Ferrara Fire Apparatus Inc Frontline Hackney Emergency Vehicles KME Fire Apparatus Krammes Kustom Body LDV Inc Marion Body Works Inc Mobile Concepts by Scotty Neel Fire Protection Apparatus Odyssey Automotive Specialty Inc n Pierce Manufacturing Inc (See ad page 13) Plastisol Composites North America Rosenbauer n Summit Fire Apparatus (See ad page 20) Surrey Fire Safety House SVI Trucks Taylor Made Ambulances West-Mark Communications American LaFrance LLC David Clark Co Inc Dodgen Mobile Technologies Emergency Vehicles Inc Equipment Innovators EXCELLANCE INC Ferrara Fire Apparatus Inc Fire Fighter Exam Frontline Krammes Kustom Body LDV Inc Mobile Concepts by Scotty Odyssey Automotive Specialty Inc n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) n Search Systems Inc (See ad page 7) n Sigtronics Corp (See ad page 49) SVI Trucks Crash Fire Rescue Alexis Fire Equipment Co Danko Emergency Equipment Emergency Vehicles Inc Foster Rescue Products Krammes Kustom Body LifeGuard Technologies Oshkosh Truck Corp Plastisol Composites North America Rosenbauer Emergency Support Vehicles American LaFrance LLC Braun Industries Inc Braun Northwest Inc CustomFIRE Apparatus Inc Danko Emergency Equipment n Disaster Response Solutions Inc (See ad page 74) Dodgen Mobile Technologies Emergency Vehicles Inc Equipment Innovators Foster Rescue Products Hackney Emergency Vehicles Harley-Davidson Motor Co Horton Emergency Vehicles Krammes Kustom Body www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_139 139 LDV Inc Marion Body Works Inc Odyssey Automotive Specialty Inc PyroLance NA SVI Trucks n Toyne Inc (See ad page 56) Unruh Fire Inc West-Mark Wheeled Coach Industries Inc Hazardous Materials American LaFrance LLC ARI-HETRA (Automotive Resources Inc) Braun Northwest Inc CustomFIRE Apparatus Inc Emergency Vehicles Inc Equipment Innovators EXCELLANCE INC Ferrara Fire Apparatus Inc Hackney Emergency Vehicles KME Fire Apparatus Krammes Kustom Body LDV Inc Marion Body Works Inc Neel Fire Protection Apparatus Nor E First Response Inc Odyssey Automotive Specialty Inc n Pierce Manufacturing Inc (See ad page 13) Plastisol Composites North America Seagrave Fire Apparatus LLC n Search Systems Inc (See ad page 7) n Summit Fire Apparatus (See ad page 20) SVI Trucks Investigation and Evidence Labs Dodgen Mobile Technologies Emergency Vehicles Inc Equipment Innovators LDV Inc Odyssey Automotive Specialty Inc n Search Systems Inc (See ad page 7) Midmount Ladder American LaFrance LLC n Crimson Fire Inc (See ad page 35) n E-ONE (See ad page 29) KME Fire Apparatus Marion Body Works Inc n Pierce Manufacturing Inc (See ad page 13) Seagrave Fire Apparatus LLC Smeal Fire Apparatus Co Sutphen Corp Midmount Platform American LaFrance LLC n Crimson Fire Inc (See ad page 35) n E-ONE (See ad page 29) KME Fire Apparatus Marion Body Works Inc n Pierce Manufacturing Inc (See ad page 13) Smeal Fire Apparatus Co Sutphen Corp Mobile Canteens/Kitchens Krammes Kustom Body Pumpers American LaFrance LLC n Crimson Fire Inc (See ad page 35) CustomFIRE Apparatus Inc n WS Darley Co (See ad page 31) n E-ONE (See ad page 29) Ferrara Fire Apparatus Inc Fire Equipment Services Fort Garry Fire Trucks Four Guys Stainless Tank Equipment Inc Greenwood Emergency Vehicles Inc HME Ahrens-Fox KME Fire Apparatus Marion Body Works Inc Midwest Fire Montana Fire Works National Foam Inc (Kidde Fire Fighting) n Pierce Manufacturing Inc (See ad page 13) Plastisol Composites North America Rosenbauer Smeal Fire Apparatus Co n Summit Fire Apparatus (See ad page 20) Sutphen Corp SVI Trucks n Toyne Inc (See ad page 56) West-Mark Repair American LaFrance LLC CustomFIRE Apparatus Inc Equipment Innovators Fire Equipment Services Greenwood Emergency Vehicles Inc n Summit Fire Apparatus (See ad page 20) SVI Trucks West-Mark Rescue Aircraft Dynamics Corp (Robopaks) American LaFrance LLC Braun Industries Inc Braun Northwest Inc Concept Engineering Group Inc Air-Spade n Crimson Fire Inc (See ad page 35) CustomFIRE Apparatus Inc Danko Emergency Equipment n WS Darley Co (See ad page 31) Emergency Vehicles Inc Equipment Innovators EXCELLANCE INC Ferrara Fire Apparatus Inc Fire Equipment Services Foster Rescue Products Four Guys Stainless Tank Equipment Inc Hackney Emergency Vehicles HME Ahrens-Fox Horton Emergency Vehicles KME Fire Apparatus Krammes Kustom Body LDV Inc Life Star Rescue Inc Marion Body Works Inc McCoy Miller Midwest Fire Montana Fire Works Neel Fire Protection Apparatus Odyssey Automotive Specialty Inc n Pierce Manufacturing Inc (See ad page 13) Plastisol Composites North America RESCUE 1 Rosenbauer n Search Systems Inc (See ad page 7) n Summit Fire Apparatus (See ad page 20) Sutphen Corp SVI Trucks Taylor Made Ambulances n Toyne Inc (See ad page 56) Unruh Fire Inc West-Mark Wheeled Coach Industries Inc Skid Units CAT PUMPS-High Pressure Pumps Systems n CET Fire Pumps Manufacturing (See ad page 82) Custom Fiberglass Products LLC Danko Emergency Equipment n WS Darley Co (See ad page 31) n E-ONE (See ad page 29) Fire Equipment Services Greenwood Emergency Vehicles Inc Life Star Rescue Inc Midwest Fire Semo Tank SS Fire Apparatus Co n United Plastic Fabricating Inc (See ad page 58) Unruh Fire Inc US Foam Technologies Weis Fire and Safety Equipment West-Mark Specialty American LaFrance LLC CustomFIRE Apparatus Inc Danko Emergency Equipment Dodgen Mobile Technologies Emergency Vehicles Inc Equipment Innovators EXCELLANCE INC Fire Equipment Services Frontline Hackney Emergency Vehicles Harley-Davidson Motor Co Krammes Kustom Body LDV Inc Life Line Emergency Vehicles Life Star Rescue Inc Marion Body Works Inc Montana Fire Works National Foam Inc (Kidde Fire Fighting) Odyssey Automotive Specialty Inc Phillips Environmental Products Inc Plastisol Composites North America Rosenbauer Semo Tank n Summit Fire Apparatus (See ad page 20) SVI Trucks TurboDraft by Schutte Koerting FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 139 1/7/09 9:58:49 AM
  • 146. Apparatus Accessories, Parts, Systems Tankers American LaFrance LLC n Crimson Fire Inc (See ad page 35) CustomFIRE Apparatus Inc Danko Emergency Equipment n WS Darley Co (See ad page 31) n E-ONE (See ad page 29) Fire Equipment Services Firovac-Reberland Fort Garry Fire Trucks Four Guys Stainless Tank Equipment Inc Greenwood Emergency Vehicles Inc HME Ahrens-Fox KME Fire Apparatus Marion Body Works Inc Midwest Fire National Foam Inc (Kidde Fire Fighting) Neel Fire Protection Apparatus n Pierce Manufacturing Inc (See ad page 13) Plastisol Composites North America Rosenbauer Semo Tank Smeal Fire Apparatus Co SS Fire Apparatus Co n Summit Fire Apparatus (See ad page 20) n Toyne Inc (See ad page 56) US Tanker-Fire Apparatus Inc Weis Fire and Safety Equipment Trailers ArvinMeritor n WS Darley Co (See ad page 31) n Disaster Response Solutions Inc (See ad page 74) Dodgen Mobile Technologies Equipment Innovators Fire Equipment Services Foster Rescue Products Frontline Hackney Emergency Vehicles National Foam Inc (Kidde Fire Fighting) Nor E First Response Inc Odyssey Automotive Specialty Inc n Paratech Inc (See ad page 21) Semo Tank Surrey Fire Safety House n United Plastic Fabricating Inc (See ad page 58) Unruh Fire Inc Wells Cargo Inc Upgrades US Tanker-Fire Apparatus Inc Used Danko Emergency Equipment Horton Emergency Vehicles Life Star Rescue Inc Wheeled Coach Industries Inc Water Tenders CustomFIRE Apparatus Inc Danko Emergency Equipment n WS Darley Co (See ad page 31) Fort Garry Fire Trucks HME Ahrens-Fox Midwest Fire Montana Fire Works Neel Fire Protection Apparatus Semo Tank SS Fire Apparatus Co n Summit Fire Apparatus (See ad page 20) US Tanker-Fire Apparatus Inc West-Mark n Extendo Bed Company Inc Wildland Trident Emergency Products LLC American LaFrance LLC n CET Fire Pumps Manufacturing (See ad page 82) n Crimson Fire Inc (See ad page 35) Danko Emergency Equipment n WS Darley Co (See ad page 31) Fire Interface Research Equipment Inc Fort Garry Fire Trucks Greenwood Emergency Vehicles Inc ITT Night Vision KME Fire Apparatus Midwest Fire Montana Fire Works Neel Fire Protection Apparatus n Pierce Manufacturing Inc (See ad page 13) Plastisol Composites North America Pro-Tech Industries Rosenbauer Semo Tank Smeal Fire Apparatus Co SS Fire Apparatus Co Unruh Fire Inc US Foam Technologies Weis Fire and Safety Equipment West-Mark Engine Throttles APPARATUS ACCESSORIES, PARTS, SYSTEMS Anti-Sway Bars Roadmaster Inc Apparatus Organization Systems n Extendo Bed Company Inc (See ad page 49) Performance Advantage Co Sensible Products n United Plastic Fabricating Inc (See ad page 58) Axels and Brakes ArvinMeritor Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems LLC Bendix Spicer Foundation Brakes LLC Hendrickson Trailer Suspension Systems Hendrickson Truck Suspension Systems Bumpers Avionic Structures Inc Hendrickson Bumper and Trim Cabinet Systems Mermaid Manufacturing Pro Poly of America Inc Pro-Tech Industries Sensible Products TruckVault Collision-Avoidance Vehicular System Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems LLC Intec Video Systems Inc PRO-VISION Video Systems Safety Vision Universal Life Safety Products Compartment Tracks/Slides Austin Hardware Supply Inc 140 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_140 140 (See ad page 49) Hansen International n On Scene Solutions LLC (See ad page 64) Performance Advantage Co Drains R-O-M Corp Suspensions ArvinMeritor Glide-Rite Products of North America Hendrickson Trailer Suspension Systems Hendrickson Truck Suspension Systems Raydan Manufacturing Inc Roadmaster Inc Fire Research Corp Tool Mounts and Systems Generator Governors n Kochek Company Inc Fire Research Corp Harrison Hydra-Gen LTD Handles Austin Hardware Supply Inc Hansen International Hardware AS America Austin Hardware Supply Inc Hansen International Moore Industrial Hardware Trident Emergency Products LLC Labels, Control Panel Trident Emergency Products LLC (See ad page 84) Life Star Rescue Inc Performance Advantage Co POK of North America Inc Sensible Products Zephyr Industries Inc n Ziamatic Corp (See ad page 75) Transmissions Allison Transmission ArvinMeritor Tracks/Slides for Compartments Austin Hardware Supply Inc n Extendo Bed Company Inc Lubricating Systems (chassis) (See ad page 49) Hansen International Life Star Rescue Inc n On Scene Solutions LLC (See ad page 64) Performance Advantage Co VOGEL Lubrication Inc Valves Lubricants Haynes Manufacturing Co Stevens Fire Chemicals VOGEL Lubrication Inc Motors, Hydraulic XRT Power Systems Polishes, Waxes Flitz International LTD Power Take-Off Cole Hersee Co Parker Chelsea XRT Power Systems Pressure Governors n Class 1 (See ad page 41) Fire Research Corp Pump, Hydraulic CAT PUMPS-High Pressure Pumps Systems Parker Chelsea Stanley Hydraulic Tools TNT Rescue Systems Inc XRT Power Systems Rear Observation Systems/Backup Cameras AS America Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems LLC Hansen International Intec Video Systems Inc PRO-VISION Video Systems Safety Vision Remote Throttles InPower LLC Rollerized Track Systems for Vehicles n Extendo Bed Company Inc (See ad page 49) Rollout Cargo Beds n Extendo Bed Company Inc (See ad page 49) n On Scene Solutions LLC (See ad page 64) AH Stock Manufacturing Corp n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) n Hale Products Inc (See ad page 41) n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Trident Emergency Products LLC n Waterous Co (See ad page 25) Vehicle Identification Plaque n IMS Alliance (See ad page 40) Ventilator, Crew Cab Moore Industrial Hardware APPARATUS MAINTENANCE Lifting Systems ARI-HETRA (Automotive Resources Inc) APPARATUS REFURBISHING Lettering and Decals Life Star Rescue Inc Reflexite Americas Refurbishing American LaFrance LLC Braun Northwest Inc CustomFIRE Apparatus Inc EXCELLANCE INC Fire Equipment Services Greenwood Emergency Vehicles Inc Life Star Rescue Inc n Pierce Manufacturing Inc (See ad page 13) Seagrave Fire Apparatus LLC n Summit Fire Apparatus (See ad page 20) APPARATUS REPAIRS American LaFrance LLC CustomFIRE Apparatus Inc www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:58:50 AM
  • 147. Breathing Apparatus/ Equipment Fort Garry Fire Trucks Frontline Greenwood Emergency Vehicles Inc n Summit Fire Apparatus (See ad page 20) Trilex Ltd Weis Fire and Safety Equipment APPAREL Screenprinting and Embroidery Dove Designs FirehouseDecalsAndMore.com n 5.11 Tactical Series (See ad page 19) TR Designs Inc BAGS Bail Out n CMC Rescue Inc (See ad page 69) Fire Innovations Golfire Inc High Angle Associates Rescue Technology n True North Gear (See ad page 100) Body Reeves EMS LLC Emergency Medical Supplies Bristol Fire Apparel Inc BurnFree Products Conterra Inc EMS Innovations Inc Ferno Flotec Inc Fox International HARPER Rescue Pack Lab Safety Supply MERET Morrison Medical Pacific Safety Products Inc Persys Medical Pro-Tuff Uniforms RB Fabrications Inc The Reeves Group UO Equipment Co WATER-JEL Technologies Z-Medica Gear Advanced Rescue Systems/KMP Fire Alliance Fire and Rescue American Firewear Cetacea Corp Chieftain Safety Manufacturing n CMC Rescue Inc (See ad page 69) Dove Designs Eagle Gear Fire-Dex Fire Innovations Firl Industries Inc n 5.11 Tactical Series (See ad page 19) Hansen Fire Safety Lab Safety Supply MERET Morning Pride Manufacturing Pacific Helmets/Alliance Fire and Rescue Petzl America Pigeon Mountain Industries Inc Quaker Safety Products Corp RB Fabrications Inc Reeves EMS LLC The Reeves Group www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_141 141 Royal Case Co Sperian Fire Total Fire Group Trilex Ltd n True North Gear (See ad page 100) Western Shelter/Crew Boss Hose Storm King Mountain Technologies Inc WATER-JEL Technologies n Kussmaul Electronics Co Inc (See ad page 48) MarathonNorco Aerospace Inc Pulsetech Products Corp TMS Medical Technologies BOATS/EQUIPMENT Airboat Husky Airboats Eliminators Fire n Kussmaul Electronics Co Inc (See ad page 48) Junk Yard Dog Industries Mercedes Textiles Ltd Inverters Rope Isolators BKA n CMC Rescue Inc (See ad page 69) Fire Innovations Golfire Inc RB Fabrications Inc RIT Rescue and Escape Systems Royal Case Co Special Electronics Designs Inc n Sterling Rope Co (See ad page 59) Trilex Ltd SCBA-Mask Allegro Industries Chieftain Safety Manufacturing Golfire Inc Hansen Fire Safety RB Fabrications Inc SCBAS Inc n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) SM Smith Co Trilex Ltd n True North Gear (See ad page 100) Storage RB Fabrications Inc SM Smith Co n Sterling Rope Co (See ad page 59) Trilex Ltd n True North Gear (See ad page 100) Tactical Medical Bags Conterra Inc Ferno Fire Hooks Unlimited Inc n 5.11 Tactical Series (See ad page 19) Flotec Inc HARPER Rescue Pack Lab Safety Supply MERET Pacific Safety Products Inc RB Fabrications Inc The Reeves Group Royal Case Co n True North Gear (See ad page 100) Z-Medica BARCODE EQUIPMENT Trilex Ltd BATTERIES Analyzers MarathonNorco Aerospace Inc Pulsetech Products Corp TMS Medical Technologies Chargers/Conditioners Advanced Lighting Corp Aircraft Dynamics Corp (Robopaks) Fox International Onan - Cummins Onan Generators Cole Hersee Co n Kussmaul Electronics Co Inc (See ad page 48) Monitors Ice Rescue Cole Hersee Co ECX Engineering Corp n Kussmaul Electronics Co Inc (See ad page 48) Silent Knight Brunswick Commercial Government Products Dive Rescue International Husky Airboats Lifeguard Systems Inc Response Marine Inc Nonchargeable SureFire TMS Medical Technologies Inflatable Achilles Inflatable Craft Dive Rescue International FSI North America Rescue ONE Connector Boats Response Marine Inc Stearns Inc Rechargeable Advanced Lighting Corp Fox International Milwaukee Electric Tool Corp TMS Medical Technologies Lights BELTS Life Gemtor Inc Golfire Inc RIT Rescue and Escape Systems Trilex Ltd Reflective Boston Leather Inc Fire Hooks Unlimited Inc Fox International PolyBrite International Reflexite Americas Trilex Ltd Rescue Capital Safety (DBI/SALA Protecta) n CMC Rescue Inc (See ad page 69) Fire Innovations Fox International HARPER Rescue Pack High Angle Associates International Safety Equipment Inc Miller Fall Protection MSA Rescue Technology Trilex Ltd Safety Capital Safety (DBI/SALA Protecta) Cetacea Corp Fire Innovations Fox International HO Bostrom Co Inc International Safety Equipment Inc LifeGuard Technologies Trilex Ltd BLANKETS Fire Basofil Fibers LLC BurnFree Products Junkin Safety Appliance Co North Safety Products American LaFrance LLC Brunswick Commercial Government Products Federal Signal Corp Metalcraft Marine Inc Rescue ONE Connector Boats Response Marine Inc SeaArk Marine Inc Command Light Foxfury Personal Lighting Solutions Hammerhead Industries Inc n On Scene Solutions LLC (See ad page 64) Rescue Achilles Inflatable Craft American LaFrance LLC Brunswick Commercial Government Products Dive Rescue International Glas-Master/Wehr Engineering Hammerhead Industries Inc Husky Airboats Lifeguard Systems Inc Metalcraft Marine Inc Rescue ONE Connector Boats Response Marine Inc SeaArk Marine Inc BRAKES Air Dryers Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems LLC Antilock Systems ArvinMeritor Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems LLC Compressors Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems LLC Control Valves Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems LLC Suspension Controls ArvinMeritor BREATHING APPARATUS/ EQUIPMENT Accessories American Airworks Breathing Air Systems n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) n Eagle Compressors Inc (See ad page 26) FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 141 1/7/09 9:58:50 AM
  • 148. Building Materials Flamefighter Corp HO Bostrom Co Inc Hypres Equipment Interspiro Mako Compressors MSA Poseidon Air Systems SCBAS Inc Scott/American Bristol Breathing Air Systems n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) Sperian Fire Thuemling Instrument TVI Corp Air Booster Pump American Airworks Hydraulics International Inc Air Compressors Air Systems International American Airworks ArvinMeritor n Bauer Compressors Inc (See ad page 72) n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) n Eagle Compressors Inc (See ad page 26) Hypres Equipment Lawrence Factor Inc Mako Compressors MAX-AIR Compressors Poseidon Air Systems n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) n Eagle Compressors Inc (See ad page 26) Elmridge Protection Products GfG Instrumentation Inc Mako Compressors n Ward Diesel Filter Systems (See ad insert) Air Management Panels n Bauer Compressors Inc (See ad page 72) Hypres Equipment SCBAS Inc Air Pack for High Rise Fires n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) Dragon Fur Safety Air Cushion Inc Booster Pumps Hydraulics International Inc Hypres Equipment Poseidon Air Systems Breathing Air Trailers n Bauer Compressors Inc (See ad page 72) Foster Rescue Products Hypres Equipment Building-Installed Air Replenishment System American Airworks Cascade Systems Avon-ISI n Bauer Compressors Inc (See ad page 72) n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) n Eagle Compressors Inc (See ad page 26) Luxfer Gas Cylinders Mako Compressors MAX-AIR Compressors MSA Poseidon Air Systems SCBAS Inc n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) Structural Composites Industries (SCI) Air Systems International American Airworks n Bauer Compressors Inc (See ad page 72) n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) n Eagle Compressors Inc (See ad page 26) Hypres Equipment Mako Compressors Oxygen Generating Systems International (OGSI) Poseidon Air Systems SCBAS Inc Scott/American Bristol Breathing Air Systems n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) Structural Composites Industries (SCI) Air-Filling Stations Class 2 Containment Air Cylinders Air Systems International American Airworks n Bauer Compressors Inc (See ad page 72) n Eagle Compressors Inc (See ad page 26) Hydraulics International Inc Hypres Equipment Mako Compressors MAX-AIR Compressors Oxygen Generating Systems International (OGSI) Poseidon Air Systems Scott/American Bristol Breathing Air Systems n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) Air Filtration System, Portable Air Systems International American Safety Health Promotions Ltd ARI-HETRA (Automotive Resources Inc) Hypres Equipment Mako Compressors MAX-AIR Compressors Cleaning Equipment and Supplies Allegro Industries Continental Girbau Inc Flitz International LTD Landa Water Cleaning Systems n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) WINSOL Laboratories Compressors Air Systems International American Airworks n Bauer Compressors Inc (See ad page 72) n Eagle Compressors Inc (See ad page 26) Hypres Equipment Mako Compressors MAX-AIR Compressors 142 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_142 142 n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) Electric Air Booster Pump American Airworks Emergency Air Systems Avon-ISI Interspiro Sperian Fire Face Mask, Simulated Smoke Essex PBR Corp Sperian Fire Superior Signal Co Inc Facepiece Fit Testing Equipment Allegro Industries n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) Occupational Health Dynamics (OHD) OHD LLC n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) TSI Inc SCBA Covers HO Bostrom Co Inc Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) Air Systems International Avon-ISI n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) Hydraulics International Inc Interspiro n ISI (See ad page 73) Luxfer Gas Cylinders MSA North Safety Products Structural Composites Industries (SCI) Testing Equipment Mobile SCBA Bottle Racks Hydraulics International Inc Poseidon Air Systems Scott/American Bristol Breathing Air Systems Speedtech Instruments Superior Signal Co Inc GearGrid Wall Cabinets n Gearmasters (Witmer Public Safety Group Inc) (See ad page 18, 87) Groves Inc n United Plastic Fabricating Inc (See ad page 58) Mounting Brackets for SCBA Flamefighter Corp HO Bostrom Co Inc LifeGuard Technologies Performance Advantage Co n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) n Ziamatic Corp (See ad page 75) Allegro Industries Pro Poly of America Inc n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) n Ziamatic Corp (See ad page 75) BUILDING MATERIALS Fire-Resistant Panels/Coatings Cogebi Inc Flame Shield Consulting WHP Trainingtowers BUILDINGS Building/Gate Access Oxygen Regulators VIDEX Inc ECX Engineering Corp UO Equipment Co Burn Respirator n Kidde Fire Trainers Inc Allegro Industries Avon-ISI n ISI (See ad page 73) MSA n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) n Kidde Fire Trainers Inc Respirator Spectacle Kit n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) Interspiro n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) Sperian Fire SCBA Bottle Storage Systems Breathing Air Systems GearGrid n Gearmasters (Witmer Public Safety Group Inc) (See ad page 18, 87) Groves Inc HO Bostrom Co Inc LifeGuard Technologies Performance Advantage Co Pro Poly of America Inc Sperian Fire Structural Composites Industries (SCI) n United Plastic Fabricating Inc (See ad page 58) n Ziamatic Corp (See ad page 75) Fire Facilities Inc (See ad page 62) WHP Trainingtowers Gas Fired (See ad page 62) Pro Safe Fire Training Systems Inc WHP Trainingtowers Gas-Fired Props n Kidde Fire Trainers Inc (See ad page 62) Pro Safe Fire Training Systems Inc WHP Trainingtowers Hazardous Materials Storage Environmental Compliance Products (ECP) Portable Burn Rooms Fire Facilities Inc n Kidde Fire Trainers Inc (See ad page 62) WHP Trainingtowers Prefabricated Fire Facilities Inc n Kidde Fire Trainers Inc (See ad page 62) WHP Trainingtowers Training Fire Facilities Inc n Kidde Fire Trainers Inc (See ad page 62) WHP Trainingtowers www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:58:51 AM
