WINGATE UNIVERSITY

           DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT STUDIES



  PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT PROGRAM ACADEMIC CATALOG...
TABLE OF CONTENTS

           PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT PROGRAM ACADEMIC CATALOG 2009-2011

               Staff ………………………………………...
Campus Box 5010
                                                          Wingate NC 28174
                               ...
This PA Program Academic Catalog is intended as a supplement to the Wingate University Academic
Catalog and has been struc...
APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
   1. A Bachelor’s degree from a four-year regionally accredited college or univers...
Shadowing a Physician or Physician Assistant in their routine duties is beneficial but it will be
           considered as...
Graduates of Wingate University, who meet all admission requirements as listed above, will be
           given preference ...
The strategic planning process will include an annual faculty retreat in order to examine all pertinent data
such as outco...
dermatology, pulmonary, cardiology (including ECG) and hematology. Also incorporated into these topics
are correlated revi...
infectious diseases, gastrointestinal, neurological and endocrine diseases. Students will be expected to
utilize the clini...
CLINICAL ROTATION SITES
MPAS degree curriculum will be delivered both on and off the main campus of Wingate University.
Di...
clinical rotation will last for five weeks with a total of 3 different clinical rotations per semester. During the
last se...
Seventh Semester (Fall – Final Semester)
PA 625 PANCE Preparation II (2 Semester Hours). In this second course, students a...
TOTAL COST*                             $56,000


TUITION DEPOSIT
Applicants will be interviewed in February 2009 for admi...
FACULTY
Rosalind V. Becker MS PA-C ......................................Assistant Professor and Academic Coordinator
   •...
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WINGATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT STUDIES ...

  1. 1. WINGATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT STUDIES PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT PROGRAM ACADEMIC CATALOG 2009-2011 Information and Course Descriptions for the Master of Physician Assistant Studies Degree Page | 1 5/3/2010
  2. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT PROGRAM ACADEMIC CATALOG 2009-2011 Staff …………………………………………………………. 3 Accreditation …………………………………………………. 3 Introduction…………………………………………………… 3 About the PA Program ………………………………………. 4 Admissions Requirements ………………………………….. 5 Medical Terminology ………………………………………… 6 Academic Calendar ………………………………………….. 7 Assessment of the PA Program ………………………….. 7 Academic Policies ………………………………………… 8 MPAS Required Curriculum ………………………………… 8 Clinical Rotation Sites ………………………………………… 11 Student Privacy, Informed Consent ………………………… 13 Codes of Professional and Academic Conduct …………… 13 Projected Tuition ……………………………………………… 13 Tuition Deposit ………………………………………………… 14 Students’ Employment ……………………………………… 14 Additional Expenses ………………………………………… 14 Laptop Computer ………………………………………… 14 Licensing ……………………………………………………… 14 Faculty ………………………………………………………… 15 Page | 2 5/3/2010
  3. 3. Campus Box 5010 Wingate NC 28174 (704) 233-8051 telephone pa@wingate.edu (866) 320-2726 fax pa.wingate.edu Program Director ................................................................................ Gary R. Uremovich DMin MPAS PA-C Medical Director .................................................................................................................. Roy C. Blank MD Academic Coordinator ...................................................................................... Rosalind V. Becker MS PA-C Assistant Program Director ................................................................................ David A. Compton MD MPH Clinical Coordinator .................................................................................. Michael B. Whitehead DHSc PA-C ACCREDITATION The Physician Assistant Program at Wingate University received provisional accreditation through the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA) on March 10, 2008. The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) granted approval on January 10, 2008, for Wingate University to offer the Master of Physician Assistant Studies degree. Wingate University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). The last accreditation was completed in 2006. Wingate University is accredited to award the bachelor, master and professional degrees. The Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) is the recognized regional accrediting body in the eleven U.S. southern states (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia) and Latin America for institutions of higher education that award associate, baccalaureate, masters or doctoral degrees (see www.sacscoc.org). Questions about the status of the University’s accreditation may be obtained from the Commission on Colleges by calling (404) 679-4500 or by writing the SACS home office at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, GA 30033. INTRODUCTION Wingate University is operated on a nondiscriminatory basis. Wingate University abides by the provisions of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title XI of Educational Amendments of 1972 and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Section 504. Wingate University does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, religion, color, national or ethnic origin, age, disability or military service in its administration of education policies, programs, activities or services. Each student is responsible for knowing the policies, procedures, curricular requirements and codes of conduct for the Department of Physician Assistant Studies and the University. Each student is responsible for his/her progress towards degree completion. Neither the student’s advisor nor the faculty of the Department of Physician Assistant Studies is responsible for insuring that the student meets degree requirements. The Department and/or the University may terminate enrollment of any student for professional, academic or financial reasons. Page | 3 5/3/2010
