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Parent to Parent Can parent liaisons increase parental
 

Parent to Parent Can parent liaisons increase parental

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  • NASBHC 2007 Conference, Washington D.C. June 28, 2007
  • NASBHC 2007 Conference, Washington D.C. June 28, 2007
  • NASBHC 2007 Conference, Washington D.C. June 28, 2007
  • NASBHC 2007 Conference, Washington D.C. June 28, 2007
  • NASBHC 2007 Conference, Washington D.C. June 28, 2007
  • NASBHC 2007 Conference, Washington D.C. June 28, 2007

Parent to Parent Can parent liaisons increase parental Parent to Parent Can parent liaisons increase parental Presentation Transcript

  • Parent to Parent Can parent liaisons increase parental awareness, involvement & use of School-Based & School-Linked Health Centers?
  • Presenters Department of Pediatrics School-Based & Community Health Program Stephanie Kendzierski, MSW, LLMSW Rachel Pearson, MSW, LMSW Stacey Ingram
    • Michigan State University
    • Office of Medical Education
    • Research & Development
      • Brian Mavis, PhD
  • Detroit, Michigan * Kids Count in Michigan, Data Book 2006 **US Census Bureau, 2005 American Community Survey Economic & Health Indicators for Children * Detroit Michigan Child Population (ages 0-17) 263,709 2,513,714 Percent of total population 29.7& 24.8% Children under 18 living in poverty 45% 19% Students receiving free/reduced lunch 71.3% 37.1% State health insurance participation (ages 0-18) Healthy Kids (Medicaid) 55.3% 32.1% MI Child (SCHIP) 0.8% 1.3% Children ages 1-14 hospitalized for asthma 71.1 24.5 Birth to teens ages 15-19 (per 100,000) 71 34.4
  • HFHS School-Based & Community Health Program
    • Established in Detroit, Michigan in 1994 as the School-Based Health Initiative
    • Initial support from the W. K. Kellogg Foundation in partnership with the Detroit Public Schools
    • Current funding:
      •  Local, state & private sources  Henry Ford Health System
    • SBCHP provides services to medically underserved school-age children & their younger siblings and young adults
    • Services offered:
      •  Primary Care  Prevention  Family Planning
      •  Mental Health  Health Education  Medicaid Outreach
  • HFHS School-Based & Community Health Program
    • Full & part-time centers
    • Currently 8 programs l ocated in elementary schools, middle schools, a high school and a community youth center
    • Staffing varies by center:
      • nurse practitioner, physician’s assistant or registered nurse
      • medical assistant
      • social worker
      • pediatrician
  • Funding Requirement
    • Health Center Advisory Boards
      • Required for Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) funded SBHCs
      • Board composition
        • Parents (minimum of 33.3% of the board)
        • School staff
        • Community members
        • SBHC staff (maximum of 50% of the board)
    • 5 SBCHP programs are funded by MDCH
  • Problem
    • Encouraging parent participation is challenging
      • Many things compete for parents’ time
      • Schools struggle to maintain their parent organizations
      • Health Center Advisory Board concept is not widely understood
    • SBCHP staff have many duties to fulfill
      • Establishing advisory boards takes time
    • SBCHP has struggled to create & maintain advisory boards
  • Problem Solving
    • Do we need someone with dedicated time to establish an advisory board?
    • Who would be in the best
    • position to recruit parents &
    • community members?
    • What type of work would they do?
  • Possible Solution
    • Parent Liaisons
      • Connected to the school &
      • community
      • Familiar with the issues faced by
      • parents
      • Aware of what would motivate parents to participate
    • Funding
      • Proposal submitted to Families and Communities Together (FACT) at Michigan State University
  • Project Goals
    • Increase the clinics’ community & school outreach efforts
    • Establish active adult & youth advisory boards
    • Encourage parental involvement in the clinic
    • Increase the number of signed parent consent forms
    • Increase use of the clinics’ services by students and their siblings
  • Pilot Clinics
    • Webber Health Center
      • Provides medical & dental services
      • Located in Webber School
        • Pre-K – 8 th grade public school
    • YouthVille Health Center
      • Provides medical & mental health services
      • Located in YouthVille Detroit
        • Youth center operated by the Detroit Youth Foundation
      • Linked to University Preparatory Academy
        • Pre-K – 12 th grade charter school system
  • Project Staffing
    • Project Coordinator
      • Responsible for overseeing the project and supervising the parent liaisons
      • Worked 24 hours per week
    • Two parent liaisons (one at each clinic)
      • Responsible for clinic outreach & advisory board development
      • Worked 20 hours per week
  • Staff Recruitment
    • Project Coordinator
      • Professional position
      • Posted on HFHS careers web site
      • Posted at the local school of social work
    • Parent Liaison
      • Para-professional position
      • Principals recommended suitable parents from each school
  • Project Timeline Planned Actual
    • Spring : Hire Project Coordinator
    • Spring : Began interviewing for Project Coordinator
    • Summer : Project Coordinator develops the parent liaison training program
    • Summer : Continued interviewing Project Coordinators, interviewed Parent Liaisons
    • Sept .: Hire Parent Liaisons & implement training program
    • Sept .: Project Coordinator & Parent Liaisons started work
      • Webber liaison resigned
    • Oct .: Begin outreach & advisory board development
    • Oct .: Webber Parent Liaison Replaced. Ad Hoc training “program” implemented.
