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Record industry 15
 

Record industry 15

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MUS 419 Chadron State College

MUS 419 Chadron State College

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    Record industry 15 Record industry 15 Presentation Transcript

    • Recording Industry Chapter 15
    • Recording History
      • 1877 Edison invents cylinder recording
      • 1887 Emile Berliner patented gramophone, 1890 first lateral-cut disks, 1893 formed United States Gramophone Company
      • 1894 1st commercial recording
      • 1901 Victor Talking Machine Co.
    • History cont.
      • 1917 1st Jazz Recording
      • 1924 Bell Labs invents electrical recording process: range 100-5,000 Hz
      • 1930s Great Depression, Sales Drop 90%, Jukebox growths helps industry
      • 1939 Decca markets low cost 35 cent recording
    • History cont.
      • 1942-45 AF of M strike
      • Late 1940s one-stops (distributors with all labels); Independent Labels grow
      • 1948 33 1/3 RPM record & 45 RPM born
      • 1950s TV takes over, Radio stations fire live bands & use recorded music.
      • 1953 - Les Paul perfects multi-track recording machine
    • History cont
      • 1955 Columbia Record Club
      • 1957 Rack Jobbing begins
      • 1958 Stereo introduced. Listening booths disappear.
      • 1960s NARM National Association of Record Merchandisers. Major labels begin to reclaim market.
    • History cont.
      • 1970s - Independent Producers grow. 16-24 track recorders & synthesizers
      • 1980s - Disco bust, MTV & Video Clips, CDs
      • 1990s - DAT approved, internet begins to effect distribution.
      • 2000 - MP3s, Napster, iPod, iTunes
    • Major Labels
      • “their own distribution system”
      • Own manufacturing facilities, lower costs
      • Well financed international corps.
      • Can sign more artists for more money
      • Can promote at $100,000 per single
      • 1 in 5 recoup
      • Can ride out continued losses
    • Independent Labels
      • Must rely on various distributors, money slow in returning up the pipeline
      • Closer to street level, release new styles earlier than majors
      • Can serve a niche market with loyal following
    • Specialty Labels
      • Specific demographic - classical (Nonesuch & Deutsche Grammophon), Folk & ethnic (Folkways)
      • DIY - Do It Yourself. Sell from the stage or a web site
    • Major Labels
      • Universal Music Group - 29.59%
      • Sony/BMG - 28.46%
      • Warner Music Group - 14.68%
      • EMI Music Group - 9.91%
    • Universal
      • Interscope/Geffen/A&M
      • Island Def Jam Music Group
      • Motown
      • Universal Music Nashville
      • Universal Records
      • Verve Music Group
      • Universal Classics Group
    • Universal cont
      • Universal Music Enterprises
      • Universal Music Latino
      • Island Records Group (UK)
      • Mercury (UK)
      • Polydor (UK)
    • Sony
      • Arista Records
      • BMG/Classics
      • BMG Heritage
      • BMG International Companies
      • Columbia Records
      • Epic Records
      • J Records
      • Legacy Recordings
    • Sony cont
      • RCA Records
      • RCA Victor Group
      • RLG Nashville
      • Sony Classical
      • Sony Music International
      • Sony Music Nashville
      • Sony Wonder
      • Sony Urban Music
    • Warner Music Group
      • Asylum Records
      • Atlantic Records Group
      • East West
      • Warner Bros. Records Inc
      • Warner Music International
      • Warner Strategic Marketing
    • EMI Music Group
      • Angel Records
      • Blue Note Records
      • Capitol Records US
      • Capitol Records Nashville
      • EMI Latin
      • EMI Christian Music Group
      • Narada
      • Priority Records
      • Virgin Records America
    • Administrative Structure
      • Executive (CEO, COO, CFO, General Manager) - Lawyers or Producers
      • A&R (Artist & Repertoire) - sign talent, listening to demos, visiting clubs & showcases. After signing guide project through
    • Structure cont.
      • Distribution/Sales - get product into stores and one-stops
      • Marketing - Radio Promotion (visit stations, appearances, interviews, etc.), Video Promotion, Publicity (manage media coverage, articles & interviews), Advertising (ads in national and trade press, etc.) ,
    • Structure cont.
      • Creative Services (design products, album art, posters), Production Dept (oversee various steps), Product Manager, Special Products (licensing requests, repackaging back catalog)
    • Structure cont.
      • International Dept - foreign sales and affiliates
      • Business & Legal Affairs - copyrights, contracts, etc.
      • Accounting - royalties, budgets, reports
      • Publishing Affiliates - all companies have a BMI & ASCAP publisher
    • Trade Associations
      • NARAS (National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences - Grammy Awards
      • RIAA - Record Industry Association of America
      • NARM - National Association of Record Merchants