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The lake report 2-13-12
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The lake report 2-13-12

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  • 1. The Lake Report By: Blake Kellum, SJRA February 13, 2012 Lake Conroe continues slow but steady rebound in water level!As winter weather patterns have started to set in on Southeast Texas, the San Jacinto RiverAuthority is closely monitoring the Lake Conroe water level. Daily lake level records,maintained by the Lake Conroe Division staff, indicate that since the beginning of the new year,the lake has regained over two feet of water level. With more rain in the forecast for themiddle of the week and several more systems moving through over the next 10 days, the SJRAremains optimistic that the recovery from historic low lake levels, due to the exceptionaldrought conditions of 2011, will continue. The combination of extremely wet soil conditionsand regular precipitation occurring within Lake Conroe‘s relatively small, 444 square milewatershed is just what is needed for water level conditions to improve. For comparison, LakeLivingston’s watershed is comprised of more than 17,000 square miles of drainages thatencompass most of the Dallas/Fort Worth metro-plex and stretch all the way into the southernpanhandle region. That is a lot of area in which to capture and retain runoff from stormsystems that would otherwise totally miss hitting Lake Conroe’s small drainage basin.Going forward for the remainder of 2012, the Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration(NOAA) is forecasting a weakening of La Nina conditions in the equatorial Pacific sometime thisspring or summer. La Nina conditions are primarily to blame for the extreme weather patternsexperienced by much of the U.S. in 2011, including the historic, exceptional drought in Texas.Lake Conroe Level is currently reporting in at 194.60 feet above “mean sea level” (msl), which isup from a low of 192.68’ msl in December of last year. There are no discharges of any typebeing made from the dam. Water temperatures remain in the high 50’s to low 60’s.For more information and current lake conditions go to www.sjra.net or like us on Facebook.