USP Undergraduate Catalog

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USP Undergraduate Catalog

  1. 1. University Undergraduate Catalog 2000-2002 COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES Overview 143 Medical Technology Program 143 Medical Technology Major 143 Course Descriptions 147 Faculty 148 Department of Occupational Therapy 149 Occupational Therapy Major 149 Course Descriptions 154 Faculty 159 Department of Physical Therapy 160 Physical Therapy Major 160 Course Descriptions 164 Faculty 170 Department of Physician Assistant Studies 171 Physician Assistant Major 171 Preprofessional Phase (Years 1-3) 172 Professional Phase (Years 4 and 5) 174
  2. 2. Prev Table of Contents Next COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES OVERVIEW enhance understanding and skill development. Experiences with patients are initiated early in The College of Health Sciences offers a bachelors degree in Health Sciences and pro- the professional programs, so students experi- fessional education in medical technology, ence the day-to-day issues that professionals occupational therapy, physical therapy and face. A variety of public and privately funded physician assistant studies. The mission of the systems including hospitals, rehabilitation cen- College is to prepare students for future prac- ters, nursing homes, homes, schools and com- tice as health care delivery professionals. The munity-based organizations are utilized for faculty are committed to student-centered clinical experiences. Faculty encourage personal learning, using many different methods to development so each graduate prepares for a productive and satisfying career. MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PROGRAM DESCRIPTION excel in their respective academic disciplines, including those who are actually working in the The Medical Technology Program focuses fields of health care and industry. on the learning of integrated scientific con- Medical technology professionals, also known cepts and their useful application to the diag- as clinical laboratory scientists, perform all the nosis of disease. laboratory procedures essential to diagnosing a The program provides a solid background in disease. In addition to being respected members biology, chemistry, mathematics and commu- of a health care team, medical technologists nication in the first three years. This is fol- make vital contributions in many other areas of lowed by a fourth year of practical hands-on the laboratory sciences. These fields include learning of specific diagnostic skills in a clini- epidemiology; veterinary medicine; sales; mar- cal laboratory setting. keting; laboratory supervision and manage- Our goal is to develop scientific competence ment; education; instrumentation; public in students, and the capability of performing health; food technology; toxicology; medical, specific tests and experiments leading to the industrial and pharmaceutical research; and diagnosis of human disease. This is achieved forensic determinations. Positions are available by providing a program taught by faculty who University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 143 2000-2002 University Catalog
  3. 3. Prev Table of Contents Next throughout the nation and are as varied as the able, thus providing experience and salary individual’s own preferences and interests. compensation. The medical technology Students are enrolled full-time at the senior rotates through each of the specialized University for three academic years and must departments in the clinical laboratory. complete a minimum of 101 credit hours of Preparation in the hematology lab includes approved courses. Additionally, passing the studies of the cellular blood components (red Writing Proficiency Examination is a require- cells, white cells, and platelets) and the disor- ment for graduation. In the case of failure, ders associated with these cells and the blood students may fulfill a contract with the forming tissues. In Blood Bank, or Immuno- Writing Center that will allow them to take hematology, the students learn blood typing the writing proficiency equivalency exam, or and crossmatching, and preparation of com- may elect to take EN095 during the summer; ponents. Microbiology involves the study of the final examination in this course shall be the causative agents of disease (bacteria, equivalent to the Writing Proficiency viruses, fungi and parasites). The department Examination. of Serology/Immunology utilizes the prin- Students apply for their hospital internship ciples of immune reactions to diagnose many program following completion of the second viral and bacterial diseases, and is on the year. A cumulative grade point average of 2.5 leading edge of clinical lab science. In is required to make an application. Clinical Chemistry, qualitative and quantita- Upon the successful completion of this cur- tive analysis are used to identify and measure riculum, students spend 12 months at an minute amounts of chemicals in the body approved hospital school of medical technolo- necessary for its proper functioning. Other gy. The University assists students in obtain- areas of study are endocrinology, urinalysis, ing acceptance into an approved hospital pathology, instrumentation, quality control, school and holds formal affiliations with the molecular diagnostics, cell biology and labo- schools of medical technology at three area ratory computer systems. hospitals: Cooper Health System, Camden, When the clinical rotation has been satis- NJ; Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, PA; factorily completed, the student qualifies for Elkins Park Hospital (Tenet Health System), the degree of Bachelor of Science in Medical Elkins Park, PA; St. Vincent’s Medical Center, Technology. Jacksonville, FL; and Florida Hospital, National certification examinations, given Orlando, FL. by the Board of Registry of Medical These schools are approved by the National Technologists of the American Society Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory of Clinical Pathologists, enable those who Sciences (NAACLS). Affiliation of hospital pass to use the professional designation MT schools with institutions offering a degree (ASCP) after their names. Medical technolo- program is endorsed by NAACLS, and the gy is a rapidly growing and changing field, combined four-year program has been and provides a varied and interesting profes- approved by the Pennsylvania State Board of sion for someone interested in the sciences Medical Education and Licensure. The affili- and in medicine. ates are hospitals that have kept pace with technological developments, possess the newest instrumentation, and have established excellent medical and surgical services. During the senior year, students usually pay a reduced rate of tuition. Opportunities for working in the clinical laboratories are avail- University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 144 2000-2002 University Catalog
  4. 4. Prev Table of Contents Next MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM FIRST YEAR FALL SEMESTER SECOND YEAR FALL SEMESTER Course # Course Name Credit Hours Course # Course Name Credit Hours MT101 Medical Technology Orientation I 1 BS240 Basics of Microbiology 4 BS130 Introductory Biology I 4 CH201 Organic Chemistry I 3 CH101* General Chemistry I 3 CH203 Organic Chemistry Lab I 1 CH103* General Chemistry Lab I 1 Core Distribution Requirement 3 MA101 Mathematical Analysis I 3 IH201 Intellectual Heritage I 3 EN101 College Composition 3 Social Science PE101 Physical Education I 0 Fundamental Requirement 3 Credits/Semester 15 Credits/Semester 17 SPRING SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER MT102 Medical Technology Orientation II 1 BS348 Clinical Microbiology 4 BS131 Introductory Biology II 4 CH202 Organic Chemistry II 3 CH102* General Chemistry II 3 CH204 Organic Chemistry Lab II 1 CH104* General Chemistry Lab II 1 PY200 Survey of Physics 4 MA102 Mathematical Analysis II 3 IH202 Intellectual Heritage II 3 EN102 Introduction to Literature 3 MT201 Medical Technology Seminar 1 PE102 Physical Education II 1 Social Science Fundamental Requirement 3 Credits/Semester 16 Credits/Semester 19 * CH111/113 and CH112/114 may be substituted for CH101/103 and CH102/104. a. All students must demonstrate proficiency in com- puter applications before progressing to the spring semester of their second year. b. The student must have a GPA of 2.5 by the end of the summer semester of the second year, in order to progress to the third year of the medical tech- nology major. c. Students must pass the Writing Proficiency Examination as a requirement for graduation. University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 145 2000-2002 University Catalog
