Paragraphs for Training Grants

This section of links may be inserted in part or as a whole in a proposal.
UTMB Overview a...
School of Nursing (SON) (long version)
      Master’s Nursing Program
      PhD Program in Nursing
School of Allied Health...
UTMB Bioinformatics Program
AT&T Center for Telehealth Research and Policy

Research Centers
Sealy Center on Aging (short ...
Safety Manuals and Standard Operating Procedures
       UTMB Safety Manual
       The Environmental Containment Laboratory...
Academic and clinical operations also operate under the President of the University. Deans of the four schools
and UTMB Vi...
School of Nursing (SON). The University of Texas Medical Branch School of Nursing, established in 1890 as
the John Sealy H...
The Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health (PMCH) maintains the faculty expertise to
address contemporary ...
More than 470,000 square feet of space is dedicated to research, including the Truman Graves Blocker
Medical Research Buil...
UTMB’s School of Medicine has 752 full-time faculty, nearly 820 medical students, 500 clinical residents in
training, and ...
UTMB and UT Austin have maintained a close relationship since their establishment, but the degree of active
collaboration ...
concepts and knowledge in a clinical setting, applying them in a problem-solving mode. This makes
   learning of basic sci...
with issues of fertility, reproduction, and normal and abnormal sexual development. Computer-based
instruction and student...
(general preventive medicine, occupational medicine, and aerospace medicine). Approximately one-fourth of
Texas’s practici...
The Cell Biology Graduate Program is a multidisciplinary program designed to provide students the academic
and research sk...
of solving basic biological and health-related problems who will be competitive for leadership positions in
universities, ...
in other programs and for special students who do not seek a formal degree. PhD students in the Medical
Humanities are exp...
pursuing advanced research, the PhD curriculum in Rehabilitation Sciences is offered through the Graduate
Program in Preve...
cognitive/neurological rehabilitation, and rehabilitation in aging. Fellows conduct collaborative research with
core facul...
UTMB's Efforts to Increase Numbers of Disadvantaged Students in the Health Professions. Substantial
institutional resource...
of these candidates, the director of the Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity sits on all search committees
and is a ...
combined total was $963,890. This does not include exceptional need scholarships, or other awards given by
UTMB. Two years...
*Expected to complete by 5th Year


 Graduation of Under-Represented Minority Students. As noted, UTMB has made significan...
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  1. 1. Paragraphs for Training Grants This section of links may be inserted in part or as a whole in a proposal. UTMB Overview and Administration Patient Care Education School of Medicine (short version) School of Nursing (SON) (short version) School of Allied Health Sciences (SAHS) (short version) Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (GSBS) Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health (PMCH) (short version) Diversity (short version) For more complete descriptions of resources and programs, this section of links may be inserted in part or as a whole. Please note, several facilities, programs, or centers in this list have short, alternative, and longer descriptions. University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) Overview (alternate version) History Patient Care (alternate version) Education (alternate version) School of Medicine School of Nursing School of Allied Health Sciences Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences UTMB and the University of Texas at Austin School of Medicine (SOM) Integrated Medical Curriculum (IMC) Gross Anatomy and Radiology (GAR) Molecules, Cells, and Tissues (MCT) Pathobiology and Host Defense (PHD) Cardiovascular/Pulmonary (CVP) Gastroenterology/Nutrition (GIN) Renal/Fluid/Electrolytes (RFE) Dermatology/Hematology/Musculoskeletal (DHM) Great Syndromes Practice of Medicine Year 1 and Year 2 (POM 1 & 2) IMC Course Committees Academic Progress Committee Student USMLE Scores Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (GSBS) Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health (PMCH) (short version) Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health (PMCH) (long version) Sociomedical Sciences Division Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics Cell Biology Graduate Program Cellular Physiology and Molecular Biophysics Program Experimental Pathology Program Graduate Program in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (BMB) Biophysical, Structural & Computational Biology (BSCB) Graduate Program in the Medical Humanities Microbiology and Immunology Program Neuroscience Graduate Program (NGP) Graduate Program in Pharmacology and Toxicology Masters in Medical Science (MMS) Institute for the Medical Humanities (IMH)
  2. 2. School of Nursing (SON) (long version) Master’s Nursing Program PhD Program in Nursing School of Allied Health Sciences (SAHS) (long version) Master of Physical Therapy Master of Occupational Therapy Master of Physician Assistant Studies Interdisciplinary Rehabilitation Sciences PhD Curriculum Postdoctoral Interdisciplinary Rehabilitation Research Training Program Postdoctoral Psychology Training Program Diversity (long version) UTMB's Efforts to Increase Numbers of Disadvantaged Students in the Health Professions Grade and High School Initiatives Undergraduate Initiatives Institutional Committees, Offices, Policies and Procedures Supporting Disadvantaged Students Diversity in Medical Education Committee Office of Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action Policies Admissions Procedures and Activities UTMB's Mission Statement and Strategic Plan Core Committee for the Support of Minority Faculty and Administrators Diversity Committee on Minority Education Office of Educational Outreach Financial Aid and Scholarships UTMB’s Experience in the Recruitment, Enrollment, Retention, and Graduation of Under-represented Minority Students Recruitment Enrollment Retention Graduation of Under-Represented Minority Students Hispanic Center of Excellence UTMB Education Resources Clinical Research Education Office (CREO) (short version) Clinical Research Education Office (CREO) (alternate version) Clinical Research Education Office (CREO) (long version) Scientific Writing for Clinical Research (short version) Scientific Writing for Clinical Research (long version) Moody Medical Library Office of Educational Development Research Education Office of Postdoctoral Affairs – Postdoctoral Training Program Research Resources General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) (short version) General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) (alternate version) General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) (long version) Patient Services Metabolic Control Unit Body Composition & Whole Body Counter Body Protein Monitoring Sleep Laboratory Metabolic Kitchen GCRC Computer Resources Office of Biostatistics (OBIOS) Office of Biostatistics (OBIOS) (alternate version)
  3. 3. UTMB Bioinformatics Program AT&T Center for Telehealth Research and Policy Research Centers Sealy Center on Aging (short version) Sealy Center on Aging (alternate version) Sealy Center on Aging (long version) Volunteer Registry Senior Services Office Division of Geriatrics, Department of Internal Medicine Data Management System for Medical Research (DMSMED) Personnel Equipment and Software Network Connection and Communication Security Schema Archiving and Backup Schema Center for Population Health and Health Disparities (CPHHD) Center to Eliminate Health Disparities Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Women’s Health Asthma and Allergic Diseases Research Center Sealy Center for Environmental Health and Medicine NIH/NIEHS-funded NIEHS Center and the Sealy Center for Environmental Health and Medicine (SCEHM) Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases (CBEID) UTMB BSL-4 Laboratory (Robert Shope Pavillion Laboratory) Western Regional Center of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases (WRCE) Biosafety Level 2, 3 and 4 Laboratories National Biocontainment Laboratory at Galveston (The Galveston National Laboratory; GNL) Biodefense programs and facilities Animal Model Capabilities Biosafety Containment Laboratories BSL2/BSL3 Facilities BSL4 Facilities Galveston National Laboratory (GNL) Major Equipment World Reference Center for Emerging Viruses and Arboviruses (WRCEVA) Electron Microscopy W. M. Keck Center for Virus Imaging Core Facilities UTMB’s Animal Resources Center (ARC) (long version) Other University Facilities Sealy Center for Structural Biology (SCSB) Computers Biostatistics Consultation Administrative Support Safety and Biosecurity Compliance Institutional BioSafety Committee Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) Chemical Safety Committee Select Agents Emergency Response Hazard Communication Occupational Medicine and Employee Health Training Disposal of Hazardous Materials Certification of biological safety cabinets and chemical fume hoods
  4. 4. Safety Manuals and Standard Operating Procedures UTMB Safety Manual The Environmental Containment Laboratory Manual Biosafety Level 3 Manuals The Robert E. Shope, M.D. Laboratory (BioSafety Level 4) Manual Hepatitis C Research Center (HCRC) Sealy Center for Structural Biology (short version) Sealy Center for Structural Biology (long version) NMR Spectroscopy and MRI BSL-3/Advanced Cryoelectron Microscopy Imaging Keck Facility Macromolecular Assembly and Biophysical Chemistry X-ray Crystallography Center for Biomedical Engineering (CBME) Center for Biomedical Engineering (CBME) (alternate version) Center for Addiction Research Sealy Center for Cancer Cell Biology (Short version) UTMB Cancer Programs Brief History of Cancer Programs at UTMB Sealy Center for Cancer Cell Biology. Comprehensive Cancer Center Oncology Clinical Trials Office (OCTO) Programs in Cancer Prevention and Education Cancer Teaching and Curriculum Enhancement in Undergraduate Medicine Cancer Nutrition Network for Texans Sealy Center for Molecular Medicine (SCMM) (short version) Sealy Center for Molecular Medicine (SCMM) (long version) Recombinant DNA Laboratory Molecular Genomics Core NHLBI Proteomics Center Bioinformatics Program Stark Diabetes Center Center for Population Health and Health Disparities (CPHHD) East Texas Area Health Education Center (AHEC) Animal Resources Center (ARC) (short version) Investigational Drug Service Office of Community Outreach (OCO) Galveston and Eastern Texas This section may be inserted in part or as a whole in the proposal. UTMB Overview and Administration. The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB), which is on the Gulf of Mexico 48 miles south of Houston, is the third oldest medical school founded and the oldest medical school in continuous operation west of the Mississippi River. The UTMB complex encompasses 54 major buildings, including five interconnected hospital buildings with more than 774 hospital beds, on 85 acres at the east end of Galveston Island. The University maintains close affiliation with one of only three Shriners’ Hospitals for Children focused on burns in the US UTMB is one of seven health components of the 15-institution University of Texas System, and is unique among the Texas health science centers in that it operates its academic and patient care programs and facilities (and the only state-funded general purpose hospital and clinics) under a single administrative structure. Hospital and research operations fall under the President of the University, facilitating the integration of UTMB’s education, research, and patient care programs, and providing a strong synergistic environment for clinical research and education. UTMB’s annual budget approaches $1.4 billion.