  • 149. Clothing, Emergency Responder CAMERAS Aerial Truck Camera-Monitor System AS America PRO-VISION Video Systems Back-up Video Systems Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems LLC Flamefighter Corp Hansen International Intec Video Systems Inc PRO-VISION Video Systems Safety Vision Charge Coupled Device n Search Systems Inc (See ad page 7) Night Vision Systems Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems LLC ITT Night Vision PRO-VISION Video Systems Safety Vision n Search Systems Inc (See ad page 7) Zistos Corp Thermal Imaging 3M Avon-ISI Axsys Technologies Inc Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems LLC Bullard n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) n E2V Technologies Inc (See ad page 86) n ISG Thermal Systems USA Inc (See ad page 65) n ISI (See ad page 73) Morning Pride Manufacturing MSA n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) n Search Systems Inc (See ad page 7) Total Fire Group Zistos Corp Video Camera Systems ITT Night Vision Mobile Concepts by Scotty NICE Systems Panasonic Computer Solutions Co PRO-VISION Video Systems Safety Vision Silent Knight Zistos Corp CHAINS Carbide Stihl Tempest Technology Inc Concrete Cutting Stanley Hydraulic Tools Diamond Stanley Hydraulic Tools Rescue Cutting Reflexite Americas Tire, Automatic Insta-Chain Inc n Onspot of North America Inc (See ad page 84) n Rud Chain Inc (See ad page 107) www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_143 143 Tire, Standard Workrite Uniform Co n Rud Chain Inc EMS (See ad page 107) CHASSIS Ambulance Braun Northwest Inc Life Line Emergency Vehicles Fire Apparatus American LaFrance LLC n Crimson Fire Inc (See ad page 35) Fire Interface Research Equipment Inc Fort Garry Fire Trucks HME Ahrens-Fox International Truck Engine Corp Kenworth Truck Co n Pierce Manufacturing Inc (See ad page 13) Smeal Fire Apparatus Co n Spartan Chassis Inc (See ad page CV2, 1) CHOCKS Fox International Turtle Plastics CLOTHING, EMERGENCY RESPONDER Chemical-Protective/Haz-Mat Airboss-Defense DQE Inc DuPont EZEM/RSDecon Fyrepel Products Interspiro Lab Safety Supply North Safety Products Ricochet Manufacturing Co Inc Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics Stedfast USA n Trelleborg Viking (See ad page 14) TVI Corp Chemical-Protective/Haz-Mat, Reusable Airboss-Defense n Blauer Manufacturing Co (See ad page 53) Fyrepel Products n Globe CB Ready (See ad page 2, 3) Lion Apparel n Trelleborg Viking (See ad page 14) Cleaning and Rebuilding Services n Globe CARES (See ad page 2, 3) n Globe Manufacturing Co (See ad page 2, 3) Pellerin Milnor Corp National Safety Clean Inc Stevens Fire Chemicals Coveralls Bristol Fire Apparel Inc driFIRE LLC Fyrepel Products Gibson Barnes dba Flight Suits Innotex Inc PGI Inc Pro-Tuff Uniforms Ricochet Manufacturing Co Inc Suits USA Inc Topps Safety Apparel Inc Western Shelter/Crew Boss American Firewear n Blauer Manufacturing Co (See ad page 53) Bristol Fire Apparel Inc Chieftain Safety Manufacturing Dragon Fur Elbeco Inc EZEM/RSDecon Fechheimer Brothers Co Fire-Dex n 5.11 Tactical Series (See ad page 19) Freudenberg Nonwovens LLC Fyrepel Products Gerber Outerwear Gibson Barnes dba Flight Suits n Globe LifeLine (See ad page 2, 3) n Globe Manufacturing Co (See ad page 2, 3) Lion Apparel Morning Pride Manufacturing Pacific Safety Products Inc Pro-Tuff Uniforms Ricochet Manufacturing Co Inc n Southern Mills Inc (See ad page 43) Sperian Fire Stedfast USA Suits USA Inc Topps Safety Apparel Inc Total Fire Group Western Shelter/Crew Boss n WL Gore Associates Inc (See ad page 9) Z-Medica Extrication American Firewear Bristol Fire Apparel Inc Fire-Dex Fyrepel Products Gerber Outerwear Pro-Tuff Uniforms Ricochet Manufacturing Co Inc Southcombe Brothers Ltd Topps Safety Apparel Inc n WL Gore Associates Inc (See ad page 9) Archimedes Products Inc Pellerin Milnor Corp Proximity Fire-Dex Freudenberg Nonwovens LLC Fyrepel Products n Globe Cairns (See ad page 2, 3) n Globe Firefighter Suits (See ad page 2, 3) n Globe Manufacturing Co (See ad page 2, 3) Lion Apparel Morning Pride Manufacturing n PBI Performance Products Inc (See ad page CV4) Quaker Safety Products Corp Total Fire Group Reflective (See ad page 53) Boston Leather Inc Bristol Fire Apparel Inc Repair n Globe CARES (See ad page 2, 3) n Globe Manufacturing Co (See ad page 2, 3) Stationwear n Blauer Manufacturing Co (See ad page 53) Bristol Fire Apparel Inc Dove Designs Dragon Fur driFIRE LLC DuPont Elbeco Inc Fechheimer Brothers Co n 5.11 Tactical Series (See ad page 19) n Globe LifeLine (See ad page 2, 3) LaCrosse Footwear Inc Lighthouse Uniform Co Lion Apparel Pro-Tuff Uniforms Redback USA Topps Safety Apparel Inc TR Designs Inc Western Shelter/Crew Boss Workrite Uniform Co Turnout Gear/Structural In-House Gear Drying System n Blauer Manufacturing Co Elbeco Inc Fechheimer Brothers Co n 5.11 Tactical Series (See ad page 19) Gerber Outerwear n IMS Alliance (See ad page 40) LaCrosse Footwear Inc Majestic Fire Apparel Inc Pacific Safety Products Inc Pro-Tuff Uniforms Tactron Inc Airboss-Defense Basofil Fibers LLC Bristol Fire Apparel Inc Chieftain Safety Manufacturing DuPont Fire-Dex Fire Master Fox International Freudenberg Nonwovens LLC Fyrepel Products n Globe Cairns (See ad page 2, 3) n Globe CB Ready (See ad page 2, 3) n Globe Firefighter Suits (See ad page 2, 3) n Globe Manufacturing Co (See ad page 2, 3) Innotex Inc Lab Safety Supply LaCrosse Footwear Inc Lion Apparel Morning Pride Manufacturing n PBI Performance Products Inc (See ad page CV4) Quaker Safety Products Corp n Quest Enterprises Inc (See ad page 48) Southcombe Brothers Ltd n Southern Mills Inc (See ad page 43) Stedfast USA Total Fire Group FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 143 1/7/09 9:58:52 AM
  • 150. Communications Equipment n WL Gore Associates Inc n US Digital Designs Inc Turnout Gear Storage Antennas Archimedes Products Inc GearGrid Groves Inc Frontline (See ad page 9) Uniforms Boston Leather Inc Bristol Fire Apparel Inc Dove Designs Dragon Fur driFIRE LLC Elbeco Inc n 5.11 Tactical Series (See ad page 19) Gibson Barnes dba Flight Suits Lighthouse Uniform Co Lion Apparel Pro-Tuff Uniforms Suits USA Inc Topps Safety Apparel Inc Workrite Uniform Co USAR Chieftain Safety Manufacturing Dragon Fur DuPont Gerber Outerwear n Globe LifeLine (See ad page 2, 3) n Globe Manufacturing Co (See ad page 2, 3) Lion Apparel Morning Pride Manufacturing n PBI Performance Products Inc (See ad page CV4) Ricochet Manufacturing Co Inc Southcombe Brothers Ltd n Southern Mills Inc (See ad page 43) Total Fire Group n True North Gear (See ad page 100) n WL Gore Associates Inc (See ad page 9) Wildland American Firewear Bristol Fire Apparel Inc Chieftain Safety Manufacturing Dragon Fur DuPont Fire-Dex Freudenberg Nonwovens LLC Lab Safety Supply Majestic Fire Apparel Inc Morning Pride Manufacturing PGI Inc Pro-Tuff Uniforms Southcombe Brothers Ltd Topps Safety Apparel Inc Total Fire Group n True North Gear (See ad page 100) Western Shelter/Crew Boss WILDFIRE COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT After-Market Replacement Products Cobalt Audio Video Comtronics Inc Announcers, Alarm First-In by Westnet NOTIFIER Silent Knight (See ad page 103) Audio Components Cobalt Audio Video Comtronics Inc Safety Vision n US Digital Designs Inc (See ad page 103) Call-Monitoring Systems Digitize Inc iamresponding.com NICE Systems Omnicron Electronics Silent Knight Confined Space Rescue CON-SPACE Communications Ltd n Firecom (See ad page 61) MSA Pigeon Mountain Industries Inc Rescue Technology n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) n Search Systems Inc (See ad page 7) Hospital/EMS Dispatch Console Digitech Computer Inc Integrated CAD and RMS Alpine Software Corp/RedAlert Astra Software Corp Emergency Reporting ESRI FDM Software Ltd n FirePrograms Software (See ad page 57) n US Digital Designs Inc (See ad page 103) Vernon Software Systems Inc Intercoms Digitech Computer Inc Digitize Inc Safety Vision Cobalt Audio Video Comtronics Inc CON-SPACE Communications Ltd David Clark Co Inc Federal Signal Corp n Firecom (See ad page 61) Fire Research Corp n Quala-Tel Communications (See ad page 108) Setcom Corp n Sigtronics Corp (See ad page 49) Dispatch Systems/Equipment Microphones Crime Analysis ESRI Global Software Corp Data Warehousing First Responder Systems Technology Inspironix Inc Digital Imaging Digitech Computer Inc DW Digital Wireless Inc FDM Software Ltd n FirePrograms Software (See ad page 57) First Responder Systems Technology Global Software Corp n Locution Systems Inc (See ad page 51) M/A-Com Inc Mentor Engineering Inc Motorola Inc Omnicron Electronics Setcom Corp n US Digital Designs Inc (See ad page 103) Vernon Software Systems Inc n ZOLL Data Systems (See ad page 27) Handheld Radios Hammerhead Industries Inc Kenwood USA Corp M/A-Com Inc Motorola Inc Special Electronics Designs Inc Tait Radio Communications Headsets Alliance Fire and Rescue Cobalt Audio Video Comtronics Inc CON-SPACE Communications Ltd David Clark Co Inc n Firecom (See ad page 61) 144 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_144 144 Gibson Barnes dba Flight Suits M/A-Com Inc OTTO Pacific Helmets/Alliance Fire and Rescue ProComm Americas Ltd n Quala-Tel Communications (See ad page 108) n Search Systems Inc (See ad page 7) Setcom Corp n Sigtronics Corp (See ad page 49) Cobalt Audio Video Comtronics Inc CON-SPACE Communications Ltd David Clark Co Inc Hammerhead Industries Inc Omnicron Electronics OTTO ProComm Americas Ltd Star Headlight Lantern Co Inc Mobile Data Terminals/Systems AMREL (American Reliance Inc) Astra Software Corp Digitech Computer Inc Digitize Inc DW Digital Wireless Inc Emergency Film Group Emergency Technologies Inc Frontline Global Software Corp iamresponding.com M/A-Com Inc Mentor Engineering Inc Motorola Inc Mountain Fire Technologies Panasonic Computer Solutions Co Raytheon JPS Communications Safety Vision Salamander Technologies Inc Tait Radio Communications Tripod Data Systems Mounting Brackets Havis-Shields Equipment Corp Star Headlight Lantern Co Inc Notification Receivers and Encoders Dayton Industrial Corp Digitize Inc First-In by Westnet Futurecom Systems Group Inc Silent Knight n US Digital Designs Inc (See ad page 103) Pagers Comtronics Inc Digital Paging Co Tait Radio Communications the911shop.com US Alert LLC Radio Interoperability Devices Digitize Inc First Responder Systems Technology Frontline Futurecom Systems Group Inc n Grace Industries Inc (See ad page 32) M/A-Com Inc Motorola Inc n Quala-Tel Communications (See ad page 108) Raytheon JPS Communications Special Electronics Designs Inc Radio Parts and Accessories Comtronics Inc CON-SPACE Communications Ltd Futurecom Systems Group Inc Havis-Shields Equipment Corp M/A-Com Inc OTTO n Quala-Tel Communications (See ad page 108) Radios Dayton Industrial Corp Kenwood USA Corp M/A-Com Inc Motorola Inc Raytheon JPS Communications Relm Wireless Corp Special Electronics Designs Inc Tait Radio Communications Radios, Apparatus-Mounted Frontline Kenwood USA Corp Motorola Inc Recorders NICE Systems Omnicron Electronics PRO-VISION Video Systems Regional Information Sharing Emergency Technologies Inc ERT Systems LLC First Responder Systems Technology Global Software Corp Mountain Fire Technologies Remote Communications Device with Printer Digitize Inc n US Digital Designs Inc (See ad page 103) Satellite Communications Systems Frontline Mentor Engineering Inc SCBA, Mounted Avon-ISI Comtronics Inc www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:58:52 AM
  • 151. Detectors/Extinguishing Systems n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) Interspiro MSA n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) Speakers Code 3 Inc ProComm Americas Ltd Star Headlight Lantern Co Inc Telemetry Equipment Avon-ISI Cardionics Inc n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) DW Digital Wireless Inc n E2V Technologies Inc (See ad page 86) n Grace Industries Inc (See ad page 32) M/A-Com Inc Mentor Engineering Inc Transceivers Futurecom Systems Group Inc Tait Radio Communications Underwater Dive Rescue International Vehicular Intercom Systems Comtronics Inc David Clark Co Inc Futurecom Systems Group Inc n Quala-Tel Communications (See ad page 108) Setcom Corp n Sigtronics Corp (See ad page 49) Voice-Alerting Systems (Automated) Digitize Inc First-In by Westnet Gamewell-FCI n Locution Systems Inc (See ad page 51) Silent Knight n US Digital Designs Inc (See ad page 103) Wireless Data Equipment Digital Paging Co Digitize Inc DW Digital Wireless Inc Emergency Technologies Inc ERT Systems LLC Futurecom Systems Group Inc M/A-Com Inc Mentor Engineering Inc Motorola Inc Panasonic Computer Solutions Co Raytheon JPS Communications Safety Vision Salamander Technologies Inc Tripod Data Systems Vernon Software Systems Inc Wireless Mobile Applications Astra Software Corp Comtronics Inc Digitize Inc DW Digital Wireless Inc Emergency Technologies Inc ESRI First Responder Systems Technology Futurecom Systems Group Inc Global Software Corp www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_145 145 n Grace Industries Inc (See ad page 32) n Informed Publishing (See ad page 50) Kenwood USA Corp M/A-Com Inc Mapping Solutions Inc Mentor Engineering Inc Motorola Inc Panasonic Computer Solutions Co Safety Vision Tripod Data Systems Vernon Software Systems Inc n ZOLL Data Systems (See ad page 27) COMPUTERS/SOFTWARE Billing Software Emergency Reporting n FirePrograms Software (See ad page 57) n ZOLL Data Systems (See ad page 27) Counterterrorism Software Action Training Systems Inc AristaTek Defense Group Inc-COBRA Software ESRI Fieldsoft Inc First Responder Systems Technology Hazguide Software Solutions LLC Vernon Software Systems Inc Dispatching Alpine Software Corp/RedAlert Astra Software Corp Digitech Computer Inc Digitize Inc Emergency Reporting EMS Manager FDM Software Ltd n FirePrograms Software (See ad page 57) Global Software Corp n Locution Systems Inc (See ad page 51) Mentor Engineering Inc Motorola Inc n US Digital Designs Inc (See ad page 103) Vernon Software Systems Inc n ZOLL Data Systems (See ad page 27) Hardware AMREL (American Reliance Inc) Astra Software Corp Defense Group Inc-COBRA Software DW Digital Wireless Inc Emergency Film Group ESRI Global Software Corp Mapping Solutions Inc Mentor Engineering Inc Panasonic Computer Solutions Co Salamander Technologies Inc Simfx Emergency Management Simulation Tripod Data Systems n US Digital Designs Inc (See ad page 103) IFSTA Reference Multiple-Choice Tests Action Training Systems Inc Fire Fighter Exam PC Turnkey Systems Lab Safety Supply Life Safety Systems Inc MSA n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) Torfino Enterprises Inc Zistos Corp Astra Software Corp Emergency Reporting Emergency Technologies Inc Image Trend Inc Mountain Fire Technologies NOTIFIER Software - IBM PC Compatible Action Training Systems Inc Alpine Software Corp/RedAlert AristaTek Astra Software Corp Card Imaging Clayton I D S Columbia Weather Systems Inc Defense Group Inc-COBRA Software Digitech Computer Inc Emergency Reporting Emergency Technologies Inc EMS Manager ESRI FDM Software Ltd n FirePrograms Software (See ad page 57) First Responder Systems Technology Hazguide Software Solutions LLC Image Trend Inc n Informed Publishing (See ad page 50) Inspironix Inc Mentor Engineering Inc Salamander Technologies Inc Sim Ops Studios Simulation Research Corp Tripod Data Systems n ZOLL Data Systems (See ad page 27) Software - Macintosh Compatible Digitech Computer Inc Emergency Reporting EMS Manager COOLING EQUIPMENT/SYSTEMS Fans, Accessories Mermaid Manufacturing n Super Vacuum Manufacturing Co Inc (See ad page 70) Fans, Circulation EURAMCO Safety n Super Vacuum Manufacturing Co Inc (See ad page 70) Fans, Misting EURAMCO Safety J Neils Enterprises Inc/VENTRY Fans n Shafer Enterprises LLC / Cool Shirt (See ad page 68) n Super Vacuum Manufacturing Co Inc (See ad page 70) COUNTERTERRORISM Bags for Contaminated Clothing, Evidence Reeves EMS LLC Detection Equipment Ahura Scientific Inc Berkeley Nucleonics n BW Technologies by Honeywell-America (See ad page 45) n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) ICX Agentase Idaho Technology Inc ITT Night Vision Disaster Lighting Package J Neils Enterprises Inc/VENTRY Fans Life Safety Systems Inc NBC Decontamination Equipment Base-X Inc n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) EZEM/RSDecon ICX Agentase Lab Safety Supply Life Safety Systems Inc Nor E First Response Inc Reeves EMS LLC Protective Clothing Chieftain Safety Manufacturing n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) Interspiro Life Safety Systems Inc Southcombe Brothers Ltd n WL Gore Associates Inc (See ad page 9) Protective Equipment n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) EZEM/RSDecon n Grace Industries Inc (See ad page 32) Life Safety Systems Inc n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) S E International Inc Structural Composites Industries (SCI) Specialty Vehicles Dodgen Mobile Technologies EXCELLANCE INC Life Safety Systems Inc Mobile Concepts by Scotty Odyssey Automotive Specialty Inc DETECTORS/EXTINGUISHING SYSTEMS AC Voltage Hansen Fire Safety Storm King Mountain Technologies Inc Calibration Gas GfG Instrumentation Inc n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) Carbon Monoxide 3M Bascom-Turner Instruments n BW Technologies by Honeywell-America (See ad page 45) n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) Fox International Gamewell-FCI GfG Instrumentation Inc Hansen Fire Safety Industrial Scientific Corp J and N Enterprises Inc Morphix Technologies RAE Systems FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 145 1/7/09 9:58:53 AM