  5. 5. Prev Table of Contents Next MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM THIRD YEAR FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER Course # Course Name Credit Hours Course # Course Name Credit Hours CO101 Introduction to Communication 3 Core Distribution Requirement 3 Medical Technology Elective** 3 BS355 Clinical Immunology 3 Core Distribution Requirement 3 BS308 Human Parasitology 3 BS218 Hematology 3 BS466 Genetics 4 BS212 Functional Human Anatomy and Core Elective 3 Histology 3 Credits/Semester 16 CH341 Molecular Structure in Biochemistry 3 TOTAL CREDITS (Three Years) 101 Credits/Semester 18 ** The student may choose from the following: CH364 Analytical Methods in Toxicology and Clinical Chemistry, ET301 Ethics in Health Care, ST310 Introduction to Biostatistics, any English or communication course (any course beginning with EN or CO); or may choose BS310 (Anatomy and Physiology I) to replace BS212, plus BS311 (Anatomy and Physiology II) as the medical technology elective. FOURTH YEAR* Summary of Didactic Hours of Instruction Weeks of Laboratory Rotation Credit Hours** MT490 Clinical Hematology/Coagulation 10-12 6-8 MT491 Clinical Immunohematology 4-5 4-5 MT492 Clinical Chemistry 10-14 8-11 MT493 Clinical Microbiology 14-18 8-10 MT494 Clinical Immunology/Serology 3-4 3-4 MT495 Clinical Seminar 2-3 3-5 Credits/Year 36-38 * Medical technology program taken at an approved hospital school. ** Credits vary according to clinical affiliation site. TOTAL CREDITS 137-139 University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 146 2000-2002 University Catalog
  6. 6. Prev Table of Contents Next COURSE DESCRIPTIONS MT491 Clinical Immunohematology 4-5 semester credit hours 4-5 weeks MT101 Medical Technology Blood antigens, antibodies, crossmatching, Orientation I hemolytic diseases, and related diagnostic 1 semester credit hour tests and component preparation. In-depth 1 class hour study of blood donor service and its many Introduction to the program; faculty presen- facets such as transfusions and medico-legal tations, study skills, course electives, career aspects. paths and options are introduced. MT492 Clinical Chemistry MT102 Medical Technology 8-11 semester credit hours Orientation II 10-14 weeks 1 semester credit hour Enzymology, endocrinology, biochemistry of 1 class hour lipids, carbohydrates and proteins; metabo- Detailed description of med tech responsibil- lism of nitrogenous end products; physiology ities and on-site lab visits. Discussion of cur- and metabolism of fluids and electrolytes; rent topics in science and health care. and toxicology as related to the body and dis- eases. Technical procedures include colorime- MT201 Medical Technology Seminar try, spectrophotometry, electrophoresis, chro- 1 semester credit hour matography, automation and quality control. 1 class hour Emphasis is on reading and discussion of MT493 Clinical Microbiology current journal articles in medical technology 8-10 semester credit hours and student preparation of a research paper. 14-18 weeks Review of application for internship posi- Identification and clinical pathology of bac- tions, including resume preparation and teria, fungi, viruses and parasites. Techniques interviewing skills. (Prerequisites: MT101 to isolate, stain, culture and determine and MT102, or permission of instructor) antimicrobial susceptibility. Instrumentation and quality control. MT399 Independent Study in Medical Technology MT494 Clinical Immunology/ Serology 2 semester credit hours 3-4 semester credit hours 1 conference hour/ 3-4 weeks study time Immune response, immunoglobulins, Clinical laboratory science topics of special autoimmunity and complement, and related interest not included in structured courses. tests and diseases. Survey and demonstration Current issues, trends, or research in such of serological diagnostic tests. clinical areas as hematology, microbiology, biochemistry, immunohematology, or MT495 Clinical Seminar immunology-serology may be explored by 3-5 semester credit hours qualified students. A course may be elected 2-3 weeks more than once. (Prerequisites: permission of Includes courses in orientation, clinical instructor and program director) microscopy, laboratory management, venipuncture, lab math and clinical correla- MT490 Clinical Hematology/ tion conferences. Coagulation 6-8 semester credit hours 10-12 weeks Composition and function of blood; diseases related to blood disorders and role of platelets and coagulation. Manual and auto- mated techniques of diagnostic tests for abnormalities. University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 147 2000-2002 University Catalog
  7. 7. Prev Table of Contents Next FACULTY Margaret Reinhart, MT (ASCP) BS (Millersville); MMA (Pennsylvania State) Director, Medical Technology Program Coordinator of Clinical Education Phone: (215) 596-8797 E-mail: m.reinha@usip.edu Adjunct Faculty Cooper Health System, Camden, NJ Edison Catalano, MD BS (Lieco Lavallesa); MD (Montevideo) Medical Director Kathryn Durr, MT (ASCP) MS (Rider) Program Director Diana Hullihen, MT (ASCP) BS (Douglas) Program Coordinator Elkins Park Hospital, Elkins Park, PA Phyllis Gotkin, MT (ASCP) MEd (Beaver); PhD (Pacific Western) Program Director Richard Rupkalvis, MD BS (Benedictine); MD (Rush Medical College) Medical Director Florida Hospital, Orlando, FL Patricia Rogers BS (Tennessee State University) Medical Technology Program Director Rodney F. Holcomb, MD MD (Tulane University) Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, PA Caryn Lennon, MT (ASCP) BS (Quinnipiac) Program Director Michael Warhol, MD MD (Pittsburgh) Medical Director St. Vincent’s Medical Center, Jacksonville, FL Lynnette Chakkaphak, MS, MT(ASCP) BS (University of Massachusetts); MS (University of South Florida) Program Director Matthew Patterson, MD BS, MD (University of Florida) Medical Director, Chief Pathologist University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 148 2000-2002 University Catalog
  8. 8. Prev Table of Contents Next DEPARTMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY Mission activities as dressing, grooming, bathing and The basic mission of the Department of eating. Occupational Therapy is to serve the health Adaptive equipment and modifications to needs of the community through preparation the home or work environment may be incor- of reflective occupational therapy graduates porated into the treatment to enhance perfor- who will practice in a broad range of institu- mance in personal care, home management, tional, home, school, industrial and communi- job requirements and leisure activities. ty settings. Graduates will use goal-directed Occupational therapists work with clients of occupations or activities as the foundation for all ages, from infants to the elderly. They use a facilitating an individual’s adaptation to bio- variety of activities in treatment, such as play- logical, psychological and/or environmental ing with children, cooking with a homemaker, factors which may have interrupted the per- or using a computer with an office worker. son’s life course. In addition to teaching physical activities, We view occupational therapy education as a occupational therapists design treatment plans preparation for lifelong learning. Professional to help clients improve decision-making, service requires a foundation in the values of problem-solving and perceptual skills, as well broad-based humanistic, ethical and scientific as memory functioning. knowledge. Graduates will be prepared for The work environment of occupational multifaceted roles in health care delivery as therapists is as varied as the kinds of clients present, evolving and future practice demands they treat. Treatment may take place in a hos- change. pital, school, community or home environ- ment. In a mental health setting, where clients may be diagnosed as schizophrenic, mentally OVERVIEW OF retarded, or depressed, occupational therapists PROFESSION develop activities to help people cope with Occupational therapy is a health profession stress and gain self-esteem. that provides services to individuals with phys- In a school situation, an occupational thera- ical, mental, developmental or emotional dis- pist may help a child develop the perceptual abilities. Some of the most common disabili- motor skills needed to integrate vision, touch ties treated by occupational therapists are and other senses to organize information for stroke, neurological conditions, arthritis, devel- learning. opmental disabilities, hand injuries, spinal In a community setting, the therapist may cord injuries, depression and schizophrenia. establish a gardening group for elders or a The focus of occupational therapy is on game group that will be carried out by a group helping clients develop the functional capacity of volunteers. Therapists may teach a shelter to live independently, care for personal needs, resident with limited cognitive abilities how to and participate in work, school or community use public transportation so he or she can find activities. Occupational therapists help clients employment or develop teaching materials for improve motor performance and reasoning nurses to give to cognitively impaired abilities as well as teach them such functional teenagers who need to learn health promotion University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 149 2000-2002 University Catalog