  4. 4. This PA Program Academic Catalog is intended as a supplement to the Wingate University Academic Catalog and has been structured to recognize the graduate level of this professional course of study. The University catalog contains important information concerning the history, goals, facilities and operations of Wingate University and all applicants are encouraged to review the catalog. ABOUT THE PA PROGRAM The Wingate University Department of Physician Assistant Studies will cover seven continuous semesters (27 months). The first year (3 semesters in 12 months) is didactic classes and the second year is clinical rotations throughout the region in various medical specialties. The mission of the Wingate University Department of Physician Assistant Studies is to educate physician assistants to become competent, compassionate and comprehensive health care providers. Graduates will become leaders in the health care community, continuously striving for excellence in their professional endeavors while compassionately providing for the health care needs of those they serve. The goals of the Department of Physician Assistant Studies are to • Identify for admission those individuals with the academic ability, clinical experience, interpersonal skills and maturity necessary to become outstanding physician assistants. • Provide a coordinated, comprehensive didactic and clinical curriculum that will allow graduates to deliver the highest quality of health care services. • Promote a didactic and clinical educational environment that embraces the concepts of continuous communication, cooperation and compassion. • Promote an atmosphere of “learner-centered” education that empowers students to become self- directed learners. • Instill in students the core values of Wingate University: Faith – Knowledge – Service. • Provide students with the medical knowledge, clinical skills and caring attitude needed to practice as a physician assistant anywhere and within any type of clinical practice. • Promote continuously a comprehensive approach to health and disease by emphasizing health maintenance, disease prevention and life-long learning. • Develop in students an appreciation of the dignity of the individual and each individual’s right to a quality life. • Promote continued professional growth through life-long learning. • Encourage graduates to strive for excellence in clinical practice while employing professional ethics as a member of the health care team focused on service to others. The PA program will prepare individuals to become valued members of the health care team licensed to practice medicine with physician supervision. The Wingate University PA program has elected not to use CASPA (Centralized Application Service for Physician Assistants) for the class of students to enter in 2009. You will make application directly to the Department of Physician Assistant Studies. Application for admission forms for the class beginning August 2009 can be downloaded from our website or can be obtained by calling our offices. A nonrefundable application fee of $50.00 will be required upon submission of application. Incomplete applications for admission will be returned to the applicant without review. Deadline for application to the program for the class beginning August 2009 is January 15, 2009. Admission to the PA program is dependent on (1) applicant’s timely submission of all documentation required in the application and applicant’s academic record, especially with regard to prerequisite science and general courses; (2) quality and number of hours of clinical experience; and (3) successful personal interview. Applicant interviews will begin in February 2009. Only applicants who meet admissions criteria for academic performance and clinical experience will be invited for interviews. Admission decisions and wait-list decisions will be made within 10-21 days following interviews. Page | 4 5/3/2010
  5. 5. APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 1. A Bachelor’s degree from a four-year regionally accredited college or university. 2. A nonrefundable $50 application fee in the mailed Application for Admission packet. 3. Sealed transcripts from all college-level education, especially showing prerequisite courses listed below, must be delivered from the applicant’s college or university directly to the Department of Physician Assistant Studies on or before the Application for Admission deadline. 4. Eight of the 9 prerequisite courses must be completed or in progress at the time the Application for Admission is submitted, evidenced by transcripts submitted before Application for Admission deadline. Courses considered or titled “basic,” introduction to,” “principles of,” “elements of,” or similar, may not meet the criteria for satisfying prerequisite course requirements. Questions concerning the suitability of a particular course can be addressed to the PA program office by emailing the course summary description from the institution’s academic catalog. 5. The six science prerequisite courses must have an overall GPA of 3.2 or better. Grades below B for any course will not be accepted. Current GPA for courses in progress will be required during the interview. Science Courses and Semester Hours Anatomy and Physiology with Lab (4) Microbiology (4) General Biology Science (4) General Chemistry with Lab (4) Organic Chemistry with Lab (4) Biochemistry (3) 6. An overall GPA of 3.0 or higher on the six science prerequisite courses and three general prerequisite courses, evidenced by transcripts submitted before Application for Admission deadline. Grades below B for any course will not be accepted. General Courses and Semester Hours College Algebra or higher (3) Applied Statistics (3) Psychology Course (3) 7. A minimum of 500 hours clinical experience with direct patient contact must be completed or in progress at the time of applicant’s interview in February. Higher consideration is given to applicants who are compensated for their contact hours since this implies a higher level of accountability. Certification of current clinical experience achieved to date must be submitted with the Application for Admission. Completion of the minimum of 500 hours of clinical experience must be completed within 180 days of applicant’s acceptance into the PA program with certification of completion. Quality and number of hours of clinical experience completed at the time of the application submission and interview are critical factors in the decision for admission to the program. Examples of Acceptable Experience: Orderly Emergency Room Technician Certified Laboratory Technician Emergency Medical Technician Phlebotomy Military Medic, Clinical Specialist or Athletic Trainers (there may be an Independent Corpsman exception depending on the type of work Surgical Technician experience) Radiological Technician Certified Physical Therapist or Physical Certified Nursing Assistant Therapist Assistant Nursing Certified Massage Therapist Page | 5 5/3/2010