  • 152. Diesel n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) Fixed Gas Detection Systems 3M n BW Technologies by Honeywell-America (See ad page 45) n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) GfG Instrumentation Inc Industrial Scientific Corp NOTIFIER RAE Systems n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) Zellweger Analytics Flame GreCon Inc n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) Gas Bascom-Turner Instruments n BW Technologies by Honeywell-America (See ad page 45) n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) Gamewell-FCI GfG Instrumentation Inc Industrial Scientific Corp J and N Enterprises Inc Morphix Technologies Photovac Inc RAE Systems n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) Gas and Vapor Tubes n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) J and N Enterprises Inc RAE Systems n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) Gas, Open Path n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) Heat Gamewell-FCI GreCon Inc n ISG Thermal Systems USA Inc (See ad page 65) NOTIFIER n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) Infrared n BW Technologies by Honeywell-America (See ad page 45) GfG Instrumentation Inc GreCon Inc Hansen Fire Safety Industrial Scientific Corp n ISG Thermal Systems USA Inc (See ad page 65) n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) Leak Detection 3M Bascom-Turner Instruments n BW Technologies by Honeywell-America (See ad page 45) GfG Instrumentation Inc Industrial Scientific Corp J and N Enterprises Inc Morphix Technologies Photovac Inc RAE Systems n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) Sierra Instruments Inc NBC Detection Ahura Scientific Inc Alexeter Technologies n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) ICX Agentase Idaho Technology Inc Lab Safety Supply Response Biomedical Corp Portable Gas Detection Instruments 3M Bascom-Turner Instruments n BW Technologies by Honeywell-America (See ad page 45) n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) GfG Instrumentation Inc n Grace Industries Inc (See ad page 32) Industrial Scientific Corp Pelsue Co Photovac Inc RAE Systems RKI Instruments Inc n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) n Smiths Detection (See ad page CV3) Zellweger Analytics Radiation Detector Berkeley Nucleonics S E International Inc Head Lamps The Blackjack Foxfury Personal Lighting Solutions Pelican Products Inc Life Jackets, Inflatable Dive Rescue International Lifeguard Systems Inc Rescue Technology Stearns Inc DOORS, APPARATUS Compartment Austin Hardware Supply Inc R-O-M Corp Dump Valves AH Stock Manufacturing Corp n Ziamatic Corp (See ad page 75) Hardware and Latches AMDOR Inc AS America Austin Hardware Supply Inc Hansen International Moore Industrial Hardware Rollup AA Manufacturing Co Inc AS America Austin Hardware Supply Inc Hansen International R-O-M Corp ELECTRICAL ACCESSORIES Apparatus Circle D Lights Cole Hersee Co ECX Engineering Corp GFCIs Smoke Power Electronic Systems Inc Gamewell-FCI NOTIFIER n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) Silent Knight Quick Connect/Disconnect Spark Detection/Extinguishing Systems BlazeMaster Fire Sprinkler Systems GreCon Inc Testers Industrial Scientific Corp Morphix Technologies DIESEL Engines Caterpillar Inc Cummins Inc Detroit Diesel Corp SEI Industries Ltd Generators Cummins Inc SEI Industries Ltd TVI Corp DIVE/RESCUE EQUIPMENT Flashlights The Blackjack Dive Rescue International n 5.11 Tactical Series (See ad page 19) Lifeguard Systems Inc 146 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_146 146 MERET Pelican Products Inc Underwater Kinetics Cole Hersee Co n Kussmaul Electronics Co Inc (See ad page 48) Waterproof Plugs and Cords Circle D Lights Cole Hersee Co Hansen Fire Safety EMERGENCY MEDICAL SUPPLIES Ambulance Supplies Biomedix Inc BurnFree Products David Clark Co Inc n Disaster Response Solutions Inc (See ad page 74) n Emergent Respiratory Products Inc (See ad page 98) EMS Innovations Inc Firehouse Medical Inc Mermaid Manufacturing Persys Medical Aspirators Data Management Products Clayton I D S ESRI n FirePrograms Software (See ad page 57) n Informed Publishing (See ad page 50) Inspironix Inc Mentor Engineering Inc VIDEX Inc Defibrillators n Physio-Control (See ad page 23) TMS Medical Technologies ZOLL Medical Corp Diagnostic Tools Persys Medical The Reeves Group Smiths Medical PM Inc Electrodes, Disposable n Physio-Control (See ad page 23) ZOLL Medical Corp First Aid Equipment/Supplies American Safety Health Institute (ASHI) BurnFree Products Cetacea Corp Conterra Inc Dragon Fur EMS Innovations Inc Firehouse Medical Inc HARPER Rescue Pack Junkin Safety Appliance Co Morrison Medical North Safety Products Persys Medical The Reeves Group Royal Case Co UO Equipment Co WATER-JEL Technologies Z-Medica Immediate Response Kits American Safety Health Institute (ASHI) Base-X Inc BurnFree Products EMS Innovations Inc EZEM/RSDecon Glas-Master/Wehr Engineering HARPER Rescue Pack MERET Meridian Medical Technologies Inc Persys Medical The Reeves Group UO Equipment Co WATER-JEL Technologies Z-Medica Immobilization Equipment EMS Innovations Inc Firehouse Medical Inc Laerdal Medical Corp Life Support Products/Allied Healthcare Products Inc Morrison Medical Reeves EMS LLC The Reeves Group Life Support Products/Allied Healthcare Products Inc UO Equipment Co Israeli Bandages Climate Controlled Rx Cabinets Medications Danhard Inc Mermaid Manufacturing Persys Medical The Reeves Group Meridian Medical Technologies Inc www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:58:54 AM
  • 153. Extinguishing Agents/ Equipment Oxygen Cylinder Flotec Inc Life Support Products/Allied Healthcare Products Inc Luxfer Gas Cylinders MERET Oxygen Generating Systems International (OGSI) Royal Case Co UO Equipment Co Oxygen Delivery Systems n Emergent Respiratory Products Inc (See ad page 98) Oxygen Systems Brackets MERET Oxygen Generating Systems International (OGSI) Sensible Products Patient Assessment Guides n FirePrograms Software (See ad page 57) n IMS Alliance (See ad page 40) Patient Removal Devices Firehouse Medical Inc Morrison Medical The Reeves Group n IMS Alliance (See ad page 40) n Informed Publishing (See ad page 50) Laerdal Medical Corp Mobile Concepts by Scotty Simulaids Inc EXERCISE EQUIPMENT EZEM/RSDecon Hypres Equipment International Fitness Testing SportsArt Fitness EXHAUST REMOVAL SYSTEMS Apparatus Mounted n Air Vacuum Corp Ferno Firehouse Medical Inc Morrison Medical Stretchers EMS Innovations Inc Ferno Firehouse Medical Inc Life Star Rescue Inc Morrison Medical Reeves EMS LLC The Reeves Group Stryker Suction System Laerdal Medical Corp Life Support Products/Allied Healthcare Products Inc SSCOR Inc Westmed Inc Tool Carrying Pockets n 5.11 Tactical Series (See ad page 19) HARPER Rescue Pack Training Aids American Safety Health Institute (ASHI) Cardionics Inc Emergency Books and Training Inc EZEM/RSDecon Fire Fighter Exam Firehouse Medical Inc Galen Press Ltd ICS Toolbox LLC www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_147 147 Wheeled Units, Carbon Dioxide n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) Ansul Inc n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) AFFF Ansul Inc n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) National Foam Inc (Kidde Fire Fighting) US Foam Technologies Diesel n CET Fire Pumps Manufacturing Air HAWK Air Purification Systems n Air Vacuum Corp (See ad page 78) ARI-HETRA (Automotive Resources Inc) MagneGrip Nederman Inc n PlymoVent Corp (See ad page 104) n Ward Diesel Filter Systems (See ad insert) Station Mounted Air HAWK Air Purification Systems n Air Vacuum Corp (See ad page 78) ARI-HETRA (Automotive Resources Inc) Inger Dog Inc MagneGrip Nederman Inc n PlymoVent Corp (See ad page 104) EXTINGUISHERS Brackets and Storage Cabinets Flamefighter Corp n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) Sensible Products Carbon Dioxide Ansul Inc n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) Dry Chemical Ansul Inc n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) US Foam Technologies Foam n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Intelagard Inc n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) US Foam Technologies Fluorprotein (See ad page 62) National Foam Inc (Kidde Fire Fighting) Foam-Proportioning Equipment EXTINGUISHING AGENTS/ EQUIPMENT n Williams Fire Hazard Control Inc n Emergent Respiratory Products Inc Splints National Foam Inc (Kidde Fire Fighting) Task Force Tips Inc (See ad page 78) MagneGrip n PlymoVent Corp (See ad page 104) n Ward Diesel Filter Systems (See ad insert) Resuscitators (See ad page 98) Firehouse Medical Inc Laerdal Medical Corp Life Support Products/Allied Healthcare Products Inc n Physio-Control (See ad page 23) UO Equipment Co Westmed Inc Water n Kidde Fire Fighting AR-AFF US Foam Technologies (See ad page 80) CAFS (See ad page 82) n WS Darley Co Ansul Inc CAT PUMPS-High Pressure Pumps Systems n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) n FoamPro (See ad page 36) n Hale Products Inc (See ad page 41) n Pierce Manufacturing Inc (See ad page 13) Robwen Inc Task Force Tips Inc n Waterous Co (See ad page 25) n Williams Fire Hazard Control Inc (See ad page 80) Gel (See ad page 31) Firematic International n Hale Products Inc (See ad page 41) Montana Fire Works n Pierce Manufacturing Inc (See ad page 13) Snap-Tite Hose Inc US Foam Technologies n Waterous Co (See ad page 25) Barricade International Inc n Phos-chek (ICL Performance Products) (See ad page 90) High-Expansion Foam Ansul Inc n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) National Foam Inc (Kidde Fire Fighting) Spumifer American Co Class A Foams Feecon (Kidde Fire Fighting) Hazard Control Technologies Inc n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) National Foam Inc (Kidde Fire Fighting) Multipurpose (Alcohol-Resistant) Foam n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) National Foam Inc (Kidde Fire Fighting) Spumifer American Co Nozzles, Air-Aspirating Foam n Phos-chek (ICL Performance Products) (See ad page 90) US Foam Technologies n Williams Fire Hazard Control Inc (See ad page 80) Class AB Hazard Control Technologies Inc US Foam Technologies Class B Foams n Elkhart Brass CAT PUMPS-High Pressure Pumps Systems n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Feecon (Kidde Fire Fighting) n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) National Foam Inc (Kidde Fire Fighting) POK of North America Inc Spumifer American Co Task Force Tips Inc n Williams Fire Hazard Control Inc (See ad page 80) Positive-Pressure Foam Injection (See ad page 15) Feecon (Kidde Fire Fighting) n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) National Foam Inc (Kidde Fire Fighting) US Foam Technologies n Williams Fire Hazard Control Inc (See ad page 80) CAT PUMPS-High Pressure Pumps Systems n FoamPro (See ad page 36) National Foam Inc (Kidde Fire Fighting) Eductors (See ad page 15) Feecon (Kidde Fire Fighting) n FoamPro (See ad page 36) n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) Montana Fire Works National Foam Inc (Kidde Fire Fighting) Barricade International Inc n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Feecon (Kidde Fire Fighting) Halcyon Products Inc n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) Proportioners Ansul Inc n Elkhart Brass FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 147 1/7/09 9:58:57 AM
  • 154. Extinguishing Systems Robwen Inc Spumifer American Co n Waterous Co (See ad page 25) Protein Foam n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) National Foam Inc (Kidde Fire Fighting) Structural Firefighting Foams EYEWEAR Accessories Allegro Industries Checkers Industrial Products Inc DE Williams Shields n ESS/Eye Safety Systems Inc (See ad page 67) n 5.11 Tactical Series (See ad page 19) Royal Case Co SM Smith Co Sperian Fire Protective n Phos-chek (ICL Performance Products) (See ad page 90) Tanks, Foam-Holding Hazard Control Technologies Inc n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) National Foam Inc (Kidde Fire Fighting) Structural Composites Industries (SCI) n United Plastic Fabricating Inc (See ad page 58) Trailers n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) National Foam Inc (Kidde Fire Fighting) Surrey Fire Safety House n United Plastic Fabricating Inc (See ad page 58) n ESS/Eye Safety Systems Inc (See ad page 67) Milwaukee Electric Tool Corp North Safety Products Paulson Manufacturing Corp Stihl FABRICS Aluminized n PBI Performance Products Inc (See ad page CV4) Chemical, Protective DuPont n WL Gore Associates Inc (See ad page 9) Coveralls n Elkhart Brass Freudenberg Nonwovens LLC Gemtor Inc Gibson Barnes dba Flight Suits Pacific Safety Products Inc n PGI/Difco Performance Fabrics Inc (See ad page 89) n Phos-chek (ICL Performance EMS Training Foam (See ad page 15) Products) (See ad page 90) Stevens Fire Chemicals WINSOL Laboratories Units/Generators Feecon (Kidde Fire Fighting) National Foam Inc (Kidde Fire Fighting) n Super Vacuum Manufacturing Co Inc (See ad page 70) Wetting Agents Ansul Inc n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) National Foam Inc (Kidde Fire Fighting) Petro-Green Inc n Phos-chek (ICL Performance Products) (See ad page 90) Stevens Fire Chemicals WINSOL Laboratories Wildland/Urban CAT PUMPS-High Pressure Pumps Systems Montana Fire Works n Phos-chek (ICL Performance Products) (See ad page 90) Spumifer American Co EXTINGUISHING SYSTEMS Carbon Dioxide Ansul Inc Wheeled Units American Pacific Corp Ansul Inc n Williams Fire Hazard Control Inc (See ad page 80) n Blauer Manufacturing Co (See ad page 53) Fechheimer Brothers Co Freudenberg Nonwovens LLC Gibson Barnes dba Flight Suits Pacific Safety Products Inc n PGI/Difco Performance Fabrics Inc (See ad page 89) n WL Gore Associates Inc (See ad page 9) Fire-Resistant n Blauer Manufacturing Co (See ad page 53) driFIRE LLC Fechheimer Brothers Co Freudenberg Nonwovens LLC Gibson Barnes dba Flight Suits Majestic Fire Apparel Inc n PBI Performance Products Inc (See ad page CV4) n PGI/Difco Performance Fabrics Inc (See ad page 89) Royal Case Co Safety Components Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics n WL Gore Associates Inc (See ad page 9) Moisture Barrier n Blauer Manufacturing Co (See ad page 53) driFIRE LLC Freudenberg Nonwovens LLC n PGI/Difco Performance Fabrics Inc (See ad page 89) n Southern Mills Inc (See ad page 43) n WL Gore Associates Inc (See ad page 9) 148 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_148 148 Outer Shell Chemicals, Cleaners n Blauer Manufacturing Co Flame Shield Consulting Flitz International LTD Inca Gold Products LLC National Safety Clean Inc Petro-Green Inc (See ad page 53) n PBI Performance Products Inc (See ad page CV4) n PGI/Difco Performance Fabrics Inc (See ad page 89) Safety Components Permeable n WL Gore Associates Inc (See ad page 9) Reflective Trim 3M Visibility and Insulation Solutions Reflexite Americas Stationwear Dove Designs driFIRE LLC n PGI/Difco Performance Fabrics Inc (See ad page 89) Thermal Liner driFIRE LLC Freudenberg Nonwovens LLC Majestic Fire Apparel Inc n PGI/Difco Performance Fabrics Inc (See ad page 89) Safety Components Turnouts Freudenberg Nonwovens LLC n PBI Performance Products Inc (See ad page CV4) n PGI/Difco Performance Fabrics Inc (See ad page 89) Safety Components n Southern Mills Inc (See ad page 43) Wildlands n PBI Performance Products Inc (See ad page CV4) n PGI/Difco Performance Fabrics Inc (See ad page 89) n Southern Mills Inc (See ad page 43) FIBERS Fire-Resistant Basofil Fibers LLC driFIRE LLC DuPont Gibson Barnes dba Flight Suits Lenzing/Ivodex n PBI Performance Products Inc (See ad page CV4) n PGI/Difco Performance Fabrics Inc (See ad page 89) FIRE STATION SUPPLIES Brackets, Mountings for Fittings, Adapters, Tools n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Performance Advantage Co Sensible Products Zephyr Industries Inc n Ziamatic Corp (See ad page 75) Cabinets and Lockers n Gearmasters (Witmer Public Safety Group Inc) (See ad page 18, 87) n Salsbury Industries - Lockers.com (See ad page 94) Coat Racks n Gearmasters (Witmer Public Safety Group Inc) (See ad page 18, 87) Deodorizers Inca Gold Products LLC Stevens Fire Chemicals WINSOL Laboratories Disinfectants National Safety Clean Inc WINSOL Laboratories Doors/Accessories AMDOR Inc Moore Industrial Hardware VIDEX Inc Dryers American Airworks Maytag Commerical Laundry Pellerin Milnor Corp Unimac Williams Direct Dryers Furniture All A Board Inc Gear Hangers and Dryers Fire Research Corp GearGrid n Gearmasters (Witmer Public Safety Group Inc) (See ad page 18, 87) Groves Inc Pellerin Milnor Corp Ram Air Gear Dryer Heaters Roberts-Gordon Schaefer Ventilation Equipment Lighting Circle D Lights n Locution Systems Inc (See ad page 51) Smoke Odor Eliminators Stevens Fire Chemicals Storage Racks/Gear Systems GearGrid n Gearmasters (Witmer Public Safety Group Inc) (See ad page 18, 87) Groves Inc Sico America Inc Washing Machines Continental Girbau Inc Maytag Commerical Laundry Pellerin Milnor Corp Unimac FLOORING Compartment Durable Corp Dur-A-Flex Inc Turtle Plastics Station/Engine Bay Durable Corp Dur-A-Flex Inc Turtle Plastics www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:58:57 AM
  • 155. Hand Tools FLOWMETERS Flotec Inc Sierra Instruments Inc Speedtech Instruments FOOTWEAR EMS Airboss-Defense n 5.11 Tactical Series (See ad page 19) n Globe FootGear (See ad page 2, 3) n Globe Manufacturing Co (See ad page 2, 3) Haix North America Inc LaCrosse Footwear Inc PRO-Warrington Footwear Ranger Footwear Servus Footwear Thorogood Shoes by Weinbrenner n WL Gore Associates Inc (See ad page 9) Haz-Mat Airboss-Defense PRO-Warrington Footwear Ranger Footwear Servus Footwear Thorogood Shoes by Weinbrenner Structural Firefighting Airboss-Defense n Black Diamond (See ad page 92) n Globe FootGear (See ad page 2, 3) n Globe Manufacturing Co (See ad page 2, 3) Haix North America Inc LaCrosse Footwear Inc PRO-Warrington Footwear Ranger Footwear Servus Footwear Stedfast USA Thorogood Shoes by Weinbrenner Total Fire Group Vibram n WL Gore Associates Inc (See ad page 9) Wildland Firefighting n Black Diamond (See ad page 92) Haix North America Inc LaCrosse Footwear Inc PRO-Warrington Footwear Ranger Footwear Servus Footwear Thorogood Shoes by Weinbrenner Total Fire Group Vibram FUNDRAISING PROGRAMS Bullard Fire Fighter Exam Municipal Marketing Services Turtle Plastics GAUGES Flow Sierra Instruments Inc Pressure n Class 1 (See ad page 41) ECX Engineering Corp Fire Research Corp Innovative Controls Inc Thuemling Instrument Testing n Class 1 (See ad page 41) Thuemling Instrument GENERATORS, DIESEL Stationary ARI-HETRA (Automotive Resources Inc) n CE Niehoff Co (See ad page 112) Onan - Cummins Onan Generators n Tele-Lite Inc (See ad page 107) XRT Power Systems Truck Mounted Krammes Kustom Body Onan - Cummins Onan Generators Stadco Products XRT Power Systems GENERATORS, ELECTRIC Portable Akron Brass Co Base-X Inc n CE Niehoff Co (See ad page 112) Fabco Power J Neils Enterprises Inc/VENTRY Fans Onan - Cummins Onan Generators n Tele-Lite Inc (See ad page 107) XRT Power Systems Stationary Onan - Cummins Onan Generators XRT Power Systems Truck Mounted Fabco Power Onan - Cummins Onan Generators Raven Technology n Tele-Lite Inc (See ad page 107) XRT Power Systems GENERATORS, GASOLINE Portable Onan - Cummins Onan Generators Tempest Technology Inc GENERATORS, HYDRAULIC Portable 0901FE_149 149 Firefighting Alliance Fire and Rescue American Firewear Basofil Fibers LLC Fire-Dex Hansen Fire Safety Knoxville Glove Co Lab Safety Supply Morning Pride Manufacturing Pacific Helmets/Alliance Fire and Rescue Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics Southcombe Brothers Ltd Tempo Glove Manufacturing Inc Total Fire Group n WL Gore Associates Inc (See ad page 9) Hazardous Materials Airboss-Defense North Safety Products Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics Southcombe Brothers Ltd n Trelleborg Viking (See ad page 14) Latex FirstLine LLC QRP Gloves Inc Liners FirstLine LLC Knoxville Glove Co Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics Tempo Glove Manufacturing Inc Nitrile Airboss-Defense Alliance Fire and Rescue FirstLine LLC Pacific Helmets/Alliance Fire and Rescue QRP Gloves Inc Ringers Gloves Proximity American Firewear Knoxville Glove Co Morning Pride Manufacturing Total Fire Group n CMC Rescue Inc ARI-HETRA (Automotive Resources Inc) Fabco Power Harrison Hydra-Gen LTD Hart-A-Gen Systems Inc Liquid Level www.FireEngineering.com Flitz International LTD Stationary ARI-HETRA (Automotive Resources Inc) Fabco Power Harrison Hydra-Gen LTD Hart-A-Gen Systems Inc Krammes Kustom Body Onan - Cummins Onan Generators XRT Power Systems (See ad page 41) Innovative Controls Inc Automotive American Firewear Basofil Fibers LLC Hansen Fire Safety Knoxville Glove Co Ringers Gloves Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics Southcombe Brothers Ltd Tempo Glove Manufacturing Inc Valeo n WL Gore Associates Inc (See ad page 9) Axes Akron Brass Co Council Tool Co Fire Hooks Unlimited Inc Firemark Tool Co Inc Flamefighter Corp Liberty Art Works Inc Moore Industrial Hardware Nupla Corp n Paratech Inc (See ad page 21) Forcible Entry Tools BKA n Champion Rescue Tools (See ad page 17) Council Tool Co Cutters Edge n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Fascut Industries Inc Fire Hooks Unlimited Inc Firemark Tool Co Inc Genesis Rescue Systems/American Rescue Technology Inc Glas-Master/Wehr Engineering My Channellock Tools Nupla Corp Ogura HyPower Corp n Paratech Inc (See ad page 21) Power Jamb LLC SJ Forcible Entry Training Station (FETS) Stanley Tools Team Equipment Tico Titanium Inc n Ziamatic Corp (See ad page 75) Gas Powered Cutters Edge Mounting Brackets End of the Road Inc Performance Advantage Co Sensible Products Zephyr Industries Inc Pike Poles Akron Brass Co Firemark Tool Co Inc Flamefighter Corp Liberty Art Works Inc Moore Industrial Hardware Nupla Corp Wrenches BKA Rescue Truck Mounted n Class 1 HAND TOOLS Extrication Fabco Power Stanley Hydraulic Tools n Class 1 (See ad page 41) Fire Research Corp Sierra Instruments Inc GLOVES n Elkhart Brass American Firewear (See ad page 69) Knoxville Glove Co Morning Pride Manufacturing Pigeon Mountain Industries Inc Ringers Gloves Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics Southcombe Brothers Ltd Tempo Glove Manufacturing Inc Total Fire Group Valeo n WL Gore Associates Inc (See ad page 9) (See ad page 15) Firemark Tool Co Inc Hansen Fire Safety n Harrington Inc (See ad page 83) n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) My Channellock Tools Red Head Brass LLC Task Force Tips Inc Zephyr Industries Inc FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 149 1/7/09 9:58:58 AM
