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Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
Dispelling lean startup myths
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Dispelling lean startup myths

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  • 1. Dispelling Lean Startup Myths - what you truly need to know to practice Lean right! Sanchan Sahai Saxena Go get it!
  • 2. Myth #1
  • 3. Myth #1Lean Startup calls for building anMVP that appeals to all potentialcustomers
  • 4. What I typically hear… Myth #1
  • 5. What I typically hear…“This is just not ready yet. We need to continue polishing the UX for our MVPso it appeals to regular folks too – the Monicas from Montana. Otherwise, they Myth #1 will never like the product and will never come back again.”
  • 6. What I typically hear…“This is just not ready yet. We need to continue polishing the UX for our MVPso it appeals to regular folks too – the Monicas from Montana. Otherwise, they Myth #1 will never like the product and will never come back again.”“We need to release our MVP in the wild and get it in front of as many users as possible. But before we can do that, we need to add more features and options to appeal to a broader range of customers. ”
  • 7. What I tell them instead…
  • 8. What I tell them instead… Designing for everybody is like designing for nobody.
  • 9. What I tell them instead… Designing for everybody is like designing for nobody. Startups need to focus – and focus on the early adopters first.
  • 10. What I tell them instead… Designing for everybody is like designing for nobody. Startups need to focus – and focus on the early adopters first. Early adopters are a special breed. Image from Paulo Ordoveza on Flickr
  • 11. What I tell them instead… Designing for everybody is like designing for nobody. Startups need to focus – and focus on the early adopters first. Early adopters are a special breed. They have the problem that you are trying to solve and are willing to invest time and energy in using a less than ideal solution. Image from Paulo Ordoveza on Flickr
  • 12. What I tell them instead… Designing for everybody is like designing for nobody. Startups need to focus – and focus on the early adopters first. Early adopters are a special breed. They have the problem that you are trying to solve and are willing to invest time and energy in using a less than ideal solution. You goal is to find the early adopters for your product and make your MVP viable for them – not everyone. Image from Paulo Ordoveza on Flickr
  • 13. Where are your users? * Image from Wikipedia article
  • 14. Where are your users? * Image from Wikipedia article
  • 15. Where are your users? All potential customers of your technology/product * Image from Wikipedia article
  • 16. Where are your users? All potential customers of your technology/product Over time, your goal is to convert all potential customers to adopt your technology/product. * Image from Wikipedia article
  • 17. Where are your users? All potential customers of your technology/productBut you have to start by converting your early adopters first! Over time, your goal is to convert all potential customers to adopt your technology/product. * Image from Wikipedia article
  • 18. Target your MVP to the right users * Image from Wikipedia article
  • 19. Target your MVP to the right users * Image from Wikipedia article
  • 20. Target your MVP to the right users MVP, by definition, should not be designed to appeal equally well to all your potential customers. Your MVPn * Image from Wikipedia article
  • 21. Target your MVP to the right users Instead, you must focus on making your MVP viable and appealing to your early adopters first. Your MVPn * Image from Wikipedia article
  • 22. What others are saying…
  • 23. What others are saying… Steve Blank (article) In the real world not every customer is going to get overly excited about your minimum feature set. Only a special subset of customers will and what gets them breathing heavy is the long-term vision for your product. Most customers will not want a product with a minimal feature set. In fact, the majority of customers will hate it. So why do it? Because you are selling the first version of your product to early evangelists. You’re selling the vision and delivering the minimum feature set to visionaries not everyone.
  • 24. What others are saying… Steve Blank (article) Eric Ries (article) In the real world not every customer is going The minimum viable product is that product to get overly excited about your minimum which has just those features and no more feature set. Only a special subset of customers that allows you to ship a product that early will and what gets them breathing heavy is the adopters see and, at least some of whom long-term vision for your product. resonate with, pay you money for, and start to give you feedback on. Most customers will not want a product with a minimal feature set. In fact, the majority of And sometimes it’s useful to them because customers will hate it. So why do it? Because early adopters have the same kind of visioning you are selling the first version of your product power that entrepreneurs do, but because to early evangelists. they can see what the end product is going to be. You’re selling the vision and delivering the minimum feature set to visionaries not everyone.