  6. 6. Shadowing a Physician or Physician Assistant in their routine duties is beneficial but it will be considered as only minimal clinical experience when considered during the application review and interview process. Examples of Unacceptable Experience: Clerical duties for an organization Veterinary work 8. A letter of recommendation from a health care professional (such as MD, DO, PA, NP, RN). This letter must provide observed evidence of the applicant’s ethical, professional and scholarly ability to be a health care provider and submitted directly to the Department of Physician Assistant Studies with the signed Recommendation Form. Letters must be mailed through the U.S. Postal Service and received before the deadline for application submission. Letters not received on or before the deadline will not be considered and may disqualify applicant from being considered for admission. Letters that are faxed, emailed or prepared by any member of applicant’s family will not be accepted. 9. A general letter of recommendation with observed evidence of applicant’s ethical behavior, trustworthiness, ability to work in a team and general work ethic and submitted directly to the Department of Physician Assistant Studies with the signed Recommendation Form. Letters must be mailed through the U.S. Postal Service and received before the deadline for application submission. Letters not received on or before the deadline will not be considered and may disqualify applicant from being considered for admission. Letters that are faxed, emailed or prepared by any member of applicant’s family will not be accepted. 10. A signed “Technical Standards Requirements” attesting to the applicant’s abilities and skills, to be signed and submitted with Application for Admission: The abilities and skills that candidates and students must possess in order to complete the education and training associated with Physician Assistant education are referred to as “Technical Standards.” These same abilities and skills are essential for clinical practice as a Physician Assistant. The Technical Standards reflect five categorical areas: observation, communication, critical reasoning (intellectual), motor and sensory, and behavioral/social and represent minimum competence levels. Students must attest that they meet these Technical Standards prior to or at the time of matriculation to the Wingate University Department of Physician Assistant Studies. Students found to be in violation of Technical Standards are at risk for dismissal from the program. Reasonable accommodation for persons with documented disabilities will be considered on an individual basis, but a candidate must be able to perform in an independent manner. A complete copy of the “Technical Standards” is part of the application for admission form. Candidates will be required to certify that they have read and understand the Technical Standards of the Department of Physician Assistant Studies at Wingate University and attest that they have no condition that would interfere, inhibit, compromise or distract from their participation in the program. 11. Successful completion of personal interview. 12. Certification of Basic Life Saving Training for Health Care Providers must be completed 30 days prior to enrollment in the program. Please note the following: No GRE is required for admission to the Wingate University PA program No personal essay or narrative is required at time of application submission Page | 6 5/3/2010
  7. 7. Graduates of Wingate University, who meet all admission requirements as listed above, will be given preference in the application process. Applicants previously enrolled in another PA, medical or nursing school will be considered on an individual basis. There will be no advanced placement. The PA Program does not accept transfer credit from a student previously enrolled in another PA program, nor does it accept experiential credit. All students accepted in the PA program must satisfy all requirements of the didactic and clinical years of study. All non US citizens or students who have English as a second language must submit their college transcripts to the World Education Services for translation and successfully complete the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language www.toefl.org). Applicants must have no history of drug abuse or conviction of a felony (a background check will be performed upon being accepted for admission or accepted for the wait-list) PREPARATION FOR COURSEWORK Following admission into the PA program, accepted students will be advised to purchase two review texts in preparation for beginning the didactic year of study. rd Medical Terminology by Peggy S. Stanfield (3 edition Jones and Bartlett) nd Barron’s Anatomy and Physiology: The Easy Way (2 edition Barron’s Series) During orientation prior to the beginning of classes, students will be tested on the contents of each text. In order to pass the exams, students must achieve a grade of 80% or better. Opportunities to retake the exams for those students scoring less than 80% will be available throughout the first semester. All students must pass the exam to progress to the second semester. ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2009-2011 Fall semester 2009 (16 weeks) August 23 Classes begin August 19-21 Orientation for new students October 11-12 Fall break August 24 Classes begin November 24-26 Thanksgiving break October 8-9 Fall break December 6-8 Final exams November 25-27 Thanksgiving break December 7-9 Final exams Spring semester 2011 (16 weeks) January 3 Classes begin Spring semester 2010 (16 weeks) January 17 Martin Luther King, Jr., holiday January 4 Classes begin March 7-11 Spring break January 18 Martin Luther King, Jr., holiday April 22-25 Easter Break March 1-5 Spring break April 26-28 Final exams March 8 Classes resume April 2-5 Easter break Summer semester 2011 (11 weeks) April 19-21 Final exams May 9 Classes begin May 30 Memorial Day holiday Summer semester 2010 (11 weeks) July 4 Independence Day holiday May 4 Classes begin July 25-27 Final exams May 31 Memorial Day holiday July 4 Independence Day holiday Fall semester 2011 (16 weeks) July 12-14 Final exams August 17-19 Orientation for new students August 22 Classes begin Fall semester 2010 (17 weeks) November 22-26 Thanksgiving break August 18-20 Orientation of new students December 12-14 Final exams ASSESSMENT OF THE PA PROGRAM A comprehensive assessment process will examine outcome instruments and Physician Assistant National Certification Examination (PANCE) scores and will tie directly to curriculum assessment. Quality assurance processes will be conducted throughout the year as documented in the program’s assessment plan. Student surveys of courses will be conducted every semester; results of these evaluations will be examined each semester to look for immediate weakness, and the results of course surveys are annually reviewed prior to implementing curriculum changes. Page | 7 5/3/2010
  8. 8. The strategic planning process will include an annual faculty retreat in order to examine all pertinent data such as outcomes, quality assurance, maintenance items (such as the PANCE Blueprint) and alignment of the program’s mission and vision statement with the institutional strategic plan and vision. The program competencies will be tied to the Accreditation Review Commission for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA) Standards, which will allow a cyclic process of examining formative, summative and outcome instruments that are closely correlated with the graduate competencies. The conceptual framework of the ongoing assessment system represents a continuous process of improvement. Integral to the self-study will be a semi-annual (or more frequent) meeting of the Advisory Council. The Council is composed of interested members within the local medical and health care community. Their feedback to the results of our assessments and evaluation of outcomes will be essential to our strategic goals and program improvement initiatives. ACADEMIC POLICIES Students will be provided a copy of program goals and competencies at orientation. Each course and clinical rotation syllabus has course descriptions and objectives required that guide student learning and list competencies that students achieve during each course. Students who are enrolled in the program must earn grades of C (2.0) or better in all courses and maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 to remain in good academic standing in the program. Students are expected to understand and adhere to the codes and standards of the profession and generic abilities in professional behavior. Students are required to be in good academic standing to enter the clinical year. Students who receive less than a C in a didactic course or who have less than a 3.0 GPA will be required to repeat the course(s) and earn at least a C and an overall 3.0 GPA prior to entering clinical rotations. Specific learning objectives are distributed to students for each clinical rotation. Grades are based on mid-point and final evaluations by clinical preceptors, end-of-rotation exams, professional seminar attendance and student presentations. If a student fails to obtain a minimum grade of C in a clinical rotation, he or she is placed on academic probation and the rotation must be repeated. Students who fail to obtain a minimum grade of C in two clinical rotations will be subject to dismissal from the program. Any didactic course or clinical rotation that is required to be repeated will also incur additional tuition charges of $667 per semester hour. Such repetitions will lengthen the program beyond 27 months. A student’s readiness to graduate will be determined by an overall GPA of 3.0, successful completion of required courses, clinical rotations, demonstration of written and oral proficiencies, successful completion of required objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs), completion of the required total semester hours for the program and completion of a Capstone project. Students who complete the program in good academic and financial standing by the end of the fall semester final exam period graduate in December. MPAS REQUIRED CURRICULUM First Semester (Fall – Didactic Year) PA 520 Introduction to the Profession (1 Semester Hour). This course will provide an historical perspective of the physician assistant profession, as well as current trends and issues. The course will stress the importance of biomedical ethics and professional responsibilities in relation to the PAs role as health care providers. Content relating to physician assistant professional organizations, program accreditation, graduate certification and re-certification, employment considerations and professional liability are to be included. PA 530 Clinical Medicine I (6 Semester Hours). This is the first of three classes reviewing medical diagnosis and treatment. This course teaches the pathology of disease by system and specialty. This semester will include nutrition, clinical laboratory medicine, ophthalmology and otolaryngology, (EENT), Page | 8 5/3/2010