  • 156. Hazardous Materials Products/Services HAZARDOUS MATERIALS PRODUCTS/SERVICES Western Shelter/Crew Boss ZUMRO Inc n Scott Health Safety TVI Corp Western Shelter/Crew Boss (See ad page 39) S E International Inc Storm King Mountain Technologies Inc HEATING PROTECTION n Fol-Da-Tank Co Cleaning Service and Supplies for Contaminated Gear Portable Decon Systems (Berms, Tanks, Hoops) HELMETS n Husky Portable Containment n Holmatro Inc Inflatable Decon Shelters/Equipment Andax Industries LLC Base-X Inc DQE Inc n Fol-Da-Tank Co (See ad page 38, 76) FSI North America n Husky Portable Containment (See ad page 64) MITI Manufacturing Company Inc Western Shelter/Crew Boss ZUMRO Inc Absorbents Andax Industries LLC EZEM/RSDecon (See ad page 5) National Safety Clean Inc Petro-Green Inc WINSOL Laboratories Containment and Leak Plugging Supplies Edwards Cromwell Spill Control n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) n Paratech Inc (See ad page 21) Vetter GmbH Western Region Sales Service ZUMRO Inc Decon Apparatus/Trailers Andax Industries LLC n Disaster Response Solutions Inc (See ad page 74) EMS Innovations Inc Nor E First Response Inc SEI Industries Ltd ZUMRO Inc Decon Lighting/Heating Units Andax Industries LLC Base-X Inc DQE Inc Hazmatshower.com TVI Corp Decon Stretchers Andax Industries LLC Reeves EMS LLC TVI Corp Decon Stations, Portable Andax Industries LLC DQE Inc FSI North America Hazmatshower.com n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) n Husky Portable Containment (See ad page 64) MITI Manufacturing Company Inc Vetter GmbH Western Region Sales Service Western Shelter/Crew Boss ZUMRO Inc Decon Tents, Rigid and Inflatable Base-X Inc EMS Innovations Inc FSI North America Life Safety Systems Inc MITI Manufacturing Company Inc Nor E First Response Inc Pelsue Co Vetter GmbH Western Region Sales Service Western Shelter/Crew Boss ZUMRO Inc Decon Water Heaters/Injectors and Related Equipment FSI North America Hazmatshower.com Reeves EMS LLC TVI Corp Drive-Through Containment Systems (See ad page 38, 76) (See ad page 64) EMS Innovations Inc FSI North America Hazmatshower.com n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) MITI Manufacturing Company Inc SEI Industries Ltd n Super Vacuum Manufacturing Co Inc (See ad page 70) Vetter GmbH Western Region Sales Service ZUMRO Inc Kits, Chemical Spill-Control Andax Industries LLC n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) Edwards Cromwell Spill Control Medprotect Inc MITI Manufacturing Company Inc Petro-Green Inc Kits, Safety Tool n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) Edwards Cromwell Spill Control Mass Decon Systems, Portable Andax Industries LLC n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) EZEM/RSDecon FSI North America Hazmatshower.com Nor E First Response Inc Reeves EMS LLC SEI Industries Ltd SM Smith Co TVI Corp ZUMRO Inc Oil-Containment Berms n Fol-Da-Tank Co (See ad page 38, 76) n Husky Portable Containment (See ad page 64) Nor E First Response Inc Oil-Containment Trays n Fol-Da-Tank Co (See ad page 38, 76) Personal Protective Equipment Airboss-Defense Andax Industries LLC Avon-ISI DQE Inc Dragon Fur DuPont Elmridge Protection Products EZEM/RSDecon Foxfury Personal Lighting Solutions n Grace Industries Inc (See ad page 32) Lion Apparel Majestic Fire Apparel Inc Meridian Medical Technologies Inc Morphix Technologies 150 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_150 150 Runoff Berms and Bladders DQE Inc n Fol-Da-Tank Co (See ad page 38, 76) Nor E First Response Inc Reeves EMS LLC TVI Corp Secondary Containment Units Andax Industries LLC DQE Inc n Fol-Da-Tank Co (See ad page 38, 76) n Husky Portable Containment (See ad page 64) MITI Manufacturing Company Inc SEI Industries Ltd Shower/Eyewash Base-X Inc FSI North America Hazmatshower.com MITI Manufacturing Company Inc Stihl Accessories BKA The Blackjack Bullard Cetacea Corp Checkers Industrial Products Inc DE Williams Shields n ESS/Eye Safety Systems Inc (See ad page 67) Liberty Art Works Inc Majestic Fire Apparel Inc Pacific Helmets (NZ) LTD Phenix Technology ProComm Americas Ltd Reflexite Americas Royal Case Co n Streamlight Inc (See ad page 47) Underwater Kinetics Fiberglass Bullard Chieftain Safety Manufacturing Morning Pride Manufacturing Pacific Helmets (NZ) LTD Total Fire Group Kevlar Composite Pacific Helmets/Alliance Fire and Rescue Pacific Helmets (NZ) LTD Pigeon Mountain Industries Inc Leather Seton Identification Products Lion Apparel Pacific Helmets (NZ) LTD n Paul Conway Shields (See ad page 34) Testing and Monitoring Equipment Plastic or Composite Tags/Labels/Pipemarkers Ahura Scientific Inc GfG Instrumentation Inc Idaho Technology Inc Industrial Scientific Corp J and N Enterprises Inc Morphix Technologies RAE Systems Response Biomedical Corp S E International Inc Sierra Instruments Inc Bullard David Clark Co Inc Liberty Mountain Lion Apparel North Safety Products Pacific Helmets (NZ) LTD n Paul Conway Shields (See ad page 34) Petzl America Pigeon Mountain Industries Inc Trailers Shields ArvinMeritor n Disaster Response Solutions Inc (See ad page 74) LDV Inc Mobile Concepts by Scotty Nor E First Response Inc TVI Corp n United Plastic Fabricating Inc (See ad page 58) Bullard DE Williams Shields n IMS Alliance (See ad page 40) Pacific Helmets (NZ) LTD n Paul Conway Shields (See ad page 34) Phenix Technology Tactron Inc Wash-Down Berms Shrouds n Fol-Da-Tank Co (See ad page 38, 76) n Husky Portable Containment (See ad page 64) MITI Manufacturing Company Inc Water Heaters and Related Equipment for Decon Facilities FSI North America Hazmatshower.com Nor E First Response Inc Majestic Fire Apparel Inc Pacific Helmets (NZ) LTD Phenix Technology HOODS Firefighters American Firewear Basofil Fibers LLC Fire-Dex Innotex Inc www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:58:59 AM
  • 157. Hydration System, Personal Interspiro Majestic Fire Apparel Inc Morning Pride Manufacturing n PBI Performance Products Inc (See ad page CV4) PGI Inc Quaker Safety Products Corp Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics Tempo Glove Manufacturing Inc Total Fire Group HORNS Air Buell Air Horns Star Headlight Lantern Co Inc HOSE/RELATED PRODUCTS Accessories Armored Textiles Inc Cetacea Corp n Fol-Da-Tank Co (See ad page 38, 76) Hannay Reels Inc n Knox Co (See ad page 77) n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Northline Coupling Systems Ltd PyroLance NA n RollNRack LLC (See ad page 96) Trident Emergency Products LLC Turtle Plastics n Williams Fire Hazard Control Inc (See ad page 80) Accessories to Mount Brass Goods n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Sensible Products Trident Emergency Products LLC Adapters and Elbows Clamps Groves Inc Niedner Boston Leather Inc Digitize Inc n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) WILDFIRE Packs Threaded Fittings Advanced Rescue Systems/KMP Fire n Harrington Inc Couplings/Adapters Armored Textiles Inc Firequip Fire Hose n Harrington Inc (See ad page 83) Highwater Hose Inc Key Fire Hose Corp n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Phoenix Rescue Equipment Inc Red Head Brass LLC Snap-Tite Hose Inc WILDFIRE Dryers American Airworks Groves Inc Exit Systems Key Fire Hose Corp Expanders Firequip Fire Hose Red Head Brass LLC Forestry Armored Textiles Inc Firequip Fire Hose n Fol-Da-Tank Co (See ad page 38, 76) Highwater Hose Inc Key Fire Hose Corp n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Mercedes Textiles Ltd Niedner Snap-Tite Hose Inc Armored Textiles Inc n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) n Harrington Inc (See ad page 83) Highwater Hose Inc n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Northline Coupling Systems Ltd POK of North America Inc Red Head Brass LLC Trident Emergency Products LLC Gaskets Bed Covers Large Diameter Hose AA Manufacturing Co Inc n Fol-Da-Tank Co (See ad page 38, 76) R-O-M Corp Blind Caps n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Northline Coupling Systems Ltd Red Head Brass LLC Snap-Tite Hose Inc Booster Hose Firequip Fire Hose Key Fire Hose Corp n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Mercedes Textiles Ltd Niedner n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Hose-Rolling Loading Tools GearGrid Modern Rescue Safety Equipment Inc Pro-Tech Industries n RollNRack LLC (See ad page 96) Large Diameter Holders Sensible Products Armored Textiles Inc Firequip Fire Hose Highwater Hose Inc Key Fire Hose Corp n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Mercedes Textiles Ltd Niedner n RollNRack LLC (See ad page 96) Snap-Tite Hose Inc WILDFIRE n Williams Fire Hazard Control Inc (See ad page 80) Maintenance Equipment Landa Water Cleaning Systems Mobile Hose Driers GearGrid www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_151 151 Racks Fire Research Corp GearGrid n Gearmasters (Witmer Public Safety Group Inc) (See ad page 18, 87) Groves Inc n RollNRack LLC (See ad page 96) Ramps Checkers Industrial Products Inc Flamefighter Corp Flamefighter Corp n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Spumifer American Co Winders Wyes (See ad page 84) Phenix Technology n RollNRack LLC (See ad page 96) n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Mercedes Textiles Ltd Northline Coupling Systems Ltd POK of North America Inc Rubber and PVC HYDRANTS Firequip Fire Hose n Kochek Company Inc Adapters (See ad page 84) n Elkhart Brass Siamese (See ad page 15) KenMar Inc n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Northline Coupling Systems Ltd Red Head Brass LLC n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Northline Coupling Systems Ltd Small Diameter Hose Armored Textiles Inc Firequip Fire Hose Highwater Hose Inc Key Fire Hose Corp n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Mercedes Textiles Ltd Niedner Snap-Tite Hose Inc Dry Systems n Harrington Inc (See ad page 83) KenMar Inc n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Northline Coupling Systems Ltd Red Head Brass LLC TurboDraft by Schutte Koerting Marking Systems Strainers, Suction Dispensing Technology Corp n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) n Fol-Da-Tank Co (See ad page 38, 76) n Harrington Inc (See ad page 83) KenMar Inc n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Northline Coupling Systems Ltd Task Force Tips Inc Trident Emergency Products LLC Straps Security Devices n Knox Co (See ad page 77) Storz Conversion Firequip Fire Hose n Harrington Inc (See ad page 83) n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Northline Coupling Systems Ltd Red Head Brass LLC Testing Equipment Cetacea Corp n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) RB Fabrications Inc Haynes Manufacturing Co Wrench n Elkhart Brass Suction Hose ARI-HETRA (Automotive Resources Inc) Firequip Fire Hose n Harrington Inc (See ad page 83) n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Mercedes Textiles Ltd Northline Coupling Systems Ltd Task Force Tips Inc Akron Brass Co Flamefighter Corp Washers Groves Inc Rollers n Kochek Company Inc Testers (See ad page 83) Key Fire Hose Corp n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Northline Coupling Systems Ltd Trident Emergency Products LLC (See ad page 15) Firequip Fire Hose n Harrington Inc (See ad page 83) n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Northline Coupling Systems Ltd Red Head Brass LLC Stanley Hydraulic Tools Task Force Tips Inc Zephyr Industries Inc HYDRATION SYSTEM, PERSONAL Water-Carrying Containers Allegro Industries FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 151 1/7/09 9:58:59 AM
  • 158. Incident Command n True North Gear (See ad page 100) INCIDENT COMMAND Centers and Supplies n American Trade Mark Co (See ad page 94) Base-X Inc Bumperchute Co Conterra Inc n Disaster Response Solutions Inc (See ad page 74) Dodgen Mobile Technologies EMS Innovations Inc ERT Systems LLC ESRI n Extendo Bed Company Inc (See ad page 49) Ferno Fieldsoft Inc First Responder Systems Technology HARPER Rescue Pack Hazguide Software Solutions LLC ICS Toolbox LLC n IMS Alliance (See ad page 40) In Command n Informed Publishing (See ad page 50) Motorola Inc Mountain Fire Technologies NOTIFIER Phillips Environmental Products Inc Salamander Technologies Inc Tactron Inc TruckVault Work Stations n American Trade Mark Co Seton Identification Products LADDER TESTING AND INSPECTION SERVICES Aerial Aerial Inspection Underwriters Laboratories Inc Ground Aerial Inspection Aluminum Ladder Co Underwriters Laboratories Inc LADDERS, PORTABLE Aluminum Aluminum Ladder Co Fiberglass Aluminum Ladder Co Hardware, Mounting Weeb Enterprises LLC Repairs Aluminum Ladder Co LIGHTS AND LIGHTING Compartment Austin Hardware Supply Inc Circle D Lights Code 3 Inc Hansen International n On Scene Solutions LLC (See ad page 64) R-O-M Corp SoundOff Signal n Whelen Engineering Co Inc (See ad page 30) Emergency Medprotect Inc Phillips Environmental Products Inc Royal Case Co Akron Brass Co American Safety Health Promotions Ltd Austin Hardware Supply Inc Bright Star Lighting Products Circle D Lights Code 3 Inc ECCO ECX Engineering Corp Federal Signal Corp Foxfury Personal Lighting Solutions Havis-Shields Equipment Corp J Neils Enterprises Inc/VENTRY Fans Life Star Rescue Inc Loughlin Enterprises Inc Pelsue Co Phoenix USA Inc PowerArc Inc Priority 1 Life Safety RB Fabrications Inc SoundOff Signal Star Headlight Lantern Co Inc Tomar Electronics Inc Weldon Technologies Inc n Whelen Engineering Co Inc (See ad page 30) Will-Burt Co Spill-Control Kits, Blood Flashers, Apparatus Mounted (See ad page 94) Bumperchute Co n Disaster Response Solutions Inc (See ad page 74) n Extendo Bed Company Inc (See ad page 49) Fieldsoft Inc Halcyon Products Inc n IMS Alliance (See ad page 40) NOTIFIER Odyssey Automotive Specialty Inc Salamander Technologies Inc Tactron Inc TruckVault Vernon Software Systems Inc INFECTIOUS WASTE CONTAINMENT Disinfectants/Skin Protection DuPont North Safety Products Infection-Control Kits Medprotect Inc LABELS, EQUIPMENT Heat Sensor Labels Cardinal Industries Inc Labels Cardinal Industries Inc Duo-Safety Ladder Corp FirehouseDecalsAndMore.com Bumperchute Co Cetacea Corp Code 3 Inc Cole Hersee Co Federal Signal Corp InPower LLC Loughlin Enterprises Inc PowerArc Inc Star Headlight Lantern Co Inc 152 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_152 152 n Whelen Engineering Co Inc Surrey Fire Safety House Will-Burt Co Flashers, Electric Handlights (See ad page 30) Alliance Fire and Rescue Cetacea Corp Code 3 Inc Cole Hersee Co ECX Engineering Corp InPower LLC Pacific Helmets/Alliance Fire and Rescue Star Headlight Lantern Co Inc Flashers, Station Mounted Loughlin Enterprises Inc Flashers, Warning Circle D Lights Code 3 Inc Cole Hersee Co ECCO n Grace Industries Inc (See ad page 32) InPower LLC PowerArc Inc SoundOff Signal Star Headlight Lantern Co Inc Tomar Electronics Inc Torfino Enterprises Inc Flashlights, Battery Powered Bright Star Lighting Products Firemark Tool Co Inc Foxfury Personal Lighting Solutions Hammerhead Industries Inc High Angle Associates Pelican Products Inc Petzl America n Streamlight Inc (See ad page 47) Underwater Kinetics Flashlights, Rechargeable Advanced Lighting Corp Bright Star Lighting Products Firemark Tool Co Inc n 5.11 Tactical Series (See ad page 19) High Angle Associates Pelican Products Inc Petzl America n Streamlight Inc (See ad page 47) SureFire Underwater Kinetics Flashlights, Waterproof Advanced Lighting Corp Bright Star Lighting Products Hammerhead Industries Inc Pelican Products Inc n Streamlight Inc (See ad page 47) SureFire Torfino Enterprises Inc Underwater Kinetics Flood Lighting Allmand Bros Inc Advanced Lighting Corp Bright Star Lighting Products Firemark Tool Co Inc Havis-Shields Equipment Corp High Angle Associates Pelican Products Inc n Streamlight Inc (See ad page 47) SureFire Torfino Enterprises Inc Underwater Kinetics Headlamps Bright Star Lighting Products Foxfury Personal Lighting Solutions High Angle Associates Pelican Products Inc Petzl America Pigeon Mountain Industries Inc n Streamlight Inc (See ad page 47) Underwater Kinetics Helicopter Strobes Aircraft Dynamics Corp (Robopaks) Alliance Fire and Rescue Pacific Helmets/Alliance Fire and Rescue Interior AMDOR Inc Code 3 Inc n Locution Systems Inc (See ad page 51) n On Scene Solutions LLC (See ad page 64) R-O-M Corp SoundOff Signal Weldon Technologies Inc LEDs Advanced Lighting Corp Akron Brass Co AMDOR Inc Bumperchute Co Checkers Industrial Products Inc Code 3 Inc ECCO Federal Signal Corp n Grace Industries Inc (See ad page 32) n On Scene Solutions LLC (See ad page 64) Pelican Products Inc PowerArc Inc Priority 1 Life Safety R-O-M Corp SoundOff Signal n Streamlight Inc (See ad page 47) Tomar Electronics Inc Torfino Enterprises Inc Underwater Kinetics Light Sticks n On Scene Solutions LLC (See ad page 64) PowerArc Inc R-O-M Corp SoundOff Signal Command Light Fire Research Corp Havis-Shields Equipment Corp J Neils Enterprises Inc/VENTRY Fans Marine Dive Rescue International Golight Inc n On Scene Solutions LLC (See ad page 64) www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:59:00 AM
  • 159. Personal Specialty Items Nonchargeable Bright Star Lighting Products Underwater Kinetics Portable Generator Light Allmand Bros Inc J Neils Enterprises Inc/VENTRY Fans n Tele-Lite Inc (See ad page 107) Tempest Technology Inc Rechargeable Advanced Lighting Corp Bright Star Lighting Products Golight Inc Havis-Shields Equipment Corp Pelican Products Inc Underwater Kinetics n Whelen Engineering Co Inc Portable Ground Monitors Strobe for Ladders Akron Brass Co Task Force Tips Inc (See ad page 30) Loughlin Enterprises Inc Priority 1 Life Safety Tomar Electronics Inc n Whelen Engineering Co Inc (See ad page 30) Tail Lights Akron Brass Co Bumperchute Co SoundOff Signal Weldon Technologies Inc Telescoping Masts Allmand Bros Inc Rotating Lights Code 3 Inc ECCO Federal Signal Corp Golight Inc PowerArc Inc SoundOff Signal Star Headlight Lantern Co Inc n Whelen Engineering Co Inc (See ad page 30) Scene Lighting Akron Brass Co Allmand Bros Inc Command Light DQE Inc Federal Signal Corp Fire Research Corp Havis-Shields Equipment Corp J Neils Enterprises Inc/VENTRY Fans Life Safety Systems Inc n Streamlight Inc (See ad page 47) Surrey Fire Safety House n Tele-Lite Inc (See ad page 107) Weldon Technologies Inc n Whelen Engineering Co Inc (See ad page 30) Will-Burt Co Searchlights, Portable Bright Star Lighting Products Golight Inc Havis-Shields Equipment Corp n Streamlight Inc (See ad page 47) Spotlights/Searchlights Aircraft Dynamics Corp (Robopaks) Bright Star Lighting Products Circle D Lights Golight Inc Havis-Shields Equipment Corp n Streamlight Inc (See ad page 47) Will-Burt Co Station Circle D Lights n Locution Systems Inc (See ad page 51) Strobe ECCO Federal Signal Corp Loughlin Enterprises Inc Priority 1 Life Safety SoundOff Signal Tomar Electronics Inc Weldon Technologies Inc www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_153 153 Command Light Havis-Shields Equipment Corp Scott/American Bristol Breathing Air Systems Tempest Technology Inc Will-Burt Co Towers, Free-Standing Allmand Bros Inc Circle D Lights DQE Inc Scott/American Bristol Breathing Air Systems Surrey Fire Safety House Will-Burt Co Towers, Truck Mounted Command Light Scott/American Bristol Breathing Air Systems Surrey Fire Safety House Tempest Technology Inc Will-Burt Co Under-Body Mounted AMDOR Inc n On Scene Solutions LLC (See ad page 64) LOCKBOXES AMDOR Inc n Knox Co (See ad page 77) TruckVault MASTER-STREAM APPLIANCES n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Task Force Tips Inc MONITORS Fixed Truck Monitors Akron Brass Co POK of North America Inc PRO-VISION Video Systems S E International Inc Task Force Tips Inc Akron Brass Co Task Force Tips Inc Water (See ad page 62) Task Force Tips Inc n Williams Fire Hazard Control Inc (See ad page 80) NOZZLES Adjustable/Combination Akron Brass Co Armored Textiles Inc n Black Diamond (See ad page 92) n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) POK of North America Inc PyroLance NA Task Force Tips Inc n Williams Fire Hazard Control Inc (See ad page 80) Automatic Nozzles n Black Diamond (See ad page 92) Ball Valves Armored Textiles Inc n Black Diamond (See ad page 92) n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Task Force Tips Inc Brass n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Cellar n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Task Force Tips Inc Chimney Snuffer Task Force Tips Inc Distributing n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Dry Chem n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Feecon (Kidde Fire Fighting) POK of North America Inc Task Force Tips Inc Dual Agent n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Feecon (Kidde Fire Fighting) Task Force Tips Inc Electric Remote 3M Fixed-Gallonage Akron Brass Co n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) Task Force Tips Inc Forestry Armored Textiles Inc Low-Pressure Akron Brass Co First Strike Technologies Inc Task Force Tips Inc Penetrating n Kidde Fire Fighting Heat/Stress GfG Instrumentation Inc Industrial Scientific Corp Photovac Inc RAE Systems (See ad page 62) Task Force Tips Inc Remote Control Truck Monitors Akron Brass Co n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Task Force Tips Inc IAQ n Kidde Fire Fighting Companion Fire Equipment LLC n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Flamefighter Corp Hazard Control Technologies Inc PyroLance NA Task Force Tips Inc Smooth Bore Akron Brass Co Armored Textiles Inc Companion Fire Equipment LLC Liberty Art Works Inc Red Head Brass LLC Task Force Tips Inc Water Curtain n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) POK of North America Inc Task Force Tips Inc PERSONAL SPECIALTY ITEMS Artwork FDNY Artist FirehouseDecalsAndMore.com Liberty Art Works Inc Page Creations Inc Awards VH Blackinton Co Inc DE Williams Shields Liberty Art Works Inc Lighthouse Uniform Co My Channellock Tools Northwest Territorial Mint Our Designs Inc Badges VH Blackinton Co Inc Card Imaging DE Williams Shields n Entenmann-Rovin Co (See ad page 71) FireDog Jewelry Lighthouse Uniform Co Northwest Territorial Mint Our Designs Inc Seton Identification Products Smith Warren the911shop.com Bronze Axes Liberty Art Works Inc Lighthouse Uniform Co Our Designs Inc Buckles n Entenmann-Rovin Co (See ad page 71) Larry Fox Co Ltd Lighthouse Uniform Co Northwest Territorial Mint Page Creations Inc Clothing Boston Leather Inc Cardinal Industries Inc Dove Designs FirehouseDecalsAndMore.com FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 153 1/7/09 9:59:01 AM
