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Difference between tnc and mnc
 

Difference between tnc and mnc

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    Difference between tnc and mnc Difference between tnc and mnc Document Transcript

    • TNC vs MNC International corporations have several categories depending on the business structure, investment and product/ service offerings. Transnational companies (TNC) and multinational companies (MNC) are two of a these categories. Both MNC and TNC are enterprises that manage production or delivers services in more than one country. They are characterized as business entities that have their management headquarters in one country, known as the home country, and operate in several other countries, known as host countries. Industries like manufacturing, oil mining, agriculture, consulting, accounting, construction, legal, advertising, entertainment, banking, telecommunications and lodging are often run through TNC’s and MNC’s. The said corporations maintain various bases all over the world. Many of them are owned by a mixture of domestic and foreign stock holders. Most TNC’s and MNC’s are massive with budgets that outweigh smaller nations’ GDPs. Thus, TNC and MNC alike are highly influential to globalization, economic and environmental lobbying in most countries. Because of their influence, countries and regional political districts at times tender incentives to MNC and TNC in form of tax breaks, pledges of governmental assistance or improved infrastructure, political favors and lenient environmental and labor standards enforcement in order to be at an advantage from their competitors. Also due to their size, they can have a significant impact on government policy, primarily through the threat of market withdrawal. They are powerful enough to initiate lobbying that is directed at a variety of business concerns such as tariff structures, aiming to restrict competition of foreign industries. Some of the top TNC’s and MNC’s are General Electric, Toyota Motor, Total, Royal Dutch Shell, ExxonMobil and Vodafone Group Moreover, a lot of people often interchange MNC and TNC or misconstrue them to be one and the same to pertain to a company that owns production facilities in two or more countries, with the only difference that the former being the original terminology. Contrary to this popular notion, they are of different kinds. TNC has been technically defined by
    • United Nations Commission on Transnational Corporations and Investment as ‘enterprises which own or control production or service facilities outside the country in which they are based.” The committee has also placed its preference on the term TNC. MNC, on the other hand, is the older term and popularly remains to be the generic label for firms similar to TNC and MNC. Here’s the significant difference, though. Multinational companies (MNC) have investment in other countries, but do not have coordinated product offerings in each country. They are more focused on adapting their products and service to each individual local market. Well-known MNC’s are mostly consumer goods manufacturers and quick- service restaurants like Unilever, Proctor & Gamble, Mc Donald’s and Seven-Eleven. On another note, Transnational companies (TNC) are much more complex firms. They have invested in foreign operations, have a central corporate facility but give decision-making, R&D and marketing powers to each individual foreign market. Most of them come from petroleum, I.T. consulting, pharmaceutical industries among others. Examples are Shell, Accenture, Deloitte, Glaxo-Smith Klein, and Roche. Summary 1. Multinational (MNC) and Transnational (TNC) companies are types of international corporations. Both maintain management headquarters in one country, known as the home country, and operate in several other countries, known as host countries. 2. Most TNC’s and MNC’s are massive in terms of budget and are highly influential to globalization. They are also considered as main drivers of the local economy, government policies, environmental and political lobbying 3) An MNC have investment in other countries, but do not have coordinated product offerings in each country. It is more focused on adapting their products and service to each individual local market. A TNC, on the other hand, have invested in foreign operations, have a central corporate facility but give decision-making, R&D and marketing powers to each individual foreign market.
    • A Multinational Corporation (MNC) is a corporation with extensive ties in international operations in more than one foreign country. Examples are General Electric, Exxon, WalMart, Mitsubishi, Daimler Chrysler, etc... A Transnational Corporation is a MNC that operates worldwide without being identified with a national home base. It is said to operate on a border less basis. Multinational companies are not a recent phenomenon, but it is a fact that today because of modern and fast and efficient means of communications and transportation, companies and businesses find it easy to operate in many other countries apart from their parent country. It is customary to call such companies as multinational corporations. However, there is another word used for similar companies operating in more than a single country and that is transnational. This article tries to highlight the differences between multinational and transnational, in order to remove any doubt in the reader’s mind about these two concepts. There is no doubt that when a company grows at a rate faster than its products or services can be utilized by people in the home country, it tries to internationalize its business in anticipation of greater profits. Thus, when a company invests in another country besides its own and does business with another country, it is termed as a multinational. A single company can have operations in any number of countries. Today we have multinationals referred to as MNC’s. A different word has been coined to refer to corporations having a presence in more than a single country. Transnational is also a business entity having business operations in more than a single country, and many of the MNC’s classify to be called as transnational. A different word has been coined to refer to corporations having a presence in more than a single country. Transnational is also a business entity having business operations in more than a single country, and many of the MNC’s classify to be called as transnational. The basic difference between a multinational and a transnational lies in the fact that transnational company is borderless, as it does not consider any particular country as its base, home or headquarters. Multinational companies, though having a parent country and a centralized decision making process, adopts a selling strategy that is unique to every other country where it has investments. This strategy is made keeping in mind the requirements of the local markets and the rules and regulations of the government. Often MNC’s have to abide by sensitivities and culture of the local people