  9. 9. dermatology, pulmonary, cardiology (including ECG) and hematology. Also incorporated into these topics are correlated reviews of relevant pathology and radiology. PA 538 Patient Assessment I (4 Semester Hours). This course teaches foundational skills and techniques required to gather a complete medical history and perform a thorough physical examination. This course introduces the student to the art of history taking and physical exams of the skin, head and neck, lymphatics, lungs, heart and abdomen. During this course, the integration of the student’s knowledge of the structure and function of the human body will be coupled with laboratory sessions emphasizing the proper use of diagnostic equipment and techniques for performing a comprehensive physical examination. PA 541 Pharmacology I (2 Semester Hours). This is the first class in a three-part series. Students will be introduced to pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic and pharmacotherapeutic principles that provide a foundation for the study of pharmacology and therapeutics. Combined lecture and active learning exercises are designed to develop the skills that a physician assistant will need to enhance patient care in clinical practice focusing on antibiotics, pulmonary and cardiac drugs, anemia and leukemia. PA 544 Clinical Anatomy (2 Semester Hours). This course is designed to provide physician assistant students with a working knowledge of the major anatomical regions and structures of the body. Emphasis will be placed upon the relationships of components within a specific region as well as topographical and functional anatomy as it relates to physical examination skills and clinical applications. PA 546 Pathophysiology I (2 Semester Hours). Students will learn integrative human physiology and pathophysiology involving concepts of cell biology, the integumentary, cardiovascular, pulmonary and hematologic systems with an emphasis upon homeostatic mechanisms and etiologies of disease. Students will learn the interrelationships of function and dysfunction at the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ and systemic levels. PA 560 Clinical Genetics (1 Semester Hour). The successful practice of modern medicine includes the recognition of the role of genetic factors in health and disease; students must understand the genetic basis of disease. Students learn to obtain an accurate genetic pedigree and convey information to patients. Knowledge will be used to develop a more effective approach to health maintenance, disease prevention, disease diagnosis and treatment based on patients’ genetic predisposition. Second semester (Spring – didactic year) PA 527 Health Care Issues I (2 Semester Hours). PA students will develop a greater appreciation and comprehension of the socio-behavioral aspects of medical practice. Students will learn effective counseling and preventive education strategies for enhancing treatment compliance, promoting positive health patterns and enhancing positive response to illness. PA 531 Clinical Medicine II (6 Semester Hours). This course builds on pathology of disease presented in PA 530 Clinical Medicine I and continues with the presentation of the following systems: gastroenterology, infectious disease, neurology, orthopedics/rheumatology and endocrinology. Disorders are presented by system and specialty, augmented with clinical therapeutics. PA 539 Patient Assessment II (4 Semester Hours). The student will build on the knowledge and foundational skills and techniques learned in PA 538 Patient Assessment I in the performance of a thorough physical examination and medical history. Students will integrate the knowledge obtained in PA 530 Clinical Medicine I with laboratory sessions emphasizing the proper use of diagnostic equipment and technique for performing a comprehensive physical examination. The semester will include the musculoskeletal, neurological, male and female systems. PA 542 Pharmacology II (3 Semester Hours). This is the second class in a three-part series. Students will build upon the knowledge and skills obtained in PA 541 Pharmacology I. Combined lecture and active learning exercises are designed to develop the pharmacologic and therapeutic skills that a physician assistant will need to enhance patient care in clinical practice focusing on inflammatory conditions, Page | 9 5/3/2010
  10. 10. infectious diseases, gastrointestinal, neurological and endocrine diseases. Students will be expected to utilize the clinical literature and to evaluate patient cases as they related to pharmacology. PA 547 Pathophysiology II (2 Semester Hours). Students will learn integrative human physiology and pathophysiology involving the neurological, gastrointestinal, endocrine and reproductive systems with an emphasis upon homeostatic mechanisms and the etiologies of disease states. Students will understand the interrelationship of function and dysfunction at the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ and systemic levels. PA 580 Research, Epidemiology and Statistics for the Physician Assistant (2 Semester Hours). Students receive instruction in research methods and application in the clinical setting. Students gain understanding of the basic concepts of epidemiology as it relates to medical practice. Students are prepared to critically read published reports of clinical research and identify strengths and weaknesses. Students will be prepared to complete a community-based project as their capstone for the PA program. Third Semester (Summer – didactic year) PA 528 Health Care Issues II (1 Semester Hour). Students build upon concepts in patient care discussed in PA 527 Health Care Issues I. After completion of this course, students will understand and express ethical concepts as they relate to practical decision-making and problem-solving. Students will comprehend risk management strategies and the legal definitions of, and their responsibilities toward, informed consent and confidentiality. Students will gain an appreciation for health care policy, nationally and locally, as it impacts health care delivery, the practice of medicine as a PA and the socioeconomic factors pertaining to relevant health care decision making. PA 532 Clinical Medicine III (3 Semester Hours). The student will build upon the knowledge and skills attained in the two prior Clinical Medicine courses. The student will study the disorders and diseases of the following: genitourinary system (GU), psychiatric disorders, preventive medicine and complementary and alternative medicine. Disorders are presented by system and specialty-augmented with clinical therapeutics. PA 543 Pharmacology III (2 Semester Hours). This is the third class in a three-part series. Combined lecture and active learning exercises are designed to develop the pharmacologic and therapeutic skills that a physician assistant will need to enhance patient care in clinical practice focusing on renal disease, genitourinary and psychiatric disorders and alternative/complimentary medicines and dietary