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    View the complete proposal as a Word document View the complete proposal as a Word document Document Transcript

    • Innovations in Medical Education Proposal to the Medical Education and Research Committee 10-20-04 Overview In April 2003, the Wisconsin United for Health Foundation, Inc. approved the University of Wisconsin Medical School and the Oversight and Advisory Committee five-year plan for funds from the conversion of Blue Cross & Blue Shield United of Wisconsin. The plan, The Wisconsin Partnership Fund for a Healthy Future, included a proposal to fund Innovations in Medical Education as one core focus area of excellence. The Innovations in Medical Education proposal is attached to this document as Appendix A and serves as the basis for this funding request. In addition, the University of Wisconsin Medical School’s 2004-06 Strategic Plan outlines goals and objectives for medical education (Appendix B). The Strategic Plan’s Education Priorities goals 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 12, & 13 were written to guide the implementation of the Innovations in Medical Education proposal to broadly improve health professions training and the health of Wisconsin’s citizens. The term “Medical Education” refers in all cases to the full scope of educational programs supported by the Medical School and includes undergraduate, graduate, professional, and post professional education. Goals The following goals and initiatives are described in the Wisconsin Partnership Fund proposal: The [Innovations in Medical Education] initiatives will enhance health professions training and the health of Wisconsin’s citizens by: • creating new education programs, aligned with Healthiest Wisconsin 2010, to address population health needs; • focusing on gaps in health education: problem solving, information management, chronic disease, women’s health, cultural competence, ethics, oral health, pain management, and end of life care; • providing life-long learning skills and ongoing continuing professional education; • capitalizing on new opportunities for distance education for providers and citizens of Wisconsin; • developing meaningful interdisciplinary education that emphasizes team care. These goals will be achieved through the following four initiatives: A New Curriculum for the New Wisconsin Physician Clinical Skills Teaching and Assessment Center Statewide Healthcare Distance Education Innovations in Medical Education Grant Program
    • A New Curriculum for the New Wisconsin Physician The current Medical School budget allocation for medical student education is $17,325,000. This request for new funds, a net 3% increase in the funding for medical education, provides a core matrix of support to implement the desired curriculum changes as outlined in the Wisconsin Partnership for a Healthy Future Five Year Plan and the University of Wisconsin Medical School 2004-2006 Strategic Plan. Without these funds, the implementation of these (and future) new content areas will be at the behest of individual course directors and departments, without institutional oversight for achievement of the goals. This curriculum matrix team provides a bridge between faculty and central administration, and provides a mechanism for ongoing innovations in curriculum. Budget Request: 3 faculty curriculum directors $225,000 Each faculty curriculum director would be responsible for the implementation of the new curriculum across all required courses for that year of medical education. This model will allow current course directors to partner with the new faculty directors to introduce the new content areas. Faculty will be recruited for their knowledge and experience in population health, cultural diversity, ethics and other topics as articulated in Healthiest Wisconsin 2010. 4 instructional staff $250,000 Each Year 1 and 2 required medical school course will have an instructional staff co-course director assigned to implement the new curriculum and use of new instructional modalities and evaluation tools. These new staff will work with clinical clerkship directors and the MSTP and Graduate Studies program staff to implement the new curriculum elements across programs. Clinical Skills Teaching and Assessment Center The Medical School currently employs a standardized patient and assessment staff of 4 FTE, which has established a core program for teaching and assessment of clinical skills. The additional personnel requested below would allow for significant expansion of this program to include new skills such as health risk assessment, behavioral and lifestyle health management, interdisciplinary team care, ethics and communication skills, informed consent, communication about errors and mistakes, working with culturally diverse populations and with medical interpreters. This additional staff will allow creation of a Clinical Skills Health Center Advisory Group with interdisciplinary members and to include patients/families and community members, to offer these opportunities and resources to other health professions programs, to develop regional training programs for clinical practitioners, to develop web and hard copy training materials for faculty, to facilitate research on clinical teaching and assessment and to provide consultation for data analysis, survey instruments, and statistical analyses of clinical teaching and assessment content. These resources will allow for collaboration with GME, CME, and community groups wishing to use standardized patients and structured competency skills exams for teaching and assessment to provide consultation for research and education training grants. Budget request: $225,000