  9. 9. Prev Table of Contents Next skills. Homecare therapists enter the homes of • design population-based community patients and teach dressing, cooking, bathing occupation programs that reflect unmet and social activities that lead to increased and emerging community needs; independence. • integrate community, technological and Occupational therapy is one of the fastest- educational resources into treatment, pro- growing occupations in the country. The need gram planning, design and management; for occupational therapists is sure to increase • collaborate skillfully with individuals as medicinal science discoveries continue to from diverse cultures, other professionals, save and prolong lives. These advances will nonprofessionals, peers, family and com- result in greater numbers of individuals who munity members; have functional limitations. The increased • communicate in a professional manner recognition of developmental and learning using written and spoken language; disabilities in children has also increased the demand for occupational therapists. • demonstrate ability to give and receive Thirty-two percent of occupational thera- feedback from others and supervise staff; pists work in general, psychiatric or pediatric • effectively communicate ideas, concerns, hospitals. Nineteen percent work in public or goals and plans to supervisors and private schools, while another 12 percent managers; work in rehabilitation hospitals or centers. • demonstrate self-knowledge and the Others work for colleges or universities, home ability to adapt to changing social and health agencies or nursing homes. environmental demands; • advance the knowledge base of occupa- PROGRAM DESCRIPTION tional therapy through scholarly activities; and The occupational therapy curriculum is based on active learning. Students will inte- • provide service to social service organiza- grate knowledge, skills and attitudes by experi- tions including the University and ential learning or “doing.” The biopsychoso- national and local occupational therapy cial foundation of the professional program organizations. will encourage graduates to view the occupa- The Occupational Therapy Program is an tional nature of humans from four perspec- integrated five-year undergraduate-profession- tives: the individual, with biological, psycho- al degree program leading to the dual degrees logical and social abilities and limitations, is of Bachelor of Science in Health Science and central to treatment and must determine the Master of Occupational Therapy. meaning and purpose of care; the family and The first two years of the curriculum will caregivers provide the vital link between the provide a broad foundation in the natural and individual and health services; the home and social sciences and humanities, which are fun- community provide a context for treatment damental to the conceptual foundation re- and the development of values, beliefs and quired of this health profession. interests; and finally the social system in Qualified students admitted to the freshman which care is offered establishes boundaries for year will be able to identify occupational ther- delivery, use of resources, available roles and apy as their major field of study. Admission to opportunities, and norms and rewards for the Occupational Therapy Program as a fresh- behavior. man student and maintenance of a 2.3 cumu- Students who successfully complete the lative GPA during the first two years will curriculum will be able to: guarantee the student a place in the profes- • deliver humanistic, ethical and high sional phase of the occupational therapy quality occupational therapy services to curriculum. individual patients and their caregivers; University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 150 2000-2002 University Catalog
  10. 10. Prev Table of Contents Next Applications from undergraduate or gradu- Applicants for a license must have a bachelor’s ate transfer students are also welcome. The degree and a certificate from an accredited grade level to which transfer students are occupational therapy program, and a passing assigned will depend on the prerequisites they grade on the National Board for Certification have completed, but the minimum residency in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). requirement is three years. All conditions Licensing requirements vary from state to regarding guaranteed admission into the pro- state, and students can obtain information by fessional curriculum also apply to transfer stu- contacting the appropriate licensing board. dents admitted to the second year. To qualify for the Master of Occupational In addition to the academic and personal Therapy (MOT) degree, students must suc- qualifications required of students applying cessfully complete all required courses. In for the program, applicants will also be addition, passing the Writing Proficiency expected to demonstrate their knowledge and Examination and computer skills requirement understanding of occupational therapy gained are necessary for graduation. If a student fails from observation, reading and personal or the Writing Proficiency Examination, they family experiences with occupational therapy may fulfill a contract with the Writing Center practice. Applicants are encouraged to have that will allow them to take the writing profi- volunteer/observation experience in occupa- ciency equivalency exam, or elect to take tional therapy. EN095 during the summer; the final exami- The curriculum for the first and second nation in this course shall be equivalent to the years of the Occupational Therapy Program Writing Proficiency Examination. provides a broad foundation of science, social If a student does not complete all required science, arts and humanities upon which the courses for the MOT Program, but has satis- professional courses are structured. The pro- fied all the requirements for an undergraduate fessional component of the curriculum is degree, the BS in Health Science will be based on occupation systems theory, which awarded at the appropriate time. emphasizes the importance of meaning and The Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) purpose in goal-directed activities or occupa- program is accredited by the Accreditation tions. The courses will actively engage the stu- Council for Occupational Therapy Education dent in experiential learning so that knowl- (ACOTE), a specialized accrediting agency rec- edge, skills and attitudes are integrated by ognized by the U.S. Department of Education. “doing.” If you have questions or comments, please con- In addition to instruction provided by occu- tact the agency at 4720 Montgomery Lane, pational therapy and other University faculty, P.O. Box 31220, Bethesda, MD 20824-1220. the resources of clinical affiliates in communi- (301) 652-2682. ty centers, therapeutic equestrian programs, community outreach programs, long-term care facilities, hospitals, rehabilitation centers, and schools in the Greater Philadelphia area and neighboring states will be used for many clinical experiences. The two three-month clinical education components may be sched- uled throughout the United States. With few exceptions, all states require a license to practice occupational therapy. University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 151 2000-2002 University Catalog