  5. 5. Academic and clinical operations also operate under the President of the University. Deans of the four schools and UTMB Vice Presidents report to the President, as do the Vice President and Chief Executive Officer of UTMB Hospitals (Karen Sexton, RN, PhD, CHE) and other UTMB Vice Presidents. Thus, hospital and clinical research issues are addressed directly in the President’s Council, the mechanism under which these officers meet regularly. The Dean of the SOM, Garland D. Anderson, MD, has overall responsibility for education and research taking place in the most research-intensive organizations at UTMB and directs the institution’s research infrastructure. Research Services includes the Offices of Sponsored Programs, Research Education, Research Compliance, and Research Subjects Protection (providing administrative support for the Institutional Review Board), the Animal Resources Center and Animal Care and Use Committee. Two SOM Associate Deans for Research (David Gorenstein, PhD, and Don W. Powell, MD) provide strategic direction on clinical, basic and translational research in the SOM. The Schools of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences research programs also have Associate Deans for Research (Elizabeth Reifsnider, PhD, APRN, BC, and Kenneth Ottenbacher, PhD). The chairs of 20 basic and clinical science departments, as well as the directors of UTMB’s three institutes, report to the Dean of the SOM. Patient Care. Provision of high quality medical care to a large, diverse patient population is important both for medical education and clinical research. In 2005, UTMB received outpatient visits from 214 of Texas’s 254 counties and inpatients from 149 counties. UTMB’s hospitals experienced 42,294 inpatient admissions and 65,658 emergency room visits that resulted in 202,554 days of inpatient care. UTMB’s outpatient clinics (45 campus-based and 47 community-based) recorded 752,441 patient visits. In response to UTMB’s historic commitment to the medically indigent, more than $481 million dollars of unsponsored charity care was delivered. Telemedicine consultations numbered 57,850, making UTMB one of the leaders in the US in this method of health care delivery. In addition, the UTMB Shriners’ Hospital for Children-Galveston Burns Hospital includes an intensive and inclusive rehabilitation program. Education. For 2005-2006, some 2,172 students were enrolled in four schools and three institutes: the School of Medicine (830 students), the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (341 students), the School of Nursing (573 students), the School of Allied Health Sciences (428 students), the Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, the Marine Biomedical Institute and the Institute for the Medical Humanities. (short version) School of Medicine. UTMB’s School of Medicine has 752 full-time faculty, 830 medical students, 500 clinical residents in training, and more than 70 clinical fellows. Composed of six basic science and 15 clinical departments, the School of Medicine boasts the ninth largest medical enrollment in the country and graduates approximately 200 physicians per year. Over its 115-year history, the school has graduated >11,000 physicians. The UTMB School of Medicine ranks first in the US in the number of Hispanic graduates and seventh in the number of African American graduates. Currently, 25% of UTMB’s medical school students, 20% of nursing students, 30% of graduate students, 30% of allied health students and 11% of clinical residents and fellows are African American or Hispanic. Moreover, UTMB has a patient population with a mix of non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans, and Hispanics that is ideal for minority scholars who wish to conduct health disparities research. The School of Medicine admits approximately 200 students yearly and its new curriculum emphasizes small group, self-directed learning and integration of the basic and clinical sciences. The combined MD-PhD program has 39 students. UTMB has more than 50 accredited residency and fellowship programs providing training for >500 residents and fellows. To prepare physicians who will meet needs of the future, the school has programs in such emerging areas as correctional health care and, in conjunction with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, space medicine. Approximately one-fourth of practicing physicians in Texas received at least a portion of their postdoctoral or medical school training at UTMB. (short version)
  6. 6. School of Nursing (SON). The University of Texas Medical Branch School of Nursing, established in 1890 as the John Sealy Hospital Training School for Nurses, is the oldest school of nursing in the Southwest. In 1896, it became the UTMB School of Nursing, one of the divisions of the Medical Branch, with diplomas granted by the University. As the first University-affiliated school of nursing west of the Mississippi, UTMB’s School of Nursing has set the standard for progressive nursing education for more than a century and continues to be a leader in scientific and humanistic nursing education in both the Baccalaureate and Master’s Nursing Programs. The Baccalaureate Nursing Program offers the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree and has two tracks, the BSN track and RN-BSN Track. The Master’s Nursing Program offers a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) Degree. Specialties in the Master’s Nursing Program include: the Primary Care Nurse Practitioner with subspecialties in Adult/Geriatric, Pediatrics, and Family; the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner with subspecialties in Neonatal, Pediatric, and Adult; and Nurse Midwifery. A post-master’s is offered in gerontology. The Doctor of Philosophy program in nursing was approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) in 1996 and the first class of students was admitted in Fall 1997. The program is designed to prepare scholars and researchers capable of advancing nursing practice and education. Three focus areas, health promotion, human response, and healing, characterize the conceptual base of the program and define the program’s parameters of scholarly inquiry. (short version) The School of Allied Health Sciences (SAHS), established in 1968, offers multi-level educational programs for a diverse group of students in the rehabilitation and health professions and has produced more than 6,000 professionals for the nation's health care workforce. The SAHS also facilitates student and faculty involvement in scientific investigation and scholarly activities that advance health care, and promotes service through active participation in professional and community activities. The SAHS offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees through a full range of programs in allied health disciplines, including clinical laboratory sciences, occupational therapy, physical therapy, physician assistant studies, and respiratory care. The professional masters’ degrees in physical therapy (MPT) and occupational therapy (MOT) are entry-level degrees that qualify persons for practice and allow graduates to take national registration and state licensure exams. Similarly, the master’s degree in physician assistant studies (MPAS) qualifies graduates for certification as physician assistants in the State of Texas. For students with backgrounds in rehabilitation interested in pursuing advanced research, the PhD curriculum in Rehabilitation Sciences is offered through the Graduate Program in Preventive Medicine and Community Health, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. The SAHS also offers postdoctoral fellowship experiences in the interdisciplinary rehabilitation research training program and the psychology training program. The Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (GSBS) was established in 1969 and has expanded to 12 graduate programs. Clinical Science was added most recently to the list of programs. All PhD and MS degrees are awarded through the GSBS. The Master of Medical Science (MMS) is awarded to MD fellows obtaining research training, and the Master of Public Health (MPH) is awarded to physicians enrolled in residency programs. GSBS graduates hold prestigious and influential positions in universities, government and industry in the United States and around the world. All GSBS faculty have primary appointments in one of the other three schools at UTMB, and work closely within all departments, institutes, and research centers. During the first year, most graduate students are required to enroll in the Basic Biomedical Sciences Curriculum (BBSC), which provides a strong foundation for all the laboratory-based basic science disciplines or in the Biochemical, Structural and Computational Biology Curriculum (BSCB), which is tailored to undergraduate majors in chemistry, physics, computational biology, engineering or mathematics. Students choose a specific graduate program for further course work and dissertation at the end of the first year. The BBSC and BSCB are not appropriate for students interested in some areas of study, such as the Medical Humanities, Sociomedical Sciences, Clinical Science, and the MD-PhD Combined Degree Program; such students are exempted from the BBSC or BSCB. (short version)
  7. 7. The Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health (PMCH) maintains the faculty expertise to address contemporary challenges to the health and well-being of human populations through basic, translational and clinical research. PMCH faculty expertise encompasses the core disciplines of the Population Health Sciences, Public Health Sciences and Preventive Medicine Sciences and includes the specific disciplines of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, Environmental Health, Health Services, Human Nutrition, Sociomedical Sciences, Rehabilitation Sciences, General Preventive Medicine, Aerospace Medicine, Occupational Medicine, and Clinical Investigative Sciences. Departmental faculty and support personnel collaborate in a wide variety of programmatic efforts across disciplines within the department and throughout the University and beyond. (short version) Diversity UTMB is located in a state with considerable ethnic and racial diversity. One of UTMB’s five core values addresses diversity, and states, “We are committed to employ and educate a health care work force whose diversity mirrors the population they serve.” We serve a tri-ethnic patient population, which provides an ideal training ground and rich research resources for our clinical research education programs. UTMB is also fully cognizant and supportive of the needs of employees and students with disabilities. UTMB has a strong record of recruiting minority students; and diversity is increasing among the student body in all four schools. The academic health center ranks among the leaders in minority enrollment for US medical schools. The 602 students who graduated in 2005 from UTMB’s four schools included 209 of Hispanic, African American, Asian and American Indian backgrounds. According to this year's Black Issues in Higher Education Top 100 Degree Producers issue, UTMB's School of Medicine was ranked first in the nation in the number of Hispanic physicians it graduated and seventh in the number of African American physician graduates. Among Texas medical schools, UTMB ranks first in overall minority enrollment, with 25 percent of its 830 medical students coming from underrepresented groups. Building upon its role as a leader in minority student recruitment and retention, UTMB has a number of programs in place for enhancing minority student enrollment and retention. For example, UTMB’s most recent grants from the federally funded Hispanic Center of Excellence (HCOE) and Health Careers Opportunity Program (HCOP) total $4.5 million, and continue to help UTMB diversify its student population. For more complete descriptions of resources and programs, this section may be inserted in part or as a whole. Please note, several facilities, programs, or centers have short, alternative, and long descriptions. (Alternate version) The University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) Overview History UTMB, one of 15 campuses of the University of Texas System, is dedicated to educating health science professionals and researchers caring for patients and solving biomedical problems through scientific inquiry. UTMB is unique among the Texas health science centers in that it operates its academic and patient care programs and facilities (and the only state-funded general purpose hospital and clinics) under a single administrative structure. Hospital and research operations are integrated under the President of the University, facilitating the integration of UTMB’s education, research and patient care programs, and providing a strong, synergistic environment for clinical and research education. As an integrated academic medical center under one administrative structure, UTMB’s annual budget approaches $1.4 billion. Established in 1891, UTMB’s School of Medicine was the first in Texas and the third west of the Mississippi River (the second oldest School of Medicine in continuous operation west of the Mississippi). Since then UTMB has grown from one building, 23 students and 13 faculty members to a major health science center with more than 70 major buildings, 2,100 students, 900 full-time faculty and more than $150M in sponsored research. The 100-acre campus includes four schools (Medicine, Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Nursing and Allied Health Sciences), three institutes for advanced study, a major medical library and a network of hospitals and clinics that provide a full range of primary and specialized medical care.
