PAEP Student Handbook
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

PAEP Student Handbook

on

  • 1,135 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,135
Views on SlideShare
1,135
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

PAEP Student Handbook PAEP Student Handbook Document Transcript

  • Physician Assistant Education Program    STUDENT HANDBOOK     2009‐2010                                                            
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS    PROGRAM DIRECTORY ........................................................................................................................................    1 2009/2010 HOLIDAYS ..........................................................................................................................................    1 UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA .................................................................................................................................    1 MISSION.......................................................................................................................................................................    1 INNOVATION .................................................................................................................................................................    2 CHARTER ......................................................................................................................................................................    2 PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT PROFESSION ....................................................................................................................    2 DEFINITION ...................................................................................................................................................................    2 HISTORY .......................................................................................................................................................................    2 LICENSING AND REGULATION ............................................................................................................................................    3 SCOPE OF PRACTICE ........................................................................................................................................................    3 COMPETENCIES ..............................................................................................................................................................    4 CERTIFICATION AND CONTINUING EDUCATION .....................................................................................................................    4 PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT EDUCATION PROGRAM (PAEP) .........................................................................................    4 MISSION STATEMENT ......................................................................................................................................................    4 PURPOSE ......................................................................................................................................................................    5 GOALS .........................................................................................................................................................................    5 PRINCIPLES OF THE PA PROFESSION ....................................................................................................................    5 PROGRAM STRUCTURE .......................................................................................................................................    6 DIRECTORY ...................................................................................................................................................................    6 GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE ...............................................................................................................................................    6 COMMITTEES ................................................................................................................................................................    6 2009/2010 CALENDAR .........................................................................................................................................    8 YEAR 1 LEARNERS ......................................................................................................................................................    8 YEAR 2 LEARNERS ......................................................................................................................................................    9 CURRICULUM .................................................................................................................................................... 10  YEAR 1 LEARNERS ....................................................................................................................................................  0  1 YEAR 2 LEARNERS ....................................................................................................................................................  1  1 EVALUATION..................................................................................................................................................... 12  ACADEMIC STANDARDS .................................................................................................................................................  2  1 YEAR 1 .......................................................................................................................................................................  3  1 YEAR 2 .......................................................................................................................................................................  3  1 ATTENDANCE .................................................................................................................................................... 14  YEAR 1 .......................................................................................................................................................................  4  1 The Physician Assistant Education Program gratefully acknowledges the assistance of the School of Medical Rehabilitation for allowing us to  adapt portions of their student handbook for our own.  
  • YEAR 2 .......................................................................................................................................................................  5  1 ACADEMIC INTEGRITY ....................................................................................................................................... 15  POLICIES ........................................................................................................................................................... 15  STUDENT SERVICES AND RESOURCES ................................................................................................................ 16  SAFETY AND SECURITY ...................................................................................................................................................  6  1 WHEN THE FIRE ALARM SOUNDS ............................................................................................................................  7  1 STUDENT IDENTIFICATION ..............................................................................................................................................  8  1 STUDENT ID / ACCESS CARDS .........................................................................................................................................  