  • 160. Positive-Pressure Ventilators Fisher Sportswear Innotex Inc Redback USA TR Designs Inc Motorcycles Collectibles (See ad page 71) FirehouseDecalsAndMore.com Fisher Sportswear Larry Fox Co Ltd the911shop.com Dove Designs FDNY Artist FireDog Jewelry Larry Fox Co Ltd Liberty Art Works Inc Northwest Territorial Mint Our Designs Inc Emblems/Decals n American Trade Mark Co (See ad page 94) BKA Cardinal Industries Inc n Entenmann-Rovin Co (See ad page 71) FirehouseDecalsAndMore.com Larry Fox Co Ltd Liberty Art Works Inc Our Designs Inc Reflexite Americas Seton Identification Products the911shop.com Headwear/Caps Harley-Davidson Motor Co Mugs/Cups n Entenmann-Rovin Co Nameplates n American Trade Mark Co (See ad page 94) n Entenmann-Rovin Co (See ad page 71) Larry Fox Co Ltd Seton Identification Products Smith Warren the911shop.com Patches Cardinal Industries Inc FDNY Artist Larry Fox Co Ltd Our Designs Inc the911shop.com TR Designs Inc Plaques/Memorials n American Trade Mark Co Cardinal Industries Inc Dove Designs FirehouseDecalsAndMore.com Fisher Sportswear Larry Fox Co Ltd North Safety Products Our Designs Inc TR Designs Inc (See ad page 94) VH Blackinton Co Inc FirehouseDecalsAndMore.com Liberty Art Works Inc Lighthouse Uniform Co Northwest Territorial Mint the911shop.com Insignia Page Creations Inc VH Blackinton Co Inc n Entenmann-Rovin Co (See ad page 71) Our Designs Inc Page Creations Inc Smith Warren the911shop.com Jewelry VH Blackinton Co Inc Dove Designs n Entenmann-Rovin Co (See ad page 71) FireDog Jewelry Larry Fox Co Ltd Lighthouse Uniform Co Our Designs Inc Page Creations Inc the911shop.com Knives, Collector Benchmade Knife Co Inc Glas-Master/Wehr Engineering Northwest Territorial Mint Labels/Tags n American Trade Mark Co (See ad page 94) Card Imaging Cardinal Industries Inc Larry Fox Co Ltd the911shop.com Leather Boston Leather Inc n Entenmann-Rovin Co (See ad page 71) Smith Warren Southcombe Brothers Ltd Replicas Suspenders Boston Leather Inc HARPER Rescue Pack Innotex Inc POSITIVE-PRESSURE VENTILATORS Blowers Air Systems International Allegro Industries J Neils Enterprises Inc/VENTRY Fans Fire Safety Houses n BullEx Digital Safety (See ad page 46) Mobile Concepts by Scotty Surrey Fire Safety House Printed Material Alert-All Corp n Informed Publishing (See ad page 50) Larry Fox Co Ltd n Robotronics Inc (See ad page 113) Robots American Safety Health Promotions Ltd n Robotronics Inc (See ad page 113) PUMPS Panel Gauge Heaters n WS Darley Co (See ad page 31) Portable CAT PUMPS-High Pressure Pumps Systems n CET Fire Pumps Manufacturing (See ad page 82) n Class 1 (See ad page 41) n WS Darley Co (See ad page 31) n Gorman-Rupp Co (See ad page 44) n Hale Products Inc (See ad page 41) Hydraulics International Inc Mercedes Textiles Ltd MITI Manufacturing Company Inc Neel Fire Protection Apparatus Pelsue Co Scott/American Bristol Breathing Air Systems Stanley Hydraulic Tools n Tele-Lite Inc (See ad page 107) TurboDraft by Schutte Koerting n Waterous Co (See ad page 25) WILDFIRE Pump Overheat Indicator n WS Darley Co (See ad page 31) n Super Vacuum Manufacturing Co Inc (See ad page 70) n Tele-Lite Inc (See ad page 107) Tempest Technology Inc Ventilators Air Systems International American Safety Health Promotions Ltd Flotec Inc FSI North America J Neils Enterprises Inc/VENTRY Fans Pelsue Co Stihl n Super Vacuum Manufacturing Co Inc (See ad page 70) n Tele-Lite Inc (See ad page 107) Tempest Technology Inc Unifire Inc 154 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_154 154 PUBLIC EDUCATION SUPPLIES/TOOLS n Waterous Co (See ad page 25) Stationary n CET Fire Pumps Manufacturing (See ad page 82) n WS Darley Co (See ad page 31) n Hale Products Inc (See ad page 41) Hydraulics International Inc Scott/American Bristol Breathing Air Systems Truck Mounted n Class 1 (See ad page 41) n WS Darley Co (See ad page 31) n Hale Products Inc (See ad page 41) Hydraulics International Inc n Waterous Co (See ad page 25) WILDFIRE REELS Electrical Akron Brass Co Hannay Reels Inc MagneGrip Nederman Inc Phoenix Rescue Equipment Inc Hose Air Systems International Akron Brass Co Genesis Rescue Systems/American Rescue Technology Inc Hannay Reels Inc n Howell Rescue Systems Inc (See ad page 103) n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) Key Fire Hose Corp n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) MagneGrip Nederman Inc Phoenix Rescue Equipment Inc WILDFIRE Rope Special Electronics Designs Inc REHABILITATION SUPPLIES Misting Systems J Neils Enterprises Inc/VENTRY Fans Schaefer Ventilation Equipment Portable Toilets n Disaster Response Solutions Inc (See ad page 74) Phillips Environmental Products Inc RESCUE EQUIPMENT Backpacks Conterra Inc Firehouse Medical Inc n 5.11 Tactical Series (See ad page 19) HARPER Rescue Pack n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) MERET Pacific Safety Products Inc Petzl America n Skedco Inc (See ad page 91) Structural Composites Industries (SCI) n True North Gear (See ad page 100) Basket Stretchers n CMC Rescue Inc (See ad page 69) Ferno Firehouse Medical Inc High Angle Associates Rock-N-Rescue/JE Weinel Inc Caddy, Saw Blade Archimedes Products Inc Carabiners Capital Safety (DBI/SALA Protecta) n CMC Rescue Inc (See ad page 69) Conterra Inc Gemtor Inc High Angle Associates Liberty Mountain www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:59:01 AM
  • 161. Rescue Equipment Rock-N-Rescue/JE Weinel Inc n Skedco Inc (See ad page 91) n Sterling Rope Co (See ad page 59) n Hurst Jaws of Life Jacks, Hydraulic (See ad page 55) Ogura HyPower Corp Phoenix Rescue Equipment Inc RESQTEC Inc TNT Rescue Systems Inc AMKUS Rescue Systems n Howell Rescue Systems Inc (See ad page 103) n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) Ogura HyPower Corp Phoenix Rescue Equipment Inc n Res-Q-Jack/Cepco Tool Co (See ad page 81) RESQTEC Inc Cutters, Manual n Hurst Jaws of Life Chippers Petrogen Inc Stanley Hydraulic Tools TNT Rescue Systems Inc XRT Power Systems n Holmatro Inc Chains, Pulling American Safety Health Promotions Ltd Benchmade Knife Co Inc n 5.11 Tactical Series (See ad page 19) Glas-Master/Wehr Engineering Liberty Mountain Ajax RescueTools n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) Cutting, Torches AMKUS Rescue Systems Capital Safety (DBI/SALA Protecta) Gemtor Inc High Angle Associates International Safety Equipment Inc Miller Fall Protection Pelsue Co Petzl America n Rescue 42 Inc (See ad page 42) Rescue Technology (See ad page 55) n Rescue 42 Inc (See ad page 42) n Res-Q-Jack/Cepco Tool Co (See ad page 81) RESQTEC Inc Turtle Plastics Cutters, Cordless Aircraft Dynamics Corp (Robopaks) Cutters Edge Fascut Industries Inc n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) Ogura HyPower Corp Cutters, Electric Fascut Industries Inc Milwaukee Electric Tool Corp n POWER HAWK Technologies Inc (See ad page 50) Cutters, Electro-Hydraulic Fascut Industries Inc Ogura HyPower Corp Cutters, Hydraulic AMKUS Rescue Systems n Champion Rescue Tools (See ad page 17) Genesis Rescue Systems/American Rescue Technology Inc n Holmatro Inc (See ad page 5) n Howell Rescue Systems Inc (See ad page 103) www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_155 155 Jacks, Pneumatic Cutters, Pneumatic Descent Devices and Tripods n Hurst Jaws of Life n CMC Rescue Inc (See ad page 55) Modern Rescue Safety Equipment Inc Confined Space Rope Rescue System Cribbing Pulleys (See ad page 55) Glas-Master/Wehr Engineering n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) Milwaukee Electric Tool Corp AMKUS Rescue Systems Capital Safety (DBI/SALA Protecta) n CMC Rescue Inc (See ad page 69) Gemtor Inc High Angle Associates International Safety Equipment Inc Modern Rescue Safety Equipment Inc n Paratech Inc (See ad page 21) Pelsue Co Petzl America n Rescue 42 Inc (See ad page 42) Rescue Technology Rock-N-Rescue/JE Weinel Inc Sav-A-Jake International Inc Special Electronics Designs Inc n Sterling Rope Co (See ad page 59) (See ad page 5) n Hurst Jaws of Life Door/Exit Markers Aircraft Dynamics Corp (Robopaks) Exothermic Torches Broco Inc Modern Rescue Safety Equipment Inc Extrication Camera System n Search Systems Inc (See ad page 7) Glass Cutters BKA Genesis Rescue Systems/American Rescue Technology Inc Glas-Master/Wehr Engineering Team Equipment Grapples for Debris Removal Fire Hooks Unlimited Inc Hammers, Rotary Milwaukee Electric Tool Corp Harnesses Capital Safety (DBI/SALA Protecta) Fire Hooks Unlimited Inc Gemtor Inc High Angle Associates International Safety Equipment Inc Liberty Mountain Miller Fall Protection Modern Rescue Safety Equipment Inc Pigeon Mountain Industries Inc Rescue Technology RIT Rescue and Escape Systems Rock-N-Rescue/JE Weinel Inc Sav-A-Jake International Inc Hood Release Tool Genesis Rescue Systems/American Rescue Technology Inc n Howell Rescue Systems Inc (See ad page 103) Knives Mounting Brackets Capital Safety (DBI/SALA Protecta) Genesis Rescue Systems/American Rescue Technology Inc Performance Advantage Co Sensible Products TMS Medical Technologies Zephyr Industries Inc Multipurpose Tool, Hydraulic AMKUS Rescue Systems n Howell Rescue Systems Inc (See ad page 103) n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) Ogura HyPower Corp Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems LLC ITT Night Vision Royal Case Co n Search Systems Inc (See ad page 7) Zistos Corp Pneumatic Impact Tools Concept Engineering Group Inc Air-Spade n Howell Rescue Systems Inc (See ad page 103) n Paratech Inc (See ad page 21) Aircraft Dynamics Corp (Robopaks) AMKUS Rescue Systems n Champion Rescue Tools (See ad page 17) Genesis Rescue Systems/American Rescue Technology Inc n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) RESQTEC Inc Power Units, Gasoline AMKUS Rescue Systems (See ad page 17) Genesis Rescue Systems/American Rescue Technology Inc n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) RESQTEC Inc Power Units, Hydraulic (See ad page 5) n Howell Rescue Systems Inc (See ad page 103) n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) Hydraulics International Inc Phoenix Rescue Equipment Inc AMKUS Rescue Systems n Champion Rescue Tools (See ad page 17) Fire Hooks Unlimited Inc n Holmatro Inc (See ad page 5) n Howell Rescue Systems Inc (See ad page 103) n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) Phoenix Rescue Equipment Inc RESQTEC Inc TNT Rescue Systems Inc Rams, Mechanical n POWER HAWK Technologies Inc (See ad page 50) n Res-Q-Jack/Cepco Tool Co (See ad page 81) AMKUS Rescue Systems Capital Safety (DBI/SALA Protecta) n CMC Rescue Inc (See ad page 69) Conterra Inc Golfire Inc High Angle Associates International Safety Equipment Inc Liberty Mountain New England Ropes Petzl America RIT Rescue and Escape Systems Rock-N-Rescue/JE Weinel Inc n Skedco Inc (See ad page 91) n Sterling Rope Co (See ad page 59) Rescue System for High-Rises Power Units, Electrical n Holmatro Inc Rams, Hydraulic Rappelling Equipment Night Vision Systems n Champion Rescue Tools (See ad page 69) Liberty Mountain Rock-N-Rescue/JE Weinel Inc International Safety Equipment Inc Life-Pack Technologies Inc Miller Fall Protection Ogura HyPower Corp n Paratech Inc (See ad page 21) Rescue Technology Safety Air Cushion Inc n Sterling Rope Co (See ad page 59) Rescue Tool Systems Advanced Rescue Systems/KMP Fire Genesis Rescue Systems/American Rescue Technology Inc n Howell Rescue Systems Inc (See ad page 103) Rigging Plates Liberty Mountain Rock-N-Rescue/JE Weinel Inc Rope Capital Safety (DBI/SALA Protecta) Conterra Inc High Angle Associates International Safety Equipment Inc Liberty Mountain Miller Fall Protection Modern Rescue Safety Equipment Inc FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 155 1/7/09 9:59:02 AM
  • 162. Salvage Covers New England Ropes Pelsue Co Petzl America Pigeon Mountain Industries Inc Rescue Technology RIT Rescue and Escape Systems Rock-N-Rescue/JE Weinel Inc n Skedco Inc (See ad page 91) n Sterling Rope Co (See ad page 59) Sensors, Heat n ISG Thermal Systems USA Inc (See ad page 65) Sensors, Sound n Search Systems Inc (See ad page 7) Shelters, Inflatable Achilles Inflatable Craft Base-X Inc n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) Shoring Equipment Aircraft Dynamics Corp (Robopaks) n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) n POWER HAWK Technologies Inc (See ad page 50) n Rescue 42 Inc (See ad page 42) RESQTEC Inc TNT Rescue Systems Inc Spreaders, Electric Ogura HyPower Corp n POWER HAWK Technologies Inc (See ad page 50) Spreaders, Hydraulic AMKUS Rescue Systems n Champion Rescue Tools (See ad page 17) Genesis Rescue Systems/American Rescue Technology Inc n Holmatro Inc (See ad page 5) n Howell Rescue Systems Inc (See ad page 103) n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) Ogura HyPower Corp Phoenix Rescue Equipment Inc RESQTEC Inc TNT Rescue Systems Inc Spreaders, Manual n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) Stabilization Equipment Genesis Rescue Systems/American Rescue Technology Inc n Howell Rescue Systems Inc (See ad page 103) n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) n Paratech Inc (See ad page 21) n POWER HAWK Technologies Inc (See ad page 50) n Rescue 42 Inc (See ad page 42) n Res-Q-Jack/Cepco Tool Co (See ad page 81) RESQTEC Inc Team Equipment TNT Rescue Systems Inc Turtle Plastics Strap Kits n 911 Seats Inc (See ad page 81) n Super Vacuum Manufacturing Co Inc (See ad page 70) Chain, Concrete Cutting Equipment Straps, Hauling Cutters Edge Stanley Hydraulic Tools Team Equipment Cardinal Industries Inc FirehouseDecalsAndMore.com OSHA Chain, Fire Rescue Seton Identification Products Cutters Edge n Super Vacuum Manufacturing Co Inc (See ad page 70) Team Equipment Tempest Technology Inc MDI Traffic Control Products Reflexite Americas Cetacea Corp Golfire Inc Miller Fall Protection n On Scene Solutions LLC (See ad page 64) Sav-A-Jake International Inc Strut System Advanced Rescue Systems/KMP Fire Junk Yard Dog Industries n Paratech Inc (See ad page 21) n Rescue 42 Inc (See ad page 42) TNT Rescue Systems Inc Tool Holders Fire Hooks Unlimited Inc Genesis Rescue Systems/American Rescue Technology Inc Golfire Inc Performance Advantage Co Sav-A-Jake International Inc TNT Rescue Systems Inc Zephyr Industries Inc Tripods Capital Safety (DBI/SALA Protecta) Gemtor Inc International Safety Equipment Inc n Paratech Inc (See ad page 21) n Rescue 42 Inc (See ad page 42) n Res-Q-Jack/Cepco Tool Co (See ad page 81) n Skedco Inc (See ad page 91) Vacuum Concept Engineering Group Inc Air-Spade Milwaukee Electric Tool Corp Video Search Systems n ISG Thermal Systems USA Inc (See ad page 65) n Search Systems Inc (See ad page 7) Zistos Corp Winches Gemtor Inc Miller Fall Protection Pelsue Co n POWER HAWK Technologies Inc (See ad page 50) n Skedco Inc (See ad page 91) Warn Industries SALVAGE COVERS Firl Industries Inc n Fol-Da-Tank Co (See ad page 38, 76) n Husky Portable Containment (See ad page 64) SAWS Blades Broco Inc Cutters Edge Firemark Tool Co Inc Milwaukee Electric Tool Corp 156 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_156 156 n Res-Q-Jack/Cepco Tool Co Morrison Medical n On Scene Solutions LLC (See ad page 64) Sav-A-Jake International Inc Chain, Standard (See ad page 66) SIGNS Rollup Safety n American Trade Mark Co Cutters Edge Stanley Hydraulic Tools Stihl (See ad page 94) MDI Traffic Control Products Seton Identification Products Vizcon LLC Circular Stands, Portable Cutters Edge Firemark Tool Co Inc Milwaukee Electric Tool Corp n Super Vacuum Manufacturing Co Inc (See ad page 70) Team Equipment Cutoff Milwaukee Electric Tool Corp Stanley Hydraulic Tools Stihl MDI Traffic Control Products TMS Medical Technologies Traffic/Construction MDI Traffic Control Products Reflexite Americas Seton Identification Products TMS Medical Technologies Vizcon LLC Truck Cardinal Industries Inc FirehouseDecalsAndMore.com Seton Identification Products SIRENS n Super Vacuum Manufacturing Co Inc (See ad page 70) Tempest Technology Inc Electric Aircraft Dynamics Corp (Robopaks) Milwaukee Electric Tool Corp n POWER HAWK Technologies Inc (See ad page 50) n Res-Q-Jack/Cepco Tool Co (See ad page 81) Stihl Gasoline-Powered Cutters Edge Fire Hooks Unlimited Inc Team Equipment Hand Glas-Master/Wehr Engineering SEATING Ambulance HO Bostrom Co Inc Apparatus/SCBA Flamefighter Corp HO Bostrom Co Inc LifeGuard Technologies n 911 Seats Inc (See ad page 66) n Ziamatic Corp (See ad page 75) Emergency Vehicle HO Bostrom Co Inc LifeGuard Technologies n 911 Seats Inc (See ad page 66) Standard (Non-SCBA) Flamefighter Corp HO Bostrom Co Inc Outdoor Public Warning System Federal Signal Corp n Whelen Engineering Co Inc (See ad page 30) Vehicle Carson Sirens Federal Signal Corp SoundOff Signal Tomar Electronics Inc n Whelen Engineering Co Inc (See ad page 30) SMOKE GENERATING DEVICES/PRODUCTS Bombs Superior Signal Co Inc Machines American Safety Health Promotions Ltd n BullEx Digital Safety (See ad page 46) n Kidde Fire Trainers Inc (See ad page 62) MDG Fog Generators Ltd Mobile Concepts by Scotty Superior Signal Co Inc n Super Vacuum Manufacturing Co Inc (See ad page 70) n Tele-Lite Inc (See ad page 107) Tempest Technology Inc WHP Trainingtowers Simulated Smoke Mask Golfire Inc Smoke Canisters American Safety Health Promotions Ltd n Kidde Fire Trainers Inc (See ad page 62) www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:59:03 AM
  • 163. Valves Superior Signal Co Inc Smoke Ejectors n Super Vacuum Manufacturing Co Inc (See ad page 70) SPRINKLERS Heads n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) Piping BlazeMaster Fire Sprinkler Systems Systems BlazeMaster Fire Sprinkler Systems n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) Surrey Fire Safety House STEERING DEVICES Antisway Roadmaster Inc TANKS Aerial Delivery Water Tanks for Wildland Firefighting n Husky Portable Containment (See ad page 64) SEI Industries Ltd n United Plastic Fabricating Inc (See ad page 58) TRACE DETECTION EQUIPMENT Chemical Warfare Agents Ahura Scientific Inc n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) Life Safety Systems Inc n Smiths Detection (See ad page CV3) Drugs Ahura Scientific Inc Foxfury Personal Lighting Solutions Morphix Technologies n Smiths Detection (See ad page CV3) Explosives Ahura Scientific Inc Life Safety Systems Inc n Smiths Detection (See ad page CV3) TRACKING EQUIPMENT/SYSTEMS Equipment Western Shelter/Crew Boss American Safety Health Institute (ASHI) ESRI Mountain Fire Technologies Collapsible Global Positioning Bladder Surge-Control Firl Industries Inc n Fol-Da-Tank Co (See ad page 38, 76) n Husky Portable Containment (See ad page 64) Mercedes Textiles Ltd SEI Industries Ltd Western Shelter/Crew Boss Elliptical Custom Fiberglass Products LLC Semo Tank n United Plastic Fabricating Inc (See ad page 58) Fiberglass Custom Fiberglass Products LLC Plastic Custom Fiberglass Products LLC n United Plastic Fabricating Inc (See ad page 58) Polypropylene Midwest Fire Pro Poly of America Inc n United Plastic Fabricating Inc (See ad page 58) Portable Fill Firl Industries Inc n Fol-Da-Tank Co (See ad page 38, 76) n Husky Portable Containment (See ad page 64) Western Shelter/Crew Boss Replacement Custom Fiberglass Products LLC Midwest Fire n United Plastic Fabricating Inc (See ad page 58) Vacuum, Truck-Mounted Semo Tank Wetside Custom Fiberglass Products LLC Semo Tank www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_157 157 Astra Software Corp ESRI First Responder Systems Technology Mapping Solutions Inc Tripod Data Systems Personnel American Safety Health Institute (ASHI) Avon-ISI ESRI ITT Night Vision Mountain Fire Technologies Salamander Technologies Inc n Scott Health Safety (See ad page 39) Tactron Inc Vernon Software Systems Inc Vehicle ESRI First Responder Systems Technology Mapping Solutions Inc Mountain Fire Technologies n ZOLL Data Systems (See ad page 27) TRAFFIC CONTROL AND SAFETY EQUIPMENT Arrowboards Command Light n Whelen Engineering Co Inc (See ad page 30) Barricade Tape Banner Guard Division of Reef Industries Inc Reflexite Americas Barricades Seton Identification Products Vizcon LLC Preemption Systems 3M Intelligent Transportation Systems Tomar Electronics Inc Signals TMS Medical Technologies TRAFFIC-CONTROL SYSTEMS Allmand Bros Inc TMS Medical Technologies Vizcon LLC Props n BullEx Digital Safety TRAINING AIDS Books/Software/Videos Action Training Systems Inc American Safety Health Institute (ASHI) CommandSim Emergency Books and Training Inc Emergency Film Group Fire Department Instructors Conference (FDIC) Fire Engineering Fire Fighter Exam n FirePrograms Software (See ad page 57) Galen Press Ltd Hazguide Software Solutions LLC n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) Infection Control/Emerging Concepts n Informed Publishing (See ad page 50) Laerdal Medical Corp Modeltech International Our Designs Inc Simfx Emergency Management Simulation Sim Ops Studios Simulation Research Corp n Toyota Hybrid (See ad page 102) Field Guides ICS Toolbox LLC n Informed Publishing (See ad page 50) n Toyota Hybrid (See ad page 102) IMS Simulation Software Action Training Systems Inc CommandSim Simfx Emergency Management Simulation Sim Ops Studios Vernon Software Systems Inc (See ad page 46) Fire and Cop Shop Fire Facilities Inc ICS Toolbox LLC n Kidde Fire Trainers Inc (See ad page 62) Power Jamb LLC Pro Safe Fire Training Systems Inc Public Education Supplies n BullEx Digital Safety (See ad page 46) Emergency Books and Training Inc n Informed Publishing (See ad page 50) Modeltech International SCBA Blackout Masks Golfire Inc SM Smith Co Simulators and Supplies Action Training Systems Inc n BullEx Digital Safety (See ad page 46) Cardionics Inc CommandSim Digital Combustion FAAC Inc n FirePrograms Software (See ad page 57) Halcyon Products Inc ICS Toolbox LLC n Kidde Fire Trainers Inc (See ad page 62) Laerdal Medical Corp Meridian Medical Technologies Inc Mobile Concepts by Scotty Modeltech International Power Jamb LLC Pro Safe Fire Training Systems Inc Sim Ops Studios Simulation Research Corp SJ Forcible Entry Training Station (FETS) Superior Signal Co Inc WHP Trainingtowers VALVES Manikins American Safety Health Institute (ASHI) Cardionics Inc Laerdal Medical Corp Lifeguard Systems Inc Simulaids Inc Portable Training Systems Ball Intake n Class 1 (See ad page 41) n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) n Hale Products Inc (See ad page 41) n Kochek Company Inc Base-X Inc n BullEx Digital Safety SJ Forcible Entry Training Station (FETS) WHP Trainingtowers (See ad page 46) CommandSim n Draeger Safety Inc (See ad page 11) Fire and Cop Shop Fire Facilities Inc Halcyon Products Inc ICS Toolbox LLC ICX Agentase n Kidde Fire Trainers Inc (See ad page 62) Modeltech International Power Jamb LLC Pro Safe Fire Training Systems Inc (See ad page 84) Northline Coupling Systems Ltd POK of North America Inc Task Force Tips Inc Trident Emergency Products LLC Butterfly n Hale Products Inc (See ad page 41) Humat Inc KenMar Inc n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Northline Coupling Systems Ltd n Waterous Co (See ad page 25) FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 157 1/7/09 9:59:04 AM