  • Parent Liaison Perspective
  • Understanding of School-Based/Link Program
    • Read all materials received about school-based/linked
    • Asked questions regarding school-based/linked
    • Visited the other HFHS school-based/linked health centers
    • Attended staff meetings
    • Worked closely with health center staff / F.A.C.T. Team
  • Gain Knowledge About Parent Liaison Role
    • Board development training & research
    • Parent & youth engagement training
    • After-school program training
  • Developing Advisory Board
    • Brainstormed about possible members
    • Created/distributed flyers
    • Attended parenting/school events
    • Solicited T.E.E.N., YouthVille, University Preparatory Academy parents
    • Asked YouthVille & University Preparatory Academy students
    • Invited community members
  • Increase Consent Forms
    • Visited school and spoke directly to students
    • Offered incentive to students / staff
    • Prepared packets to be distributed to parents
    • Created frequently asked question list
  • Raise Awareness & Use of Health Center
    • Informed school staff of health center services
    • Distributed flyers about health center
    • Presentations within the community
    • Utilized advisory board as community outreach
    • Attended community events
  • Expectations
    • Clearer Roles
    • Structure & organization
    • Understand school-based health centers
    • Gain knowledge about parent liaison role
  • Outcomes
    • 22 member advisory board
    • Increased use of health center from within the community
    • University Preparatory Academy consent form count went from 47 to approximately 200
    • Greater knowledge of school-based and it’s mission
    • Attained knowledge of engaging parents & youth and creating an advisory board
    • Health Fair
  • Successes
    • Training classes
    • Building relationships with students, teachers and administrators
    • Committed parents on the Advisory Board
    • Chairperson of the Advisory Board
  • Challenges
    • Hours
    • Program start date
    • Time management
    • Getting the students to give their parents flyers for upcoming events
    • Getting more parents/guardians involved in the school and its activities
    • Sharing efforts
  • Reflecting…
    • Better management of projects or events
    • Numerous contacts
    • Early recruitment for advisory boards
    • 40 hour work load
    • Incentive / expectations
    • Following up & following through
    • Early training
  • Notes from the Field
    • Comments from advisory board members
    • video production by Patrick Betzold
  • Evaluation of the Pilot Program
    • Outcomes
      • Consent forms
      • Services provided
      • Advisory board meetings
    • Process
      • Interviews
      • Activity logs
  • School-Based Health Centers: Completed Consent Forms 2005 -2006 2006 - 2007
  • School-Based Health Centers: Number of Clients by Quarter 2005 2006 2007
  • School-Based Health Centers: Number of Client Visits by Quarter 2005 2006 2007
  • School-Based Health Centers: Services Provided by Quarter 2005 2006 2007
  • Advisory Board Meetings
          • Youth Adult
    • Project Coordinator 4% 8%
    • Parent Liaison (Site A) 14% 14%
    • Parent Liaison (Site B) 1% 21%
    • Advisory boards were created at both sites
    • Each has met at least once in past year
  • Time and Activity Study
  • Activity Categories: Project Coordinator
    • Training
      • Identifying training needs
      • Researching training options
      • Enrolling liaisons in trainings
      • Attending trainings
    • School & Community Outreach
      • Assist with outreach plans
      • Help prepare for activities
      • Attend school events/outreach
      • Assist recruiting adv boards
    • Health Center Advisory Board
      • Assist in meeting preparation
      • Attend SBHC advisory brd meetings
      • Assist in summarizing notes
    • Youth Advisory Board Meetings
      • Assist with meeting prep
      • Attend youth adv board meetings
      • Assist summarizing meeting notes
    • Incentives
      • Identifying contributors
      • Contacting contributors
      • Picking-up incentives
    • Staff Meetings/Supervision
      • Supervision meetings
      • Meet with Project Director
      • Meet with health center/other staff
    • Medicaid
      • Assist Medicaid outreach activities
      • Report Medicaid outreach activities
    • Other
      • Lunch
      • Travel
      • Other paperwork
  • Activity Categories: Parent Liaisons
    • Training
      • SBCHP meetings
      • Youth/parent engagement
      • Advisory board development
    • School Outreach
      • Meeting preparations
      • Meetings with parents, staff
      • Attend school events
      • Recruit parents, students, staff
    • Community Outreach
      • Meeting preparations
      • Meet: parents, community, youth
      • Recruit parents, community, youth
    • Incentives
      • Identifying contributors
      • Contacting contributors
      • Picking-up incentives
    • Advisory Board Meetings
      • Preparing for meetings
      • Conducting meetings
      • Summarizing meetings
    • Consent Forms
      • Distributing consent forms
      • Speaking with parents
      • Follow-up on incomplete forms
    • Staff Meetings/Supervision
      • Meetings with Project Coordinator
      • Meetings with Project Director
      • Meetings with other staff