supplements. Students will be expected to utilize the clinical literature and to evaluate patient cases as they related to pharmacology. PA 550 Emergency Medicine (2 Semester Hours). In this advanced clinical course, students learn treatment of trauma and medical disorders commonly presenting to the emergency department. Taught in a case-based format, the emphasis is on the priority of stabilizing patients with life-threatening trauma or illness and selecting appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic measures. Students will be required to become ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support) certified or recertified for clinical rotations. PA 552 Medical Procedures (2 Semester Hours). Students build on the knowledge, skills and techniques learned in PA 539 Patient Assessment II to evaluate the surgical patient. Taught using a combination of lectures and laboratory exercises, students learn to perform procedures such as suturing, splinting, wound care, intravenous insertions, nasogastric intubations and Foley catheter insertion. Students learn principles of surgery, including pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative care, and minor surgical procedures. PA 554 Special Populations (5 Semester Hours). Students must understand the special needs of patients within the primary care subspecialties: women’s health, pediatrics and geriatrics. This class is taught in a modular format using a variety of learning methods, including traditional lectures and interactive techniques. Page | 10 5/3/2010
  11. 11. CLINICAL ROTATION SITES MPAS degree curriculum will be delivered both on and off the main campus of Wingate University. Didactic courses will be held on the main campus while clinical rotation curriculum will be delivered in affiliated sites such as hospitals, medical practices and long-term care facilities. The Department of Physician Assistant Studies will attempt to place students in locations that are mutually agreed upon but reserves the right to place students in suitable locations when necessary. Transportation for all off- campus clinical rotations is the responsibility of the student. Students during the clinical year will serve in three rotations during the fall semester, three in the spring semester, two in the summer semester and two in the final semester. Each student will complete each rotation described below. Didactic year’s curriculum must be completed successfully in order for student to progress to the clinical year. PA 600 Ambulatory Medicine (5 Semester Hours). The five-week rotation provides practical experience in general primary care through outpatient medicine. Students engage in all aspects of patient care, including history, physical exam, treatment plan design and evaluation. Students’ application of patient and family education to treatment and preventive measures is emphasized. PA 601 Long-Term Care (5 Semester Hours). The five-week rotation provides practical clinical experience in long-term care facilities. Students engage in all aspects of patient care, including history, physical exam, treatment plan design and evaluation. Students’ application of patient and family education to treatment and preventive measures is emphasized. PA 602 Internal Medicine (5 Semester Hours). The five-week rotation provides practical clinical experience in internal medicine. Students engage in all aspects of patient care, including history, physical exam, treatment plan design and evaluation. Students’ application of patient and family education to treatment and preventive measures is emphasized. PA 603 Pediatrics (5 Semester Hours). The five-week rotation provides practical clinical experience in pediatric medicine. Students engage in all aspects of patient care, including history, physical exam, treatment plan design and evaluation. Students’ application of patient and family education to treatment and preventive measures is emphasized. PA 604 Psychiatry (5 Semester Hours). The five-week rotation provides practical clinical experience in psychiatric medicine. Students engage in all aspects of patient care, including history, physical exam, treatment plan design and evaluation. Students’ application of patient and family education to treatment and preventive measures is emphasized. PA 605 General Surgery (5 Semester Hours). The five-week rotation provides practical clinical experience in general surgery. Students engage in all aspects of patient care, including history, physical exam, treatment plan design and evaluation. Students’ application of patient and family education to treatment and preventive measures is emphasized. PA 606 Women’s Health (5 Semester Hours). The five-week rotation provides practical clinical experience in women’s health. Students engage in all aspects of patient care, including history, physical exam, treatment plan design and evaluation. Students’ application of patient and family education to treatment and preventive measures is emphasized. PA 607 Emergency Medicine (5 Semester Hours). The five-week rotation provides practical clinical experience in emergency medicine. Students engage in all aspects of patient care, including history, physical exam, treatment plan design and evaluation. Students’ application of patient and family education to treatment and preventive measures is emphasized. PA 608 Elective Clinical Rotation I (5 Semester Hours). This is the first of two required elective clinical rotations. This course will provide clinical experience in medical or surgical specialty of the student’s choice. All clinical rotations will be offered throughout the last 4 semesters of the MPAS Program. Each Page | 11 5/3/2010