  8. 8. More than 470,000 square feet of space is dedicated to research, including the Truman Graves Blocker Medical Research Building, an 11-story laboratory building housing several centers, research cores and departments, and the Dockside Building, a dedicated structural biology building housing state of the art NMR equipment. The UTMB School of Medicine’s 20 basic, biomedical and clinical academic departments all have faculty conducting funded research. All of these facilities are on the UTMB main campus; none is more than a 10-minute walk from any other. In recent years UTMB has invested more than $7M annually from endorsement and tobacco settlement revenues in campus wide interdisciplinary research centers, most based within the School of Medicine. These include: the Sealy Centers for Molecular Science (1991-present), Structural Biology (1995-present), Molecular Cardiology (1994-2000), Cancer Cell Biology (1995-present), Aging (1995present) and Vaccine Development (2001-present), as well as the General Clinical Research Center (continuously funded by NIH since 1962), the Texas Space Grant Consortium (1989), the Center for Aerospace Medicine and Physiology (1995), the Centennial Center for Toxicology (1996), the World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center for Tropical Diseases (1994), the Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases (2001-present), Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Women’s Health (2002-present) and the Center for Addiction Research (2004- present). Extensive institutional funding also supports interdisciplinary programs in bioinformatics, neuroscience, and gastrointestinal research. As part of this investment, the University established such core facilities as the Transgenic Mouse Core Facility, Molecular Genomics Core Laboratory, Biomedical Resources (Protein and Proteomics) Facility, and more recently the Robert E. Shope Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4) Research Laboratory, an $18M facility completed in mid-2003 with a combination of foundation, institutional and NIH support. This investment in research has paid off, as UTMB sponsored research funding has more than doubled in the past five years. External funding is $158.6 million per year. Overall, UTMB is ranked #39 among medical schools in NIH funding. The Departments of Pathology, Surgery, and Obstetrics and Gynecology are in the top 10 in NIH funding. Patient Care Clinical training takes place in four teaching hospitals, containing 900 beds, on the Galveston campus; at the Brackenridge Hospital in Austin, and in the offices of 891 affiliated physicians in private practice in Southeast Texas who supervise medical students and house officers. UTMB’s 99-acre campus of 77 buildings includes the state-of-the-art Medical Research Building, Level 1 Trauma Center, Shriners Burns Center and the only operational biosafety level 4 laboratory at an academic health center. As home of the annual National Student Research Forum, founded by UTMB in 1960 and the only competition of its type, UTMB plays a pivotal role in support of the nation’s future scientific leaders. Since its founding, UTMB has been and continues to be a major health care provider for ethnic minorities and individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds. In 2005, of the 42,294 inpatients treated at UTMB, 60% were African American or Hispanic. During this period, there were 752,441 patient visits in the UTMB outpatient clinics. Of this number, 49% were African American or Hispanic. Provision of high quality medical care to a large diverse patient population is important both for medical education and clinical research. In 2005, UTMB received outpatient visits from 204 of Texas’ 254 counties and inpatients from 149 counties. In 2005, UTMB’s hospitals served 42,294 inpatients and experienced 65,658 emergency room visits that resulted in 202,544 days of inpatient care. There were 752,441 patient visits to UTMB’s outpatient clinics (45 campus-based and 47 community-based). In response to UTMB’s historic commitment to the medically indigent, more than $481 million dollars of unsponsored charity care was delivered. Telemedicine consultations numbered 28,929, making UTMB one of the leaders in the US in this method of health care delivery. In addition, the UTMB-Shriners Hospitals for Children-Galveston Burns Hospital is one of four Burn Injury Rehabilitation Model Systems in the United States. The UTMB Burn Model System program in the Shriners Burns Hospital includes an intensive and inclusive rehabilitation program. Education Over two thousand students are enrolled in four schools and two institutes: the School of Medicine (826 students), the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (312 students), the School of Nursing (564 students), the School of Allied Health Sciences (334 students), the Marine Biomedical Institute and the Institute for the Medical Humanities. Of 1,147 full time faculties, 834 are in the School of Medicine.
  9. 9. UTMB’s School of Medicine has 752 full-time faculty, nearly 820 medical students, 500 clinical residents in training, and more than 70 clinical fellows. Composed of six basic science and fifteen clinical departments, the School of Medicine boasts the ninth largest medical enrollment in the country and graduates approximately two hundred physicians per year. In the course of its 115-year history, the school has graduated over 11,000 physicians. The UTMB School of Medicine ranks first in the US in the number of Hispanic graduates and seventh in the number of African American graduates. Currently, 25% of UTMB’s medical school students, 20% of nursing students, 30% of graduate students and allied health students and 11% of clinical residents and fellows are African American or Hispanic. Moreover, UTMB has a patient population with a mix of non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans, and Hispanics that is ideal for minority scholars who wish to conduct health disparities research. The School of Medicine admits approximately 200 students yearly and its new curriculum emphasizes small group, self-directed learning and integration of the basic and clinical sciences. The combined MD-PhD program has 39 students. UTMB has approximately 53 accredited residency and fellowship programs providing training for over 500 residents and fellows. To prepare physicians to meet the needs of the future, the school conducts training in such emerging areas as health care of inmates of correctional institutions and in conjunction with NASA, space medicine. Approximately one fourth of Texas’ practicing physicians received at least a portion of their graduate or undergraduate training at UTMB. In the School of Nursing, the Nursing Doctoral Program is designed to provide nurses who have already demonstrated specialized clinical expertise at the master’s level the opportunity to contribute to the further development of nursing knowledge and professional leadership. This is achieved through the systematic study of the dimensions of the construct of healing as central to nursing practice, scholarship and leadership. The program of study thus prepares scholars and researchers who will advance the theoretical and investigatory capacities of nurses to further healing with a variety of persons and within a variety of contexts. Healing within this program of study is understood as the interactive process that emerges when patients within a specified health context gain access to the expertise of the professional nurse to facilitate progression toward a desired “wholeness,” such as wholeness being the root meaning of the construct of healing. The program enables students to explore diverse approaches to healing, emphasizing those that fall within the parameters of professional nursing practice. Healing has many axes of meaning and this diversity provides an array of organizing frameworks of study, conceptualized as interacting dimensions. It is assumed that exploration of the diverse possible meanings of healing extend and test nursing knowledge and thereby improve patient care. The School of Allied Health Sciences (SAHS) provides multi-level educational programs for a diverse group of students, colleagues and members of the community, facilitates student and faculty involvement in scientific investigation and scholarly activities that advance health care and promotes service through active participation in professional and community activities. The SAHS offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees and certificates through a full range of programs in allied health disciplines including clinical laboratory sciences, human and basic sciences, occupational therapy, physical therapy, physician assistant studies, psychology training, radiology health sciences, respiratory care, and rehabilitation sciences. Since its establishment in 1921, the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (GSBS) has expanded to 12 graduate programs, and works closely within all departments of the other schools as well as two institutes, and seven research centers. GSBS graduates are currently found in prestigious and influential positions in universities, government and industry in the U.S., and around the world. UTMB and the University of Texas at Austin The main campus of the University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin) is today comprised of 90 research units housed on the 350-acre main campus and in facilities across the state. Of the 8.8 million square feet of assignable space at the main campus, 10% is research laboratory (not classroom laboratories) space. External research funding is $417 million per year, of which $264 million is from federal agencies (Department of Defense, $120 million; NIH, $50 million; NSF, $42 million). The University has one of the largest graduate schools in the nation with more than 10,000 students and more than 170 graduate degree programs.