8 1 CARD ACCESS PROTOCOL FOR STUDENTS ..........................................................................................................................  8  1 FINANCIAL AID & AWARDS ............................................................................................................................... 19  LIBRARY AND COMPUTER LABS ......................................................................................................................... 19  NEIL JOHN MACLEAN HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY ...............................................................................................................  9  1 BOOKSTORE ...................................................................................................................................................... 20  PARKING ........................................................................................................................................................... 20  COUNSELLING SERVICES .................................................................................................................................... 21  OFFICE OF STUDENT AFFAIRS ..........................................................................................................................................  1  2 HEALTH SERVICES ............................................................................................................................................. 22  DENTAL SERVICES ............................................................................................................................................. 23  MAILBOXES & LOCKERS  .................................................................................................................................... 23  .                                   The Physician Assistant Education Program gratefully acknowledges the assistance of the School of Medical Rehabilitation for allowing us to  adapt portions of their student handbook for our own.  
  • Program Directory     Office Fax:  272‐3068                  PHONE    Rm#  EMAIL  Ms Sarah Clarke, Program Director  272‐3094  P121  clarkes@cc.umanitoba.ca  Dr. Neil Berrington, Medical Director  272‐3112  P121  berringt@cc.umanitoba.ca   Dr. Ming‐Ka Chan, Clinical Coordinator  977‐5683  P123  mkchan@exchange.hsc.mb.ca  Mr. Ian Jones, PA Faculty    272‐3134  P127  jonesi@cc.umanitob.ca  Ms Claire Chandler, PA Faculty    272‐3133  P127  chandle0@cc.umanitoba.ca  Ms Sandra Toback, Program Coord.  272‐3065  P121  toback@cc.umanitoba.ca  Ms Jacki Armstrong, Office Assistant  272‐3094  P121  armstro4@cc.umanitoba.ca    Note: P=Pathology Building, Bannatyne Campus (see Appendix F for Map)      2009/2010 Holidays   The following statutory and other holidays will be observed by the University in 2009/2010:    Holiday Day     Holiday Falls      Holiday To Be Observed  Labour Day    Monday, Sept 7, 2009    Monday, Sept 7, 2009  Thanksgiving Day  Monday, Oct 12, 2009    Monday, Oct 12, 2009  Remembrance Day  Wednesday, Nov 11, 2009  Wednesday Nov 11, 2009  Louis Riel Day    Monday, Feb 15, 2010    Monday, Feb 15, 2010  Good Friday    Friday, April 2, 2010    Friday, April 10, 2010  Victoria Day    Monday, May 24, 2010    Monday, May 24, 2010   Canada Day    Thursday, July 1, 2010    Thursday, July 1, 2010  Civic Holiday    Monday, August 2, 2010  Monday, August 2, 2010    Winter Holiday Break:  December 24, 2009 – January 4, 2010   The University re‐opens on Tuesday January 5, 2010  Spring Break:  February 15 – 19, 2010    University of Manitoba  Located  in  the  city  of  Winnipeg,  the  University  of  Manitoba  is  the  province's  premier  post‐secondary  educational institution and its only research‐intensive university. Since the University of Manitoba was  first established in 1877, our scientists, scholars and students have been making a difference ‐ right here  at home and around the world.  Mission   To  create,  preserve  and  communicate  knowledge,  and  thereby  contribute  to  the  cultural,  social  and  economic well‐being of the people of Manitoba, Canada and the world.  1   
  • Innovation  The  University  of  Manitoba  maintains  a  reputation  as  an  innovative  leader  in  health  care  education,  delivery, and inter‐professional collaboration. Manitoba is currently the only Canadian jurisdiction with  legislation  for  Physician  Assistant  registration  and  practice  and  is  home  of  the  first  graduate‐level  Physician Assistant Educational Program in Canada.   Charter  It is a fundamental standard of the University of Manitoba community to provide all its members with  the opportunity for inquiry and the freedom to discuss and express views openly and freely without fear  of retaliation, or abuse of person or property. These attributes are the foundation of good citizenship.  To this end, students, staff, and faculty have an obligation to act in a fair and reasonable manner toward  one another and the environment and physical property of the University.     By this charter, choosing to join the community at the University of Manitoba obligates each member:    To practice personal and academic integrity;  To respect the dignity and individuality of all persons;  To respect the rights and property of others;  To take responsibility for one’s own personal and academic commitments;  To contribute to our community for fair, cooperative and honest inquiry and learning;  To respect and strive to learn from differences in people ideas and opinions;  To  refrain  from  and  discourage  behaviors  which  threaten  the  freedom  and  respect  every  individual  deserves    Physician Assistant Profession  Definition  Physician  Assistants  (PAs)  are  healthcare  professionals  trained  in  the  medical  model  who  practice  medicine under the supervision of licensed physicians within a patient‐centered healthcare team. Under  physician  supervision,  PAs  take  medical  histories  and  perform  physical  exams,  order  and  interpret  laboratory  and  diagnostic  tests,  perform  selected  diagnostic  and  therapeutic  procedures,  prescribe  medications, and provide patient education and counseling.  Although educated as generalists, PAs are  considered “polyvalent” clinicians who receive additional education, training, and experience on the job  and may work in primary care or subspecialty areas in a wide variety of practice settings.   History  The  PA  profession  originated  in  the  United  States  in  the  1960s  in  response  to  a  national  shortage  of  primary  care  physicians.  Dr.  Eugene  Stead  at  Duke  University  created  a  program  for  former  Navy  corpsmen to receive additional medical training and enter the civilian workforce. Shortly thereafter, Dr.  2   