  • 25. Lesson #1
  • 26. Lesson #1Make your MVP viable for theearly adopters first
  • 27. Myth #2
  • 28. Myth #2Lean Startup calls for testingeverything by practicing releaseearly, releasing often methodology
  • 29. What I typically hear…
  • 30. What I typically hear… “We ship code twice a week because we want to release often and learnquickly from our customers about things that we should be building for them Myth #1 next.”
  • 31. What I typically hear… “We ship code twice a week because we want to release often and learnquickly from our customers about things that we should be building for them Myth #1 next.” “We release twice daily as it is consistent with the lean startup’s release early, release often approach. We just do it because we can and our deployment systems are pretty awesome.”
  • 32. What I tell them instead…
  • 33. What I tell them instead… Don’t delegate your vision to your customers!
  • 34. What I tell them instead… Don’t delegate your vision to your customers! You must start with your own Vision – an idea of where you want to go. I have a vision!
  • 35. What I tell them instead… Don’t delegate your vision to your customers! You must start with your own Vision – an idea of where you want to go. I have a vision! User Testing helps you find the best strategy (a path forward) to get to your Vision.
  • 36. As Eric said…
  • 37. As Eric said… Not having a vision is like getting into your car and asking your GPS where to go.
  • 38. As Eric said… Not having a vision is like getting into your car and asking your GPS where to go. Oh mighty GPS – tell me where should I go today?
  • 39. As Eric said… Not having a vision is like getting into your car and asking your GPS where to go. Oh mighty GPS – tell me where should I go today? If you don’t have a destination in mind, no number of GPSs will help you - no amount of testing can tell you where you want to go.
  • 40. Start with your vision…
  • 41. Start with your vision… …and articulate it as a collection of hypotheses!
  • 42. Start with your vision… …and articulate it as a collection of hypotheses! Your Vision
  • 43. Start with your vision… …and articulate it as a collection of hypotheses! Your Hypo- thesis1 Hypo- thesis2 Hypo- thesis3 Hypo- thesisN Vision
  • 44. Start with your vision… …and articulate it as a collection of hypotheses! Your Hypo- thesis1 Hypo- thesis2 Hypo- thesis3 Hypo- thesisN Vision Create a plan that allows you to validate and learn about these hypotheses early and often!
  • 45. Start with your vision… …and articulate it as a collection of hypotheses! Your Hypo- thesis1 Hypo- thesis2 Hypo- thesis3 Hypo- thesisN Vision 2 weeks 1 week Create a plan that allows you to validate and learn about these hypotheses early and often!
  • 46. Start with your vision… …and articulate it as a collection of hypotheses! Your Hypo- thesis1 Hypo- thesis2 Hypo- thesis3 Hypo- thesisN Vision 2 weeks 1 week Your Learning Schedule Create a plan that allows you to validate and learn about these hypotheses early and often!
  • 47. Creating a schedule for learning…
  • 48. Creating a schedule for learning…Don’t release for the sake of releasing – release for the sake of learning.
  • 49. Creating a schedule for learning…Don’t release for the sake of releasing – release for the sake of learning.  Identify early on what you want to learn from your early adopters
  • 50. Creating a schedule for learning…Don’t release for the sake of releasing – release for the sake of learning.  Identify early on what you want to learn from your early adopters  Strategize how you want to learn (concierge MVP etc.)
  • 51. Creating a schedule for learning…Don’t release for the sake of releasing – release for the sake of learning.  Identify early on what you want to learn from your early adopters  Strategize how you want to learn (concierge MVP etc.)  Create a schedule that facilitates the learning using the right MVP with your users
  • 52. Creating a schedule for learning…Don’t release for the sake of releasing – release for the sake of learning.  Identify early on what you want to learn from your early adopters  Strategize how you want to learn (concierge MVP etc.)  Create a schedule that facilitates the learning using the right MVP with your users Don’t follow a release schedule – follow a Learning Schedule ©
  • 53. What others are saying…
  • 54. What others are saying… Eric Ries (article) The issue there is, if you just follow the release early, release often mantra, you find yourself running around in circles. Pretty soon you’re chasing your own tail a little bit because you’re not operating against a clear, long-term vision of what you’re trying to accomplish.