  12. 12. clinical rotation will last for five weeks with a total of 3 different clinical rotations per semester. During the last semester only 2 clinical rotations will be available. Students will engage in all aspects of patient care from history and physical exam to treatment plan design and evaluation. Patient and family education will be stressed as they apply both to treatment plans and preventative issues. The purpose of this rotation is to allow students to explore more completely an area of interest in clinical medicine or surgery. Students will engage in all aspects of patient care for patients within that specialty’s patient population from history and physical exam to treatment plan design and evaluation. Patient and family education will be stressed as they apply both to treatment plans and preventative issues. PA 609 Elective Clinical Rotation II (5 Semester Hours). This is the second of two required elective clinical rotations. This course will provide clinical experience in medical or surgical specialty of the student’s choice. All clinical rotations will be offered throughout the last 4 semesters of the MPAS Program. Each clinical rotation will last for five weeks with a total of 3 different clinical rotations per semester. During the last semester only 2 clinical rotations will be available. Students will engage in all aspects of patient care from history and physical exam to treatment plan design and evaluation. Patient and family education will be stressed as they apply both to treatment plans and preventative issues. The purpose of this rotation is to allow students to explore more completely an area of interest in clinical medicine or surgery. Students will engage in all aspects of patient care for patients within that specialty’s patient population from history and physical exam to treatment plan design and evaluation. Patient and family education will be stressed as they apply both to treatment plans and preventative issues. Fourth Semester (Fall – clinical year) PA 621 Introduction to Quality Improvement and Patient Safety (1 Semester Hour). This is a continuation of work initiated on PA 580 Research, Epidemiology, and Statistics. This course will allow the student to gain competency in quality improvement strategies necessary for completion of their Capstone Project. Students will develop skills and knowledge in practice-based learning, development of a variety of improvement strategies, and an introduction to systems-based practice. This course coincides with the PA student’s initial contact with clinical rotations and will serve as a guide in assessing patient safety and process improvement. Furthermore, it will help develop strategies for completing the Quality Improvement Capstone Project required for graduation. The capstone experience is student-directed, meaning that students take responsibility for identifying and defining a problem to work on, working within a multidisciplinary team, facilitating the approach and methods needed to address a problem, and presenting findings in both oral and written forms. Three Five-Week Clinical Rotations (15 Semester hours). Courses described above. Fifth Semester (Spring – clinical year) PA 623 Professional Development (1 Semester Hour). The instructor will teach through an interactive discussion format. Topics include resume development, employment strategies, completion of state applications for practice, medical malpractice, reimbursement issues and financial planning. Three Five-Week Clinical Rotations (15 Semester hours). Courses described above. Sixth Semester (Summer – clinical year) PA 624 PANCE Preparation I (2 Semester Hours). The first of two courses to prepare students for successful completion of the Physician Assistant National Certifying Examination (PANCE), necessary for entering medical practice. Students learn strategies for successful study and successful completion of board-style exams. Students are prepared to take a systems approach, integrating all aspects of medicine, including medical and surgical disorders encountered in general adult and pediatric medicine. Topics also include typical clinical presentation, etiology, pathophysiology, diagnostic work-up, lab interpretation and management of disorders. Two Five-Week Clinical Rotations (10 Semester hours). Courses described above. Page | 12 5/3/2010
  13. 13. Seventh Semester (Fall – Final Semester) PA 625 PANCE Preparation II (2 Semester Hours). In this second course, students are prepared to successfully complete the Physician Assistant National Certifying Examination (PANCE), necessary for entering medical practice. Students learn strategies for successful study and successful completion of board-style exams. Students are prepared to take a systems approach, integrating all aspects of medicine, including medical and surgical disorders encountered in general adult and pediatric medicine. Topics also include typical clinical presentation, etiology, pathophysiology, diagnostic work-up, lab interpretation and management of disorders. PA 710 Summative Evaluation (1 Semester Hour). This course provides a summative evaluation tool to measure cognitive, motor and effective domains at a point near the students’ completion of the program. Students perform an objective standardized clinical examination (OSCE) in order to demonstrate competency in interpersonal skills, comprehensive physical examination skills and professional bearing. Students complete an end-of-course written examination providing proof of medical knowledge and clinical competence. PA 720 Capstone Project Completion (4 Semester Hours). This is a continuation of the Capstone Project first defined and discussed in PA 580 Research, Epidemiology, and Statistics, and PA 621 Introduction to Quality Improvement and Patient Safety. This course will allow the student to complete work on the Capstone project and formally present the findings to peers and instructors. This project is required for graduation from the MPAS Program. Two Five-Week Clinical Rotations (10 Semester hours). Courses described above. STUDENT PRIVACY AND INFORMED CONSENT Students in the Department of Physician Assistant Studies are granted privacy through the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) enacted to protect the privacy associated with educational records, to establish the rights of students to inspect and review their educational records and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings. In compliance with FERPA, the Wingate University Department of Physician Assistant Studies requires its students’ informed consent to the sharing of personal information with its educational partners (clinical rotation sites) strictly on a need-to-know basis. This personal information may include, but is not limited to, social security numbers, immunization records, e-mail addresses, telephone numbers, results of health care tests, results of credit