  • Dick  Smith  created  a  fast‐track  medical  training  program  based  at  the  University  of  Washington  and  designed  to  provide  primary  healthcare  clinicians  for  the  Pacific  Northwest.  At  present,  there  are  approximately 70,000 PAs practicing in the U.S. and 143 accredited educational programs.     Mid‐level clinicians have been employed by the Canadian Forces for over 50 years. In 1984 the first class  of  “physician  assistants”  graduated  from  the  Canadian  Forces  Medical  Services  School  in  Borden,  Ontario. They are generally acknowledged as the first formally trained PAs in Canada.     In  October  1999,  the  Canadian  Academy  of  Physician  Assistants  (now  the  Canadian  Association  of  Physician  Assistants,  or  CAPA)  was  formed.  That  same  year,  Manitoba  enacted  legislation  allowing  persons  trained  as  PAs  in  either  the  Canadian  Forces  or  accredited  U.S.  programs  to  practice  in  the  province  as  Clinical  Assistants,  certified;  changes  to  the  Medical  Act  are  pending  to  redesignate  these  clinicians  as  “Physician  Assistants”.  Manitoba  is  at  present  the  only  province  with  legislation  for  PA  registration  and  practice,  though  PAs  work  in  Ontario  under  a  different  practice  model  and  other  Canadian jurisdictions are exploring models for incorporating PAs into their workforces.     In addition, health care planners and administrators in Europe, India, Africa and Australia have utilized  similar models or are starting to explore this health care field.   Licensing and Regulation   The regulation and licensing of PAs is a provincial responsibility.      In Manitoba, Physician Assistants are currently registered pursuant to the Clinical Assistant Regulation  of The Medical Act.     All PAs licensed by the College of Physician and Surgeons of Manitoba (CPSM) must enter into a contract  of supervision with a licensed physician(s), and must also submit a list of alternate supervising physicians  for approval.    Further information may be found on the CPSM website at www.cpsm.mb.ca  Scope of Practice   PAs are effectively extensions of their supervising physicians. Therefore, they may not provide services  that  are  outside  of  the  supervising  physician's  own  scope  of  practice.  Within  these  parameters,  an  individual  PA’s  scope  of  practice  will  be  further  dictated  by  local  regulations,  by  the  PA’s  level  of  education  and  experience,  and  by  the  unique  supervisory  relationship  between  supervising  physician  and PA.     PAs are expected to remain constantly aware of their scope of practice and knowledge limitations, and  to  consult  with  the  supervising  physician  whenever  necessary.  PAs  are  expected  to  clearly  identify  themselves to patients as functioning under physician supervision.  3   
  • Competencies  The  Canadian  Association  of  Physician  Assistants  (CAPA)  has  created  a  national  Occupational  Competency  Profile  for  the  PA  profession.  This  document  details  the  key  and  enabling  competencies  expected of an entry‐level PA in Canada. These competencies, and the document that details them, are  adapted from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada’s CanMEDS framework. Canadian  PA  education  programs  are  accredited  by  the  Conjoint  Accreditation  Service  of  the  Canadian  Medical  Association  (CMA)  based  in  part  on  their  assessment  of  the  education  program’s  ability  to  instill  the  competencies outlined in the OCP.   Certification and Continuing Education  In Canada, the national Physician Assistant Certification Examination is administered and maintained by  the Physician Assistant Certification Council (PACC). This entry to practice examination is written upon  successful completion of a CMA or ARC‐PA accredited PA program; the certification entrance to practice  exam is administered independently of any training program to ensure that PAs meet the standard set  out  in  the  Occupational  Competency  Profile  (OCP)  for  the  Physician  Assistant  profession.  This  Occupational  Competency  Profile  is  currently  under  revision  by  CAPA;  it  will  be  distributed  as  an  Appendix to this Handbook once finalized.      In addition, the Council is developing CPE requirements that all Canadian PAs will be required to fulfill to  maintain ongoing certification. This national certification process establishes a common standard of care  across Canada and fosters an ongoing professional learning process for all PAs.     The decision to require national certification in order to work as a PA in any given jurisdiction remains at  present at the discretion of that jurisdiction.      Physician Assistant Education Program (PAEP)    The  University  of  Manitoba’s  Physician  Assistant  Education  Program  (PAEP)  is  Canada’s  first  graduate‐ level  program  for  PA  education  offered  by  a  University.  Upon  completion  of  all  components  of  the  comprehensive  two  year  program,  graduates  receive  a  Master  of  Physician  Assistant  Studies  degree  from the Faculty of Graduate Studies.  Mission Statement  The  University  of  Manitoba  Physician  Assistant  Education  Program  aims  to  educate  outstanding  physician assistant clinicians, to advance the academic field of the profession, and to foster PA leaders  who  will  serve  their  communities  and  advance  the  physician  assistant  profession  in  Manitoba  and  Canada.  4   
  • Purpose  The PAEP focuses on preparing competent professionals who will extend the delivery of quality health  care  services  to  the  citizens  of  Manitoba  and  Canada.  The  program  integrates  graduate‐level  critical  thinking and analysis, problem solving, scientific inquiry, and self directed learning with the effective use  of  technology.  This  approach  prepares  graduates  for  the  demands  of  modern  practice  in  a  rapidly  changing  health  care  environment.  A  team  approach  to  health  care  is  emphasized  not  only  in  clinical  practice but also in research, leadership, education, and continued professional development.     Housed within the Faculty of Graduate Studies and administered through the Faculty of Medicine, the  PAEP incorporates the concepts of student centred learning, adult learning principles, and professional  education with the clinical competencies necessary for effective physician assistant practice.   Goals  The primary goal of the PAEP is to ensure that graduates meet the competencies outlined in the national  Occupational Competency Profile (OCP) developed by the Canadian Association of Physician Assistants  (CAPA).  In  keeping  with  this  goal,  the  pedagogical  and  ideological  foundations  of  the  PAEP  are  the  CanMEDS competencies, on which the national OCP is based, and the Four Principles of Family Medicine  developed by the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC). The overlap in these two frameworks  can be expressed as follows:       Principles of the PA Profession    The physician assistant is an effective clinician (Core Competencies: Medical Expert).    Physician  assistant  practice  is  based  in  all  health  care  settings  (Core  Competencies:  Collaborator,  Manager).    The  physician  assistant  is  a  resource  to  a  defined  practice  population  (Core  Competencies:  Health  Advocate, Scholar, Professional).    The  physician  assistant‐physician‐patient  relationship  is  central  to  the  role  of  the  physician  assistant  (Core Competencies: Communicator, Collaborator).   In addition to ensuring graduates attain the national competencies, program‐specific goals include the  following:   • Educate  PA  health  professionals  who  possess  diverse  and  comprehensive  competencies  and  function effectively as members of the health care team in all clinical settings  • Promote an understanding of the principles of scientific inquiry and research design  • Develop the ability to utilize principles of education to benefit patients, their families, and the  community  5   