  10. 10. UTMB and UT Austin have maintained a close relationship since their establishment, but the degree of active collaboration has grown dramatically over the past two decades. This growth has been fueled by a large number of factors, including rapid transportation, growth of distance education and telemedicine, the desire to have an academic medical presence in Austin (the state capital), the desire at UTMB to expand the clinical base for medical education, and the growth of individual interdisciplinary collaborations between UTMB and UT Austin investigators. UTMB now has a satellite campus in Austin, based at Brackenridge Hospital, as part of an affiliation with the Seton Healthcare network. In 2005, 22 third-year medical students spent their entire year in Austin with a comparable number of fourth-year students pursing electives there. This number increased to 36 in 2006. Currently, UTMB full-time faculty in UT Austin will number 61, including 29 in Internal Medicine, 16 in Obstetrics and Gynecology, and 12 in Pediatrics. UTMB and UT Austin presently have joint MD/PhD programs in neuroscience, bioengineering and molecular biology, with an MD/PhD program in Pharmacy slated to start in Fall 2007. Students spend two years in medical school at UTMB in Galveston. They then move to UT Austin for PhD coursework and complete the research for their thesis at either campus. Medical studies are completed with 18 months of clinical rotations in either Austin or Galveston. During each phase of the program, students participate in small group sessions and other exercises designed to help them integrate the newest concepts of biomedical research with applications to clinical medicine. UTMB also has developed a clinical science MD/PhD program, supported by a K-30 award. The curriculum and programs developed for the clinical sciences program also will be adopted for the MD/PhD programs shared by UTMB and UT Austin. (long version) The School of Medicine (SOM) has 1,168 full time faculty, 830 medical students, 554 residents in training, and more than 95 clinical fellows working and studying in five basic science and fifteen clinical departments. The SOM admits ~200 students, graduates a comparable number of physicians yearly, and boasts the ninth largest medical enrollment in the country. In the course of its 115-year history, the school has graduated more than 11,225 physicians. As described below, the SOM ranks nationally in enrollment and graduation of minority students, which reflects UTMB’s commitment to the diversity needs of American health care. The Integrated Medical Curriculum (IMC) emphasizes small group, self-directed learning and integration of the basic and clinical sciences. This curriculum was implemented in 1998. Courses in Years 1 and 2 are overseen and directed by the course directors, individual course committees and the SOM Curriculum Committee. Student performance on USMLE Step 1 was not adversely affected by implementation of the new curriculum. Initiatives have been undertaken to further improve performance by better preparation of students for the Step 1 examination. Courses in the IMC include an initial 24-week core of instruction on the scientific principles integral to the practice of medicine, followed by six organ-based blocks and a syndromes-based course, all of which integrate traditional basic science disciplines (anatomy, physiology, pathology, pharmacology, microbiology, and immunology) for each of the major systems of the human body. All courses are interdisciplinary, and are based on self-directed, problem-based learning, with supplemental large-group lectures and laboratory sessions. Clinical skills development and clinical reasoning are emphasized in the longitudinal Practice of Medicine course. The major characteristics of the IMC aid learning, build life-long learning skills, and provide opportunities for introducing more concepts related to clinical and translational research: 1. Basic science material is integrated across disciplines. For example, rather than learning about membranes in one course (Physiology) and cell signaling in another course (Biochemistry), material is presented in Molecules Cells and Tissues that integrates membrane structure and function with cell signaling concepts. This holistic approach makes it easier for students to understand and learn the scientific principles related to normal human biology. 2. Basic science material is integrated with clinical science material. Each week’s topic is linked to one or more clinical cases presented as problems to solve. Thus, students are stimulated to use the basic science
  11. 11. concepts and knowledge in a clinical setting, applying them in a problem-solving mode. This makes learning of basic science concepts more interesting and aids in retention of the material. The clinical cases become more complex in the second year, enabling students to review and increase their knowledge base and to foster independent learning and build life-long learning skills. For the problem-based learning (PBL) sessions, the class is divided into groups of nine or ten students. Six hours of PBL are scheduled per week (3 two-hour periods held on each Monday, Wednesday, and Friday). A 1-2 hour period (usually on Friday) is scheduled for PBL clinical wrap-up. The problems have been clinical cases (usually three per week) that relate to the content of the weekly learning goals. Learning goals are defined by the students themselves, with guidance by a faculty small group preceptor. The first hour of each period is used to discuss learning issues generated in the previous PBL period. The second hour is used for presentation and discussion of a new case, and for generating new learning issues. A list of case-specific learning issues is distributed at the end of each case. Exams include questions based on these learning issues. The following courses comprise the IMC during the first two years of medical school: Gross Anatomy and Radiology (GAR). This is the first course in Year 1, and is designed to illustrate important relationships between anatomic structure and radiologic anatomy. The prime objective of the course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the anatomy of the human body and to emphasize the clinical relevance of anatomy in the diagnosis of clinical disorders. The course includes extensive anatomic dissection experience to supplement lectures and small group PBL sessions. Molecules, Cells, and Tissues (MCT). This course bridges the traditional disciplines of microscopic anatomy, cell and molecular biology, genetics, physiology, pharmacology, and biochemistry in an integrated course that emphasizes relationships between molecular structure and complex human systems. The basic concepts learned in the course are reinforced by further emphasis emphasis during each of the later organ-based courses. The course combines PBL sessions with laboratory sessions and lectures. Pathobiology and Host Defense (PHD). Expanding on the content of traditional pathology courses, this course stresses the pathologic changes that are manifest in human disease, with an emphasis on the microbiologic and immunologic features of health and disease. Relevant pharmacologic principles are included and are integrated into the topics covered in each segment of the course. Laboratory exercises illustrate the functional aspects of these principles, which expand on material covered in PBL sessions and lectures. Neuroscience and Human Behavior (NHB). This course addresses the anatomy, physiology, and behavioral aspects of the nervous system, with extensive functional correlations and clinical manifestations of neurologic and psychiatric diseases and trauma. Anatomic laboratory sessions that focus on the structure and organization of the human nervous system are interspersed with case-based tutorials and lectures stressing the relationship between anatomy, functional brain systems, neurology, and human behavior. Periodic clinical demonstrations emphasize these relationships further through expert modeling of neurologic examinations in clinical diseases. Cardiovascular/Pulmonary (CVP). This course includes the biologic principles applicable to these organ systems, while emphasizing their complex relationship to each other and other organ systems. Normal structure and function are integrated with pathology, pathophysiology, therapeutics, and diagnostic techniques. PBL sessions and laboratory experiences are supplemented by lectures. Gastroenterology/Nutrition (GIN). This course covers the complex physiologic functions of the GI tract, including the gut, liver biliary tract and pancreas. Neuroendocrinology and immunology of the digestive track and basic and clinical concepts of nutrition are included. Learning is accomplished through PBL sessions, lectures, and laboratory sessions. Renal/Fluid/Electrolytes (RFE). This course relates the principles of fluid and electrolyte homeostasis, renal physiology, and immunology to understanding the normal function and pathophysiologic manifestations of the renal system. With emphasis on introduction of clinical syndromes through PBL sessions, students are exposed to the connection between basic pathophysiologic principles that influence the kidneys and their manifestations in human disease. Endocrinology/Reproduction (ER). This course emphasizes the major endocrinologic organs of the body, along with the metabolic consequences of diseases affecting them. Male and female reproductive anatomy, physiology, pathology, and relevant principles of molecular biology and pharmacology are included. Major emphasis is placed on PBL sessions, which include illustrative cases of major endocrinologic syndromes along
  12. 12. with issues of fertility, reproduction, and normal and abnormal sexual development. Computer-based instruction and student-led debates are included. Dermatology/Hematology/Musculoskeletal (DHM). This course bridges the diverse structures of the skin, blood, and connective tissue by emphasizing the immunologic and other pathophysiological features common to diseases of each system. PBL sessions introduce major concepts and clinical syndromes, with lectures serving to reinforce and clarify basic principles. Great Syndromes. This is the final course in Year 2, and serves to integrate the multidisciplinary topics of previous courses into a series of cases that illustrate major syndromes of human disease, particularly as related to effects on multiple organ systems. Fundamental scientific principles and concepts, pathophysiology of organ systems, and principles of health and disease are emphasized in PBL cases. Predicated on students’ knowledge gained in previous IMC courses, the course acquaints them with the complexities and integrative dimensions of clinical judgment and decision-making in patient care. The influence of life stages and patient perspective are woven into the basic science and clinical features of each topic. Practice of Medicine Year 1 and Year 2 (POM 1 & 2). POM focuses on clinical skills development during Years 1 and 2. It emphasizes the practical development of skills in communication, medical interviewing, and physical examination. This is complemented by principles of medical ethics, professionalism, and evidence-based medicine and clinical reasoning. Weekly small-group sessions with clinical faculty are the focal point of the course. Basic skills in Year 1 are reinforced through regularly scheduled half-day visits to primary care physician practices in the community. Experiences are expanded in Year 2 with periodic University-based clinical experiences to practice and develop clinical abilities, especially as they relate to each organ system. IMC Course Committees. Progress of students in each course of the IMC is monitored by course committees, which are responsible for (1) review of student performance in the course and providing information to the Associate Dean for Student Affairs about students with academic difficulties; (2) determination of final grades in each course and reporting the official grades to the Office of Enrollment Services; (3) upon request from the Academic Progress Committee, providing additional information about the student’s performance; and (4) providing narrative evaluations for inclusion into the Medical Student Performance Evaluation. Academic Progress Committee. Oversight of student performance in all courses and in USMLE Steps 1 and Step 2, including determination of promotion, academic warning, remediation, or dismissal of students, and certification of eligibility for graduation, is the responsibility of the School of