  • 55. What others are saying… Eric Ries (article) Steve Blank (article) The issue there is, if you just follow the release Earlyvangelists, particularly in early, release often mantra, you find yourself corporations, will be buying into your entire running around in circles. vision, not just your first product release. Pretty soon you’re chasing your own tail a little They will need to hear what your company bit because you’re not operating against a plans to deliver over the next 18 to 36 months. clear, long-term vision of what you’re trying to accomplish. These Earlyvangelists are first buying the vision and then the product. They need to fall in love with the idea of your product. It’s the vision that will keep them committed the many times you screw up. You’ll have bugs, your product will eat their data, you’ll get the features wrong, performance will be bad, you’ll argue about pricing, etc.
  • 56. Lesson #2
  • 57. Lesson #2Learn early, Learn Often aboutyour vision’s hypotheses
  • 58. Myth #3
  • 59. Myth #3MVP is the minimum product thatyou can ship quickly
  • 60. What I typically hear… Myth #1
  • 61. What I typically hear…“We just need to build something minimum - get it out in front of real users Myth #1 and get user data to iterate.”
  • 62. What I typically hear…“We just need to build something minimum - get it out in front of real users Myth #1 and get user data to iterate.” “I don’t think we should build FeatureX. None of our competitors offer it either. Plus, it will take a long time to build. We must build something quickly and something minimum. ”
  • 63. What I tell them instead…
  • 64. What I tell them instead… Sometimes I wish that Eric Ries coined the term VMP (Viable Minimum Product) instead of an MVP (Minimum Viable Product) to reduce the confusion.
  • 65. What I tell them instead… Sometimes I wish that Eric Ries coined the term VMP (Viable Minimum Product) instead of an MVP (Minimum Viable Product) to reduce the confusion. But oh well! 
  • 66. Thinking Minimum before Viable?
  • 67. Thinking Minimum before Viable? “Minimum” in MVP doesn’t mean cheap or minimal.
  • 68. Thinking Minimum before Viable? “Minimum” in MVP doesn’t mean cheap or minimal. It simply means that you build what you need.
  • 69. Thinking Minimum before Viable? “Minimum” in MVP doesn’t mean cheap or minimal. It simply means that you build what you need. But first, you have to focus on defining what you need to learn from your early adopters.
  • 70. Find the Viable that is also the Minimum
  • 71. Find the Viable that is also the Minimum All stuff that is minimum. Minimum
  • 72. Find the Viable that is also the Minimum All stuff that All stuff that is is viable for all minimum. your users. Minimum Viable
  • 73. Find the Viable that is also the Minimum All stuff that All stuff that is is viable for all minimum. your users. Minimum Viable
  • 74. Find the Viable that is also the Minimum All stuff that All stuff that is is viable for all minimum. your users. Minimum Viable Your MVP that is viable for your early adopters and helps validate your hypotheses.
  • 75. What others are saying…
  • 76. What others are saying…Eric RiesSome entrepreneurs hear "minimum viable"product as "smallest imaginable" product.MVP, despite the name, is not about creatingminimal products.
  • 77. What others are saying…Eric Ries David Aycan (article) Sometimes, entrepreneurs miss a key opportunitySome entrepreneurs hear "minimum viable" to establish market differentiation by interpretingproduct as "smallest imaginable" product. the "minimum" component of an MVP to meanMVP, despite the name, is not about creating "nothing challenging." Worse, they sometimesminimal products. create a product thats not competitive by rationalizing that they can get something like the core idea by replacing a feature with something easier to implement.
  • 78. What others are saying…Eric Ries David Aycan (article) Sometimes, entrepreneurs miss a key opportunitySome entrepreneurs hear "minimum viable" to establish market differentiation by interpretingproduct as "smallest imaginable" product. the "minimum" component of an MVP to meanMVP, despite the name, is not about creating "nothing challenging." Worse, they sometimesminimal products. create a product thats not competitive by rationalizing that they can get something like the core idea by replacing a feature with somethingSteve Blank (article) easier to implement.This minimum feature set (sometimes calledthe “minimum viable product”) causes lots ofconfusion. Founders act like the “minimum”part is the goal.
  • 79. Lesson #3
  • 80. Lesson #3Aim for the Viable before youaim for the Minimum.
  • 81. Thank you! This is my MVP presentation.More iterations to come soon based on your feedback! So don’t be shy and let me know what you think!

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