  • • Instill an awareness of and sensitivity to cultural and individual differences  • Encourage professional involvement and community service  • Foster a commitment to continuous personal and professional growth      Program Structure  Directory   Office Fax:  272‐3068                  PHONE    Rm#  EMAIL  Ms Sarah Clarke, Program Director  272‐3094  P121  clarkes@cc.umanitoba.ca  Dr. Neil Berrington, Medical Director  272‐3112  P121  nberrington@exchange.hsc.mb.ca  Dr. Ming‐Ka Chan, Clinical Coordinator  977‐5683  P123  mkchan@exchange.hsc.mb.ca  Mr. Ian Jones, PA Faculty    272‐3134  P127  jonesi@cc.umanitob.ca  Ms Claire Chandler, PA Faculty    272‐3133  P127  chandle0@cc.umanitoba.ca  Ms Sandra Toback, Program Coord.  272‐3065  P121  toback@cc.umanitoba.ca  Ms Jacki Armstrong, Office Assistant  272‐3094  P121  armstro4@cc.umanitoba.ca  Note: P=Pathology Building, Bannatyne Campus (see Appendix F for Map)  Governance Structure    See Appendix A    Committees    See Appendix B for full Terms of Reference for all committees    Physician Assistant Program Committee (PAPC)  The  PAEP  Program  Committee  (PAPC)  is  to  oversee  the  further  developments,  implementation,  maintenance and all future educational and programmatic activities of the Physician Assistant Education  Program (PAEP). As well, it will be the delegated reporting body for the responsible functioning of the  Faculty of Medicine’s PA training functions in relationship to the Canadian Forces.  Curriculum Committee  The PAEP Curriculum Committee is to oversee the development, implementation, and evaluation of the  curriculum of the Physician Assistant Education Program (PAEP).   6   
  •   Progress Committee  The Progress Committee of the Physician Assistant Education Program (PAEP) is the standing committee  pertaining  to  the  application  of  policies  and  procedures  regarding  PAEP  learner  academic  progression  and remediation.  As the delegated reporting body for all PAEP progression, evaluation, and remediation  issues, the Progress Committee shall report to the Physician Assistant Program Committee (PAPC) on a  regular basis.   Awards Committee  The Awards Committee is a standing committee of the Physician Assistant Education Program (PAEP). Its  duties  are  to  review  and  make  recommendations  concerning  the  terms  of  awards,  scholarships,  bursaries, medals and prizes offered to students through the PAEP and to recommend for approval by  the PA Program Committee recipients of all awards, scholarships, bursaries, medals and prizes offered  to students through the PAEP.  Admissions Committee  The  Physician  Assistant  Education  Program  (PAEP)  Admissions  Committee  oversees  all  aspects  of  student  selection  and  recommends  admission  of  appropriate  candidates  to  the  Physician  Assistant  Education Program (PAEP). The PAEP Admissions Committee will make its recommendations to the PA  Program  Committee,  who  in  turn  will  then  notify  the  Faculty  of  Graduate  Studies  (FGS)  of  its  recommendations.   Appeals Committee  This committee is under development.                                    7   
  •   2009/2010 CALENDAR    The PAEP is a 26 month program consisting of one year of basic and clinical science courses followed by  48  weeks  of  clinical  rotations.  Year  One  is  broken  down  into  3,  13‐week  semesters;  an  exam  period  follows each semester.  Year Two follows the PGME calendar; rotations are broken into 4 week blocks  and are completed at a variety of clinical teaching units in Winnipeg and throughout the province.    YEAR 1 LEARNERS  ORIENTATION  Wed Sep 2 – Fri Sep 4  SEMESTER I  Tues Sep 8 – Tues Dec 8, 2009  EXAM WEEK: Wed Dec 9 – Wed Dec 23*  Statutory Holidays:  Mon Sep 7 (Labour Day)  Mon Oct 12 (Thanksgiving Day)  Wed Nov 11 (Remembrance Day)  Holiday Break:  University closure from Thur Dec 24, 2009 – Mon Jan 4, 2010 inclusive  ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐    SEMESTER II  Tues Jan 5 – Fri Apr 9, 2010  EXAM WEEK:  Mon Apr 12 – Fri Apr 23*  Spring Break:  Mon Feb 15 – Fri Feb 19  Statutory Holidays:  Mon Feb 15  Louis Riel Day  Fri Apr 2  Good Friday  ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  SEMESTER III  Mon Apr 26 – Fri July 23, 2010  EXAM WEEK:  Mon Jul 26 – Fri July 30  Statutory Holidays:  Mon May 24  Victoria Day  Thur July 1  Canada Day    * Possibly earlier depending on Pharmacology, Anatomy, exams    Year One Comprehensive Didactic Exam (CDE) Saturday July 31, 2010  This  examination  is  three  hours  and  consists  of  180  multiple  choice  questions,  covering  all  of  the  material of year I. The major emphasis of the examination is on what is regarded as clinically relevant  material.  Questions  are  centered  predominantly  on  the  major  clinical  disciplines  of  Internal  Medicine,  Surgery, Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Psychiatry, Emergency Medicine, Critical Care Medicine  8   
  • and Infectious Disease. Basic sciences material deemed to be highly relevant in a clinical setting may also  be  asked.  (Examples  –  pharmacology  of  important  therapeutic  agents,  anatomy  of  certain  peripheral  nerve entrapments, physiology of cardiac failure, biochemical basis of gout, etc.)    The goal of the examination is to assess learners’ knowledge of clinically relevant didactic material, prior  to entry into the clinical year. The examination also offers a formative function, in as much as it gives the  learner  a  foretaste  of  the  examination  experience  similar  to  what  they  could  expect  in  a  national  certification examination at the conclusion of their studies.  YEAR 2 LEARNERS    Period     Dates  1  Clinical Rotation  August 27 ‐ September 23, 2009  2  Clinical Rotation  September 24 ‐ October 21, 2009  3  Clinical Rotation  October 22 ‐ November 18, 2009  4  Clinical Rotation  November 19 ‐ December 16, 2009  5a  Vacation  December 17 – January 4, 2010  5b  PAEP Activities  January 5 – January 13, 2010  6  Clinical Rotation  January 14 ‐ February 10, 2010  7  Clinical Rotation  February 11 ‐ March 10, 2010  8  Clinical Rotation  March 11 ‐ April 7, 2010  9  Clinical Rotation  April 8 ‐ May 5, 2010  10a  Clinical Rotation  May 6 – May 19, 2010  10b  Vacation  May 20 – June 2, 2010  11  Clinical Rotation  June 3 – June 30, 2010  12  Clinical Rotation  July 1 – July 28, 2010  13  Clinical Rotation  July 29 – August 25, 2010  14  PAEP Activities  August 26 – 27, 2010  15  Vacation  August 28 – September 12, 2010  16  Exam Prep  September 13 – September 26, 2010  National  Certification  17  Exam  Exact Date TBA        Each clinical rotation begins on a Thursday and ends on a Wednesday.    See Appendix H for Year 2 Supplement        9   
  • CURRICULUM  YEAR 1 LEARNERS  Semester I      PHAC 2100  Pharmacology        3 credits of 6 total (runs through Semester 2)  PAEP 7000  Physiology and Pathophysiology for PAs I    3 credits    PAEP 7010  Human Anatomy for PAs        3 credits    PAEP 7030  Professional Studies for PAs         3 credits   PAEP 7042  Biochemistry for PAs          1 credit   PAEP 7044  Statistics, Research Design, Epidemiology for PAs  1 credit  PAEP 7046  Genetics for PAs          1 credit   PAEP 7052  Patient Assessment for PAs I        2 credits        Curriculum Integration          nil credit       Semester II    PHAC 2100  Pharmacology        3 credits of 6 total (continued from Semester 1)  PAEP 7002  Physiology and Pathophysiology for PAs II    3 credits    PAEP 7054  Patient Assessment for PAs II        2 credits    PAEP 7090  Principles of Psychiatry for PAs         3 credits    PAEP 7068  Adult Medicine for PAs I          6 credits    PAEP 7110  Emergency / Critical Care        3 credits        Curriculum Integration          nil credit    Semester III    PAEP 7082  Diagnostic Imaging for PAs        1 credit   PAEP 7056  Patient Assessment for PAs III        2 credits    PAEP 7084  Microbiology for PAs          1 credit   PAEP 7100  Principles of Surgery for PAs        3 credits    PAEP 7070  Adult Medicine for PAs II        6 credits    PAEP 7048  Pediatrics for PAs           3 credits    PAEP 7050  Obstetrics & Gynecology for PAs      3 credits          PAEP 7150  Comprehensive Year One Exam, July 31, 2010    nil credit      Curriculum Integration          nil credit        10   