    • Other
      • Lunch
      • Invoices
      • Travel
      • Other paperwork
  • Time and Activity Study: The Data
    • November 2006 through May 2007
      • Only some activities from Sept-Oct
    • 4139 records
      • 1455 records from Project Coordinator logs
      • 1207 records from Parent Liaison at Site A
      • 1477 records from Parent Liaison at Site B
  • Project Coordinator Activities
  • Project Coordinator by Month Parent Liaison Training Activities Staff Meetings and Supervision
  • Project Coordinator by Month School Outreach Community Outreach
  • Project Coordinator by Month Other Activities Youth and Parent Advisory Board Recruitment
  • Parent Liaison Activities Site A Site B
  • Parent Liaison Activities
  • Monthly Parent Liaison Activities: Consent Forms
  • Monthly Parent Liaison Activities Student Advisory Board Health Center Advisory Board
  • Monthly Parent Liaison Activities Community Outreach School Outreach
  • Monthly Parent Liaison Activities: School Outreach
  • Staff Interviews
    • Telephone interview (10-30 minutes)
    • 11 of 12 planned interview completed
      • Parent liaisons
      • Supervising social worker
      • Health center personnel
      • SBCHP administrative staff
  • Lessons Learned: Staff Interviews
    • Importance of training in multiple skill areas
    • Basic skills and experience necessary
    • Clear expectations of supervisor
    • Need for a clear message about programs
    • Boundary issues need to be resolved
  • Put the Cart AFTER the Horse
    • Know what you have, need, and want before you get started
    • Know what you are willing to do to make the program a success.
      • How much time can you devote to:
            • Finding the right candidate?
            • Orientation?
            • Supervision?
            • Helping make connections with the school?
  • Supervision Suggestions
    • The provider should plan to meet with the PL for 30 minutes at least twice a week
    • The PL should give the provider a daily update (written or verbal)
      • Keeps provider aware of the direction of the project and keeps PL accountable
    • Provider should be readily available for questions and giving direction
  • Front-End Heavy Lifting
      • Give Parent Liaison a knowledge base regarding SBHCs in general and your site in particular
        • Make sure the PL has a clear message to share with the community
        • Be clear about how your clinic should be represented
      • Spend time with the Parent Liaison providing introductions to school staff and administration
        • The PL needs to be comfortable and feel empowered to have meetings without clinic staff
      • Provide training on relevant topics
  • What Every PL Should Know
    • Board Development
      • Recruiting and retaining board members
      • Leading a meeting/meeting styles
      • Creating by-laws
      • Setting and keeping an agenda
      • Recording and distributing minutes
      • Decision making options
      • Electing officers
      • Attend a board meeting from another
      • organization
  • What Every PL Should Know
    • Professional Development
      • Dressing professionally
      • E-mail & phone etiquette
      • Effective communication
      • Engagement skills
  • What staffing is really needed?
    • If the provider or other clinic staff can dedicate time to supervise the PL, project coordinator not needed
    • Choosing the right Parent Liaison is key
  • Necessary Qualifications
    • Experience
      • Some college or 2 years professional work experience
      • Interest in or experience with child & adolescent health care
      • Experience in community outreach or project management preferred
      • Prior experience with serving on a board/committee preferred
  • Necessary Qualifications
    • Skills
      • Ability to work with minimal supervision
      • Basic computer knowledge
        • E-mail, Microsoft Word and Excel
      • Excellent communication skills
        • Written, verbal and interpersonal
      • Excellent organizational skills
        • Able to prioritize, multi-task and meet deadlines
      • Works well independently and collaboratively
      • Easily adapts to change
      • Creative & innovative perspective
      • Exceptional time management skills
  • Things to Keep in Mind…
    • If you are serving in a impoverished area, your parents will likely have additional life stressors that will affect their work
      • Car troubles, child care issues, sick children
    • You will have to be flexible but mindful of the project timeline and goals
    • The amount of time it takes to learn and apply new skills and knowledge varies by person
  • Unanswered Questions…
    • Can the PL position serve as a welfare to work model?
    • Would a stronger project coordinator with a different skill set have made a difference?
    • Why were the results at each site different?
      • School vs. community?
      • Skill set of parent liaison?
      • Other factors?
  • Keys to Success
    • Success will depend on both the provider and the PL.
      • You have to find the right balance. The PL can’t be working in a vacuum, but the provider can’t be expected to micro-manage
      • The line of communication between the provider and the PL must always be open and clear
      • Boundaries about roles and responsibilities have to be very clear
  • Questions, Discussion . . .