  11. 11. Prev Table of Contents Next OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY CURRICULUM FIRST YEAR FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER Course # Course Name Credit Hours Course # Course Name Credit Hours BS103 General Biology I 4 CO101 Introduction to Communication 3 CH109 Survey of Chemistry 4 BS202 Human Structure and Function II (Lab) 4 EN101 College Composition 3 OT104 Occupational Therapy MA101 Mathematical Analysis I 3 Orientation IV 1 PE101 Physical Education I 0 PS205 Abnormal Psychology 3 OT101 Occupational Therapy Orientation I 0 IH202 Intellectual Heritage II 3 Core Distribution Requirement 3 PY200 Survey of Physics 4 CS110/111 Introduction to Computer Credits/Semester 18 Applications 1 Credits/Semester 18 THIRD YEAR SUMMER SEMESTER Course # Course Name Credit Hours SPRING SEMESTER OT310 Neuroanatomy (Lab) 4 Course # Course Name Credit Hours Credits/Semester 4 BS104 General Biology II 4 MA102 Mathematical Analysis II 3 (Transfer students are required to take OTIO5: Overview of Occupational Therapy Practice, 2 semester EN102 Introduction to Literature 3 credit hours) PS101 Introduction to Psychology 3 FALL SEMESTER OT102 Occupational Therapy Orientation II 1 Course # Course Name Credit Hours PE102 Physical Education II 1 OT303 Motor Development and Learning 4 Core Distribution Elective 3 OT308 Movement Analysis (Lab) 4 Credits/Semester 18 OT331 Survey of Clinical Medicine I 3 OT344 Introduction to Clinical Skills 2 SECOND YEAR FALL SEMESTER OT381 Fieldwork—Level I— Course # Course Name Credit Hours Application of BS201 Human Structure and Basic Clinical Skills 1 Function I (Lab) 4 Core Distribution Requirement 3 PS200 Psychology of Human Development 3 Credits/Semester 17 AN101 Introduction to Anthropology and Health Behavior 3 SPRING SEMESTER OT103 Occupational Therapy Orientation III 1 Course # Course Name Credit Hours IH201 Intellectual Heritage I 3 OT332 Survey of Clinical Medicine II 3 SO101 Introduction to Sociology 3 OT360 Clinical Teaching Skills (Lab) 3 Credits/Semester 17 OT462 Occupational Therapy Theory 3 OT452 Occupation Form and Performance (Lab) 4 OT382 Fieldwork—Level I— Application of Basic Psychosocial Treatment Techniques 1 Core Distribution Requirement 3 Credits/Semester 17 University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 152 2000-2002 University Catalog
  12. 12. Prev Table of Contents Next OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY CURRICULUM FOURTH YEAR SUMMER SEMESTER FIFTH YEAR SUMMER SEMESTER Course # Course Name Credit Hours Course # Course Name Credit Hours OT442 Environmental Competence (Lab) 3 OT545 Computers and Treatment (Lab) 3 OT482 Fieldwork—Level I—Community- OT523 Applied Research III 3 Based Environmental Adaptations 1 Credits/Semester 6 Credits/Semester 4 FALL SEMESTER FALL SEMESTER Course # Course Name Credit Hours Course # Course Name Credit Hours Occupational Therapy Elective 3 OT441 Psychosocial Treatment OT580 Fieldwork—Level II— Techniques (Lab) 3 Community Rehabilitation 12 OT455 Evaluation and Assessment (Lab) 4 Occupational Therapy Elective 3 OT521 Applied Research I (Lab) 3 or PS329 Cognitive Processes (Memory) 3 Independent Study 3 OT572 Historical Concepts in Credits/Semester 18 Occupational Therapy 3 OT483 Fieldwork—Level I— SPRING SEMESTER Physical Rehabilitation 1 Course # Course Name Credit Hours Credits/Semester 17 OT582 Fieldwork—Level II—Acute Care 9 Occupational Therapy Elective 3 SPRING SEMESTER Occupational Therapy Elective 3 Course # Course Name Credit Hours or OT570 Clinical Management Independent Study 3 and Supervision 3 Credits/Semester 15 OT448 Rehabilitation Treatment Techniques (Lab) 3 TOTAL CREDITS 184 OT522 Applied Research II 3 a. All students must demonstrate proficiency in com- puter applications before progressing to the spring OT579 Clinical Reasoning 2 semester of their second year. OT488 Therapeutic Activity Groups 3 b. Students must pass the Writing Proficiency Examination as a requirement for graduation. OT484 Fieldwork—Level I— Institution-Based Acute Care 1 Credits/Semester 15 University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 153 2000-2002 University Catalog
  13. 13. Prev Table of Contents Next COURSE DESCRIPTIONS OT303 Motor Development and Learning OT101 Occupational Therapy 4 semester credit hours Orientation I 4 class hours 0 semester credit hours Developmental continuum of movement 1 class hour and motor learning is studied through obser- Overview of the role and values of occupa- vation and analysis of individuals throughout tional therapy practitioners. Preliminary the life span. Emphasis on identifying and exploration of how student uses time and understanding normal and abnormal move- activities in his or her life. ment patterns. Video and patient demon- strations will require active student participa- OT102 Occupational Therapy tion and application of principles from Orientation II anatomy and kinesiology. (Prerequisites: 1 semester credit hour OT104 or OT105, OT310 and PS200) 1 class hour Overview of the importance of activity in OT308 Movement Analysis human lives. Brief historical overview of pro- 4 semester credit hours fession. Some preliminary discussion of 3 class hours/3 lab hours activities. Osteology, surface anatomy and kinesiology with emphasis on peripheral nerves, cranial OT103 Occupational Therapy nerves and upper extremities, head and neck. Orientation III Regional approach will emphasize movement 1 semester credit hour and performance, and observation and 1 class hour analysis. Lab will feature tutorial groups Continuation of OT102. Overview of clini- focusing on clinical problems and applica- cal practice in variety of medical and com- tion of movement principles, anatomy and munity settings. Case study will be used to kinesiology. (Prerequisites: OT310 and demonstrate how activity is used in different PY200) settings and specialties. OT310 Neuroanatomy OT104 Occupational Therapy 4 semester credit hours Orientation IV 3 class hours/3 lab hours 1 semester credit hour In-depth study of functional components, 1 class hour major structures and functions of normal Continuation of OT103. Survey of where and abnormal nervous systems. Examination therapists practice, modalities used and ele- of normal and abnormal specimens and neu- ments of therapy outcomes. Introduction to robiological substrates of behavior and learn- ethical practice values, history of the profes- ing. (Prerequisites: BS202, CH109 and sional associations, and medical terminology. PS200) Exploration of professional behaviors and beliefs. OT331 Survey of Clinical Medicine I 3 semester credit hours OT105 Overview of Occupational 3 class hours Therapy Practice I & II Survey of medical evaluation, treatment and 2 semester credit hours 2 class hours follow-up for diseases that compromise Overview of clinical practice in variety of motor performance in individuals from birth medical and community settings. Explor- to old age. Connective disease, rheumatol- ation of where therapists practice, modalities ogy, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, frac- used and elements of therapy outcomes. tures, sports injuries, traumatic Introduction to ethical practice values, histo- injuries.(Prerequisite: OT310) ry of the profession, medical terminology, and professional behaviors and beliefs. University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 154 2000-2002 University Catalog
  14. 14. Prev Table of Contents Next OT332 Survey of Clinical Medicine II OT381 Fieldwork–Level I–Application 3 semester credit hours of Basic Clinical Skills 3 class hours 1 semester credit hour Survey of medical evaluation, treatment and 3 hours per week follow-up for psychiatric diseases that com- Performance of clinical skills on volunteer promise assumption of roles and habits. patients in classroom learning situation. Includes addictive, substance, depressive, Students must ambulate and transfer the vol- manic, and schizophrenic disorders; trau- unteers, take a blood pressure and pulse, matic head injury; learning disabilities; measure joint range of motion, and docu- organic brain problems; Alzheimer’s disease; ment experiences with the volunteer patients. schizophrenia; manic-depression; multiple (Prerequisites: OT104 or OT105, CO101, personalities; and mental retardation. EN102, PS200, PS205 and SO101) (Prerequisites: OT104 or OT105, OT310, OT382 Fieldwork–Level I–Application PS205 and PY200) of Basic Psychosocial Treatment Techniques OT344 Introduction to Clinical Skills 1 semester credit hour 2 semester credit hours 1 day per week 1 class hour/3 lab hours Small-group practice on volunteer clients at Introduction to clinical skills, professional predetermined sites under adjunct faculty behavior and performance requirements for supervision. These techniques consist of work in a variety of clinical settings. observation, interviewing, and reinforcing Students will be required to master emer- activities of daily living with individuals who gency procedures, clinical safety, basic strate- have cognitive learning disabilities, psychi- gies for ambulating and transferring chroni- atric and cultural problems. (Prerequisite: cally impaired individuals, method for OT381) taking blood pressure and pulse, and tech- niques for assisting patients in their activities OT399 Independent Study of daily living skill development. 