  • YEAR 2 LEARNERS     PAEP 7202  Family Medicine for Physician Assistants      8 weeks  6 credits  PAEP 7210  Clinical Internal Medicine for Physician Assistants   4 weeks  3 credits  PAEP 7220   Clinical Surgery for Physician Assistants       4 weeks  3 credits  PAEP 7230  Orthopedic & Sports Medicine for Physician Assistants   4 weeks  3 credits  PAEP 7240  Clinical Pediatrics for Physician Assistants     4 weeks  3 credits  PAEP 7250  Clinical Psychiatry for Physician Assistants     4 weeks  3 credits  PAEP 7260  Community Health for Physician Assistants     4 weeks  3 credits  PAEP 7270  Clinical Emergency Medicine for Physician Assistants   4 weeks  3 credits  PAEP 7280  Clinical Obstetrics & Gynecology for Physician Assistants  4 weeks  3 credits  PAEP 7290  Clinical Anesthesia for Physician Assistants     2 weeks  1.5 credits  PAEP 7204  Clinical Electives for Physician Assistants I     2 weeks  1.5 credits  PAEP 7206  Clinical Electives for Physician Assistants II     2 weeks  1.5 credits    PAEP 7300  Year Two Comprehensive Assessment of Clinical Skills (CACS)    nil credit  PAEP 7350  Year Two Capstone Project            nil credit      Note:  Core  rotations  are  situated  within  the  province  of  Manitoba  while  electives  may  be  completed  within any institution affiliated with a recognized Physician Assistant Program.  Some core rotations are  conducted outside the Winnipeg for all learners E.g. the Pediatrics rotation currently includes a 2 week  block  in  Thompson  Other  rotations  such  as  Family  Medicine  have  options  in  Winnipeg,  Portage,  and  sites in the Parkland Region. Learners are advised to expect that they will spend a minimum of 4 weeks  of Family Medicine in a rural area 100 kilometers or more from Winnipeg.    When students are sent to rural areas for mandatory core rotations, the PAEP will cover housing for the  student at a location arranged by the Program. Some housing arrangements may be shared rooms in a  house. If accommodations are unsuitable for any reason (e.g accommodation for families) students can  make their own separate arrangements, and cover any expense above and beyond the cost of the PAEP‐ sponsored  accommodation.  The  PAEP  will  also  fund  travel  to  and  from  core  rotations  more  than  100  kilometers outside Winnipeg. Automobile travel will be reimbursed at the standard University rate per  kilometer; air travel arranged by the Program will be funded by the PAEP.   Clinical Logging  During  Year  2,  each  student  will  be  provided  a  Clinical  Logbook  in  which  to  record  clinical  exposures.  Completion  of  this  logbook  is  mandatory  and  is  important  for  both  student  education  and  Program  evaluation.  The  logbooks  will  be  used  by  rotation  preceptors  in  part  to  complete  the  student’s  PA  In‐ Training Evaluation Report. Logbooks will also be reviewed with faculty advisors during academic days  and by the Progress Committee at the end of the clinical year.     11   
  • Academic Days  During the clinical year, learners will periodically return to the Bannatyne campus for academic days and  half‐days.  Academic days will consist of a variety of activities including academic sessions, workshops,  advisor meetings, capstone project presentations, and observed histories and physicals.    Capstone Project  During  Year  2  of  the  Program,  each  student  will  present  a  capstone  project,  which  may  take  one  of  several  formats  outlined  by  the  Program  and  chosen  by  the  student  in  consultation  with  Program  faculty.  The  deadline  for  submission  of  capstone  projects,  which  include  both  a  written  and  an  oral  presentation component, will be in early Spring of the clinical year. Projects will be presented to fellow  students and Program faculty during academic days later in the clinical year. For more information on  the capstone project, please see Appendix C.      Evaluation  Academic Standards  General information on satisfactory academic performance is outlined in the Faculty of Graduate Studies  regulations at the following web address:  http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/graduate_studies/admin/532.htm    The PAEP supplementary regulations are currently being considered for approval through the Faculty of  Graduate  Studies.  Once  formally  endorsed  by  the  University  these  regulations  will  be  added  as  an  Appendix.    In accordance with Faculty of Graduate Studies policy as outlined in the Graduate Calendar, a minimum  grade point average of 3.0 with no grade below C+ must be maintained for continuance in the Master's  program.  Students  who  fail  to  maintain  this  standing  will  be  required  to  withdraw  unless  the  Dean  of  Graduate  Studies  approves  a  remedial  recommendation  from  the  PAEP  Progress  Committee.  Progress  Committee recommendations may include sitting for supplemental exams, repeating clinical rotations,  or  other  forms  of  remediation  as  appropriate.  Failure  of  any  prescribed  remediation  will  result  in  the  student’s being required to withdraw from the Program.    PA  learners  are  required  to  demonstrate  satisfactory  academic  performance  in  areas  not  related  to  performance in courses, such as attendance at and participation in lectures, seminars and laboratories,  and  progress  in  research.  Learners  who  fail  to  maintain  satisfactory  performance  may  be  required  to  withdraw on the recommendation of the PAEP Program Committee to the Dean of Graduate Studies.  12   
  • Year 1   Course Performance  Students  receiving  a  grade  of  C  or  lower  in  6  credit  hours  or  less  of  coursework  may,  at  the  recommendation  of  the  Progress  Committee,  be  permitted  to  write  one  supplemental  exam  in  each  course  for  which  a  grade  of  C  or  lower  is  obtained.    Students  receiving  a  grade  of  C  or  lower  on  a  supplemental exam will be required to withdraw from the PAEP.    Year One Comprehensive Didactic Exam (CDE)  At  the  conclusion  of  the  first  year  of  study,  PAEP  learners  are  required  to  pass  the  “Year  I  Comprehensive Examination.”  The Examination is graded as pass / fail.  Failing grades will be referred to  the Progress Committee for remediation.  Year 2  Clinical  evaluation  consists  of  three  components:  preceptors  will  all  participate  in  completing  the  PA‐ ITERS.  Some  of  you  will  also  participate  in  the  mini‐CEX  evaluations,  about  which  you  will  receive  information  under  separate  cover.  Observed  H  &  Ps  occur  during  academic  full  days  and  are  administered  by  the  PAEP.  Preceptors  may  be  recruited  to  assist  in  these  assessments  depending  on  need and preceptor availability.  Physician Assistant In Training Evaluation Report (PA‐ITER)  PA‐ITERs are the clinical performance evaluations filled out by preceptors at the mid‐point and end of  each clinical rotation. PA‐ITERs assess Can MEDS competencies in all areas. At the completion of each  clinical rotation, all students are expected to attain a satisfactory PA‐ITER as determined by the rotation  clinical preceptor(s) and submitted to the PAEP. For a copy of the PA‐ITER, see Appendix D.    Students who obtain an unsatisfactory PA‐ITER in 6 credit hours or less of clinical rotation time (a 4 week  rotation  is  3  credit  hours)  may  be  permitted,  at  the  discretion  of  the  PAEP  Progress  Committee,  to  complete some form of remediation determined by the PAEP Progress Committee.       Students  receiving  unsatisfactory  PA‐ITERs  in  more  than  6  credit  hours  of  clinical  rotations  will  be  required to withdraw from the PAEP.    Mini Clinical Evaluation Exercises (Mini‐CEX)  In these exercises, a clinical preceptor evaluates the student’s performance in a 15 to 20 minute clinical  encounter  with  a  patient.  This  exercise  is  designed  to  focus  on  one  predetermined  component  of  the  patient  encounter,  such  as  history  taking,  physical  exam  skills,  or  patient  education.  The  patient  encounter is followed immediately by 10 to 15 minutes of feedback from the preceptor. Further details  on the mini‐CEX will be added as supplemental pages before rotations commence. For a copy of a mini‐ CEX evaluation form, see Appendix D.   13   
