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Mollusca
Mollusca
Mollusca
Mollusca
Mollusca
Mollusca
Mollusca
Mollusca
Mollusca
Mollusca
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Mollusca

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  • 1. Mollusca<br />SanchayGumber<br />
  • 2. The Mollusca, common name molluscs or mollusks, is a large phylum of invertebrate animals. There are around 85,000 recognized extant species of molluscs. This is the largest marine phylum, comprising about 23% of all the named marine organisms. Numerous molluscs also live in freshwater and terrestrial habitats. Molluscsare highly diverse, not only in size and in anatomical structure, but also in behaviourand in habitat.<br />The phylum Mollusca is typically divided into nine or ten taxonomic classes, of which two are extinct. The gastropods (snails and slugs) include by far the most classified species, accounting for 80% of the total. Cephalopod molluscs such as squid, cuttlefish and octopus are among the most neurologically advanced invertebrates. Either the giant squid or the colossal squid is the largest known species of animal without a backbone.<br />
  • 3. The two most universal features of the body structure of molluscs are a mantle with a significant cavity used for breathing and excretion, and the organization of the nervous system. Because of the great range of anatomical diversity, many textbooks base their descriptions on a hypothetical &quot;generalized mollusc&quot;, with features common to many but not all classes within the Mollusca.<br />There is good evidence for the appearance of gastropods, cephalopods and bivalves in the Cambrian period 542 to 488.3 million ago. However, the evolutionary history both of the emergence of molluscs from the ancestral group Lophotrochozoa, and of their diversification into the well-known living and fossil forms, is still vigorously debated. The most abundant metallic element in molluscs is calcium.<br />
  • 4. Molluscs have for many centuries been the source of important luxury goods, notably pearls, mother of pearl, Tyrian purple dye, and sea silk. Their shells have also been used as money in some pre-industrial societies.<br />There is a risk of food poisoning from toxins that accumulate in molluscs under certain conditions, and many countries have regulations that aim to minimize this risk. Blue-ringed octopus bites are often fatal, and the bite of Octopus rubescens can cause necrosis that lasts longer than one month if untreated, and headaches and weakness persisting for up to a week even if treated.[Stings from a few species of large tropical cone shells can also kill. However, the sophisticated venoms of these cone snails have become important tools in neurological research and show promise as sources of new medications.<br />
  • 5. Schistosomiasis (also known as bilharzia, bilharziosis or snail fever) is transmitted to humans via water snail hosts, and affects about 200 million people. A few species of snails and slugs are serious agricultural pests, and in addition, accidental or deliberate introduction of various snail species into new territory has resulted in serious damage to some natural ecosystems.<br />
  • 6. Taxonomy<br />The phylum Mollusca is monophyletic and is typically divided into nine or ten taxonomic classes, of which two are extinct. The gastropods (snails and slugs) include by far the most classified species, accounting for 80% of the total. Cephalopod molluscs such as squid, cuttlefish and octopus are among the most neurologically advanced invertebrates. Either the giant squid or the colossal squid is the largest known species of animal without a backbone.<br />Opinions vary about the number of classes of molluscs—for example the table below shows eight living classes, and two extinct ones. However some authors combine the Caudofoveata and solenogasters into one class, the Aplacophora. Two of the commonly recognized classes are known only from fossils.<br />
  • 7. Distinguishing<br />features<br />The two most universal features of the body structure of molluscs are a mantle with a significant cavity used for breathing and excretion, and the organization of the nervous system. Because of the great range of anatomical diversity, many textbooks base their descriptions on a hypothetical &quot;generalized mollusc&quot;, with features common to many but not all classes within the Mollusca.<br />
  • 8. Respiration<br />Most molluscs have only one pair of gills, or even only one gill. Generally the gills are rather like feathers in shape, although some species have gills with filaments on only one side. They divide the mantle cavity so that water enters near the bottom and exits near the top. Their filaments have three kinds of cilia, one of which drives the water current through the mantle cavity, while the other two help to keep the gills clean. If the osphradia detect noxious chemicals or possibly sediment entering the mantle cavity, the gills&apos; cilia may stop beating until the unwelcome intrusions have ceased. Each gill has an incoming blood vessel connected to the hemocoel and an outgoing one to the heart.<br />
  • 9. Reproduction<br />The simplest molluscan reproductive system relies on external fertilization, but there are more complex variations. All produce eggs, from which may emerge trochophore larvae, more complex veliger larvae, or miniature adults. Two gonads sit next to the coelom, a small cavity that surrounds the heart and shed ova or sperm into the coloem, from which the nephridia extract them and emit them into the mantle cavity. Molluscs that use such a system remain of one sex all their lives and rely on external fertilization. Some molluscs use internal fertilization and/or are hermaphrodites, functioning as both sexes; both of these methods require more complex reproductive systems.<br />
  • 10. Thank you<br />

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