    • Statewide Healthcare Distance Education The Medical School currently employees 3.5 FTE staff in distance education and educational technology support. The addition of new staff will support programs to allow more community providers, patients and citizens to participate in health education programs and will provide interdisciplinary education for nursing, pharmacy, physician assistant and medical students. The technology resources of the new Health Sciences Learning Center will allow the staff to support new non traditional learning methods, such as web based and distance education programs for communities and citizens of Wisconsin. This unit will assist with the implementation of a partnership between the UW Medical School and communities in educating Wisconsin citizens on health related issues and applying research findings to improve the health of individuals and communities. They will serve as consultants on research and educational training grants for implementation, evaluation and assessment of non-traditional learning technologies. Budget request: $275,000 Innovations in Medical Education Grant Program This request should be considered by the MERC during discussion of the RPF process for research and education. Appendix A: Wisconsin Partnership Fund for a Health Future 5 Year Plan Innovations in Education Appendix B: UW Medical School Strategic Plan 2004-2006 Education Priorities Appendix A The Wisconsin Partnership Fund for a Healthy Future University of Wisconsin Medical School and the Oversight and Advisory Committee 2003-2008 Plan Core Focus Areas of Excellence
    • Innovations in Medical Education The Opportunity: Transforming Medical Education in Wisconsin As a new century begins, improving population health in Wisconsin will require healthcare providers with knowledge and skills not traditionally learned in medical schools. In addition to being expert in the art and science of medicine, today’s healthcare professionals—physicians, nurses and allied providers—must be skilled in preventing as well as treating disease; be familiar with methods of risk recognition, including genetic screening; expert with all methods of communication; and must understand healthcare economics. Health professionals must to work as a team in a constantly changing field. They need to understand emerging technology, and know how to manage burgeoning information. Training in ethics, patient rights and privacy, research protocols and informed consent is now required of medical school graduates. Providers need a thorough understanding of women’s health, culturally sensitive healthcare, geriatrics, mental health, and substance abuse and violence. Just as importantly, they must have easy access to ongoing education and consultation to stay current. The Challenge: Redesigning the Educational Process Medical science and population health sciences are changing at an unprecedented rate. And while all medical schools strive to give students the very best education, few have the opportunity or resources to respond to evolving educational demands. Many lack the modern facilities to support the necessary computer and research technology. Others lack the flexibility to embrace new curricula and teaching methods. The Solution: Innovations in Medical Education The UW Medical School will soon move into a modern education facility where students from medicine, nursing, pharmacy and allied health programs will learn together at one site. The Health Sciences Learning Center (HSLC) will also unite the Medical School and its continuing medical education program, and will combine the campus’ three health sciences libraries. In addition, it will feature technology linking educational programs throughout the state, helping Wisconsin assure a diverse and competent workforce. With the physical resources in place, the school is focusing on new ways to train Wisconsin’s health providers. These initiatives will enhance health professions training and the health of Wisconsin’s citizens by: • creating new education programs, aligned with Healthiest Wisconsin 2010, to address population health needs; • focusing on gaps in health education: problem solving, information management, chronic disease, women’s health, cultural competence, ethics, oral health, pain management, and end of life care; • providing life-long learning skills and ongoing continuing professional education; • capitalizing on new opportunities for distance education for providers and citizens of Wisconsin; • developing meaningful interdisciplinary education that emphasizes team care. The Wisconsin Partnership Fund will help the school achieve these goals through the following four initiatives: A New Curriculum for the New Wisconsin Physician
    • Healthcare practitioners in the 21st century will need to be prepared using new curricula that feature the synergistic combination of medicine and public health. This will mean extensively revising current courses and integrating more information on population health sciences such as epidemiology, health services research and health policy, problem solving skills, and evidence- based medicine. Adding state-of-the-art technology such as digital imaging, computational based demonstrations, and computer assisted exams, and incorporating information management skills will be critical. Interdisciplinary education will be developed with nursing, pharmacy, physician assistant and social work programs to afford future providers the expertise to work as part of healthcare teams. Similarly, UW graduate students will be trained in areas such as ethics and research, and informed consent. Clinical Skills Teaching and Assessment Center Learning the science of medical care is only part of a physician’s education. Medical students must also acquire basic interviewing, physical exam and clinical procedures skills. The new 24- room Teaching and Assessment Center will allow students to demonstrate their skills in examining and communicating with patients through the standardized patient assessment program. New resources will also help provide clinical skills testing on demand, increase the numbers of trained standardized patients, and support added initiatives, such as EMT training and continuing professional development. Statewide Healthcare Distance Education The Health Sciences Learning Center will position the Medical School as an education resource for students, residents and trainees, and providers across the campus and the state. These expanding communities of electronic learners will allow more students, community faculty, community providers, patients and citizens to participate in health education programs and will provide interdisciplinary education for nursing, pharmacy, physician assistant and medical students. Taking full advantage of the center’s technological resources will require new support to design curriculum for local sites. Innovations in Medical Education Grant Program To remain a leader in teaching innovation, the Medical School will launch a new “Innovations in Medical Education” small grant program to support new curricula, assessment or evaluation methods, and new technology for existing courses. The program will allow faculty and staff to explore educational methods or techniques before heavily investing resources. Appendix B University of Wisconsin Medical School 2004-2006 Strategic Plan II. Education Priorities Background Recognizing that excellence in education is crucial to meet the challenges of healthcare in the 21st century, the UW Medical School will strive to develop exemplary educational programs for all areas of education at the UW Medical School—medical students, graduate students, residents,