  •   Observed Histories and Physicals (H&Ps)  Students  will  return  to  the  Bannatyne  campus  for  academic  days  at  the  end  of  each  4  week  clinical  rotation  block.  During  these  academic  days,  activities  will  include  conducting  comprehensive  histories  and  physical  exams  under  the  observation  of  PA  and  medical  faculty.  Each  student  will  complete  a  minimum of 12 observed H & Ps during the clinical year.  Six will be for formative purposes and during  the  latter  half  of  the  year,  6  core  observed  histories  and  physicals  will  count  towards  the  final  comprehensive assessment.  For a copy of the Clinical Skills Feedback Form, see Appendix D.   Comprehensive Assessment of Clinical Skills (CACS)  At  the  end  of  Year  2,  PA  Faculty  will  compile  a  summative  evaluation  of  each  student’s  clinical  performance,  called  the  Comprehensive  Assessment  of  Clinical  Skills  (CACS)  based  on  review  of  PA‐ ITERs, mini‐CEX evaluations, and observed histories and physical exams.     The  CACS  will  be  graded  on  a  pass/fail  basis  by  consensus  of  the  PAEP  Program  Director,  Medical  Director, and PAEP faculty after review of performance on all three components of the clinical year. If,  upon review of all evaluation modes, significant concerns regarding performance in one or more areas  (clinical skills, medical knowledge, communication skills, professionalism, etc.) exist, the matter will be  forwarded  to  the  PAEP  Progress  Committee  for  review  and  to  determine  whether  appropriate  remediation can be prescribed.    Should the PAEP Program Committee determine that a student’s unsatisfactory performance in clinical  work is not remediable, (in cases of gross violations of professional ethics, for example) the student will  be required to withdraw from the PAEP.   Capstone Project  The  capstone  project  is  evaluated  on  a  pass/fail  basis.  Projects  deemed  unsatisfactory  by  Program  faculty  may  be  revised  and  resubmitted  once.  Projects  deemed  unsatisfactory  after  one  resubmission  will  result  in  the  student’s  being  required  to  withdraw  from  the  PAEP.    For  a  copy  of  the  Capstone  Project Evaluation form, see Appendix D.      Attendance  Year 1   Students are required to attend a minimum of 75% of didactic lectures per month. Students who fail to  maintain  satisfactory  attendance  may  be  required  to  withdraw  on  the  recommendation  of  the  PAEP  Progress Committee.      Unexcused absence from any year one component involving contact with patients or simulated patients  will be subject to disciplinary action at the discretion of the PAEP Progress Committee.  14   
  • Year 2  Unexcused absences in the clinical year are unacceptable and will be considered by the PAEP Progress  Committee during quarterly reviews of student progress. As clinical exposures are a crucial part of the  PA  student’s  education,  students  missing  more  than  1  day  of  a  2  week  clinical  rotation,  2  days  of  a  4  week rotation, or 4 days of an 8 week rotation will be required to make up additional missed days, even  in cases where the absences are excused.    If  an  absence  is  unavoidable,  it  is  mandatory  that  learners  notify  both  the  PAEP  office  and  the  appropriate  departmental  coordinator/program  assistant  prior  to  their  absence.  Please  see  individual  rotation  information  sheets  for  procedures  for  being  excused  from  rotation  time  due  to  illness  or  emergency. (This may require waking up at 6:00 a.m. to leave a voicemail message if necessary.)   Depending on the length of the absence, a doctor’s certificate may be required. Students in the clinical  year are permitted up to two working days per year away from clinical and academic responsibilities to  attend professional conferences.    In  the  event  of  a  leave  of  absence  due  to  matters  unrelated  to  performance  (e.g.  illness,  maternity  leave)  elective  time  may,  at  the  discretion  of  the  Progress  Committee,  be  utilized  to  appropriately  compensate for missed core rotation time.     Attendance  at  academic  days  is  mandatory  unless  excused  by  the  Clinical  Coordinator  or  Medical  Director of the PAEP. A minimum of 80% attendance is expected for successful completion of this year.      Academic Integrity    Plagiarism or any other form of cheating in assignments or examinations is subject to serious academic  penalty  as  per  the  University  of  Manitoba  policy  of  academic  integrity.  (Section  7  of  the  General  Academic Regulations and Requirements)  http://webapps.cc.umanitoba.ca/calendar08/regulations/plagiarism.asp      Policies    The Faculty of Graduate Studies Calendar contains important policy and other information that pertains  to students in the PAEP. Please refer to the appropriate sections (noted) of the Graduate Calendar for  policies in the following areas:    Policy on the Responsibilities of Academic Staff With Regard to Students (Part One, Section 1)  Policy on Respectful Work and Learning Environment (Part One, Section 2)  Accessibility Policy for Students (Part One, Section 3)  15   
  • Disclosure and Security of Student Academic Records (Part One, Section 4)  Language Usage Guidelines (Part One, Section 5)  Conflict of Interest Between Evaluators and Students Due to Close Personal Relationships (Part One,  Section 6)  Other Policies of Interest to Students (Part One, Section 7)  ‐Campus alcohol policy  ‐HIV/AIDS policy  ‐Parking Regulations  Student Discipline Bylaw (Part Two, Section 1)  Inappropriate and Disruptive Student Behaviour (Part Two, Section 2)  Hold Status (Part Two, Section 3)   Immunizations – PAEP  students  participate  in  the  Bannatyne  campus  Immune  Status  Program.  For  information on this Program, please see the following link: http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/medicine/education/undergraduate/immunestatus.html    Professionalism  – The  Faculty  of  Medicine  is  currently  revising  its  guidelines  regarding  professional  behavior. This policy, once formalized, will be added to the Handbook as a Supplement.    Technical  Standards – Please  see  the  following  link  for  the  Faculty  of  Medicine’s  Essential  Skills  and  Abilities and Accommodation document (pp105‐112): http://www.umanitoba.ca/admin/governance/media/senagenda_may2009.pdf      Student Services and Resources  Safety and Security   Security Service Officers are on duty 24 hours a day every day of the year. In the case of an emergency,  you  are  advised  to  contact  Security  Services  immediately  by  dialing  555  from  any  474,  480,  789,  975,  977  University  exchange  or  #555  from  any  MTS  or  Rogers  cell  phone,  and  if  you  have  access  to  the  University telephone system call 474‐9312 or 474‐9341.   The  Safewalk  Program  provides  a  student  patrol  member  or  a  Security  Services  Officer  at  night  to  accompany you to your destination. The parameters at Bannatyne Campus are William–Notre Dame and  Sherbrook–Tecumseh. Call 789‐3330.   Code  Blue  Emergency  Call  Stations  are  located  at  strategic  outdoor  sites  on  campus.  When  activated,  they  alert  everyone  nearby  of  an  emergency  with  a  blue  flashing  light  and  provide  two‐way  communication  with  Security  Services.  For  additional  information,  contact  the  Bannatyne  Campus  Security Services ‐ Room S105 Medical Services Building ‐ 789‐3330.  16   