Medicine Academic Progress Committee. The Academic Progress Committee consists of nine members elected from the Faculty of Medicine for staggered four-year terms: five physicians and four basic scientists. The Chair is a physician member of the committee elected annually by its members. Current course directors are excluded from membership. Student USMLE scores. Step 1 of the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) must be taken prior to beginning Year 3. Students are conditionally promoted to Year 3 pending results of the examination. Students who receive a failing score on their first effort on USMLE Step 1 are required to withdraw from the curriculum no later than the conclusion of the specific course they are taking at the time the failing score is received. They are then placed on leave of absence or academic reassignment for a period not to exceed one year, upon consultation with the Associate Dean for Student Affairs. After a period of preparation, students may retake the USMLE Step 1, followed by resumption of the Year 3 curriculum, pending receipt of their score. For the past two years, the USMLE pass rate and mean scores for UTMB students have been above the national average for the first times since the inception of the Step 1 exam in the early 1990s. In 2004, the Step 2 mean and pass rate also surpassed the national norms. These results are in the context of one of the most diverse medical student bodies in the country. Improvement has occurred at all performance levels of the class – high end, middle, and lower-performing students. This improvement is thought to be multifactorial, and is attributed to continued improvement in the curriculum and testing, better examination preparation programs, raised awareness and harder work by students, and outstanding efforts by support personnel in Student Affairs. UTMB has approximately 60 accredited residency and fellowship programs providing training for over 550 residents and fellows. UTMB is the only US medical center to offer all three residencies in preventive medicine
  13. 13. (general preventive medicine, occupational medicine, and aerospace medicine). Approximately one-fourth of Texas’s practicing physicians received at least a portion of their graduate or undergraduate training at UTMB. UTMB emphasizes research as an important experience for its students. It has, for example, hosted the annual National Student Research Forum (NSRF) since 1960, which brings some of the most promising US medical students to this campus. The primary purpose of the NSRF, which is planned and managed by students, is to provide a national scientific assembly for presentation of research by medical students, residents, and graduate students in the biomedical sciences. The Forum recognizes excellence in research by means of awards, based upon the judgment of a panel of scientists selected from the UTMB faculty and select campuses across the United States. The three-day Forum includes a keynote address and provides an opportunity for young medical scientists to receive meaningful and pertinent discussion of their research efforts by peers and established scientists in an atmosphere encouraging the highest scientific standards. Student presentations may include research in the basic or clinical sciences, on work completed or in progress, but that has not been published prior to abstract submission. Participants may present their research in either oral or poster sessions. Over the past forty-five years, the Forum has grown from a small regional meeting to a nationally respected assembly of young scientists. Last year, 44 medical schools were represented, and approximately 110 papers were presented. Awards are provided for the most meritorious student presentations, including awards provided by the Clinical Research Education Office and the General Clinical Research Center for the most outstanding research in clinical and translational research. The Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (GSBS) was established in 1921 and has expanded to 12 graduate programs. Clinical Science was added most recently to the list of programs. All PhD and MS degrees are awarded through the GSBS. The MPH is awarded to physicians enrolled in the preventive medicine residency programs. GSBS graduates are currently found in prestigious and influential positions in universities, government and industry in the US, and around the world. All GSBS faculty have appointments in one of the other three schools at UTMB, and work closely within all departments, institutes, and research centers. During the first year, most graduate students are required to enroll in the Basic Biomedical Sciences Curriculum (BBSC), which provides a strong foundation for all the laboratory based basic science disciplines. Students choose a specific graduate program for further course work and dissertation at the end of the first year. The BBSC is not appropriate for students interested in some areas of study, such as the Medical Humanities, Sociomedical Sciences, Clinical Science and the MD-PhD Combined Degree Program, and such students are exempted from the BBSC requirement. The specific programs within the graduate school follow. (long version) Preventive Medicine and Community Health (PMCH). UTMB’s SOM has the only Department of PMCH within the University of Texas System, and this department and its divisions (Environmental Toxicology, Human Nutrition, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Sociomedical Sciences and General Preventive Medicine) serve as the home for the PMCH Graduate Program. However, PMCH graduate faculty appointments are also given to faculty in many other departments, as needed for interdisciplinary teaching and research mentoring. The PMCH Graduate Program is multidisciplinary and includes specialized curricula in Sociomedical Sciences (which focuses on aging, international and minority – especially Hispanic health, behavioral medicine, social support and health, medical outcomes, health services utilization, social epidemiology, psychosocial stress, sexual behavior, and health promotion), Biostatistics, Rehabilitation Sciences (described under School of Allied Health Sciences), Human Nutrition, and Environmental Toxicology. All of these award the PhD degree, except for Biostatistics, which offers only the MS degree. Clinical Science was previously a curriculum within PMCH. Although it is still administered by the PMCH Program, Clinical Science is now approved for listing as a separate program by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB). Students in all the PMCH curricula and programs are primarily interested in patient-oriented research or in studies of populations or existing databases of clinical or health outcomes. The PMCH Program also administers a Masters of Public Health (MPH) Program, which is approved by the THECB for awarding the MPH degree to physicians who are enrolled in the preventive medicine residencies (General Preventive Medicine, Occupational Medicine and Aerospace Medicine). Some residents in these programs interested in careers in clinical research pursue the MS or PhD degree, rather than the MPH.
  14. 14. The Cell Biology Graduate Program is a multidisciplinary program designed to provide students the academic and research skills necessary to develop and answer hypotheses about all aspects of morphology, physiology, biochemistry, genetics, and development of cells, tissues, and organisms. Topics of research concentration include cell communication and signaling, cancer, stem cells, spinal cord regeneration, chronic pain, cell death, stroke, pregnancy, reproduction, endocrinology, Alzheimer's disease, vertigo and musculoskeletal problems in aging and space biology. The Cellular Physiology and Molecular Biophysics Program trains scientists to undertake independent research in modern cellular physiology and biophysics. The program is multidisciplinary, and includes a variety of graduate courses in such areas as membrane structure and biochemistry, molecular biology, cell physiology, ion transport, excitability and ion channels, computer modeling, optical techniques, electrophysiology techniques, systems analysis, and advanced study in neurotransmission, neural repair, receptor transduction, muscle excitation-contraction coupling, structural biology and membrane proteins, epithelial function and cellular homeostasis. This program offers the student a unique opportunity for close interaction with nationally and internationally prominent faculty in the area of cell physiology and membrane transport. The majority of program faculty have active research programs funded by such peer-reviewed sources such as NIH, NSF, the American Heart Association, and others. The Experimental Pathology Program includes more than 50 highly trained faculty members in the Department of Pathology and many others from other departments and disciplines. Specific fields of concentration include pathobiology and immunobiology of infectious diseases including those caused by viruses, bacteria and other intracellular pathogenic organisms; mechanisms of chemical injury; environmental toxicology; chemical carcinogenesis; cellular signal transduction; molecular oncogenesis; neuropathology; renal pathology; and mycology. The Graduate Program in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (BMB) provides students with a carefully designed and individually tailored curriculum, and includes advanced course work and dissertation research training. The Program prepares students for careers in: biochemistry, cell biology, computational biology, bioinformatics, structural biology and biophysics. Graduates have had excellent success in attaining academic and postdoctoral positions in outstanding research institutions, as well as in leading biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. Areas of research interest include mechanisms of action of various protein and, steroid receptors, molecular basis of gene expression, cancer cell biology and carcinogenic mechanisms, biophysics of macromolecules, structural and computational biology, drug design, biochemical toxicology, molecular basis of aging, hormones and growth factors, cell signaling, oxidative stress and disease, and DNA repair and mutagenesis. The new Biophysical, Structural & Computational Biology (BSCB) Curriculum PhD Educational Track within BMB is designed for students who want to apply disciplines of mathematics, physics, chemistry, computer science and/or engineering to solve biological problems. The view is taken that the practice of bioscience and medicine over the next several decades will require integrating the biological and physical sciences in order to solve the most challenging problems in biology and human health. The PhD scientists who will be best prepared and most successful in this post-genomic age will be those who are knowledgeable and facile in both the physical sciences and biology. The curriculum provides a rigorous theoretical and practical background in basic physics and chemistry for understanding and interpreting structure and interactions of biological molecules. It also provides the skills to recognize and solve key problems in biochemistry, molecular & cell biology, physiology, and genetics using molecular biophysical approaches. The Graduate Program in the Medical Humanities, which is provided by faculty in the Institute for the Medical Humanities (IMH), was established in 1988, offering the first MA and PhD degrees in the medical humanities in the US. It is still one of the very few programs to offer advanced degrees (MA, PhD, MD/PhD, and JD/PhD) in the medical humanities. Some 46 students have graduated since 1988; and 24 degree-seeking students are currently enrolled. After the first year of courses, PhD students will ordinarily begin focusing on areas of specialization to prepare for the qualifying examination and dissertation proposal. Students elect major and minor areas of specialization, which include Health Care Ethics, Health Policy, History of Medicine, Literature and Narrative Studies in Health Care, and Religion and Medicine. Major areas of specialization require five courses; minor areas require three courses. Each student's course choices are determined in collaboration with the area coordinator, advisor, and graduate program director. The Microbiology and Immunology Program is a multidisciplinary, interdepartmental program with the goal of providing state-of-the-art training for careers in biomedical research. The aim is to produce scientists capable