    • postdoctoral fellows, health professions students—as well as for faculty development, continuing professional education and undergraduate education. The School will emphasize two main strengths: incorporating the outstanding research, scholarship and spirit of inquiry into the fabric of its education programs; and continuing to apply the “Wisconsin Idea” of seeking to make “the beneficent influence of the University available to every home in the State” to its education programs. Innovations in Education Goal 1. Establish a climate of professionalism, excitement, inquiry and collaboration for education by supporting innovation and rewarding quality through measurable outcomes. A. Establish or enhance measurable outcomes to ensure excellence for all courses and programs. B. Review courses and programs for “best practices” at UW Medical School. C. Publicly recognize annual achievements in accomplishing these educational goals. D. Reward achievements in educational quality at individual, course and department levels. E. Promote professional conduct for all faculty, staff and students to support a respectful and reflective learning environment. F. Measure and monitor the qualities of the learning environment as well as the professional interaction between faculty and instructional staff, and students. G. Support inquiry in research and scholarship, and encourage students to participate in research. H. Measure and support quality of life and healthy lifestyles for students, and ensure that education programs support healthy lifestyles where possible. I. Develop core support for graduate students through a central student services office. Goal 2. Promote improvements in educational programs by informing faculty, staff and students of national trends and reviews of best practices in education. A. Establish a Health Outcomes and Medical Education (HOME) office at the UW Medical School to evaluate outcomes of educational changes. B. Establish curriculum guidelines for incorporating evidence-based research in education methods. C. Develop measurable methods to demonstrate whether new education content or courses can improve public health outcomes. D. Disseminate information on teaching methods and course content and determine necessary changes. E. Initiate visiting professorships, establish grand rounds for education and invite guest lecturers to share successful educational innovations with faculty and staff. F. Initiate mini-sabbaticals for basic science and clinical faculty, and instructional staff, to develop new course content or methods. G. Support changes in medical student education, course content, and teaching methods as outlined in the 2003 Liaison Committee Medical Education (LCME) report. H. Improve the health status of the public by promoting Continuing Medical Education (CME) offerings as a method of changing physician behavior. Goal 3. Encourage creativity, new directions and an entrepreneurial philosophy among teaching faculty and staff.
    • A. Increase the number of educational grants awarded for proposals that incorporate translational content. B. Achieve a greater mix of clinical and basic faculty in courses. C. Create innovative, individually initiated education programs by identifying “start up” funds for new education projects. D. Identify creative sources of funding and new populations of students who will be served by these innovative efforts. Education Content Goal 4. Support the goals of Healthiest Wisconsin 2010: A Partnership Plan to Improve the Health of the Public by establishing new content and evaluation in courses and programs to address the population health issues of the state. Goal 5. Emphasize the scientific basis of current understanding of the health risks, mechanisms of disease, and therapeutic approaches to disease and prevention measures. A. Review all education programs to assure students develop the following skills: Interpreting and appraising evidence in scientific literature; Study design and statistical analysis; Epidemiology and population health; Research experiences; Life-long inquiry. B. Establish new courses and content as needed, with emphasis on interdisciplinary approaches in research and health promotion and healthcare delivery. Goal 6. Advance and strengthen interdisciplinary and health professions education as an integral function of an academic health center; align curriculum more closely with the current healthcare delivery environment. A. Develop new courses targeted to students of various disciplines so they learn collaboratively. B. To model effective translation of basic and applied sciences into clinical care, increase programs and courses which include both researchers and clinicians. C. Undertake a systematic review of the Medical School’s health professions programs to ensure quality and to maximize student experiences. D. Initiate new courses or content about healthcare systems; trends in healthcare delivery; population and public health; and measures of quality, ethics, professionalism and safety in healthcare delivery. E. Increase education in ethical issues in healthcare throughout the Medical School’s curriculum, residency training process, and continuing medical education. Goal 7. Establish innovative approaches to teaching health professions students how to deliver culturally sensitive healthcare and to address health disparities and diverse populations in Wisconsin.