  • Fire Regulations   All University Buildings at the Bannatyne Campus have a fire alarm system.   A Fire Safety Plan written for students and staff at the Bannatyne Campus is available at    http://www.umanitoba.ca/admin/human_resources/ehso/media/FireSafetyPlanBann.pdf  In the event of an emergency in a University building, one should dial “555” to get the Campus Police  and “4911” (“4” to get the outside line) to connect to Emergency Medical Services or “#555” from MTS  or Rogers cell phone.   WHEN THE FIRE ALARM SOUNDS   Intermittent Bells   If  you  are  in  Dentistry,  Pathology  (where  OPAS  is  located),  Medical  Rehabilitation,  Old  Basic  Sciences,  Medical  Services  or  Chown  Buildings,  intermittent  bells  signify  a  fire  alarm  condition  in  an  adjoining  building.  Cease  all  operations  and  await  further  instructions  from  the  Building‘s  Chief  Fire  Warden  or  Fire  Warden.  If  you  are  in  the  Brodie  Centre,  intermittent  bells  signify  a  fire  alarm  condition  in  the  building.  If  you  know  the  origin  of  the  alarm  and  you  know  it  is  false,  cease  all  operations  and  await  further instructions from the Building‘s Chief Fire Warden or Fire Warden. If you do not know the origin  of the alarm, evacuate the building following the evacuation procedures for the building.   Continuous Bells   If  the  fire  alarm  bells  produce  a  continuous  sound,  evacuate  the  building  immediately  following  the  evacuation procedure for the building. If a fire bell rings while you are in the Rehabilitation Hospital, you  are  no  longer  required  to  evacuate.  Reassure  patients,  visitors  and  students  and  listen  to  the  paging  system to determine the location of the alarm.   Close all doors and leave all lights on. Do not use elevator.   RED Emergency Phones—Bannatyne Campus   Emergency phones are located in: Neil John Maclean Library, 2nd Level, Brodie Centre   ‐North of the Library stacks   ‐East side middle of the stacks   ‐Middle aisle of stacks Medical Services Building located by room #S105A   Basic Medical Sciences Building, 1st floor, North side by passenger elevators   Chown Building, 753 McDermot, North Entrance Lobby   Dentistry Building, 1st floor by passenger elevator   Pathology Building close to room #P006   Brodie Building adjacent north of the hallway of Room #140 (U of M Bookstore)   Brodie Centre, Basement area across from the tri‐elevators  17   
  • Student Identification In order to assist faculty members and support staff in identifying each student, photographs are taken  by U of M Imaging Services at a time arranged by the PAEP main office.  Student photos will be sent to  clinical rotation preceptors during Year Two of the Program.    ID badges are required  by the Winnipeg  Regional  Health Authority for use during all clinical/fieldwork  education.  In  addition,  the  PAEP  provides  magnetic  name  tags  to  all  learners.    These  must  be  clearly  visible and worn at all times during all PAEP educational activities.     Lost or misplaced name tags may be replaced through the PAEP main office at a charge of $10.00 to the  learner.  Student ID / Access Cards U of M IDs will be provided during Year 1 orientation.  Access will be provided in the following areas on a  24 hour basis:   the 24 Hour Computer Lab, 280 Brodie Centre   the interior door to the Student Lounge & Games Rooms, 1st Floor Brodie Centre   the Student Locker Room, 727 Brodie Centre   the exterior door located at 150 Brodie Centre (hallway beside the Bookstore)   the exterior door to Brodie Centre, 727 McDermot Avenue   the exterior door at 730 William (Basic Medical Sciences Bldg)  the exterior door at 771 McDermot Avenue (School of Medical Rehabilitation)  the exterior door on the first floor on Bannatyne by Shipping & Receiving   the exterior door to the Dentistry Building, 790 Bannatyne Avenue   if classrooms requiring card access are utilized, access will be arranged at that time  Card Access Protocol for Students   Student ID cards must be activated by Colin Wootton, Card Access Coordinator, 789‐3649, S013 Medical  Services Bldg.  Hours for card activation are Monday – Friday, 8:00am – 9:45am, 10:00am – 12:00pm,  12:30–2:30pm and 2:45pm ‐ 4:00 pm, Monday.   Please contact him directly to make an appointment  during the first few weeks of Semester 1.  Activation takes approximately 10 minutes per card.  Note: All entries using an ID Card may be recorded electronically.  Reports will be available to the PAEP if  requested.  Any misuse of ID Access cards will be reviewed by the PAEP Administration and dealt with in  an appropriate manner.    Any evidence of breach of security should be reported immediately to Security Services at 789‐3330.    Lost Card: Report lost or misplaced ID cards immediately to the Physician Assistant Education Office to  have the card de‐activated.   *THIS PAGE UPDATED AUG 19/09  18   
  • The loss of your student ID card should be reported immediately to both the Neil John Maclean Library  and the ID Centre. For more information, contact Security, located at S105 Med Services Building, 789‐ 3330  and  the  ID  Centre  400  University  Centre,  474‐9423,  or  visit  their  web  site  at www.umanitoba.ca/students/records      Financial Aid & Awards    General  information  on  the  following  Funding  and  Awards  can  be  found  on  the  Faculty  of  Graduate  Studies website at  http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/graduate_studies/funding/index.html:    External granting agency fellowships  University of Manitoba Graduate Fellowships  (UMGF) – see Appendix E for Terms of Reference   Manitoba Graduate Scholarships for Master’s Students (MGS)  Faculty/Departmental Bursary/Scholarship/Award  Research and Teaching Assistantship Opportunities  Canadian Federal, Provincial and Territorial Government Loans/Bursaries    PAEP  students  may  also  apply  for  the  Walker  Wood  Foundation  Bursary  through  the  Financial  Aid  &  Awards Office at http://umanitoba.ca/student/fin_awards/.    This Bursary will be awarded to 3 students  during  the 09 / 10 academic year who have high  academic standing, demonstrate leadership qualities  and who have a demonstrated need for financial assistance.          Library and Computer Labs  Neil John Maclean Health Sciences Library    The  Neil  John  Maclean  Health  Sciences  Library  (NJMHSL),  located  on  the  second  floor  of  the  Brodie  Centre at the Bannatyne Campus, is the major resource library for clinical medicine, biomedical sciences,  dentistry,  dental  hygiene,  nursing,  rehabilitation,  hospital  administration,  Aboriginal  health  and  consumer health.     The NJMHSL has over 200,000 volumes comprised of print, audiovisual and computer‐based media, as  well as more than 1,200 current journal titles and approximately 3,400 electronic journals and over 70  rehabilitation assessment tools.     New journals are located on the 1st floor (200 level) in the Dr. Robert E. Beamish Reading Area and new  books  are  located  adjacent  to  the  Information  Centre.  Dental  journals,  consumer  health  information,  reference,  and  reserve  materials  are  also  on  the  200  level.  Books,  journals  and  the  Aboriginal  health  collection  are  located  on  the  300  level.  The  journals  are  shelved  in  alphabetical  order;  the  books  by  National Library of Medicine call numbers.   19   