  15. 15. of solving basic biological and health-related problems who will be competitive for leadership positions in universities, government laboratories and the private sector. The program emphasizes innovative research and versatile approaches to problem solving. Students are required to study a specialty area in depth, while also acquiring a breadth of knowledge. Individualized research is pursued in one of several areas, including bacterial and viral pathogenesis, microbial genetics, molecular virology, host defenses, autoimmunity, neuroimmunology, immune regulation, structural and molecular biology. Modern approaches are taught through graduate faculty research programs that include molecular, genetic, cellular, microbial, and animal and human topics, and may involve techniques in structural biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, immunochemistry, immunobiology, tissue culture, and animal and human studies. The Neuroscience Graduate Program (NGP) provides an internationally competitive educational program in neuroscience leading to the PhD degree. The rich interdisciplinary program of course work and research is designed to enhance a trainee's ability to become a scholarly and productive contributor to our knowledge of nervous system function. It is anticipated that graduates will become teachers or researchers in the field of neuroscience in academic institutions, industry, biotechnology or government. The program is designed to be rigorous but flexible and is explicitly multidisciplinary. Research can be done in areas ranging from molecules to excitable membranes to behavior, using preparations ranging from cell cultures to isolated ganglia to brain slices to intact nervous systems of invertebrates and vertebrates. Students are exposed to a broad, integrated foundation of courses in the biomedical sciences and to fundamental neurobiological concepts. They also gain exposure to modern experimental techniques: cell labeling with transported markers; immunocytochemistry; electron and confocal microscopy; nuclear magnetic resonance-based imaging; electrophysiological methods of intra- and extracellular recording; voltage and patch clamping; biochemical and pharmacological methods for isolating, identifying and characterizing the activities of important neurotransmitters, peptides, growth factors, receptors, drugs and other signaling molecules; immunological, cell culture and molecular genetics techniques; recombinant DNA technology; and behavioral research and measurement paradigms. The goal is to graduate neuroscientists with a broad base of experience with modern experimental skills who will seek to explore cellular and molecular mechanisms for understanding the organization and function of nervous systems. The Graduate Program in Pharmacology and Toxicology is housed within the Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology, which has 25 graduate program faculty, 8 of whom have primary appointments in medical school departments other than Pharmacology & Toxicology. The PhD program aims to advance scientific knowledge and prepare students to become independent future scientists. Primary research areas include mechanisms of carcinogenesis, molecular toxicology, chemical biology and neuropharmacology. The faculty provides a wide range of research opportunities for addressing research questions at many experimental levels, ranging from behavioral responses to drugs of abuse to the crystal structure of enzymatic active centers, though most questions are addressed at the cellular or molecular level. Currently 22 students are at various stages of their dissertation work leading to a PhD degree. The Masters in Medical Science (MMS) Program is a longstanding program intended for individuals with the MD degree who wish a more advanced degree in basic or clinical research within the time frame of an existing clinical or research fellowship training program. There are no specific course requirements, and the student is expected to spend at least a year to fulfill the primary requirement of completing and publishing an original research project under the mentorship of an established investigator. This program is most suitable for students who do not have the need or time for completion of more advanced research training and course work. The Institute for the Medical Humanities (IMH) was founded in 1973, and is committed to moral inquiry, research, teaching, and professional service in medicine and health care. Members of the Institute engage in research on ethical and legal problems in clinical practice and biomedical research; and on philosophical, historical, visual, literary, and religious dimensions of medicine and health care. Institute faculty are active in medical and graduate teaching, clinical ethics consultation, and health policy analysis locally and in state, national, and international academic and public contexts. The Institute encourages collaborative work among its faculty and between its faculty and their colleagues in the clinical and research departments at UTMB, as well as at universities around the country and abroad. The IMH is one of the very few medical humanities entities in the country issuing its own PhDs and MAs, and it has taken the lead in training the next generation of scholars and professors in the field. It also offers MD/PhD and JD/PhD programs. Course work is also available for University of Texas Medical Branch graduate students
  16. 16. in other programs and for special students who do not seek a formal degree. PhD students in the Medical Humanities are expected to: 1) acquire a general knowledge of the humanist tradition; 2) become acquainted with the methods and literature of the humanities as these relate to medicine; 3) develop a competence in one or more humanities disciplines and apply this competence to the investigation of a particular problem; 4) transform this investigation into a dissertation that represents significant and original research; and 5) demonstrate an ability to teach and work with a variety of persons in the humanities and the health care sciences and professions. The Institute hosts visiting scholars; sponsors symposia that deepen the dialogue between the humanities and the health professions; conducts a seminar course for trainees and postdoctoral fellows, entitled “Ethics in Science”; and provides services in ethics consultation, in which trained professionals facilitate discussion, analysis and understanding of ethical issues in patient care and research. Common issues that arise include end-of-life care, informed consent process, and patient confidentiality. The Ethics Consultation Service is available to physicians, nurses, allied health professionals, and administrators. Finally, the Institute’s research program in ethics and legal issues involved in scientific endeavors advances inquiry within the humanities, while enlarging the scholarly vision of connections between the humanities, health care, health policy, and biomedical research. The IMH is heavily involved in clinical research education, as described below, in relation to the K30 Program and the GCRC. (long version) The School of Nursing (SON) has graduated more than 7,000 students since its establishment in 1890 as the first nursing school in Texas. 164 BSN degrees and 32 MSN degrees were awarded in 2005. Required courses for the BSN degree include methods used to acquire, generate, and utilize knowledge in the practice of professional nursing. Emphasis is on research methods and resources for knowledge acquisition. Students are guided to develop critical thinking skills to pursue creative solutions to clinical nursing problems. The Master’s Nursing Program (MSN degree) is designed for nurses who hold a baccalaureate degree in nursing and wish to obtain advanced preparation as nurse practitioners, nurse educators or nurse leaders in complex organizations. The curriculum is flexible in meeting the needs and interests of a diverse student population and enables students to utilize many available learning opportunities. Students may select from a variety of courses in nursing. All students complete the course, “Issues and Methods in Nursing Research” where they learn skills to evaluate the credibility of reported research, determine its usefulness in guiding advanced nursing practice, and to develop a research proposal. Students may also elect a qualitative research methods course which instructs in several qualitative approaches, validity/reliability issues, and strategies for combining qualitative and quantitative methods. The PhD Program in Nursing is designed to provide nurses who hold baccalaureate or master’s degrees an opportunity to become scholars and researchers capable of advancing nursing practice and education. Three focus areas, health promotion, human response, and healing, provide the structure to develop knowledge that will extend the understanding of the promotion of physical, psychological, and social well-being. These are applied within the context of prevention and the maintenance or restoration of health. The program prepares nursing scholars to design, conduct, communicate and evaluate research that contributes to a body of knowledge in nursing science. (long version) School of Allied Health Sciences The School of Allied Health Sciences (SAHS), established in 1968, offers multi-level educational programs for a diverse group of students in the rehabilitation and health professions and has produced more than 6,000 professionals for the nation's health care workforce. The SAHS also facilitates student and faculty involvement in scientific investigation and scholarly activities that advance health care, and promotes service through active participation in professional and community activities. The SAHS offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees through a full range of programs in allied health disciplines including clinical laboratory sciences, occupational therapy, physical therapy, physician assistant studies, and respiratory care. The professional masters’ degrees in physical therapy (MPT) and occupational therapy (MOT) are entry-level degrees that qualify persons for practice and allow graduates to take national registration and state licensure exams. Similarly, the master’s degree in physician assistant studies (MPAS) qualifies graduates for certification as physician assistants in the State of Texas. For students with backgrounds in rehabilitation interested in
  17. 17. pursuing advanced research, the PhD curriculum in Rehabilitation Sciences is offered through the Graduate Program in Preventive Medicine and Community Health, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. The SAHS also offers postdoctoral fellowship experiences in the interdisciplinary rehabilitation research training program and the psychology training program. A brief overview of the masters’ degree programs, PhD curriculum, and postdoctoral fellowship programs is included below. Additional information about the SAHS departments and programs can be obtained at www.sahs.utmb.edu. Master of Physical Therapy. The UTMB physical therapy program was founded in 1943 and was the first educational program for physical therapists in Texas. The Department of Physical Therapy currently offers a Master of Physical Therapy (MPT) degree that requires a baccalaureate degree for admission. The department has 11 core faculty members and a large number of adjunct, supporting, and clinical faculty who also teach in the program. An extensive network of over 250 clinical sites provides professional clinical experience for students. The MPT program admits 44 students each year. Throughout its 62-year history, the physical therapy program has graduated more than 1,400 physical therapists who have served or currently serve the health care needs of Texas and the nation. The program and faculty demonstrate academic excellence, outstanding scholarship, and continuing professional service. The department is preparing an application to begin offering the Doctor of Physical Therapy degree in 2008. Master of Occupational Therapy. The occupational therapy program at UTMB is the oldest in the southwest and is accredited by the American Occupational Therapy Association. The Department of Occupational Therapy currently offers a Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) entry-level degree requiring a total of 82 credits to complete. Prerequisites include a baccalaureate degree and health related experience. The department has six core faculty members and several clinical faculty who contribute to instruction and clinical training. Clinical affiliations are in place with more than 200 hospitals, rehabilitation