  • 164. Vests Check Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems LLC n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Mercedes Textiles Ltd Northline Coupling Systems Ltd Control Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems LLC n Class 1 (See ad page 41) Deluge n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) n Kidde Fire Fighting (See ad page 62) Dry Pipe n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Dump AH Stock Manufacturing Corp n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Gate AH Stock Manufacturing Corp n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Northline Coupling Systems Ltd Task Force Tips Inc Globe n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Hardware for LDH n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Highwater Hose Inc n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Northline Coupling Systems Ltd Snap-Tite Hose Inc Hydrant Akron Brass Co n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Haynes Manufacturing Co Humat Inc n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Northline Coupling Systems Ltd Task Force Tips Inc Intake Akron Brass Co n Class 1 (See ad page 41) n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Firemans Friend Engineering Inc n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Northline Coupling Systems Ltd Snap-Tite Hose Inc Task Force Tips Inc Pressure Relief n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) Hydraulics International Inc Northline Coupling Systems Ltd Task Force Tips Inc n Waterous Co (See ad page 25) Relief n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) n Waterous Co (See ad page 25) Swing-Out AH Stock Manufacturing Corp Akron Brass Co n Elkhart Brass (See ad page 15) VESTS Fire and Emergency Chieftain Safety Manufacturing Dragon Fur Ferno HARPER Rescue Pack n IMS Alliance (See ad page 40) Columbia Weather Systems Inc Thermal Control Persys Medical WATER/ICE RESCUE Boards Dive Rescue International Ferno Lifeguard Systems Inc Flotation Devices Lifeguard Systems Inc Marsars Water Rescue Systems Inc Rescue ONE Connector Boats Rescue Technology Rock-N-Rescue/JE Weinel Inc Stearns Inc Bulletproof Ocean Rescue Reels Chieftain Safety Manufacturing Pacific Safety Products Inc Marsars Water Rescue Systems Inc Personal Protection Accessories Cooling Dive Rescue International Dragon Fur Foxfury Personal Lighting Solutions High Angle Associates Lifeguard Systems Inc Marsars Water Rescue Systems Inc Rescue ONE Connector Boats Sav-A-Jake International Inc Weeb Enterprises LLC Air Systems International Allegro Industries Bullard DQE Inc n Shafer Enterprises LLC / Cool Shirt (See ad page 68) Steele Inc Identification/Position Conterra Inc n Disaster Response Solutions Inc (See ad page 74) n IMS Alliance (See ad page 40) In Command RB Fabrications Inc Tactron Inc Reach Pole Systems Lighted Dive Rescue International Golfire Inc Lifeguard Systems Inc Marsars Water Rescue Systems Inc Modern Rescue Safety Equipment Inc Pigeon Mountain Industries Inc RIT Rescue and Escape Systems Rock-N-Rescue/JE Weinel Inc Stearns Inc n Sterling Rope Co (See ad page 59) Majestic Fire Apparel Inc Reflective Ferno n 5.11 Tactical Series (See ad page 19) n IMS Alliance (See ad page 40) In Command Majestic Fire Apparel Inc MDI Traffic Control Products North Safety Products Pacific Safety Products Inc RB Fabrications Inc Reflexite Americas Vizcon LLC 158 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_158 158 Special Operations Marsars Water Rescue Systems Inc Sleds Lifeguard Systems Inc Marsars Water Rescue Systems Inc Rescue ONE Connector Boats Throw Bags WEATHER STATIONS Disaster Operations Climatronics Corp Columbia Weather Systems Inc Forest Climatronics Corp Columbia Weather Systems Inc Speedtech Instruments Hazardous Materials Climatronics Corp Columbia Weather Systems Inc Speedtech Instruments WHEELS Chocks Checkers Industrial Products Inc Durable Corp n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Turtle Plastics Zephyr Industries Inc n Ziamatic Corp (See ad page 75) Tire Accessories ARI-HETRA (Automotive Resources Inc) Insta-Chain Inc RealWheels Cover Co Inc Wheel Simulators Phoenix USA Inc RealWheels Cover Co Inc Wheelcovers Phoenix USA Inc RealWheels Cover Co Inc WILDLAND FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Helicopter Buckets n Fol-Da-Tank Co (See ad page 38, 76) SEI Industries Ltd Tents and Shelters Hazmatshower.com n Hurst Jaws of Life (See ad page 55) Pelsue Co Storm King Mountain Technologies Inc Western Shelter/Crew Boss Tools Advanced Rescue Systems/KMP Fire Council Tool Co Eagle Gear Fire Hooks Unlimited Inc Flame Shield Consulting Foxfury Personal Lighting Solutions ITT Night Vision n Kochek Company Inc (See ad page 84) Nupla Corp Sav-A-Jake International Inc SEI Industries Ltd www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:59:04 AM
  • 165. Colorado DEALERS Other Training Materials Rescue Equipment Rope Radio Communication Equipment Pumps Generators Protective Clothing Positive-Pressure Ventilators Lights Chargers Ladders Hoses, Nozzles, Reels Haz-Mat Supplies Hand/Forcible Entry Tools Foam Equipment Fire Station Supplies Fire Extinguishing Equipment Extinguishers Systems EMS Supplies Diving Water Rescue Equipment Computers Software Breathing Apparatus Supplies Apparatus Accessories Company Alarm Systems (U.S. and Canada) Alabama Buddy Gray Fire Equipment Tuscaloosa, AL 205-345-1296; www.buddygrayfire.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l l NAFECO Decatur, AL 800-628-6233; www.nafeco.com l l l l l l l l l l l l Arizona Procutt Tool Phoenix, AZ 888-450-9805; www.diamondblade.us l l California Allstar Fire Equipment Inc Hayward, CA 510-887-6295; www.allstarfire.com l l Allstar Fire Equipment Inc Arcadia, CA 626-652-0900; www.allstarfire.com l l LN Curtis Sons Oakland, CA 510-839-5111; www.lncurtis.com l l Diamondback Fire Rescue Temecula, CA 888-355-9111; www.diamondbackfire.com l l Fire Etc San Diego, CA 619-525-7286; www.fire-etc.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Healthware Solutions Arcata, CA 877-389-1367; www.healthwaresolutions.com l l l l l l l l l l Rescue 3 International Wilton, CA 800-457-3728; www.rescue3.com l Rescue Source Wilton, CA 916-687-6556; www.rescuesource.com l l Wolfpack Gear Inc Paso Robles, CA 805-239-9746; www.wolfpackgear.com l Canada BH Safety Services Consulting Ltd Winnipeg, AB, Canada 204-786-8429; www.bhsafetyservices.ca l l l l WILDFIRE Lachine, AB, Canada 514-637-5572; www.wildfire-equipment.com l l l l l l l l l l l Colorado American Safety Associates of Colorado Parker, CO 303-841-3982 B H Fire Equipment Durango, CO 970-749-5884; www.bhfire.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l CS Supply Inc Johnstown, CO 970-663-4966; www.cssupplyinc.com l Front Range Fire Apparatus Frederick, CO 303-449-9911; www.frontrangefire.com l l Mile-Hi Fire Apparatus Inc Commerce City, CO 303-289-9909; www.milehifire.com l l l Rocky Mountain Emergency Vehicles Inc Denver, CO 303-322-9854; www.rmev.com l l l l TNT Tools Denver, CO 303-794-4741; www.tnttool.com Western Fire Truck Inc Arvada, CO 800-627-2159; www.western-fire.com www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_159 159 l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 159 1/7/09 9:59:05 AM
  • 166. Other Training Materials Rescue Equipment Rope Radio Communication Equipment Pumps Generators Protective Clothing Positive-Pressure Ventilators Lights Chargers Ladders Hoses, Nozzles, Reels Haz-Mat Supplies Hand/Forcible Entry Tools Foam Equipment Fire Station Supplies Fire Extinguishing Equipment Extinguishers Systems EMS Supplies Diving Water Rescue Equipment Computers Software Breathing Apparatus Supplies Apparatus Accessories Company Alarm Systems Connecticut Connecticut New England Fire Equipment Apparatus Corp New Haven, CT 203-239-5678; www.nefea.com l l l l l Shipman’s Fire Equipment Co Inc Waterford, CT 860-442-0678; www.shipmans.com l l l l l l l l l l l l Tri State Fire Apparatus Sales Services Inc Watertown, CT 860-945-0802 l l l l l l l l l l l Delaware DPC Emergency Equipment Marydel, DE 302-492-1245; www.dpcemergency.com l Graves Uniforms Lewes, DE 800-441-8010; www.gravesuniforms.com l Florida East Coast Fire Equipment Inc West Palm Beach, FL 561-683-3473; www.eastcoastfire.com l l K-Tool Co Melbourne, FL 321-757-6561 l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Poly Systems Co Backboard Bagging Systems West Palm Beach, FL 561-848-2770; www.packagingzone.com Ten-8 Fire Equipment Inc Bradenton, FL 941-756-7779; www.ten8fire.com l l Municipal Equipment Co LLC Orlando, FL 407-843-3071; www.mecofire.com PolyBilt Body Co LLC Ocala, FL 352-629-1414; www.polybilt.com l l l l l l l l Georgia American Safety Fire House Atlanta, GA 770-441-3473 l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Idaho NRS Rescue Moscow, ID 877-677-7370; www.nrsrescue.com l Illinois AEC Fire Safety Springfield, IL 217-529-3003; www.aecfire.com Air One Equipment Inc South Elgin, IL 847-289-9000; www.aoe.net Banner Fire Equipment Inc Roxana, IL 618-251-4200; www.bannerfire.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Bigfoot Construction Equipment Inc Woodstock, IL 888-743-7320; www.outriggerpads.com Cases USA Inc Monee, IL 708-534-9100; www.cases-usa.com n l l Hydro Flow Products Inc Arlington Heights, IL 847-434-0101; www.hosemonster.com (See ad page 113) 160 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_160 160 l www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:59:05 AM
  • 167. Other Training Materials Rescue Equipment Rope Radio Communication Equipment Pumps Generators Protective Clothing Positive-Pressure Ventilators Lights Chargers Ladders Hoses, Nozzles, Reels Haz-Mat Supplies Hand/Forcible Entry Tools Foam Equipment Fire Station Supplies Fire Extinguishing Equipment Extinguishers Systems EMS Supplies Diving Water Rescue Equipment Computers Software Breathing Apparatus Supplies Apparatus Accessories Company Alarm Systems Maryland Illinois (cont.) Illinois Fire Police Equipment Bourbonnais, IL 815-939-7711; www.ilfirepolice.com Interstate Emergency Vehicles Inc Joilet, IL 815-730-9997; www.interstateinc.us l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Jencor Systems Chicago, IL 773-593-7316; www.psftags.com l Mid-State Tank Co Inc Sullivan, IL 800-722-8384; www.midstatetank.com l RescueVac Systems North Aurora, IL 800-301-6798; www.rescuevac.com l l l Roche Sculpture Des Plaines, IL 847-296-9593; www.rochesculpture.com l VLR Communications Arlington Heights, IL 847-870-8310; www.vlrcommunications.com l Warthog Products Ltd Lombard, IL 630-916-7188; www.thewarthog.com l l l l Indiana CKS Co Inc Mooresville, IN 317-831-7940; www.ckscompany.com l Firemans Chore Inc Indianapolis, IN 317-627-5142; www.firemanschore.com Hoosier Fire Equipment Inc Greenfield, IN 317-891-8375; www.hoosierfire.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Task Force Tips Inc Valparaiso, IN 800-348-2686; www.tft.com Tech+Med Industries Indianapolis, IN 800-788-6554; www.pmrtechmed.com l l Kentucky Elevatorkey.com Lexington, KY 859-312-3922; www.elevatorkey.com l Galls Inc Lexington, KY 800-876-4242; www.galls.com Vogelpohl Fire Equipment Inc Erlanger, KY 859-282-1000; www.vogelpohlfire.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Louisiana Bracelets For America Alexandria, LA 318-443-7280; www.braceletsforamerica.com l Maryland Crestline Industries Inc Baltimore, MD 410-764-2444; http://crestlineprotect.com l l Federal Resources Supply Co Chester, MD 410-643-7810; www.federalresources.com l l l FL Anderson Co Baltimore, MD 410-539-5123; www.flandersonfire.com l l l l Goto Corp Timonium, MD 410-252-1868 l l www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_161 161 l l l l l l l l l l l l l FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 161 1/7/09 9:59:06 AM
  • 168. Other Training Materials Rescue Equipment Rope Radio Communication Equipment Pumps Generators Protective Clothing Positive-Pressure Ventilators Lights Chargers Ladders Hoses, Nozzles, Reels Haz-Mat Supplies Hand/Forcible Entry Tools Foam Equipment Fire Station Supplies Fire Extinguishing Equipment Extinguishers Systems EMS Supplies Diving Water Rescue Equipment Computers Software Breathing Apparatus Supplies Apparatus Accessories Company Alarm Systems Massachusetts Massachusetts Applied Rescue Systems of New England Webster, MA 508-943-8369 l l Ed Lyons Fire Equipment Inc Stoughton, MA 781-341-1220; www.edlyonsfire.com l FSP Books and Videos Hudson, MA 978-562-1289; www.fire-police-ems.com Gleason Fire Equipment Charlemont, MA 413-337-4948 l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Michigan Apollo Fire Equipment Co Romeo, MI 586-752-1800; www.apollofire.com l l Circle K Service Midland, MI 989-496-0511; www.circlekservice.com l l W B Thompson Co Inc Iron Mountain, MI 906-774-6543; www.wbthompson.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Minnesota Conway Fire Apparatus Lewiston, MN 507-523-2155 l Mark Enterprises Inc Plymouth, MN 736-478-2770 l Mississippi Forestry Suppliers Inc Jackson, MS 800-360-7788; www.forestry-suppliers.com Tupelo Fire Equipment Co Inc Tupelo, MS 800-426-7842; www.tupelofire.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Missouri Emergency Sales Services LLC Pacific, MO 636-271-7804; www.allairsales.com l Emergency Vehicle Parts Products Inc O’Fallon, MO 636-980-1443; www.evpp.com l Leo M Ellebracht Co Wentzville, MO 636-332-6985; www.lmecompany.com l l l l l HOT Fire Safety Equipment North Kansas City, MO 816-221-6656; www.h-o-tfire.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l 1-800 BOARD UP INC St Louis, MO 800-585-9293; www.1-800boardup.com l Montana Montana Public Safety Equipment Billings, MT 406-655-1232 l l l l l l l l l Nevada Rice Hydro Inc Carson City, NV 800-245-4777; www.ricehydro.com l New Jersey Absolute Fire Protection Co Inc South Plainfield, NJ 908-757-3600; www.absolutefire.com l l l l All Hands Fire Equipment LLC Neptune, NJ 732-502-8060; www.allhandsfire.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Approved Fire Protection Co South Plainfield, NJ 908-755-2222 Cain Sons Fire Equipment Inc Pine Brook, NJ 973-227-2277 162 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_162 162 l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:59:07 AM
  • 169. Other Training Materials Rescue Equipment Rope Radio Communication Equipment Pumps Generators Protective Clothing Positive-Pressure Ventilators Lights Chargers Ladders Hoses, Nozzles, Reels Haz-Mat Supplies Hand/Forcible Entry Tools Foam Equipment Fire Station Supplies Fire Extinguishing Equipment Extinguishers Systems EMS Supplies Diving Water Rescue Equipment Computers Software Breathing Apparatus Supplies Apparatus Accessories Company Alarm Systems New York New Jersey (cont.) Campbell Supply Co Inc Edison, NJ 732-287-8884; www.campbellsupply.com l Continental Fire and Safety Inc Trenton, NJ 609-588-0096; www.continentalfireandsafety.com l l Fire and Safety Services South Plainfield, NJ 800-400-8017; www.f-ss.com l Fire Apparatus Repair Inc Hamilton, NJ 609-689-2888 l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Murphy Fire Safety Inc Kearny, NJ 201-998-8310 New Jersey Fire Equipment Co Dunellen, NJ 732-968-2121; www.njfe.com l l Garden State Rescue Products Shrewsbury, NJ 732-842-7850; www.emsgoodies.com J B Hunt Manufacturing Co Trenton, NJ 609-587-2600; www.jbhuntfire.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Pin and Patch Factory Iselin, NJ 732-602-2152; www.pinandpatchfactory.com l State Line Fire Safety Inc Park Ridge, NJ 201-391-3290 l l Tasc Fire Apparatus Inc Farmingdale, NJ 732-938-3393 l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Turn Out Fire Safety Inc Jersey City, NJ 201-963-9312; www.turnoutuniforms.com l Turn Out Uniforms Inc Totowa, NJ 973-200-0950; www.turnoutuniforms.com l l l l l l l l l l Union Fire Equipment Corp Union, NJ 908-964-9604 l l l l l l l l l l l l Artesia Fire Equipment Inc Artesia, NM 800-748-2076; www.artesiafire.com l l l l Independent Fire Co Albuquerque, NM 505-243-3600 l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l New Mexico l l l l l l l l New York AAA Emergency Supply Co Inc White Plains, NY 914-949-0512 l Adirondack Fire Equipment Schenectady, NY 518-355-1207; www.adirondackfire.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l American LaFrance Hamburg Hamburg, NY 716-648-1907; www.americanlafrance.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Denko Watkins Glen, NY 877-336-5636; www.denkofoam.com EMSDepot Middle Island, NY 631-924-8223; www.emsdepot.com l l l l l l l l l l l l EMSSHIRTS.COM Suffern, NY 888-315-8557; www.emsshirts.com Fire Apparatus Unlimited Scotia, NY 518-399-1671 l l l l Fire-End Croker Corp Elmsford, NY 914-592-3640; www.fire-end.com l l l Firematic Supply Co East Yaphank, NY 631-924-3181; www.firematic.com l l FIRETRAC Troy, NY 518-235-8846; www.firetrac.info l www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_163 163 l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 163 1/7/09 9:59:07 AM
  • 170. Other Training Materials Rescue Equipment Rope Radio Communication Equipment Pumps Generators Protective Clothing Positive-Pressure Ventilators Lights Chargers Ladders Hoses, Nozzles, Reels Haz-Mat Supplies Hand/Forcible Entry Tools Foam Equipment Fire Station Supplies Fire Extinguishing Equipment Extinguishers Systems EMS Supplies Diving Water Rescue Equipment Computers Software Breathing Apparatus Supplies Apparatus Accessories Company Alarm Systems New York New York (cont.) Garrison Fire Rescue Corp Palenville, NY 518-678-2281; www.garrisonfire.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l Genencor Rochester, NY 269-806-2328; www.genencor.com Har-Rob Fire Apparatus Service Sales Inc Syracuse, NY 315-422-0730; www.harrob.com l l l l Henry Schein Inc Melville, NY 800-972-2611; www.henryschein.com l l Jerome Fire Equipment Co Inc Clay, NY 315-699-5288; www.jeromefire.com l l LaFrance Equipment Corp Elmira, NY 607-733-5511; www.lafrance-equipment.com l l Rockland Fire Equipment Co Inc Nyack, NY 845-358-1939; www.rocklandfire.com l Tyler Fire Equipment LLC Elmira, NY 607-734-1081; www.tylerfire.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Westchester Collectibles Valhalla, NY 914-684-6951; www.westchestercollectibles.com William Shoemaker Associates Inc Hamburg, NY 716-649-0511 l l l l l l l l l l l North Carolina CHIEF Charlotte, NC 800-824-4338; ww.chiefsupply.com Flynt Josey Charlotte, NC 704-588-1276 l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Hotstick USA Inc Raleigh, NC 919-782-4442; www.hotstickusa.com l l North Dakota Western Fire Safety Inc Dickinson, ND 701-227-1620; www.westernfire.net l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Ohio Bound Tree Medical LLC Dublin, OH 800-533-0523; www.boundtree.com l Fire Equipment Manufacturers Association Cleveland, OH 216-241-7333; www.femalifesafety.org l l l Rawhide Fire Hose Corp Orrville, OH 330-682-5080; www.rawhidefirehose.com l Rolland Specialty Vehicles Products Inc Toledo, OH 419-269-7787; www.rsvp-ambulance.com l United Fire Apparatus Corp Cridersville, OH 419-645-4083 l Van Wert Fire Equipment Co Van Wert, OH 419-238-4126 l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Oregon American Fire Protection Co Inc Portland, OR 503-234-9011 l Fire Solutions LLC Eugene, OR 541-984-0343; www.firesolutionsonline.com Life Safety Corp Portland, OR 503-231-8282; www.lifesafetycorp.com 164 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_164 164 l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:59:08 AM
  • 171. Other Training Materials Rescue Equipment Rope Radio Communication Equipment Pumps Generators Protective Clothing Positive-Pressure Ventilators Lights Chargers Ladders Hoses, Nozzles, Reels Haz-Mat Supplies Hand/Forcible Entry Tools Foam Equipment Fire Station Supplies Fire Extinguishing Equipment Extinguishers Systems EMS Supplies Diving Water Rescue Equipment Computers Software Breathing Apparatus Supplies Apparatus Accessories Company Alarm Systems Texas Pennsylvania Adams Fire Protection Co Essington, PA 610-521-2937; www.adamsfire.com l l FIRE-FLY Fire Equipment Sales Inc Cranesville, PA 814-774-8036; www.fireflyfire.com l Fire Rescue Products Harrisburg, PA 800-637-3473; www.fireandrescueproducts.com l l Fosbenner Fire Sales Center Valley, PA 610-797-2984 l Hajdukiewicz Enterprises Freeport, PA 800-863-9903 l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l J Yuricks Emergency Equipment Ambulance Sales Sheppton, PA 570-384-4156 Kaza Fire Equipment Co Ebensburg, PA 814-472-8650; www.kazafire.com l l Ketterers Rescue Products Harrisburg, PA 717-561-2621; www.ketterersrescueproducts.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l LL Diehl Uniforms Equipment Lehighton, PA 610-377-5614 l Micro Fire Apparatus Allentown, PA 610-264-4256; www.microfire.com l l 911 Safety Equipment Norristown, PA 610-279-6808; www.911se.com l Premier Safety Service Inc-Fire Div Irwin, PA 888-575-6135; www.premiersafety.com l l Susquehanna Fire Equipment Co Dewart, PA 800-822-2105; www.susquehannafire.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Personal Protection Equipment Specialists Lincoln University, PA 610-255-3666; www.ppes.us TheFirestore.com (Witmer Associates Inc) Coatesville, PA 610-857-8070; www.thefirestore.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l South Dakota Rosenbauer America Lyons, SD 605-543-5591; www.rosenbaueramerica.com l l Tennessee Cove Creek Fire Trucks Greeneville, TN 423-639-0501; www.4guysfire.com l Public Safety Depot Briceville, TN 865-603-3418; www.publicsafetydepot.com Tennessee Fire Equipment Safety Supplies LLC Chattanooga, TN 423-265-9100; www.tennfire.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Texas Maxwell Products International Duncanville, TX 972-780-0072 l Medivac Vechicles Inc Mt Pleasant, TX 903-572-0689; www.medivacvehicles.com l Steele Fire Apparatus Haskell, TX 940-864-2208; www.sfabrushfiretrucks.com l www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_165 165 l l l l l l l l l l FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 165 1/7/09 9:59:08 AM