1-4 semester credit hours (Prerequisites: OT104 or OT105, OT310, class hours TBA PS205 and PY200) Student-focused project on a relevant thera- peutic topic under faculty guidance and OT360 Clinical Teaching Skills supervision. 3 semester credit hours 2 class hours/3 lab hours OT441 Psychosocial Treatment Clinical teaching for individuals, caregivers, Techniques interdisciplinary team members, certified 3 semester credit hours occupational therapy assistants (COTAs), 2 class hours/3 lab hours aides, community members and members of Psychosocial, developmental, learning dis- support networks. Emphasis on the teaching abilities, addictive and personality disorders, principles, the teaching-learning process, substance abuse, homelessness, cultural home programs and follow-up strategies. deprivation, brain injuries and organic brain Students will demonstrate effective selection, disorders are focus of treatment to prepare grading and use of occupation with individ- patient for increased activity performance. uals with a variety of role dysfunction prob- Critical pathways will be studied for optimiz- lems. (Must be taken concurrently with ing service delivery. (Prerequisites: OT332 OT452.) and PS205) University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 155 2000-2002 University Catalog
  15. 15. Prev Table of Contents Next OT442 Environmental Competence OT462 Occupational Therapy Theory 3 semester credit hours 3 semester credit hours 3 class hours/3 lab hours 3 class hours Adaptive equipment, assistive devices and Study of humanistic foundation of practice. technology will be examined in the context Focus on major theories and examination of of meaning and purpose of individual occu- case studies to strengthen ties between theory pations. Home or workplace evaluations and practice. Link to research and patient using anthropological interviewing tech- outcomes will be emphasized. (Prerequisite: niques and analysis of effective therapist OT381) behaviors for a variety of individuals from diverse cultures. Laboratory will require OT482 Fieldwork–Level I– design and construction of low technology Community-based assistive devices and adaptations for equip- Environmental Adaptations ment at work or home. (Prerequisites: 1 semester credit hour 8 visits to home/6 supervisory sessions OT360, OT452 and AN101) Home adaptations and competence promot- OT448 Rehabilitation Treatment ing strategies for human and nonhuman ele- Techniques ments of a community living person will be 3 semester credit hours explored in a collaborative relationship. 3 class hours/3 lab hours Needs assessment, home safety evaluations, Neurodevelopmental, cognitive, perceptual- community resource finding and construc- motor treatment goals and intervention tion of low-technology devices will be com- strategies to prepare patient for increased pleted by students, who will be assigned to activity performance. Critical pathways will OTR supervised groups. (Prerequisite: be studied for optimizing service delivery. OT382) Scope of clinical work and appropriate dele- gation of tasks will be included in goal-set- OT483 Fieldwork–Level I– ting and treatment planning. (Prerequisites: Physical Rehabilitation OT442 and OT455) 1 semester credit hour 8 days OT452 Occupation Form and Daylong experience in institutions that offer Performance institutionalized care. Students will partici- 4 semester credit hours pate in interviewing, assessment, basic treat- 3 class hours/3 lab hours ment and documentation. (Prerequisite: Activity, task and role analysis for individuals OT482) who have dysfunctional life roles. Anthropological perspective on the meaning OT484 Fieldwork–Level I– and purpose of occupation. A variety of Institution-based Acute Care activities or goal-directed occupations will be 1 semester credit hour 8 visits to clinic used as modalities in the laboratory. (Prerequisites: OT303, OT308, OT344 Daylong experience in institutions that offer and AN101) acute care. Students will participate in inter- viewing, assessment, basic treatment and doc- OT455 Evaluation and Assessment umentation. (Prerequisite: OT483) 4 semester credit hours 3 class hours/3 lab hours How to select appropriate standardized eval- uation tools, evaluate patients, establish goals, write reports, communicate findings, supervise staff, use findings to refine interdis- ciplinary collaboration and home follow-up. Examination of validity and reliability of evaluation tools and test construction. (Prerequisites: OT360 and OT442) University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 156 2000-2002 University Catalog
  16. 16. Prev Table of Contents Next OT488 Therapeutic Activity Groups OT570 Clinical Management and 3 semester credit hours Supervision 2 class hours/3 lab hours 3 semester credit hours Use of developmental and treatment groups. 3 class hours Exploration and experience of how to plan General principles of administration, man- and execute successful group treatments agement and leadership. Program design, using developmental interaction tasks. Focus funding and implementation. Outcomes and on cognitive group levels, participant-obser- critical pathways will be explored in relation vation, group leadership and task grading. to resource use. Staffing patterns, quality (Prerequisite: OT441) assurance, third party reimbursement, sales and contracts. (Prerequisite: OT483) OT521 Applied Research I 3 semester credit hours OT572 Historical Concepts in 3 class hours/1 lab hour Occupational Therapy Overview of research design including exper- 3 semester credit hours imental, quasi-experimental, descriptive and 3 hours seminar qualitative methods. Analysis of publications Overview of the development of clinical and use for improved clinical practice. practice with focus on professionalization, Hands-on miniprojects and simulations will scope of practice, modalities, values, beliefs, actively engage learner in research process. research, development and evolution of (Prerequisite: OT462) ideas. Consideration of international, nation- al, state and local organizations and leaders. OT522 Applied Research II (Prerequisite: OT462) 3 semester credit hours 3 hours lecture OT579 Clinical Reasoning Students will focus on a specific project and 2 semester credit hours design, implement and document findings. 2 lecture hours Project must evolve from department faculty Overview of the clinical reasoning process active projects. Participation in class project that guides the occupational therapy process. that includes data collection and analysis. (Prerequisites: OT455 and OT462) (Prerequisite: OT521) OT580 Fieldwork–Level II–Community OT523 Applied Research III Rehabilitation 3 semester credit hours 12 semester credit hours 3 class hours Full-time experience in community rehabili- Students will continue focus on specific pro- tation. Students must receive a passing grade ject design and development, various analysis on Field Work Evaluation for Occupational methods including computer software, peer Therapy (FWE). (Prerequisite: OT484) review, oral and written presentation, research funding, and clinical and public pol- OT582 Fieldwork–Level II–Acute Care icy issues relevant to research and practice. 9 semester credit hours (Prerequisite: OT522) Full-time experience in acute care. Students must receive a passing grade on Field Work OT545 Computers and Treatment Evaluation for Occupational Therapy 3 semester credit hours (FWE). (Prerequisite: OT580) 2 class hours/3 lab hours Computers are the modern tool for improv- OT593 Advanced Research ing therapist productivity and treatment. 3 semester credit hours Survey of uses for personal use, documenta- 3 hours seminar tion, and patient education and training. Research practicum under faculty supervi- Environmental modifications will also be sion. Student will work on established pro- introduced. (Prerequisite: OT448) ject and complete a predetermined facet of study. (Prerequisite: OT522) University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 157 2000-2002 University Catalog