centers and health care facilities across the nation that provide clinical training to qualify for full-time six month clinical field-work experience. The program accepts 40 students each year and has graduated more than 1,000 occupational therapists. The quality of the educational program is reflected in the fact that more than 90% of the students pass the national certification exam on the first attempt; national average first time pass rate is 81%. Master of Physician Assistant Studies. The UTMB physician assistant studies program was established in 1971 and was the first baccalaureate program in Texas. The Department of Physician Assistant Studies currently offers a Master of Physician Assistant Studies (MPAS) degree and received the maximum accreditation award of seven years from the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (2002-2009). The department has eight core faculty and many clinical/adjunct faculty who provide training for students. The program accepts about 125 students per year and has graduated more than 1,100 students. The program maintains over 100 quality training affiliations at physician offices, hospitals, clinics, and other health agencies state-wide and has been named one of the top ten graduate physician assistant programs in the nation by U.S. News and World Reports for the past three consecutive years. Interdisciplinary Rehabilitation Sciences PhD Curriculum. The interdisciplinary rehabilitation sciences curriculum was implemented in 2000 to address recommendations included in the Institute of Medicine’s report, Enabling America: Assessing the Role of Rehabilitation Science and Engineering. The curriculum is offered through the Graduate Program in Preventive Medicine and Community Health, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, and is administratively supported by the Division of Rehabilitation Sciences in SAHS. The core faculty have appointments in a variety of departments at UTMB, including Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Internal Medicine (Geriatrics), Preventive Medicine & Community Health, Orthopedic Surgery & Rehabilitation, and Neurology. Students complete course work and a dissertation focused on rehabilitation outcome and practice designed to improve the lives of persons with a disability or chronic disease. Full-time students are supported by a combination of external research and training grants from the National Institutes of Health, and by internal endowment and scholarship funds. Postdoctoral Interdisciplinary Rehabilitation Research Training Program. The postdoctoral research training program was implemented in 1999 under a training grant from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research and is administered through the Division of Rehabilitation Sciences in SAHS. Postdoctoral fellowships are available in applied biomechanics and physiology of rehabilitation,
  18. 18. cognitive/neurological rehabilitation, and rehabilitation in aging. Fellows conduct collaborative research with core faculty who have expertise in rehabilitation, disability, and recovery. Fifteen postdoctoral fellows have been recruited into the program; of these, seven have completed fellowships and are currently in faculty, research, clinical, or administrative positions. Postdoctoral Psychology Training Program. UTMB offers intensive psychology training through research and clinical experiences/supervision, patient care, and seminar and research presentations. The psychology training program is administered through the Division of Rehabilitation Sciences in SAHS and is designed to prepare fellows for assuming roles of scientist/practitioner in a medical setting. Clinical training is focused on the advanced practice of clinical health psychology in the areas of orthopedic surgery, burns, chronic pain, oncology, functional GI disorders, and community psychology. Research focus includes women's health, rehabilitation science, chronic medical conditions, trauma and injury, and quality of life. UTMB is a member of the Association of Postdoctoral and Psychology Internship Centers (APPIC) and the program had a recent site visit for possible accreditation from the American Psychological Association. (long version) Diversity. UTMB is located in a state with considerable ethnic and racial diversity. One of UTMB’s five core values addresses diversity, and states, “We are committed to employ and educate a health care work force whose diversity mirrors the population they serve.” Serving a tri-ethnic patient population provides an ideal training ground and rich research resource for our clinical research education programs. UTMB is also fully cognizant and supportive of the needs of employees and students with disabilities. UTMB has a long standing history of recruiting, matriculating and graduating under-represented minority students, as well as students from economically and educationally disadvantage backgrounds. A Hispanic Center of Excellence (HCOE) has been located at UTMB for more than 25 years. UTMB has committed substantial institutional resources toward our core institutional value of diversity. The first Hispanic medical student was enrolled at UTMB in 1917 and graduated in 1921. According to the most recent data from the US Department of Education, UTMB, in the most recent year for which data is available, ranked number three in the number of Hispanic graduates among all US medical schools and ranked number one in total Hispanic graduates. UTMB also ranked in the top ten of those conferring medical degrees to minority students. Over the last five years, of the 949 UTMB medical graduates, 28% were underrepresented minority and 19.5% were Hispanic. During the last academic year, the student body of the School of Medicine of 930 included 25% underrepresented minority and 16% Hispanic students. The graduating class included 34 Hispanic students, four of whom graduated as members of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society (AOA). To achieve this goal, UTMB has established partnerships with several Texas colleges and universities, community organizations and school districts to enhance the recruitment, matriculation, Table XX. UTMB minority graduates – total as of 2004 retention, and graduation of minority and African Hispanic Total educationally and economically disadvantaged American premedical and medical students. These Total Graduates 655 252 907 programs include the Early Medical School Deceased 49 10 59 Acceptance Program (EMSAP) and the Joint Practicing Primary Care 178 68 246 Admission Medical Program (JAMP), which Total Practicing* 293 102 395 target students at the beginning of their college Practicing in Texas 422 146 568 Practicing out-of-state 148 81 229 experience; the Medical School Familiarization *Based on available business addresses (probably Program (MSFP) and Research and Academic undercounted). Enrichment Training Program (RACE), which **Based on specialty noted at graduation from SOM, also target college students interested in medicine and biomedical research as a career; and the Prematriculation Reinforcement Enrichment Program (PREP), which provides academic enrichment for students already accepted to medical school. In addition, as a retention measure, students on campus have access to a wide variety of programs, including peer tutoring and academic counseling.
  19. 19. UTMB's Efforts to Increase Numbers of Disadvantaged Students in the Health Professions. Substantial institutional resources were committed toward the goal of attracting a student body that better mirrors the demographics of the State of Texas. In addition, funding from HRSA, local foundations and the Herzog Foundation has elevated UTMB to a national leadership position in the enrollment and graduation of minority physicians. Academic programs, policies and procedures, and non-academic support systems were implemented and have resulted in a substantial increase in recruitment, retention, and graduation of minority students. In addition, students from disadvantaged backgrounds were introduced at an early age to careers in the health professions. Grade and High School Initiatives. UTMB initiated its first health professions program for high school students in 1982 and its first grade school program in 1983, and these continue today. For over 20 years, several other programs have been highly successful in introducing Hispanic and African American students to careers in medicine and biomedical research. These consist of the Saturday Biomedical Science Forum, Summer Science Camp I, Summer Science Camp II, the Summer Research Program for High School Students, and the Science Education Program. Undergraduate Initiatives. Summer enrichment programs have become a traditional method used by institutions of higher education to attract a select group of disadvantaged students. UTMB's Medical School Familiarization Program (MSFP) includes motivational activities that encourage students to achieve their goals; clinical experiences, which include attending rounds, observing hospital procedures, assisting in the emergency room; and academic support activities which are comprised of learning skills workshops, lectures about basic biomedical sciences, and MCAT preparation courses. In addition, students receive assistance with personal statement preparation, interviewing skills, and admissions policies and procedures. Four hundred twenty six (54%) of the 823 students who participated in the UTMB MSFP program subsequently entered medical school, while an additional 73 (8%) entered another type of health professional school, bringing the total number entering the health professions to 499 (62%). The proportional acceptance of the MSFP students to medical school exceeds those reported by Cantor, et al. (Cantor, JC, Bergeisen, L, Baker, LC. Effect of an intensive education program for minority college students and recent graduates on the probability of acceptance to medical school. JAMA.1998;280:770-776), who reported a medical school acceptance rate of 49.3% of participants, compared to 41.6% of non-participants. This effort is further described below in the section on Development of a More Competitive Applicant Pool. RACE T-35 is a five-year NIH funded Research and Academic Enrichment program that provides up to 15 minority undergraduate students an opportunity to engage in biomedical research in cardiovascular, pulmonary, and hematology for three months during the summer. It is a strong recruitment vehicle, particularly for out-of-state students. Institutional Committees, Offices, Policies and Procedures Supporting Disadvantaged Students Diversity in Medical Education Committee: The original President's Alumni Advisory Committee on Minority Affairs was formed in 1975. In 2002, it became a standing committee of the SOM Alumni Association, and changed its name to the Diversity in Medical Education Committee, establishing permanence for the group and its mission. Today, the Diversity in Medical Education Committee is a standing committee of the School of Medicine Alumni Association, assisting UTMB in attaining its core value of diversity in the admission, matriculation, retention and graduation of medical students. Like UTMB, the Alumni Association believes that a diverse body of students should be educated to provide culturally competent health care to the diverse population of the State of Texas. The committee works with under-represented and disadvantaged students to assist them in overcoming any obstacles to their assimilation into the main stream of the student body and in achieving their goal of becoming trained, outstanding physicians. The scope of the committee's activities has broadened to include the recruitment and retention of residents, faculty, and upper-level administrators. Office of Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action Policies: UTMB's policies governing academic recruitment and selection of faculty and administrators assure that vacant and new positions are widely announced and specifically target women and minority candidates. In order to ensure equitable consideration