    • A. Quantify and increase existing course content related to addressing health disparities and delivering culturally sensitive healthcare. B. Develop new courses in the Medical School’s Department of Population Health Sciences or for the Master in Public Health (MPH) degree, that address health disparities and delivering culturally sensitive healthcare. C. Expand statewide education opportunities which address the disparities of the population of Wisconsin. D. Develop new clinical experiences in population health and in underserved populations. E. Work collaboratively with the Center for the Study of Cultural Diversity in Health Care to evaluate how effective these new programs are in improving the skills of future healthcare providers and researchers in working with multicultural populations. Goal 8. Increase emphasis on competency and skills assessment as teaching and evaluation tools; optimize choice of evaluation methods for all learning programs. A. Establish a process to align student and resident clinical skill evaluation with new National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements. B. Establish measures for evaluating professionalism as a component of all Medical School education programs. C. Ensure the ethical conduct of research is an educational priority and is emphasized in the research enterprise. D. Facilitate more interaction among graduate and medical students by creating new courses or programs of interest to both groups. E. Expand and increase the Office of Continuing Medical Education’s individualized assessment of physicians in practice through its Physician Assessment Program. Education Operations Goal 9. Centralize, strengthen and increase support for core education functions, allowing faculty and instructional staff to concentrate on content, teaching methods and quality of courses. A. Fully utilize the extensive new Information Technology (IT) resources of the Health Sciences Learning Center by consolidating IT support services and adding positions as needed. B. Evaluate courses that enhance learning by adding IT supported education materials in the respective education programs. C. Create a core education and IT office for graduate and health professions education programs in the Medical Sciences Center. D. Develop core professional staff support for required Medical School interdisciplinary courses, using partnership teams with faculty and staff modeled on current successful courses. E. Work with the Health Sciences Learning Center IT section in creating new faculty and staff development programs in education technology to increase self-directed learning and problem solving in courses. F. Improve course satisfaction outcomes as a measure of increased core course support. Goal 10. Develop leadership and teaching skills of residents and fellows, while adapting to changes in resident work hours and decreased funding for residency and fellowship training.
    • A. Determine optimal teaching roles for residents in all courses, clerkships or rotations. B. Develop new clinical teaching strategies to replace anticipated decrease in resident teaching time. C. Enhance resident teaching and assessment skills by establishing “residents-as- teacher” programs in all departments. D. Investigate more collaborative, integrated programs and teaching strategies for medical students and residents. E. Determine how to combine medical student evaluation and residency skills assessments into a more integrated program incorporating new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements and US Medical Licensure Exam (USMLE) clinical skills assessment methods. Goal 11. Assess Medical School student recruitment and admissions strategies. Enhance the School’s ability to recruit from a national pool of applicants. A. Review and revise definitions for underrepresented minorities, factoring in anticipated demographic changes in Wisconsin and US populations, as well as new guidelines from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the UW-Madison campus. B. Review current recruitment and admissions procedures and enhance methods of recruiting outstanding graduate students. C. Evaluate career development of students after graduation to assess long-term outcomes of the School’s education programs. D. Strive to more closely align tuition levels with those of other Big Ten or Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC) Consortium institutions to help recruit top students. E. Evaluate capacity and quality of education programming to determine the optimal number of students to be admitted. F. Support a diverse student population by evaluating the effectiveness and outcomes of current Medical School recruitment and pipeline programs aimed at pre-college and undergraduate students. Goal 12. Evaluate education resource allocation to improve quality and support innovation. A. Review current education resources, including the Mission Aligned Management Allocation (MAMA) model, to ensure all facets of education receive necessary and appropriate support. B. Analyze MAMA’s education measures and revise to optimize allocation splits between medical, graduate and undergraduate teaching. C. Assess the reward system for interdisciplinary education and review MAMA measures to ensure support for the transformation from departmental to interdisciplinary programs. D. Review current allocations for core information technology and Health Science Library support to ensure these areas meet all education programs needs. E. Establish an “Innovations in Education” pilot grant program within the 65% of the new Wisconsin Partnership for a Healthy Future to enhance health professions training and the health of Wisconsin’s citizens. Goal 13. Implement a new degree program, Master in Public Health (MPH) as part of the focus on population and public health.
    • A. Acquire Master in Public Health (MPH) degree approval and enroll students as soon as feasible. B. Obtain accreditation for MPH degree. C. Establish distance education opportunities within the MPH courses to allow off-site access for non-residential degree candidates.