checks and criminal records known to Wingate University. Notice is hereby given that random drug screenings or additional criminal background checks may be requested of the students at any time during the didactic or clinical years as well as for placement in certain clinical rotation sites as standard operating procedure. The student may be responsible for the cost of drug screenings or additional criminal background checks. CODES OF PROFESSIONAL AND ACADEMIC CONDUCT Each student in the Department of Physician Assistant Studies will be given the Student Handbook pertinent to the guidelines of acceptable and unacceptable conduct. Included in this Handbook are guidelines for professional appearance and conduct during the didactic and clinical years. PROJECTED TUITION – SUBJECT TO CHANGE Tuition 2009-2010 Didactic Year* $24,000 Fall Spring Summer $8,000 $8,000 $8,000 Tuition 2010-2011 Clinical Year* $24,000 Fall Spring Summer $8,000 $8,000 $8,000 Tuition Fall 2011* $8,000 Page | 13 5/3/2010
  14. 14. TOTAL COST* $56,000 TUITION DEPOSIT Applicants will be interviewed in February 2009 for admission into the class beginning August 2009. Upon notification of acceptance into the program, each applicant must pay a $1,500 tuition deposit within 10 days of receipt of a certified letter of acceptance to confirm and secure the applicant’s place in the class. The deposit will be applied to the first year’s tuition if the student continues in the program. Failure to pay the $1,500 in a timely manner will forfeit applicant’s place in the program. The $1,500 deposit is nonrefundable if the applicant chooses not to enroll in the Physician Assistant Program after paying the deposit. If the applicant is dismissed by the Wingate University PA program prior to enrollment but after payment of the $1,500 for reasons including, but not limited to, discovery of history of drug abuse, felony conviction or fraudulent application statements, Wingate University will refund in full applicant’s deposit of $1,500. STUDENTS’ EMPLOYMENT AND HOUSING Students in the PA program may not work full-time due to the demands of both didactic and clinical years. Part-time work is strongly discouraged as well. Financial assistance for tuition and living expenses is available through student loans and will be coordinated through the Financial Planning office at Wingate University. Graduate students are not eligible to live in on-campus housing. Students are responsible for all living expenses and transportation. ADDITIONAL EXPENSES FOR THE PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT PROGRAM Additional costs for the PA program will include Medical textbooks (for both the didactic and clinical years) Malpractice insurance Medical equipment (such as a quality stethoscope, otoscope, ophthalmoscope, sphygmomanometer, lab coats, patches and name tags, etc.) Miscellaneous fees for offsite medical training These additional costs will be in the range of $2,000. Laptop Computer Students are required to have a laptop computer for use in the PA Program. • Processor speed ranging from 1.3 Ghz to • CD-ROM drive TM 2.15 Ghz • Microsoft Vista or Windows XP SP2 • RAM - (Random Access Memory) - 512MB (Professional) (No Macintosh) or more • Microsoft Office Suite Student and Teacher • Hard Drive - minimum 60GB Edition • Wireless standard 802.11b/g • Antivirus Software • CD/DVD or DVD/CD Burner drive • Service Plan LICENSING Following graduation with the MPAS degree, students may apply to sit for the Physician Assistant National Certification Examination (PANCE). After passing the PANCE, students may apply for licensing in any state or territory of the United States. North Carolina Medical Board Raleigh, NC 27619-0007 1203 Front Street Telephone (919) 326-1100, (919) 326-1109 Raleigh, NC 27609-7533 Fax (919) 326-0036 PO Box 20007 info@ncmedboard.org Page | 14 5/3/2010
  15. 15. FACULTY Rosalind V. Becker MS PA-C ......................................Assistant Professor and Academic Coordinator • MS Education and Leadership, Arizona School of Health Sciences (2005) • BS Health Professions, Kettering College of Medical Arts (2000) • AS Physician Assistant, Kettering College of Medical Arts (1995) • AS Medical Lab Technology, Orange County Community College (1974) Sharon Berenfeld MD................................................................................................................... Instructor MD University of Florida College of Medicine (1987) BS Microbiology, University of South Florida (1982) Roy C. Blank MD ....................................................................Associate Professor and Medical Director MD Medicine, University of Maryland (1972) BS Biology, Wake Forest University (1968) Rebecca B. Boeschel MSHS PA-C ............................................................................................ Instructor • MSHS George Washington University Medical Center (2003) • PA Certification Wake Forest University Medical Center (1979) • BA University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (1975) David A. Compton MD MPH ...............................Associate Professor and Assistant Program Director • MPH Johns Hopkins University (1986) • MD Medical College of Virginia (1984) • MS Biology and Chemistry, Virginia Commonwealth University (1979) • BS Biology Virginia Commonwealth University (1977) Gary R. Uremovich DMin MPAS PA-C ................................. Assistant Professor and Program Director • DMin Church Administration, Trinity College and Theological Seminary (2007) • MPAS Emergency Medicine, University of Nebraska (1997) • MS Educational Counseling, Vanderbilt University, Peabody School for Teachers (1981) • BS Psychology Magna cum laude, University of Maryland (1979) • BS Allied Health/Physician Assistant honor graduate University of Nebraska (1976) Michael B. Whitehead DHSc PA-C .................................. Assistant Professor and Clinical Coordinator • DHSc, Nova Southeastern University (2005) • MPAS, University of Nebraska (2000) • BS Applied Science (Physician Assistant), Creighton University • Bachelor General Studies, Chaminade University of Honolulu (1986) • Physician Assistant Program, U.S. Army Academy of Health Science (1984) Page | 15 5/3/2010

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