  •   A listing of the library’s on‐line resources and services can be found at:    http://www.umanitoba.ca/libraries/health    Faculty, staff and students of the University of Manitoba may borrow library materials on presentation  of a valid U of M photo Identification card. Staff and students of the HSC can apply to have a library card  by presenting their photo Identification to circulation staff. Library cards can be renewed at any U of M  library. Books may be borrowed for 14 days, journals for 7, and most items can be renewed up to three  times. Materials located at Fort Garry Libraries may be requested through BISON and will be delivered to  the Neil John Maclean Health Sciences Library for pickup.   Computer Labs  General use computer labs are located in the Neil John Maclean Health Sciences Library during regular  library hours.  Phone 789‐3464 to check availability of these computers.    A 24 Hour Computer Lab is located in 280 Brodie Centre. Card access is required.    Bookstore    The Health Sciences BookStore is a full service store and serves the Faculties of Medicine and Dentistry,  the  Schools  of  Dental  Hygiene  and  Medical  Rehabilitation,  the  entire  Health  Sciences  community  and  the general public. It stocks medical and allied health reference books in every health science specialty  as  well  as  general  reading,  medical  instruments,  stethoscopes,  office  and  stationery  supplies,  sportswear,  gifts  and  computer  hardware,  software  and  supplies.    It  is  located  on  the  main  floor  of  Brodie Centre at 727 McDermot and is open from 9:00am – 5:00pm Monday to Friday.    Parking    U of M parking is very limited on the Bannatyne Campus.  Private residents in the area often post rental  notices  on  bulletin  boards  around  campus,  or  students  choose  to  park  on  distant  streets  and  walk.  In  addition,  the Health Sciences Centre parkades may  have spots for rent  (contact Parking Operations at  the Health Sciences Centre at 787‐2715). For more information about U of M parking, contact Parking  Services at 474‐9483.   Parking After Hours in Lot E   Three‐month  parking  permits  can  be  obtained,  free  of  charge,  for  parking  in  Lot  E  on  weekends,  holidays, and after 4:30 pm on weekdays. Students and staff with a valid U of M ID card can obtain a  three‐month parking permit through Security Services (Room S105, Medical Services Building).     20   
  • Permits must be clearly displayed, and be completely visible from the exterior of the vehicle at all times.  Parking is not permitted at any time in the following restricted areas:   1) No Parking areas   2) Loading zones   3) Marked fire lanes and driveways   4) Marked pedestrian areas   5) 24‐hour reserved zones   6) Accessible areas  7) Landscaped areas   8) Lot corners, aisles, and end of aisles   Expired permits may be subject to a financial penalty.   Note: Parking permits are valid for Lot E only and do not provide access to the Tecumseh Parkade.  A parking map is attached as Appendix F      Counselling Services  Office of Student Affairs   The  Office  of  Student  Affairs  and  Dr.  Cornelia  Van  Ineveld,  Assistant  Dean,  Student  Affairs,  Faculty  of  Medicine,  are  responsible  for  academic  advising,  personal  counselling,  and  student  development.  Questions  about  career  options  and  rules  and  regulations  of  the  University  can  be  addressed,  as  can  family, marital, or other personal issues, which affect your ability to learn. To book an appointment with  Dr. Van Ineveld, please call 789‐3495.  Counselling Services (Bannatyne Campus)   Professional  counsellors‘  primary  goal  is  to  facilitate  the  personal,  social,  academic,  and  vocational  development of university students. To fulfill this role, the following programs and services are offered:  personal and career counselling, group counselling, referral and consultation, and specialty workshops.  Students  interested  in  meeting  with  a  counsellor  at  the  Bannatyne  Campus  (S207  Medical  Services  Building) may contact that office directly at 789‐3857, drop by during their office hours, or talk with a  receptionist at their Fort Garry office (474‐8592). Lunch hour and evening appointments are available.  For urgent concerns during regular working hours Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday 12:00 noon–7:00  pm,  (Summer  Hours:  Monday,  Wednesday,  and  Thursday  12:00  noon–5:00  pm),  please  contact  474‐ 8592. Their services are strictly confidential. Whether you just want to talk something over, or you have  a serious concern, they are available.    Web site: http://www.umanitoba.ca/student/counselling  21   
  • Counselling Service Contact Numbers (Bannatyne Campus, S207 Medical Services Building)   Prof. Gavriela Geller 474‐8620 Mondays   Prof. David Ness 474‐8619 Wednesdays   Prof. Kathryn Ritchot 474‐8618 Thursdays   Bannatyne Campus General Line: 789‐3857   Receptionist 474‐8592     Available for appointments Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 12:00 noon to 7:00 pm. (Drop‐in  meetings when doors are opened.)  Student Mental Health Service    The  Faculty  of  Medicine  has  a  Student  Mental  Health  Unit  available  to  all  students  on  the  Bannatyne  Campus,  their  spouses  and  immediate  family.  Dr.  Mark  Prober  and  his  residents  provide  prompt  consultation and treatment for any student experiencing emotional stress. You may reach him at 789‐ 3328. This is a confidential service.  Office of Student Advocacy    This  office  provides  information  and  assistance  to  students  with  respect  to  university  policies  and  procedures,  complaints  and  mediation  of  grievances.  The  office  is  located  at  519  University  Centre  or  call 474‐7423 or fax 474‐7567.   Web site: http://umanitoba.ca/student/advocay      Health Services  HEALTH SERVICES   Health  information  can  be  obtained  from  the  Misericordia  Urgent  Care  Centre  located  at  99  Cornish  Avenue (204) 788‐8188. Health services can also be obtained from any walk‐in clinic, public health nurse  (by appointment) in the rural provincial health units (by appointment only).   Medical Services   If you do not have a family physician, the Manitoba College of Family Physicians and Manitoba Health  have launched a new service called “The Family Doctor Connection Program” which provides an up‐to‐ date  comprehensive list of Winnipeg family doctors accepting new patients.  Call 786‐7111 Monday to  Friday, 8:30 am–4:30 pm. You will be assisted personally and provided with the names and telephone  numbers of family physicians accepting new patients in your area of residence.   Manitoba College of Family Physicians‘ Web Site: http://www.mcfp.mb.ca  If you are currently a student at the U of M, you can be seen at:   University Health Service, Fort Garry Campus – 104 University Centre   September to April: Monday 9:00 am–5:00 pm Tuesday to Friday: 8:30 am–5:00 pm   22   
  • May to August: Monday to Friday 8:30 am–4:30 pm, by appointment only (474‐8411)     Emergency treatment can be accommodated, but you must call the clinic first (474‐8411).     Community Health Clinics are located as follows:     Point Douglas area residents only:   601 Aikens Street   Monday to Friday: 8:30 am–4:30 pm by appointment only (940‐2025)     River Heights area residents only:   385 River Avenue   Monday,  Tuesday,  Thursday  and  Friday:  8:30  am–4:30  pm,  Wednesday  8:30  am–7:30  pm,  by  appointment only (940‐2000)     If your postal code begins with R3A, R3B, or R3C, you can be seen at:   Health Action Centre – 425 Elgin Avenue   Monday to Thursday: 8:30 am–6:00 pm, Friday 8:30 am–5:00 pm, by appointments only (940‐1626)   Saturday 8:30 am–5:00 pm   Dental Services     The Faculty of Dentistry will make appointments for cleaning teeth and dental repairs in their clinics. The  rates are low. If you need immediate attention (a toothache), contact the Clinic at 789‐3505.      Mailboxes & Lockers    Student  mailboxes  and  lockers  are  located  on  the  2nd  floor  of  Brodie  Centre  outside  of  the  Dean  of  Medicine office (260 Brodie).  The PAEP Main office will provide keys for both at the beginning of Year 1  which you will keep throughout the program.  If you forget your key for either one, the Dean’s Office  receptionist will open it for you for a charge of $2.00.  Lost keys are replaced at a cost of $10.00.                23