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Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
Blues
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  • 1. Blues
    • A Romanticized Subject
    • Began to be Recognized End of 19thC.
    • Developed from Work Songs and (some say) Spirituals
    • Combined with Ragtime circa 1895 to Create Jazz
  • 2. Blues Archeology
    • Blues Spread once it met the Music Business
    • 1. 1902 Ma Rainey “Mother of the Blues” added Blues to her Minstrel Act
  • 3. Blues Archeology
    • 2. 1903 W. C. Handy “Father of the Blues”
    • First heard the blues (p. 18)
  • 4. Blues Archeology
    • 3. 1909 W. C. Handy writes“Memphis Blues”
    • (for mayoral race)
    • 4. 1912 “Memphis Blues” is Published, others also publish Blues
    • 5. 1916 First Recorded Blues
  • 5. Blues Archeology
    • 6. 1917 First Instrumental Blues Recorded, Original Dixieland Jass Band “Livery Stable Blues”
    • 7. 1920 First African-American Recording of the Blues. Mamie Smith “Crazy Blues”
    • 8. 1923(24) First Country Blues Recorded
  • 6. Blues Styles in the 1920s
    • “ Classic” City Blues and Country Blues
    • City Blues Recorded First
    • Country Blues developed First
  • 7. “ Classic” City Blues Form
    • 12 Bars of Music
    • 3 Basic Chords
    • Repetition of the First Vocal Line
    “ St. Louis Blues” Bessie Smith
  • 8. The “Classic” Blues Form
    • vocal line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..] instrumental answer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .]
    • (chord 1)
    • || — — — — || — — — — || — — — — || — — — — ||
    • repeat vocal line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ] instrumental answer . . . . . .. . . … . . .. … ]
    • (chord 2) (chord 1)
    • || — — — — || — — — — || — — — — || — — — — ||
    • vocal line #2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . ] instrumental answer . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . ]
    • (chord 3) (chord 1)
    • || — — — — || — — — — || — — — — || — — — — ||
    “ Back Water Blues” “ Black Snake Moan”
  • 9. City Blues
    • Is a Female Dominated Style
    • It was Professional Entertainment
    • Mamie Smith was a Theater Performer before she recorded “Crazy Blues” in 1920
    • Accompaniment by Piano and/or Jazz Band
  • 10. Mamie Smith & Her Jazz Hounds
  • 11. City Blues Singers
    • Ma Rainey “Mother of the Blues”
    • Bessie Smith “Empress of the Blues”
  • 12. Country Blues
    • A Male Dominated Style
    • Self-Accompanied on Guitar
    • Used “Approximately” 12 Bars of Music
    • Performed at Smaller Gatherings, often by Itinerant Street Performers
    “ Match Box Blues” Blind Lemmon Jefferson “ Revenue Man Blues” Charlie Patton
  • 13. Country Blues Singers
    • Blind Lemon Jefferson
    • 1st country blues whose records sold well
    • Robert Johnson, Satanic Myth
    • 1930s, the end of the country blues trend. Major influence on British rockers
    • Leadbelly
    • Discovered by Lomax, influenced the Greenwich Village Folk scene
  • 14. Country Blues Styles
    • Mississippi Delta
    • Piedmont
    • Texas
  • 15. Mississippi Delta Blues
    • Thought to be the oldest form
    • Bottle Neck Guitar Style
    • Charlie Patton, Robert Johnson (but)
  • 16. Texas Blues
    • Use of single line melodies
    • Blind Lemon Jefferson
    • Leadbelly
  • 17. Piedmont Blues
    • Atlanta & Southeast
    • Closer to Ragtime Guitar
    • Barbecue Bob (1927-8)
    • Blind Boy Fuller (1930s)
  • 18. Early 1930s
    • Country and City Blues Begin to Combine
    • LeRoy Carr & Scrapper Blackwell
    • Male
    • Piano Blues & Single Line Guitar
    • Polished
    • “ Midnight Hour Blues”
  • 19. 1930s Blues
    • Kansas City Blues Shouter, jazz based
    • Joe Turner, Kansas City late 1930s. 1950s was considered a Rhythm & Blues singer
    • Blues Shouter style was adopted by rock singers
  • 20. Blues 1940s Jump Bands
    • Jump Bands were scaled down swing bands
    • Extensive riffs
    • Louis Jordan, major hits in the 1940.
    • 9 of the top 15 were Jordan’s (1946)
    • Became model for Bill Haley (used the same record producer)
    • “ Choo Choo Ch-Boogie
  • 21. Blues Late 1940s
    • Chicago Blues
    • Electrified Mississippi Delta Blues
    • Used Bottle Neck Style Guitar
    • Chess Records (Chess Brothers)
    • Muddy Waters (McKinley Morganfield)
  • 22. Blues: Muddy Waters
    • Born on Plantation
    • Recorded Country Blues 1941 for LOC
    • Moved to Chicago 1946
    • “ Hard Day Blues”
  • 23. Other Chicago (Detroit) Blues
    • Howlin’ Wolf
    • From the Delta
    • Memphis Radio Show
    • John Lee Hooker, Detroit
    • From the Delta
    • Step Father played w/Charlie Patton
    • “ Boogie Chillun”
  • 24. 1940s Smooth Urban Blues
    • Jazzy & Relaxed
    • Usually Piano Based
    • Nat King Cole, piano/singer
    • Ray Charles began in this style
  • 25. Electric Guitar Urban Blues
    • 1940-1950
    • T-Bone Walker (Texas)
    • 1st recorded electric guitar blues
    • B. B. King (Memphis)
    • Copied T-Bone’s style
    • “ B. B. Boogie”

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