  • 172. Other Training Materials Rescue Equipment Rope Radio Communication Equipment Pumps Generators Protective Clothing Positive-Pressure Ventilators Lights Chargers Ladders Hoses, Nozzles, Reels Haz-Mat Supplies Hand/Forcible Entry Tools Foam Equipment Fire Station Supplies Fire Extinguishing Equipment Extinguishers Systems EMS Supplies Diving Water Rescue Equipment Computers Software Breathing Apparatus Supplies Apparatus Accessories Company Alarm Systems Vermont Vermont Frontline Fire Rescue Equipment Co Essex Junction, VT 802-878-4236; www.frontlineco.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Virginia Allsafe Equipment Supply Co LLC Forest, VA 434-525-0494; www.allsafeequipmentandsupply.com Commonwealth Fire Equipment Co Inc Winchester, VA 540-678-4936; www.4guysfire.com l l l l l l l l l l l l FastLane Emergency Vehicles Inc Purcellville, VA 540-338-0901; www.flev.com l l Fire Protection Equipment Richmond, VA 804-262-1594 l l l First Line Technology LLC Chantilly, VA 703-955-7510; www.firstlinetech.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l High Angle Associates Fredericksburg, VA 540-786-2102; www.techrescue.biz Jack L Slagle Fire Equipment Supply Co Inc South Boston, VA 434-575-7905; www.slaglefire.com l l l l l l l l l l l Washington General Fire Apparatus Spokane, WA 509-535-4255; www.generalfire.com l Mallory Fire Longview, WA 800-625-5679; www.malloryco.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Rescue Northwest Spokane, WA 800-743-0554; www.rescuenorthwest.com US Fire Equipment Tacoma, WA 253-535-1778; www.usfireequipment.com l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Wisconsin General Fire Equipment Co Inc Milwaukee, WI 414-475-0959; www.genfire.net Jefferson Fire Safety Middleton, WI 608-836-0068; www.jeffersonfire.com l l Johnson Fire Equipment Clintonville, WI 715-823-2304 l Tri-State Industrial Superior, WI 800-777-8495 l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l Wyoming OK Fine Productions Casper, WY 307-266-4662; www.trainingdummies.com 166 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_166 166 l l www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 9:59:09 AM
  • 173. ARE YOU TIRED OF SHARING THIS COPY OF FIRE ENGINEERING? Get your own Fire Engineering subscription today! Call 800-582-6949 or visit WWW.FE-SUBSCRIBE.COM for the latest money-saving subscription offers. PROMO CODE: HSAD2009 0901FE_167 167 1/7/09 10:05:45 AM
  • 174. APPARATUS DELIVERIES The East Avon (NY) Fire Department uses this PIERCE quint as an engine and as a truck, explains Chief Andrew Eichhor. The unit is first out to all but EMS calls and has rescue tools mounted in the front bumper for easy access at MVAs. The single axle allows easier access into more confined areas which allows faster setup time. Features/Equipment: • Quantum chassis with TAK-4 System, 231-inch wheelbase, and six-seat cab; • DETROIT Series 60 490-hp diesel engine with ALLISON 4000 EVS automatic transmission; • WATEROUS CS single-stage, 1,500-gpm pump with PIERCE Husky 10 foam system and three crosslays (two 1¾-inch, one 2½-inch); • UPF 470-gallon water and 20-gallon foam tanks; • GORTITE roll-up compartment doors and four-wheel well sleeves for spare SCBA cylinders; • 75-foot aerial ladder with 750-pound tip load, AKRON StreamMaster ladderpipe, and 16-foot outrigger spread; • HOLMATRO rescue tools and two hydraulic reels in front bumper; • SAFETY VISION back-up camera; and • light and power with ONAN 15-kw hydraulic generator, four FRC (two each at aerial tip and telescoping behind cab) and one HANNAY electric cord reel. BY JOHN M. MALECKY Features/Equipment: • Cyclone II chassis with 230-inch wheelbase and six-seat cab; • DETROIT Series 60 515-hp diesel engine with ALLISON 4500 EVS automatic transmission; • WATEROUS S 100 single-stage, 2,000-gpm pump with 1¾-inch jumpline and three crosslays (two 1¾-inch; one 2½-inch); • 100-foot Bronto elevating platform with 1,500-pound tip load, AKRON StreamMaster monitor, and 19-foot, eightinch outrigger spread; • ROBINSON roll-up compartment doors and four-wheel well sleeves for spare SCBA cylinders; • HOLMATRO rescue tools; • tree trimmer tool to cut branches for access; • three HANNAY reels (two electric cord, one hydraulic); and • light and power with ONAN 10-kw hydraulic generator, six HAVIS SHIELDS floodlights (two on brow, two on platform, and two behind cab), and two FEDERAL scene lights on cab. Enter 2 at fireeng.hotims.com Enter 1 at fireeng.hotims.com The Elmwood Park (IL) Fire Department protects a suburban area. This E-ONE Bronto replaces an older aerial ladder truck and gives the department the versatility of a pump, explains Chief Michael Marino. Firefighter safety, as well as rescue and below-grade capabilities were considerations in choosing this type of apparatus. The Baltimore City (MD) Fire Department responds with two RESCUE 1 Airflex units to second alarms and special calls for support services, says Division Chief Donald Heinbuch. “Airflex” describes the vehicles’ components (air, floodlighting, and high-expansion foam). Features/Equipment: • INTERNATIONAL 4400 chassis with 169-inch wheelbase and two-seat cab; • INTERNATIONAL DT 466 260-hp diesel engine with ALLISON 3000 EVS-P automatic transmission; • 16 6,000-psi on-board air cylinders plumbed to a SIERRA booster; • EAGLE Cadet dual-bottle fill station; • storage for 48 spare SCBA cylinders; • POK foam generator with foam supply; and • light and power with ONAN 25-kw PTO generator, WILL BURT light tower, and six WHELEN fixed scene lights on body. Enter 3 at fireeng.hotims.com 168 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_168 168 www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 10:05:47 AM
  • 175. PRODUCTS/SERVICES/MEDIA Ziamatic Corp.’s ROL-LOC SCBA BRACKET has been tested to over nine G-force and complies with the 2009 edition of NFPA 1901 for use inside of crew cabs. It can be adjusted to fit any size current bottle or brand SCBA. Release the SCBA by pulling on the release and standing up. To put the SCBA back in the Rol-Loc, place the valve in the footplate and push back. The Rol-Loc fits any brand seat and the release can be mounted anywhere on the seat. www.ziamatic.com. (800) 711-FIRE. Enter 4 at fireeng.hotims.com MSA’s low-profile COMMANDO HP3 EMS/RESCUE HELMET delivers convenient eye protection. The patent-pending, optically-correct Defender Visor stays clean inside your helmet; just lower the closefitting visor for eye protection and raise the visor to stow it securely. The Defender Visor and no-brim Commando HP3 Cairns helmet give you durability, light weight, all-day comfort, and the protection required for NFPA compliance (NFPA 1971 certified for structural firefighting and NFPA 1951 certified for urban search and rescue—USAR). Other features include a threepoint chinstrap and bloodborne-pathogen-resistant earflaps. www.msanorthamerica.com. (800) MSA-2222. Enter 5 at fireeng.hotims.com Gear Keeper®’s new RIGHTANGLE FLASHLIGHT RETRACTOR KIT keeps flashlights accessible and prevents loss while eliminating the swinging and dangling associated with rightangle flashlights. This kit combines the proper retractor force with a stabilizer strap to keep firefighters’ right-angle flashlights strapped to their jackets and ready for use at a moment’s notice. Available in two sizes. www.gearkeeper.com. (805) 658-9922. Enter 6 at fireeng.hotims.com GSF SLIDES announces its 20.0007 SLIDE, which is four times stronger than the standard type of heavy-duty, 500-pound-class slide currently used on many U.S. fire truck drawer trays. The slide operates comfortably with a 1,000-pound load and is fabricated from cold-drawn steel bar, which is www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_169 169 stronger against shock and vibration, has stronger end stops, a stronger cage, and stronger reinforcing sets of minor-axis bearings. www.gsfslides.com. Enter 7 at fireeng.hotims.com Sperian’s new BIOSYSTEMS PHD6 MULTIGAS DETECTOR senses and identifies many different gases and volatile organic compounds, such as benzene, diesel, alcohol, and thousands of chemicals. It has five sensor ports, up to six detection channels, and more than 20 sensor options including PID and infrared. Day-to-day detector operations are controlled through a single mode button. A status bar on the display with easily recognizable icons gives the user realtime readings from time to calibration status. Built-in menus allow advanced users to configure the detector in the field. www.sperianprotection.com. (800) 343-3411. Enter 8 at fireeng.hotims.com IMS Alliance™ introduces the PASSPORT ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEM®. The manual system is comprised of Passport® Name Tags, Passport® Collectors, radio tags, reflective helmet shields (pictured), incident command vests, and incident command and accountability boards. It is NIMS/ ICS compliant and used by both governmental and private agencies worldwide. www.imsalliance.com. (866) 371-1670. Enter 9 at fireeng.hotims.com The Spectrex AUTOMATIC FIRE/EXPLOSION EXTINGUISHING SYSTEM protects against combat-initiated and slow-growth fires and features high-speed optical detection in less than three milliseconds, explosion suppression within 150 milliseconds, and multiple extinguishing agent discharge and dispersion. The system is capable of detecting and suppressing all possible types of fires, including small or large, slow or rapidly growing, limited-in-area or widely spread, and fuel explosions. Its control electronics provide system activation, self- and built-in test capabilities, and system monitoring. The system includes a detector/controller (pictured), an optical detector, and two extinguishing cylinders, among several other features. www. military-systems.com. (800) 452-2107. Enter 10 at fireeng.hotims.com FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 169 1/7/09 10:05:51 AM
  • 176. COMING EVENTS CONFERENCES/EXHIBITIONS FEBRUARY, 6-8, University of Missouri Extension Winter Fire School. Columbia, Missouri. Sponsor: University of Missouri—Columbia/Fire and Rescue Training Institute. Contact: (800) 869-3476, (573) 882-4735. Fax: (573) 882-0678. Web site: www.mufrti.org. FEBRUARY 7, Lt. Andy Fredericks, FDNY Memorial Seminar Exhibits. Elmsford, New York. Sponsor: Elmsford (NY) Fire Department. Contact: Syd Henry, (914) 490-1981. E-mail: shenry@elmsfordfd.com. Joe Dorio, (914) 536-2235. E-mail: jdorio@elmsfordfd.com. Web site: http://elmsfordfd.com/ seminar.php. FEBRUARY 9-12, National Arson Training Seminar. Sandestin, Florida. Sponsor: Insurance Committee for Arson Control (ICAC). Contact: Web site: www.arsoncontrol.org. E-mail: info@arsoncontrol.org. FEBRUARY 19-22, 30th Annual International Disaster Management Conference. Orlando, Florida. Sponsor: Emergency Medicine Learning Resource Center. Contact: (800) 766-6335. Fax: (407) 281-4407. Web site: www.emlrc.org. FEBRUARY 21-22, 14th Annual Jackson Fire Expo. North Canton, Ohio. Sponsor: Jackson Professional Firefighters. Contact: (330) 832-9495. E-mail: seminarcoordinator@jacksonfirefighters.com. Web site: www.jacksonfirefighters.com. FEBRUARY 27-MARCH 1, ExtricationFest. Fort Worth, Texas. Sponsor: Midsouth Rescue Technologies, Inc. Contact: (817) 521-7363. Web site: www.midsouthrescue.org. FEBRUARY 27-MARCH 1, 16th Annual NCEMSF Conference. Washington, D.C. Sponsor: National Collegiate EMS Foundation. Contact: Phone/Fax: (208) 728-7342. Web site: www.ncemsf.org. E-mail: conf2009@ncemsf.org. MARCH 9-11, FIERO Fire PPE Symposium. Charlotte, North Carolina. Sponsor: Fire Industry Equipment Research Organization. Contact: Web site: wwwfireppesymposium. com. E-mail: rtutterow@ci.charlotte.nc.us. MARCH 22-26, IAFC Wildland Urban Interface Conference. Reno, Nevada. Sponsor: International Association of Fire Chiefs. Contact: (703) 449-6418, (800) 934-1957. Web site: www.iafc.org. E-mail: iafcregistration@jspargo.com. FDIC The upcoming Fire Department Instructors Conference (FDIC) offers dynamic fire service leaders in its General Sessions, nationally known instructors in its Hands-On Training (H.O.T) and classroom sessions, and the latest technology from fire industry exhibitors. April 20-25, 2009, FDIC. Indianapolis, Indiana. Web site: fdic09.events.pennnet.com/ For registration information, call (888) 299-8016. FDNY HIGH-RISE OPERATIONS SYMPOSIUM MARCH 19-20 The Fire Department of New York (FDNY) and the FDNY Foundation sponsor this two-day event at the FDNY Training Academy on Randall’s Island in New York City. Topics include high-rise building construction/occupancy, construction emergencies (e.g., crane, scaffolding collapses), setting up the incident command system, evacuation considerations, and more. For more information, visit www.FDNYfoundation.org or call (718) 999-0779. FEBRUARY 7, Ice Rescue Technician. Harrisville, New Hampshire. Sponsor: Lifesaving Resources Inc. (603) 827-4139. Web site: www.lifesaving.com. FEBRUARY 9, Fire Inspector I. College Park, Maryland. Sponsor: Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute. Contact: (301) 226-9900, (800) ASK-MFRI (800-275-6374). Web site: www.mfri.org. FEBRUARY 16, Fire Inspector II. College Park, Maryland. Sponsor: Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute. Contact: (301) 226-9900, (800) ASK-MFRI (800-275-6374). Web site: www. mfri.org. FEBRUARY 19-22, Ice Rescue Train-the-Trainer Academy. Hancock, New Hampshire. Sponsor: Lifesaving Resources Inc. (603) 827-4139. Web site: www.lifesaving.com. MARCH 23-27, Emergency Responder Conference and Expo. Beaumont, Texas. Sponsor: Industrial Fire World. Contacts: (979) 690-7559. Fax: (979) 690-7562. Web site: www. fireworld.com/conference/conference.php. FEBRUARY 23-27, Hazardous Materials Technician. Pueblo, Colorado. Sponsor: Emergency Response Training Center. Contact: (719) 584-0584, (800) 933-4882. Fax: (719) 584-0790. E-mail: hazmat_services@aar.com. Web site: www. hazmattraining.com. COURSES/SEMINARS MARCH 2-6, Wildland Firefighter I. Carlin, Nevada. Sponsor: University of Nevada, Reno Fire Science Academy. Contact: (775) 754-6003, (866) 914-0015. Web site: http://www. fireacademy.unr.edu. FEBRUARY 2-6, Highway Emergency Response Specialist. Pueblo, Colorado. Sponsor: Emergency Response Training Center. Contact: (719) 584-0584, (800) 933-4882. Fax: (719) 584-0790. E-mail: hazmat_services@aar.com. Web site: www. hazmattraining.com. FEBRUARY 2-9, Peer Fitness Trainer Certification. Glenview, Illinois. Sponsor: Northeastern Illinois Public Safety Training Academy. Contact: (847) 998-8090. Fax: (847) 998-8091. Web site: www.nipsta.org. FEBRUARY 7, Fireground Survival Seminar featuring John Salka, FDNY. Pontiac, Illinois. Sponsor: Fire Training Resources. Contact: (866) 966-9295. Fax: (866) 860-4280. E-mail: seminar@firetrainingresources.net. Web site: firetrainingresources.net. 170 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_170 170 MARCH 9-12, Incident Command System: Train-the Trainer. Oak Forest, Illinois. Sponsor: Northeastern Illinois Public Safety Training Academy. Contact: (847) 998-8090. Fax: (847) 998-8091. Web site: www.nipsta.org. MARCH 9-13, Hazardous Materials Chemistry. Carlin, Nevada. Sponsor: University of Nevada, Reno Fire Science Academy. Contact: (775) 754-6003, (866) 914-0015. Web site: http://www.fireacademy.unr.edu. MARCH 11-18, National Fire Service Staff and Command Course. Ocean City, Maryland. Sponsor: Maryland Fire Rescue Institute. Contact: (301) 226-9900. E-mail: sac@mfri.org. www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 10:05:55 AM
  • 177. COMPANY/ASSOCIATION NEWS The DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY awarded WORCESTER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE $430,000 to continue to develop its own technology and to also conduct a national test of all existing indoor tracking and monitoring systems. The test will be administered by the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development, and Engineering Center in Natick, Massachusetts, spring 2009. Indoor location technology helps to quickly locate and rescue firefighters and other first responders who become lost, disabled, or trapped inside a building, while physiological monitoring systems alert incident commanders when firefighters are in distress. The Florida Bureau of Fire Standards and Training has granted accreditation to FLAME-SIM™, for use in a class titled “Fire Officer Virtual Experience Skills Training (VEST)”. The class is offered at the Florida State Fire College, the first fire training academy to offer course work using the training software. VEST is a three-day, 24-hour class that teaches strategies and tactics to company officers and chiefs. Program goals include improving the tracking and coordination skills of the on-scene fire officer and limiting micromanagement in real-time events. www.floridafireprograms.com. www.flame-sim.com. (877) FLAME-01. FIRE 20/20 will make available its new targeted recruitment video Why I Chose Fire to fire departments and college fire science programs at no cost. The six-minute video is designed to educate, inspire, and motivate 15- to 21-year-old women of all cultures and men of color to explore a firefighting or paramedic career. Why I Chose Fire features animation, popular music, and interviews with diverse firefighters and paramedics talking about why they love their jobs. Fire departments can stream or fill out a form to download one copy of video and a user guide at www. fire2020.org. The UNITED STATES FIRE ADMINISTRATION (USFA) has issued a report examining the causes and characteristics of fires occurring in residential structures and buildings. The report, Residential Structure and Building Fires, was developed by the National Fire Data Center and is based primarily on 2005 National Fire Incident Reporting System data and the 2005 National Fire Protection Association survey data. The report presents an overview of residential structure fires and trends for www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_171 171 one-and two-family, multifamily, and other residential structures. These fires claimed the lives of 2,895 civilians and injured an additional 13,375 civilians. Download the report at www.usfa.dhs. gov/statistics/reports/index.shtm. THE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (OSHA) and the AMERICAN FIRE SPRINKLER ASSOCIATION (AFSA) have formed an alliance to address reducing and preventing exposure to material handling, fall hazards, and motor vehicle safety issues. Through the alliance, employers and employees in the fire sprinkler and construction industries will receive guidance on material handling and fall hazards and on motor vehicle safety issues. The Alliance will develop training and educational programs addressing these hazards and communicate information through exhibits, conferences, and OSHA- and AFSA-developed Web sites. www.osha.gov. The BOYNTON BEACH (FL) FIRE RESCUE DEPARTMENT has received the 2007 Life Safety Achievement Award from the RESIDENTIAL FIRE SAFETY INSTITUTE (RFSI). For 15 years, the award has recognized the local fire prevention activities that contributed to reducing the number of lives lost in residential fires. Boynton Fire Rescue qualified for this award because it recorded zero fire deaths in structures last year. The RFSI advocates the use of residential fire sprinklers, smoke alarms, carbon monoxide detectors and teaching people fire-safe behavior. www. firesafehome.org. NAMES IN THE NEWS CURTIS BIRT, 41, was sworn in as the new chief of the Lake Cities Fire Department in Corinth, Texas. After an 11-month search, Corinth city officials promoted Birt, the acting chief since December 2007. A deputy chief since 2002, Birt is a 24-year fire service veteran and spent many of those years teaching firefighting around the country. Birt now commands 36 sworn firefighters and three administrators who are sworn officers, as well as two civilian office staff members and a volunteer. FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 171 1/7/09 10:05:55 AM
  • 178. CLASSIFIEDS E D U CAT I O N / T R A I N I N G For advertising information: (800) 237-9851 • fire@rja-ads.com E D U CAT I O N first response 545 31 ROAD GRAND JCT. CO 81504 www.mitico.com services@mitico.com PHONE (866) 545-6484 FAX (970) 243-9200 FIRE EQUIPMENT PNWFIRENEWS.COM News/information/training paul@pnwfirenews.com FIRE EQUIPMENT For classified advertising information, Call: (800) 237-9851 Email: fire@rja-ads.com 172 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_172 172 www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 10:05:59 AM
  • 179. For advertising information: (800) 237-9851 • CLASSIFIEDS fire@rja-ads.com FIRE EQUIPMENT FIRE EQUIPMENT “The Original Heavyweight Fleece Mask Bag, and Still The Best” The Mask Bag™ I, II, III IV, $14.00 and up Plus shipping, Canvas bags, fleece bags, hybrids, Red, Blue, Yellow, Blue Black, Yellow custom. The Blackout Cover™ • On and off in seconds! • Models for most masks! • Train in seconds anywhere! $9.00 ea. Plus Shipping S.M. Smith Co., Iron Mountain, MI 49801 906-774-8258 or 1-888-292-bags (2247) Fax: 906-774-9966 • www.smsmithco.com All products made in the USA. WHERE TO FIND IT Where To Find It: high-impact, cost-effective, reaching customers who value the crucial information, products and services that only Fire Engineering delivers! Reserve your spot and ensure your company is top-of-mind when purchasing decisions are made! To place your listing call (800) 237-9851 or email fire@rja-ads.com. ABSORBENT MATERIALS MULTIPURPOSE LIQUID ABSORBENT MATERIAL Besorb is the fastest liquid absorbent material on the market and makes the accident area skid-free and the environment safe in seconds! Besorb will absorb oil, water, antifreeze, gas, and much more. Available in 1 gallon jugs, 5 gallon pails, or 30 pound bags. Visit us online at www.bes-liquid.com for more information about how Besorb can work for you. Baytech Engineering Specialties Inc. Toll Free: (800) 319-3049 ALTERNATORS Need a quote? Email: fire@rja-ads.com www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_173 173 SCBA CASCADE REFILL SYSTEMS 5,000 psi 6,000 psi Serving the industry for 16 years. We manufacture stationary, mobile and custom high pressure breathing air compressors, air management panels, containment fill stations, cascade systems, free consultations. Made in TEXAS USA 2807 Peddler Lane, Kerrville TX 78028 Phone: 830-257-5006; Fax: 830-257-3720 E-mail: sales@max-air.com Website: www.max-air.com APPARATUS SALES www.sellfiretrucks.com FURNISHINGS BUNK BEDS AND LOFT BEDS for fire departments, camps, kids, teens and college students. Easy to assemble kits starting at $189 or Do-It-Yourself plans $10. Makes a great Christmas gift. www.CollegeBedLofts.com/fire-eng (866) 739-2331 AIR COMPRESSOR SYSTEMS ––BUYING AND SELLING USED FIRE APPARATUS–– C.E. NIEHOFF CO. C. E. Niehoff manufactures brushless alternators made specifically for the severest applications. Its models are designed with a wide range of output capabilities and a variety of market specific features. 2021 Lee Street Evanston, IL 60202 Phone: 800-643-4633; Fax: 847-492-1242 E-mail: sales@ceniehoff.com Website: www.ceniehoff.com FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 173 1/7/09 10:06:01 AM