  17. 17. Prev Table of Contents Next OT599 Independent Study OT679 Clinical Reasoning II 1-4 semester credit hours 3 semester credit hours Student-focused project that requires design 3 distance online hours and implementation under faculty supervi- The clinical reasoning process that guides sion. occupational therapy evaluation, goal setting, treatment planning, and documentation is OT649 Upper Extremity Rehabilitation analyzed using casework and student/client 3 semester credit hours experiences. The course will emphasize 3 distance online hours prospective and retrospective critical analysis This course focuses on the evaluation, treat- of occupational therapy theory based evalua- ment and rehabilitation of the upper extrem- tion, treatment methods and outcomes. The ity and hand as it recovers from disease, trau- course will use the student’s clinical experi- ma or reconstructive surgery. (Prerequisite: ences as the source of information and dis- OT448) cussion. (Prerequisite: OT479) OT651 Therapeutic Horseback Riding OT688 Aging in America 3 semester credit hours 3 semester credit hours 3 distance online hours 3 distance online hours Overview of the development of therapeutic Students will explore the effects of the aging horseback riding with emphasis on the occu- process on occupational performance and pational therapists influence. This course is performance components. Aging will be an advanced specialized upper-level course explored from a physiological, social, cultural that prepares the student to analyze therapy and political perspective. Students will inte- from a unique perspective. The course focus- grate knowledge and apply it to current and es on the use of horseback riding as an occu- future clients. (Prerequisites: OT441 and pation and technique to accomplish thera- OT448) peutic goals. (Prerequisite: OT448) OT689 Therapeutic Approaches to OT652 Family Centered Pediatric Hospice Care Occupational Therapy 3 semester credit hours 3 semester credit hours 3 distance online hours 3 distance online hours This course will examine the hospice philos- This course evaluates pediatric occupational ophy, death and dying, and the role of the therapy practice for clients aged 0-21 years occupational therapy practitioner with this old and their families. This course will population. Emphasis is on maximizing par- emphasis the child and family as the drivers ticipation in meaningful occupations despite of the therapeutic process with the applica- decreasing abilities and allowing the individ- tion of occupational performance based ual to prepare physically, emotionally, and treatment designs in medical, school, and spiritually for death. (Prerequisites: OT441 community settings. (Prerequisites: OT441, and OT448) OT448 and OT479) OT699 Independent Study 1-4 semester credit hours class hours TBA An advanced student focused project requir- ing research design, and implementation under faculty guidance and supervision. University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 158 2000-2002 University Catalog
  18. 18. Prev Table of Contents Next FACULTY Paula Kramer BS, MS, PhD (New York University) Chair, Department of Occupational Therapy Professor of Occupational Therapy E-mail: p.kramer@usip.edu Roger I. Ideishi BS (Washington); JD (Temple) Vice Chair, Department of Occupational Therapy Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy Phone: (215) 596-8499 E-mail: r.ideish@usip.edu Ruth L. Schemm BS (Pennsylvania); MEd, EdD (Temple) Dean of the College of Health Sciences Professor of Occupational Therapy Phone: (215) 596-8990 E-mail: r.schemm@usip.edu Gina F. Collier BS (Wisconsin-Stevens Point); MS (Thomas Jefferson) Instructor in Occupational Therapy Phone: (215) 596-8694 E-mail: g.collie@usip.edu Pamalyn A. Johns BS, MS (Thomas Jefferson) Instructor in Occupational Therapy Phone: (215) 596-8493 E-mail: p.johns@usip.edu Susy M. Krimker BS (Institute Jose Hernandez, Argentina); BS, MS (Temple) Phone: (215) 596-8789 E-mail: s.krimke@usip.edu David J. Libon BS (Massachusetts); MA (Central Michigan); PhD (Rhode Island) Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy Research Assistant Professor of Psychology Phone: (215) 596-8495 E-mail: d.libon@usip.edu Susan E. Santalucia BS, MS (Temple) Instructor in Occupational Therapy Phone: (215) 895-1172 E-mail: s.santal@usip.edu Suzanne M. Trump BS (Temple); MDiv (Lutheran Theological Seminary) Instructor in Occupational Therapy Phone: (215) 596-8758 E-mail: s.trump@usip.edu University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 159 2000-2002 University Catalog
  19. 19. Prev Table of Contents Next DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY Mission cord injury; and screening of community- The mission of the Physical Therapy dwelling older adults for fall risk. Physical Department at University of the Sciences in therapists interact with and practice in collab- Philadelphia is to graduate knowledgeable, oration with a variety of professionals, and self-assured, adaptable, reflective, and service- engage in consultation, education, critical oriented practitioners who, by virtue of criti- inquiry, and administration. cal thinking, lifelong learning, and ethical According to the American Physical values: Therapy Association, although many physical • render independent judgments concern- therapists practice in acute care or sub-acute ing patient or client needs care hospitals, more than 70% practice in pri- • promote the health of the client, and vate physical therapy offices, community health centers, industrial health centers, • enhance the professional, contextual, and sports facilities, rehabilitation centers, nursing collaborative foundations for practice homes, home health agencies, schools, or These practitioners contribute to society pediatric centers. Others work in research and the profession through practice, teaching, institutions or teach in colleges and administration, and the discovery and appli- universities. cation of new knowledge about physical The Physical Therapy Program is an inte- therapy grated undergraduate-professional graduate degree program leading to the Bachelor of PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Science in Health Science and Master of Physical Therapy (MPT) degrees. Admission Physical therapists are health professionals who work with other members of the health to the Physical Therapy Program as a fresh- care team to ensure optimal health and func- man student and maintenance of an accept- tion in a wide range of people of all ages. able academic record during the first two Physical therapists provide interventions to years guarantees the student a place in the facilitate the recovery process of people with professional phase of the physical therapy cur- physical and functional limitations or disabili- riculum. To maintain guaranteed admission ty resulting from injury or disease. Examples into the Physical Therapy professional phase of individualized interventions include thera- of the curriculum (years 3-5), students must peutic exercise, manual techniques, patient achieve a minimum cumulative grade point and family education, electrotherapy, and average of 2.50 by the end of the fall semester functional training. Physical therapists also of their second year and maintain this cumu- provide prevention and wellness services, lative grade point average of 2.50 through the including screening and health promotion. end of the spring semester of their second These activities include: conducting prenatal year. exercise classes; analyzing work settings and The guarantee of admission into the recommending changes to reduce work-relat- Physical Therapy professional phase of the ed injury; developing exercise programs for people with chronic conditions such as spinal University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 160 2000-2002 University Catalog