  20. 20. of these candidates, the director of the Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity sits on all search committees and is a member of the Core Committee for the Support of Under-represented Ethnic Groups. Admissions Procedures and Activities: The SOM Admissions Committee's policies and procedures strongly support the admission of minority and disadvantaged students. All applicants are carefully screened for an interview and subsequent admission, based on their potential for success in medical school. Their MCAT scores and undergraduate GPA are but two factors in this process. After the Supreme Court decision on the Grutter case in September 2004, the Board of Regents for the University of Texas System approved a new admissions policy which allows UTMB to consider race and ethnicity as one of several factors in the admissions process. This policy is posted on our website, in recruitment materials, brochures, and became effective with the 2006 entering class. In addition, the Dean of Medicine, Garland D. Anderson, MD, has articulated UTMB’s strong commitment to and advocacy for the admission and graduation of under- represented minority students. UTMB's Mission Statement and Strategic Plan: UTMB's mission statement includes the recruitment of students and faculty from under-represented groups. The UTMB Strategic Plan for 2001-2005 (under revision for 2007) states that, "UTMB School of Medicine will further develop, implement, and sustain recruitment and retention programs that encourage the acceptance, matriculation, and graduation of women and those from minority groups who are under-represented in medicine.” Core Committee for the Support of Minority Faculty and Administrators: This University committee was established in 1998 “to encourage activities which seek to improve relationships among all faculty and to identify issues pertinent to racial and ethnic minority faculty such as recruitment, retention and advancement, and administrative and professional employment opportunities.” The ultimate goal of this committee is to ensure fairness, equity, diversity and collegiality at UTMB. The committee membership includes faculty representatives from each of the University’s four schools. Its main role is to be consultative in nature to the University leadership. Diversity Committee on Minority Education: Established in 2003, this initiative seeks to strengthen the University’s awareness of diversity through proactive activities. Its main purpose is to further enhance current efforts to increase diversity, especially in medical education. It celebrates diversity in July of each year through a week long series of activities, featuring lectures, guest speakers, health fairs, and an essay contest on “Cultural Competence and Diversity.” In 2003, UTMB established the Diversity in Health Care Scholarship honoring William C. Levin, UTMB President Emeritus. A person who represents a commitment to diversity in some way gives the William C. Levin Lecture each year during Diversity Week, and a scholarship in that person’s name is given in the fall. Jordan Cohen, MD, was the lecturer in 2003; Louis B. Sullivan, MD, in 2004; Vivian Pinn, MD, in 2005, and Albert Hawkins in 2006. A student from any of UTMB's four schools is eligible for the scholarship; the selection is based on an original essay about the student’s commitment to diversity in the health care professions. Office of Educational Outreach: The Office of Educational Outreach (OEO) was established May 1, 1991, and recently was incorporated under the Office of Community Outreach in order to enhance its reach and resources. The OEO is dedicated to service and achieving excellence in the following areas: (1) Increasing the availability, interest, application, and relevance of science for students, K-12 educators, and the community through a wide variety of science education programs; (2) promoting career opportunities in the health sciences to students in the local school districts and private schools; and (3) assisting, enhancing, and supplementing existing recruitment efforts for under-represented minority students and faculty in order to promote a higher standard of education, patient care, and research. Financial Aid and Scholarships: Significant strides have been made in awarding scholarships to disadvantaged and under-represented minority students. With the establishment of the Herzog Foundation scholarship program at UTMB in 1994, the SOM now has more than $7,000,000 in endowments which provide scholarships for students from minority and disadvantaged backgrounds. Several other scholarship programs are available and new ones are added each year. In the 2004-2005 academic year, UTMB gave a total of 69 scholarship awards to under-represented minority students, which amounted to $389,100. Over the past three years, the total amount of scholarships for African Americans was $361,930; for Hispanics $595,960 and the
  21. 21. combined total was $963,890. This does not include exceptional need scholarships, or other awards given by UTMB. Two years ago, UTMB embarked upon a capital campaign that designated minority scholarships as a top priority. UTMB’s Experience in the Recruitment, Enrollment, Retention, and Graduation of Under-represented Minority Students. Recruitment. UTMB conducts aggressive recruitment conferences throughout the State of Texas and nationally through a series of well-planned activities. In 2002, a full-time recruiter for the SOM was hired who was specifically charged with the responsibility of increasing UTMB’s minority applicant pool. He coordinates all recruitment activities, such as campus visits, spring and fall meetings, development of recruitment materials, website updates, and the admissions process. Enrollment. Of the Texas medical Table XX. Total and minority enrollment in Texas medical schools schools, UTMB remains the leader in the in 2004. number of minority and under- Texas Schools Hispanic Black NA URM URM% TOTAL represented students currently enrolled. UTMB 123 58 3 184 23% 811 They make up 23% of the total UT Houston 117 33 3 153 19% 816 enrollment (Table XX). Despite stiffer Baylor 59 60 8 127 19% 672 competition from other State medical UT San Antonio 140 31 4 175 21% 818 schools and Hopwood, our URM UNT-TCOM 35 6 6 47 9% 501 enrollment has remained above the UT Dallas 96 54 4 154 18% 853 national mean. Texas A&M 30 11 2 43 15% 292 Texas Tech 48 11 2 61 12% 527 Retention. UTMB has with strong Abbreviation: URM, under-represented minority students. Source: Texas Medical Dental Schools Application Service & Baylor institutional support made significant College of Medicine strides during the past three years in the retention of under-represented minority students. For example, for students who entered in the 2000 academic year, under-represented minority students have lagged behind majority students in yearly promotion and four- year graduation rates, as shown in Table XX. Implementation of the Linear Academic Progression Program (LAPP) in 2002 has made a significant difference in the academic progression of our students. As shown in Table XX, 53 under-represented minority students entered UTMB in 2000. A total of 14 African Americans graduated after five years, for a 93% graduation rate, and 30 Hispanics graduated in five years, for an 83% graduation rate. One African American withdrew during the third year because of Step 1 board failure; four Hispanic students withdrew for academic reasons, one because of board failure, and one student withdrew because of health-related issues. For the majority students, this rate was 91%, with four students still enrolled in the MD/PhD program. The national 5-year graduation rate for all minority students has been estimated at approximately 82%, and for the non-under- represented minority matriculants, it is 92% (AAMC Minority Students in Medical Education: Facts and Figures XII, 2002). Thus, UTMB is above the national mean for graduating its disadvantaged students. Table XX. Information on progress and completion of students entering in 2000 as related to ethnicity. Promoted to Promoted to Promoted to Completed in Completed by Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 4th Year 5th Year Number Ethnicity (2000-2001) (2001-2002) (2002-2003) (2003-04) (2004-05) * entering Num- Num- Num- Num- Num- % % % % % ber ber ber ber ber African- American 15 13 86.7% 11 73.3% 10 66.7% 10 66.7% 14 93.3% Caucasian 107 97 90.7% 88 82.2% 86 80.4% 86 80.4% 97 90.7% Asian 33 31 93.9% 29 87.9% 28 84.8% 28 84.8% 30 90.9% Hispanic 36 31 86.1% 27 75.0% 27 75.0% 27 75.0% 30 83.3% Other 8 6 75.0% 5 62.5% 5 62.5% 5 62.5% 6 75.0% Native American 2 2 100% 2 100% 2 100% 2 100% 2 100% Total 201 180 88.7% 162 80.2% 158 78.2% 158 78.2% 179 88.9%
  22. 22. *Expected to complete by 5th Year Graduation of Under-Represented Minority Students. As noted, UTMB has made significant strides during the past twelve years in the acceptance and graduation of under-represented minority students, despite Hopwood and other efforts to roll back affirmative Table XX. Schools of Medicine with Current HCOE Grants action programs. Table XX depicts the 2004 Total URM Graduates current schools of medicine Hispanic Class Center of Excellence (HCOE) grantees School Hispanic Black NA URM URM% TOTAL with the 2004 total under-represented Puerto Rico 108 0 0 108 96 112 minority graduates by number, percent, UTMB 40 16 2 58 30 194 and ethnicity. Of the 194 UTMB Stanford 12 7 2 21 23 90 graduates last year, 58 (30%) were UT San 34 5 1 40 20 200 minorities. Of the 11 HCOE’s, UTMB Antonio ranked first in the continental US in the New Jersey 18 12 0 30 19 162 number of graduating Hispanic and Illinois 28 16 2 46 15 306 African American medical students. Arizona 13 0 1 14 14 103 San Diego 9 3 1 13 12 108 It is critically important to share our San Francisco 11 8 0 19 12 163 Texas Tech 10 1 0 11 10 112 Health Careers Opportunity Albert Einstein 10 3 0 13 8 165 Program (HCOP) progress with other Source: AAMC depicts total graduation regardless of year of institutions, undergraduate schools, and matriculation the public, not only to communicate the barriers, but also the promises and gains of our minority and disadvantage recruitment and graduation. UTMB HCOP outcomes are submitted to national and state conferences on an annual basis, and through the AAMC, National Association of Minority Medical Educators, and the National Hispanic Medical Association. Hispanic Center of Excellence. The University of Texas Medical Branch is one of 11 universities in the United States with a federally funded Hispanic Center of Excellence, funded initially in 1992. The Hispanic Center of Excellence at UTMB addresses five priorities: 1) student recruitment and academic quality, 2) student performance, 3) faculty and student research, 4) information issues related to Hispanic health, and 5) faculty recruitment, training, and retention. Dr. Jose A. Loera is Associate Director for the Center. The Hispanic Center of Excellence has an excellent record of achieving its objectives. For example, for the previous funding period one goal was to hire five new Hispanic faculty members. During this period the number of new Hispanic faculty members hired was 16. UTMB Education Resources (short version) Clinical Research Education Office (CREO). To further enhance clinical research education, UTMB established a Clinical Research Education Office under the Dean of Medicine. CREO operates in close association with the General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) and the Office of Educational Development (OED). Directed by Karl E. Anderson, MD, GCRC Associate Program Director, CREO activities are supported by a team of faculty research educators who develop new courses for our two core curricula and initiate other new research education activities for students, clinical trainees, and faculty. Additionally, review and advice on the functions and progress of the CREO are guided by an Advisory Committee, chaired by the Dean of Medicine, composed mostly of chairs or directors of major departments, centers or institutes. An NIH Clinical Research Curriculum Award (K-30), awarded in 1999, supports CREO activities. Core activities in clinical research education include a new curriculum through the Graduate Program in Preventive Medicine and Community Health intended primarily for MDs with an interest in advanced clinical research training, leading to the award of a M.S. or PhD in Clinical Investigation or Health Services Research Tracks. Additionally, CREO and the GCRC co-present “Clinical Research: Tools and Techniques," an annual course of approximately 40 weekly sessions offered for UTMB faculty, fellows, residents and students. This course includes modules on Regulations & Ethics of Clinical Research, and Epidemiological & Statistical Methods in Clinical Investigation. Other clinical research education activities include an annual seminar on Scientific Writing for Clinical Research, a monthly grants development workshop, and an e-mail based Clinical Research News service. The

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