  • 180. WHERE TO FIND IT Where To Find It is a high-impact, cost-effective source to reach a customer base who values the critical information, products and services that only Fire Engineering can deliver! The Where to Find It Directory is published in each issue, allowing you year-round delivery of your products and services. Reserve your spot to ensure your company name is top-of-mind when purchasing decisions are being made! Contact: Fire Engineering Classifieds, (800) 237-9851, or email fire@rja-ads.com to place your listing. APPARATUS SALES APPAREL APPAREL www.FiremansChore.com Denim JOB JACKETS Focusing on bringing you the best seller and buyer experience from a broker. Both parties gain more by being part of our experience. So, whether you’re selling or buying try us first! • Professional Sales and Services • Lower Commissions • Better Products Toolmounting.com is the ONLY company offering truly custom mounting and mounting products. We want to show you what makes us better today and everyday. So visit us online today! www.ambulancebroker.com • www.firetruckbroker.com www.toolmounting.com • www.evsales.net Brought to you by Emergency Vehicle Sales Inc. Phone: 717-431-3077. Fax: 717-431-3052 E-mail: bechrist@evsales.net AWARDS FIREMANS CHORE FIREMANS CHORE, INC. Denim Job Coats Located in Indianapolis, Indiana offering the Original Firefighters Denim and Diamond Quilted Job Jackets. Our company also offers embroidery and other options to make us your “One Stop Shop” for a “Truly American Firefighters Jacket”. Made in the USA and Firefighter Owned. 409 Southwood Court, Indianapolis, IN 46217 Phone: 317-627-5142 E-mail: scott@firemanschore.com Website: www.firemanschore.com DECALS SPECIAL FIRE DEPARTMENT BONUS OFFER GREAT DEAL FOR ALL FIREMEN AND GOVERNMENT PERSONNEL! Save 20% on all fire resistant underwear and fire resistant thermal underwear. In order to receive this promotion, just enter the promo code FDUSA in the box labeled coupon code during checkout or call our toll free number. You must have a valid government or fire department email address and / or a government or fire department ship to address. **Offer not valid with other promotions unless otherwise specified. YOUR SAFETY DEPENDS ON IT Wickers supplies the only underwear available on the market today that will not drip or melt when exposed to extreme heat or open flame. And unlike the offerings of our competitors, all Wickers Fire Resistant undergarments are manufactured from renewable materials and completely free of toxic chemicals. GSA-certified for government purchase and combat tested by our troops in Iraq and Afghanistan. Website: www.wickers.com Phone: (800) 648-7024 FIRE EQUIPMENT VEHICLE EXHAUST CAPTURE SYSTEMS AirMation--The Performance You Can Trust FirehouseDecalsAndMore.com Started in 2001, FirehouseDecalsAndMore.com has become the leader in the production of custom and stock decals (helmet, window, vehicle, in the production of custom and stock decals (helmet, window, vehicle, apparatus), emblems, lapel pins, bar/counter stools, neon clocks, apparatus), emblems, lapel pins, bar/counter stools, neon clocks, challenge coins, mouse pads, shift calendars, and imprinted apparel challenge coins, mouse pads, shift calendars, and imprinted apparel (T-shirts, Sweat Shirts and Baseball Caps). Additionally, our on-site art (T-shirts, Sweat Shirts and Baseball Caps). Additionally, our on-site art department can design company, station, and department logos. department take of your request, station, and department us by “If WE can’t can design company,it can’t be done”. 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Be sure to or email before you makeat FRI - Denver, CO Toll Free: 888-771-3124; Fax: 513 677-3624 Toll Free: 888-771-3124; Fax: 513 677-3624 E-mail: sales@firehousedecalsandmore.com E-mail: sales@firehousedecalsandmore.com Website: www.firehousedecalsandmore.com Website: www.firehousedecalsandmore.com FIRE EQUIPMENT RESCUE EQUIPMENT The World Leader in Vehicle Exhaust Capture Systems is 100% Compliant with NIOSH, OSHA, EPA, NFPA, USFA, and others, meeting or exceeding standards relating to carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, carcinogens, and soot in a firehouse or EMS facility, Grant Compliant, free grant application assistance, Automatic hands-free, No building or vehicle modifications, No hanging hoses, reliable and dependable, quiet 24/7 operation, Total Air Quality Control, Breathe Clean Air. 337 High St., Burlington, NJ 08016 Phone: 800-743-3323; Fax: 609-232-0712 E-mail: Air@pureair.com Website: www.airtechnologysolutions.com TRAINING FORCIBLE ENTRY TRAINING DOORS RUD Automatic Snow Chains RUD’s automatic snow chain system, ROTOGRIP® has a universal mounting system that is quick and easy to install and is designed to work in forward and reverse. The ROTOGRIP® system provides excellent traction at low speeds due to the adjustable mounting system and unique chain wheel types. With replaceable contact rings, easy installation, and superior design the ROTOGRIP® system is an ideal choice for travel in winter conditions. P.O. Box 367, Hiawatha, IA 52233 Phone: 800-553-7993; Fax: 319-294-0003 E-mail: sales@rudchain.com Website: www.rudchain.com 174 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_174 174 ROCK-N-RESCUE Rock-N-Rescue is a manufacturer and distributor of the finest and highest quality technical rescue equipment available. Representing the best manufacturers and working with them to develop new innovative equipment. We take pride in our customer service and will do what we can to assist you in all your rescue needs. P.O. Box 213 Valencia, PA 16059-0213 Phone: 800-346-7673; Fax: 724-898-3139 E-mail: info@rocknrescue.com Website: www.RocknRescue.com • Patent pending design provides endless forcible entry training. • Adjustable pressure – choose resistance of wooden or metal doors. • Door design allows user to set halligan to proper depth. • Folding base and heavy-duty casters allow easy storage. www.frictionforce.net For more information call (888) 325-3074 or fax (203) 651-1470 www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 10:06:02 AM
  • 181. Advertising Sales Offices EXECUTIVE OFFICE / PUBLISHER Eric Schlett 21-00 Route 208 South Fair Lawn, NJ 07410-2602 Tel. (973) 251-5055 Fax (973) 251-5065 E-mail: erics@pennwell.com NORTHEAST / MID ATLANTIC EASTERN CANADA Joseph T. Porter, National Sales Manager Tel. (215) 230-1950, 800-572-1863 Fax (215) 230-1951 E-mail: joep@pennwell.com MIDWEST David Kathe, Regional Sales Manager Tel. (630) 513-1724 Fax (630) 513-1781 E-mail: davek@pennwell.com SOUTHEAST Tim Tolton, Regional Sales Manager Tel. (770) 457-5462 Fax (770) 457-5463 E-mail: timt@pennwell.com SOUTHWEST / WEST / WESTERN CANADA Ted Billick, Regional Sales Manager Tel. (801) 262-1871 Fax (801) 262-3077 E-mail: tedb@pennwell.com CLASSIFIEDS Russell Johns Associates, LLC Tel. (727) 443-7666, 800-237-9851 Fax (727) 445-9380 E-mail: fire@rja-ads.com FIRE ENGINEERING® (ISSN 0015-2587) is published monthly by PennWell Corporation, 1421 S. Sheridan, Tulsa, OK 74112. January 2009 issue, Volume 162, Number 01. Periodicals postage paid at Tulsa and additional mailing offices. Executive, editorial, and advertising offices at 21-00 Route 208 South, Fair Lawn, NJ 07410-2602. Copyright 2009 by PennWell Corporation. All rights reserved. Material may not be reproduced in any form without written permission of the publisher. Fire Engineering is a registered trademark. SUBSCRIPTIONS: To subscribe call 800-582-6949 or visit our website at www.fe-subscribe.com. 1-year rate for USA and possessions $29.95, Canada $42.75, International $64.95. Call for single copy and digital site license pricing. All subscription correspondence should be addressed to Fire Engineering, PO Box 3498, Northbrook, IL 60065. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: PO Box 122, Niagara Falls, Ontario Canada L2E 6S4. GST No. 126813153 Printed in the USA Publications Mail Agreement No. 40052420 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Fire Engineering, Box 3498, Northbrook, IL 60065. Advertisers Index 5.11 Tactical Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 A Air Vacuum Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 American Trade Mark Company. . . . . . . 94 B BW Technologies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Bauer Compressors, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Black Diamond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Blauer Manufacturing Co, Inc. . . . . . . . . 53 BullEx Digital Safety. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 C C. E. Niehoff Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 CET Fire Pumps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 CMC Rescue.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Champion Rescue Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Classified Advertising . . . . . . . . . . . 172-174 Columbia Southern University. . . . . . . . . 24 Con-Space Communications. . . . . . . . . . . 7 Crimson Fire. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 D Disaster Response Solutions, Inc.. . . . . . 74 Draeger Safety. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 E E-ONE, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 E2V Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 ESS - Eye Safety Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Eagle Compressors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Elkhart Brass Mfg. Company, Inc. . . . . . . . .15 Emergent Respiratory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 Entenmann-Rovin Badge Company . . . . 71 Extendo Bed Company. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 F FDIC 2009. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 FDIC Online. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 FDNY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 FEBV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Fire Engineering E-newsletter . . . . . . . 103 Fire Engineering Subscriptions . . . . . . . 167 Firecom Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 FirePrograms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Foam Pro. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Fol-Da-Tank. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38, 76 G Globe Manufacturing Company . . . . . . . 2-3 Gorman-Rupp Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Grace Industries, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 W.L. Gore Associates, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 9 H Hale Products / Class 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Harrington, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Holmatro, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Home Fire Sprinkler Coalition. . . . . . . . . 37 Howell Rescue Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Hurst Jaws of Life. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Husky Portable Containment. . . . . . . . . 64 Hydro Flow Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 113 I IMS Alliance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 ISG Thermal Systems USA, Inc. . . . . . . . 65 ISI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Informed Field Guides. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 International Code Council. . . . . . . . . . . 97 K Kidde Fire Fighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Knox Box Company. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Kochek Company, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Kussmaul Electronics Co., Inc. . . . . . . . . 48 L Locution Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 O On Scene Solutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Onspot of North America. . . . . . . . . . . . 84 P PBI Performance Products, Inc. . . . . . . . C4 PGI DIFCO Performance Fabrics, Inc. . . 89 Paratech Incorporated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Paul Conway Shields. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 PhosChek / ICL Performance Products. . 90 Physio-Control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Pierce Manufacturing, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . 13 PlymoVent Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Power Hawk Technologies. . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Q Quala-Tel Communications. . . . . . . . . . 108 Quest Protective Clothing. . . . . . . . . . . . 48 R RUD-Chain, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Res-Q-Jack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Rescue 42 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Robotronics, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 RollNRack, LLC.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 S Salsbury Industries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Scott Health Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Seats, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Shafer Enterprises / Cool Shirt . . . . . . . . 68 Sigtronics Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Skedco, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Smiths Detection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C3 Southern Mills, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Spartan Chassis, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C2-1 Sterling Rope. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Streamlight, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Summit Fire Apparatus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Super Vacuum Mfg. Company, Inc. . . . . 70 T Tele-Lite, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Texas Engineering Extension Service. . . 95 TheFireStore.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18, 87 Toyne Fire Apparatus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Toyota Motor Sales USA, Inc. . . . . . . . . 102 Trelleborg Viking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 True North Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 U US Digital Designs, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 United Plastic Fabricating, Inc.. . . . . . . . 58 University of Maryland University College. 101 W W.S. Darley Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Ward Diesel Filter.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32A Waterous Company. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Whelen Engineering Company, Inc. . . . . 30 Williams Fire Hazard Control, Inc. . . . 80 Z ZOLL Data RescueNet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Ziamatic Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 This index is provided as a service. The publisher does not assume any liability for errors or omissions. www.FireEngineering.com 0901FE_175 175 FIRE ENGINEERING January 2009 175 1/7/09 10:06:05 AM
  • 182. RULES OF ENGAGEMENT More Cool School: The IC’s Need to “Disconnect” BY ALAN BRUNACINI AST MONTH WE STARTED DIScussing the natural competition that occurs between the incident commander’s (IC’s) brain and heart and how difficult it can be to stay calm while commanding an incident that is both tactically and emotionally challenging—in fact, most events that are difficult tactically will also in some way beat up the IC’s emotions. Operating at an active structural fire has always been a big deal to us, and always will be (I hope). It is the event that, more than any other, defines who we are and what we do. The importance of being a capable firefighter on every level creates a great deal of pressure. This is particularly true of the IC because how he performs is extremely visible. Most of the operating team go into the hazard zone and do a lot of their work inside in the “dark,” in the products of combustion, as opposed to the IC, who typically operates in the very visible command post position and also in a very “audible” position, on the radio over the tactical channel. Sometimes, the pressure to perform effectively can cause the IC to shift the responsibility of providing overall command and control professionally to the incident to taking responsibility for the incident personally. During my life as a fire chief, I responded to a lot of incidents, and by the time I arrived, a command team (IC, support officer, and senior advisor) was generally in place inside a command post vehicle operating on the strategic level. The members of those teams were typically very capable and cool. My happy role in these operations was to stand in my corner of the command vehicle and quietly watch the team work and interact with the senior advisor. Occasionally, when a young IC would seem to be taking a big (ugly) flame front fire personally, I would pat him on the shoulder and whisper in his ear: “It’s not your fault; it’s just your problem.” After the incident, the IC would generally thank me for helping him do a simple little perspec- L 176 January 2009 FIRE ENGINEERING 0901FE_176 176 tive adjustment that made him more effective. After the incident, we would then get to talk about the challenge of simultaneously staying as mentally connected as possible, along with being a bit emotionally disconnected from the incident status. Over time, I noticed that this was an acquired ability that required practice, personal discipline, and refinement. If you watch really coolheaded ICs operate at high-stress incidents, they develop the ability to clinically “disconnect” from the incident in a very special way. They have refined the ability to divert and redirect their emotional energy into an increased level of mental focus on their role as an IC. We don’t talk about the “disconnect” very much because while it may sound coolheaded, it can also sound coldhearted. The smart old soldier ICs have figured out that if they emotionally internalize the critical damage and destruction situational elements, it will completely overwhelm their ability to tactically focus and then to effectively deploy. When the IC begins to personalize the damage and destruction, he begins to fall into a sucking vortex (!) of emotional quicksand. I heard an old guy say: “Son, if it becomes YOUR fire, you will end up running down the street with your hair on fire screaming ‘Fire!’ ” He was the same guy who told the homeowner who was screaming at him in front of her burning home: “Lady, I didn’t light it; I’m trying to put it out.” Sometimes, how we deal with making the emotional to mental disconnect to somehow stay cool can produce a somewhat sarcastic (sounding) response, given our natural gallows humor. Although this very internal response is an effective coping mechanism for us, the gentle souls outside our service must be sheltered from our somewhat esoteric sense of humor—like the inside-the-command-post, old-guy to young-guy comment I heard in front of a middle-of-the-night major fire: “Son, settle down, these are nice folks, and they are having a nice fire.” Simply, our internal stuff should stay internal. We instruct the IC to temporarily separate himself from the (traumatic loss) part of the fire and to connect mentally with the tactical part, not because we don’t care what is occurring, but because we do care. We know that the IC with ice water in his veins will save a lot more humans, structures, family picture albums, and teddy bears than some IC sitting in the command SUV looking right at side A and sobbing hysterically because of the absolutely horrible effects of uncontrolled thermal insult on people, places, and things. Although we have the responsibility to provide calm, effective, nonemotional incident command, we must realize the incident has a set of human dynamics that we must also address. This is where our standard incident organization kicks in. We must develop, use, and refine a standard Owner Occupant Support Sector/Group based on a local SOP. The IC implements this organizational element to assist the humans affected by the incident. A wide range of responders must be trained to set up and operate this function. It is the IC’s responsibility to identify the human support needs of the incident and to assign that function. Whoever receives that assignment gathers up those who need assistance and begins to provide short-term recovery assistance (food, shelter, transportation, possession recovery, connection to social services). The standard practice of using this function creates the really smart schizophrenic capability for us to do simultaneous cool command and warm customer support at the same time. I never received a letter thanking us for calm command, but I received a ton of letters about people, pets, pictures, and pills. ● ● Retired Chief ALAN BRUNACINI is a fire service author and speaker. He and his sons own the fire service Web site bshifter.com. www.FireEngineering.com 1/7/09 10:06:08 AM
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