  20. 20. Prev Table of Contents Next curriculum will be revoked if any of the fol- The professional component of the curricu- lowing occurs: lum is designed to prepare physical therapy • A freshman student receives a grade of practitioners to apply scientific principles to D+ or lower in a course and the grade for prevent, identify, assess, correct, or alleviate that course when repeated is not replaced acute or prolonged movement dysfunction. with a grade of C- or higher. The Physical Therapy Program recognizes • A freshman student repeats courses dur- the need to integrate theory and classroom ing the freshman year (not for grade instruction with clinical practice. During the replacement) and the average of the origi- professional phase of the curriculum, students nal course grade and the repeat grade actively participate in a variety of clinical rota- does not equal a C- or higher. tions that may include acute care, sub-acute • A sophomore student receives a grade of care, orthopedics, sports medicine, pediatrics, D+ or lower in a course, repeats that rehabilitation, women’s health, industrial course, and the average of the original medicine, long-term care, or outpatient care. course grade and the repeat grade does The clinical education program fosters and not equal a C- average or higher. develops the students’ transition into the • The Committee on Student Discipline physical therapy profession. finds a student guilty of misconduct All states require a license to practice physi- and/or infraction of University regula- cal therapy. Applicants for a license must have tions and takes one of the following dis- a degree from an accredited physical therapy ciplinary actions: disciplinary suspension, educational program and, to qualify, must disciplinary expulsion, or disciplinary pass a state-administered national licensure probation. examination. Information regarding licensure Applications are also accepted from under- requirements may be obtained from the licen- graduate or graduate transfer students. The sure board of the state in which the student level in the curriculum to which transfer stu- intends to practice. dents are accepted will depend on the prereq- The Physical Therapy Program is accredited uisite courses they have completed. The mini- by the Commission on Accreditation in mum residency requirement is three years. All Physical Therapy Education of the American conditions regarding guaranteed admission Physical Therapy Association. into the professional curriculum also apply to To qualify for the Master of Physical transfer students admitted into the second Therapy degree, students must successfully year. complete all required courses and pass the In addition to the academic and personal Writing Proficiency Examination. If a student qualifications required of students applying to fails the Writing Proficiency Examination, the program, applicants will be expected to they may fulfill a contract with the Writing directly observe physical therapy practice. A Center that will allow them to take the writ- minimum of 20 hours of volunteer/observa- ing proficiency equivalency exam, or elect to tion experience in physical therapy is required take EN095 during the summer; the final prior to application for admission. examination in this course shall be equivalent The curriculum for the first and second to the Writing Proficiency Examination. years of the Physical Therapy Program pro- vides the broad foundation of natural science, social science, and the humanities upon which the professional courses are structured. University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 161 2000-2002 University Catalog
  21. 21. Prev Table of Contents Next PHYSICAL THERAPY CURRICULUM FIRST YEAR FALL SEMESTER SECOND YEAR SPRING SEMESTER Course # Course Name Credit Hours Course # Course Name Credit Hours BS103 General Biology I 4 PY202 Introductory Physics II 4 CH101 General Chemistry I 3 IH202 Intellectual Heritage II 3 CH103 General Chemistry Lab I 1 CO101 Introduction to Communication 3 EN101 College Composition 3 History/Literature, World Cultures, MA101 Math Analysis I 3 or Advanced Social Science (Core Dist. Req.) 3 PE101 Physical Education I 0 History/Literature, World Cultures, PT101 Physical Therapy Orientation I 0 or Advanced Social Science CS110/111 Introduction to Computer (Core Dist. Req.) 3 Applications 1 PT104 Physical Therapy Orientation IV 1 Credits/Semester 15 Credits/Semester 17 SPRING SEMESTER THIRD YEAR SUMMER SEMESTER Course # Course Name Credit Hours Course # Course Name Credit Hours BS104 General Biology II 4 PT570 Human Anatomy 6 CH102 General Chemistry II 3 Credits/Semester 6 CH104 General Chemistry Lab II 1 EN102 Introduction to Literature 3 FALL SEMESTER MA102 Math Analysis II 3 Course # Course Name Credit Hours PE102 Physical Education II 1 BS412 Human Physiology 4 PT102 Physical Therapy Orientation II 1 PT512 Fundamentals of Evaluation and Patient Care I 4 Credits/Semester 16 PT571 Kinesiology 4 PT533 Growth and Development 2 PT572 Neuroscience 3 SECOND YEAR FALL SEMESTER History/Literature, World Cultures Course # Course Name Credit Hours or Advanced Social Science (Core Dist. Req.) 3 EN302 Scientific Writing 3 Credits/Semester 20 PY201 Introductory Physics I 4 IH201 Intellectual Heritage I 3 SPRING SEMESTER BS212 Functional Human Anatomy and Histology 3 Course # Course Name Credit Hours PS101 Introduction to Psychology 3 PT513 Fundamentals of Evaluation and Patient Care II 4 SO101 Introduction to Sociology 3 PT514 Physical Agents 3 PT103 Physical Therapy Orientation III 0 PT550 Survey of Clinical Medicine I 3 Credits/Semester 19 PT520 Therapeutic Exercise 3 PT560 Research Methods I 3 PT573 Exercise Physiology 3 Credits/Semester 19 University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 162 2000-2002 University Catalog
  22. 22. Prev Table of Contents Next PHYSICAL THERAPY CURRICULUM FOURTH YEAR FALL SEMESTER FIFTH YEAR SUMMER SEMESTER Course # Course Name Credit Hours Course # Course Name Credit Hours PT551 Survey of Clinical Medicine II 3 PT541 Clinical Education II 4 PT510 Evaluation and Treatment of PT542 Clinical Education III 4 Orthopedic Dysfunction I 3 Credits/Semester 8 PT535 Treatment of Neuromuscular Dysfunction 3 FALL SEMESTER PT523 Electrophysiological Procedures 3 Course # Course Name Credit Hours PT561 Research Methods II 3 PP528 Implications of Drug Therapy Credits/Semester 15 for Physical Therapy Practice 2 PT611 Cardiopulmonary Evaluation and INTERSESSION Treatment 3 Course # Course Name Credit Hours PT667A Leadership, Administration and PT540 Clinical Education I 4 Management* 3 Credits/Semester 4 PT651 Geriatrics 3 PL501 Ethics and Values 3 SPRING SEMESTER Physical Therapy Elective 3 Course # Course Name Credit Hours Core Elective (any non-PT and non-required course)** 3 PS354 Psychosocial Aspects of Physical Disability 3 Credits/Semester 20 PT511 Evaluation and Treatment of * PT667A and PT667B must both be taken in Orthopedic Dysfunction II 3 sequence and completed successfully. **Required for class 2002 and after. PT530 Rehabilitation Procedures 3 PT534 Pediatrics 3 SPRING SEMESTER Physical Therapy Elective 3 Course # Course Name Credit Hours Credits/Semester 15 PT667B Healthcare Practice Seminar* 1 PT642 Clinical Education IV 6 PT673 Issues in Clinical Management 2 PT664 Teaching in the Health Professions 3 PT653 Clinical Medicine III 3 Physical Therapy Elective 3 Credits/Semester 18 TOTAL CREDITS 192 University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 163 2000-2002 University Catalog
  23. 23. Prev Table of Contents Next COURSE DESCRIPTIONS physical therapy profession and introduce note writing, self-development and profes- Course Descriptions sional behavior, communication, description of physical therapy practice, and the role of PT101 Physical Therapy Orientation I members of the health care team. 0 semester credit hours 1 class hour PT510 Evaluation and Treatment of The students are oriented to the University Orthopedic Dysfunction I and student services. Students are also intro- 3 semester credit hours duced to physical therapy, including profes- 3 lecture/3 lab hours sional philosophy, goals, trends in clinical (12 week format) practice, and career opportunities. An in-depth study of the standardized exami- nation techniques, pathology and treatment PT102 Physical Therapy Orientation II of the musculoskeletal system. Particular 1 semester credit hour emphasis is placed on the upper and lower 1 class hour extremities, with an introduction to the This course will explore the physical therapy spine. This course will review anatomical, profession through the profession’s guiding biomechanical, and physiological principles principles including the Code of Ethics, related to the musculoskeletal system as well Physical Therapy Practice Act of as the integration and application of these Pennsylvania, and The Guide to Physical principles to injury, pathology, and interven- Therapy Practice. The students will also ana- tion. (Prerequisites: PT513, PT514, PT520, lyze the key characteristics of professional PT550, PT560 and PT573) behavior. PT511 Evaluation and Treatment of PT103 Physical Therapy Orientation III Orthopedic Dysfunction II 0 semester credit hours 3 semester credit hours 1 class hour 3 lecture/3 lab hours This course will discuss the state of the pro- (12 week format) fession of physical therapy today, areas of A continuation of PT510 which includes professional specialization, and collaborative examination, evaluation, and intervention of relationships will be conducted. The class postural abnormalities. This course also pro- will also include discussions of physical dis- vides an in-depth study of joint mobilization abilities and the development of a therapeu- principles and techniques, in addition to tic and professional relationship with application of biomechanical foot examina- patients. Students will also master the use of tion. Additional orthopedic topics are also physical therapy electronic databases. discussed. (Prerequisites: PT510, PT523, PT535, PT540, PT551 and PT561) PT104 Physical Therapy Orientation IV 1 semester credit hour PT512 Fundamentals of Evaluation and 1 class hour Patient Care I A continuation of PT 103, with an introduc- 4 semester credit hours tion to medical terminology, note writing, 3 lecture/3 lab hours and the medical record. Transition to the An introduction to basic examination and professional years of study including profes- intervention procedures in physical therapy. sional behavior assessment is emphasized. Included are: 1) gross physical examination, consisting of vital signs, goniometry, manual PT105 Physical Therapy Orientation muscle testing, and posture, 2) functional Seminar for Transfer Students mobility including ambulation, transfers, bed 1 semester credit hour mobility, and wheelchair mobility and man- This course is designed for students transfer- agement, and 3) medical terminology, note ring into the third year of the physical thera- writing and ethical considerations. py curriculum. It is a synopsis of PT (Prerequisite: PT570) Orientation I-IV. The course will explore the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 164 2000-2002 University Catalog
  24. 24. Prev Table of Contents Next PT513 Fundamentals of Evaluation and PT530 Rehabilitation Procedures Patient Care II 3 semester credit hours 4 semester credit hours 3 lecture/ 3 lab hours 3 lecture/3 lab hours (12 week format) A continuation of PT512. Includes specific The use and prescription of adaptive equip- and alternative neuromuscular and muscu- ment, including orthotics, prosthetics, and loskeletal examination, use of functional out- wheelchairs are emphasized. Also includes come measures, architectural barrier assess- specific mobility skills for patients with ment, and functional mobility training. The spinal cord injuries, practice of principles examination and intervention of sensorimo- related to examination and intervention of tor and visual perceptual systems, along with neuromuscular impairment, and principles cognition, coordination, and postural con- of adaptive seating. (Prerequisites: PT510, trol, will be included. (Prerequisites: PT512, PT523, PT535, PT540, PT551 and PT561) PT533, PT571, PT572 and BS412) PT533 Growth and Development PT514 Physical Agents 2 semester credit hours 3 semester credit hours 2 class hours 2 lecture/3 lab hours Following an introduction to human embry- Application of heat, cold, water, light, sound, ology, this course will focus on normal motor and massage in the treatment of pain and and musculoskeletal development of the disability. Physiological effects and the indi- child from birth through adolescence. cations/contraindications will be discussed Normal processes will be compared with relative to specific patient problems. abnormal and delayed development. Laboratory sessions will allow students to Perception, adaptive speech and language, practice techniques. (Prerequisites: PT512, cognition, play, and emotional-social devel- PT533, PT571, PT572 and BS412) opment will be included. (Prerequisite: PT570) PT520 Therapeutic Exercise 3 semester credit hours PT534 Pediatrics 2 lecture/3 lab hours 3 semester credit hours Introduction to therapeutic exercise for phys- 3 lecture hours ical therapy intervention, using traditional (12 week format) and contemporary regimens and a variety of This course will focus on the application of equipment. (Prerequisites: PT512, PT533, the principles of physical therapy practice to PT571, PT572 and BS412) the pediatric population. Emphasis will be on both orthopedic and neurological condi- PT523 Electrophysiological Procedures tions and their impact on the developing 3 semester credit hours musculoskeletal and nervous systems. An 3 lecture/ 3 lab hours introduction to pediatric practice in various (12 week format) settings, as well as models for service delivery, Basic principles of electricity and the diag- will be discussed. (Prerequisites: PT510, nostic and therapeutic applications of various PT523, PT535, PT540, PT551 and PT561) electromodalities for neuromuscular rehabili- tation are presented. (Prerequisites: PT513, PT514, PT520, PT550, PT560 and PT573) University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 165 2000-2002 University Catalog
  25. 25. Prev Table of Contents Next PT535 Treatment of Neuromuscular PT542 Clinical Education III Dysfunction 4 semester credit hours 3 semester credit hours 6 week full-time clinical education 3 lecture/3 lab hours experience (12 week format) (Summer Session II) An overview of physical therapy examination Continuation of PT541. and intervention procedures for individuals with movement disorders. Both traditional PT550 Survey of Clinical Medicine I and contemporary intervention models are 3 semester credit hours 3 class hours discussed. Students practice techniques in laboratory sessions. (Prerequisites: PT513, This course is the first of a two-course PT514, PT520, PT550, PT560 and PT573) sequence that surveys clinical pathologies, including the examination, diagnosis, and PT540 Clinical Education I medical management of those pathologies 4 semester credit hours frequently encountered by physical thera- 6 week full-time clinical education pists. The course will also emphasize the experience recognition of patient signs and symptoms (Intersession) that require medical referral. (Prerequisites: Initial full-time clinical education experience PT512, PT533, PT571, PT572 and BS412) occurring under the direct supervision of a licensed physical therapist. The purpose of PT551 Survey of Clinical Medicine II this experience is to gain practice opportuni- 3 semester credit hours ties in patient examination, goal setting, 4 class hours developing a plan of care and implementing (12 week format) intervention. This assignment may be com- A continuation of PT550, with focus on gas- pleted in an acute care hospital, subacute trointestinal disorders, hepatic diseases, neu- rehabilitation unit, outpatient center, or romuscular diseases, infectious diseases, dia- skilled nursing facility. (Prerequisites: PT510, betes, and dermatological problems. PT523, PT535, PT551 and PT561) (Prerequisites: PT513, PT514, PT520, PT550, PT560 and PT573) PT541 Clinical Education II 4 semester credit hours PT560 Research Methods I 6 week full-time clinical education 3 semester credit hours experience 3 class hours (Summer Session I) Application of scientific method of inquiry Full-time clinical education experience to physical therapy practice. Elements of a occurring under the direct supervision of a research study including formulation of the licensed physical therapist. The purpose of problem, experimental design, and data this experience is to develop skill and effi- analysis are discussed in terms of clinical ciency in the areas of patient examination, applications. The physical therapist as con- goal setting, developing a plan of care and sumer of research will be stressed. (Pre- implementing intervention. This assignment requisites: PT512, PT533, PT571, PT572 may be completed in an acute care hospital, and BS412) outpatient center, skilled nursing facility, rehabilitation center, or specialty area. PT561 Research Methods II (Prerequisites: PT511, PT530, PT534 and 3 semester credit hours PS354) 3 class hours (12 week format) A continuation of PT560, with emphasis on quantitative aspects of research design. Students will prepare a research prospectus with critiques by faculty and students. (Prerequisites: PT513, PT514, PT520, PT550, PT560 and PT573) University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 166 2000-2002 University Catalog

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