University of the Cumberlands
 Physician Assistant Program


 Didactic Student Handbook




                   1|Page
PREFACE

Welcome to the University of the Cumberlands Master of Physician Assistant Studies Program
(MPAS). This program-s...
TABLE OF CONTENTS
General Information....................................................................3
   The Role of ...
FROM THE PROGRAM DIRECTOR

MPAS Students:

Putting together a comprehensive program has been a challenging undertaking, bu...
GENERAL INFORMATION

The Role of a Physician Assistant
The physician assistant is a health care professional licensed to p...
Physician Assistant Professional Oath
(Source: Student Academy of the American Academy of Physician Assistants.         UR...
OUR PROGRAM


University of the Cumberlands Mission Statement

Today the Mission Statement of University of the Cumberland...
Vision University of the Cumberlands Physician Assistant program strives for professional
excellence in an environment of ...
The institution has years of successful experience in developing and offering graduate programs
and programs aimed at non-...
Faculty
Eddie S. Perkins, DO; Program Director
David Williams, MD; Medical Director
Jennifer Harrington, PA-C; Academic Co...
2. Pre-requisite/Recommended GPA (20%) A minimum of 3.0 is awarded
                           (5%). Higher GPA’s are award...
the students will be given a brief exit survey and farewell statement. The interviewers will then
convene to determine whi...
MPAS 572 – Practical App. of Medicine II           2 hours
       MPAS 573 – Practical App. of Medicine III          3 hou...
addressed include: the diagnostic reasoning process, the use of relevant research evidence, and
proper and adequate review...
Medicine II coupled with laboratory sessions emphasizing the proper use of diagnostic
equipment and technique for performi...
medical and surgical disorders encountered in general adult medicine. This will include: clinical
presentation, acute care...
therapeutics. Students will be given a thorough introduction to pharmacologic terms,
definitions and principles which are ...
class is taught using a variety of learning methods, including traditional lectures, case-based
learning, simulated patien...
Living Expenses/Travel/Transportation
Students are responsible for arranging their own housing accommodations, transportat...
 802.11b/g wireless network card
        WPA2 security authentication
        56K standard modem
        DVD/CD-RW
   ...
Worker’s Compensation Insurance An increasing number of clinical practice sites are
         requiring students to provide...
Tuberculosis Screening
Applicants must provide documentation of tuberculosis screening through PPD testing, unless
contrai...
 Closely monitoring the students’ academic progress. If concerns arise, the faculty
         advisor will schedule indivi...
PROGRAM STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE

Academic Standards

         Academic Integrity
Dishonesty in any form will not be toler...
for progression, the student will be dismissed from the program. Any student wishing to be
readmitted will have to file a ...
Competencies Mastery
The National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants (NCCPA), in conjunction with
the AAP...
2. Knowledge of organ systems and the diseases, disorders and medical assessments
       physician assistants encounter wi...
•   Risks associated with diagnostic studies or procedures
    •   Appropriate patient education related to laboratory or ...
•   Impact of stress on health
    •   Psychological manifestations of illness and injury
    •   Effects of aging and cha...
•   Communicating effectively
    •   Using counseling techniques
    •   Facilitating patient adherence and active partic...
•   Correlating abnormal physical examination findings to a given
        disease process

    •   Correlating abnormal re...
Acute             bronchitis    Bronchogenic carcinoma        Pulmonary       embolism
Acute          bronchiolitis    Car...
Entropion                       Otitis          externa        Oral            leukoplakia
Foreign                body    ...
GU                      Tract   Conditions                   Acute/chronic renal failure
Benign prostatic hyperplasia    C...
Disorders of the Shoulder        Disorders      of      the    Infectious        Diseases
Fractures/dislocations          ...
Anxiety           Disorders Mood         Disorders           Psychoses
Panic              disorder Adjustment             ...
Erythema multiforme            Paronychia                 Vitiligo

Hematologic System
Anemias                        Coag...
will be considered on an individual basis; but, an applicant must possess the intellectual,
ethical, physical and emotiona...
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  1. 1. University of the Cumberlands Physician Assistant Program Didactic Student Handbook 1|Page
  2. 2. PREFACE Welcome to the University of the Cumberlands Master of Physician Assistant Studies Program (MPAS). This program-specific MPAS Student Handbook is published as an addendum to the University of the Cumberlands Catalog to aid students who are applying, preparing to begin Physician Assistant (PA) training at University of the Cumberlands, or actively engaged in two challenging years of career pursuit. The handbook must be used in conjunction with the following: • Current edition of the University of the Cumberlands online catalog, which may be accessed at: www.ucumberlands.edu click on ACADEMICS, then REGISTRAR, then CATALOG) • Internet posting of University of the Cumberlands policies found at: www.ucumberlands.edu • PA Program Clinical Practice Preceptor Handbook • Program Web Site: http://www.ucumberlands.edu/academics/pa Each applicant and student needs to clearly understand both the college and program-specific policies. Please read these sources carefully and contact the PA Program with any questions or concerns you may have with respect to these important documents and how they apply to you. Occasionally, updates, corrections, additions or other changes to this handbook become necessary. The PA Program reserves the right to alter the contents of this handbook as needed and at any time. Any changes apply to all current and prospective students. The faculty reserves the right to alter the curriculum, schedule of required courses, exams and other regulations affecting admission and graduation requirements. Every effort will be made to keep students well informed with respect to any changes. Validation of college registration implies the student’s acceptance of the published academic rules and regulations found in this and any other official program or college publication. ii | P a g e
  3. 3. TABLE OF CONTENTS General Information....................................................................3 The Role of a Physician Assistant..............................................................................................3 Physician Assistant Professional Oath........................................................................................4 Our Program................................................................................5 University of the Cumberlands Mission Statement....................................................................5 Master of Physician Assistant Studies Program ........................................................................5 Our History.................................................................................................................................6 Accreditation...............................................................................................................................7 Faculty and Staff.........................................................................................................................7 Application and Admission.........................................................................................................8 Degree Requirements................................................................................................................10 Didactic Curriculum (61 Hours)...............................................................................................10 Costs, Financial Aid..................................................................................................................16 Required Supplies.....................................................................................................................17 2010-2011 Program Academic Calendar..................................................................................21 Program Standards of Performance..........................................22 Academic Standards..................................................................................................................22 Competencies Mastery..............................................................................................................24 Technical Standards..................................................................................................................35 Professional Standards - Code of Ethics...................................................................................37 Retention Standards/Changes in Student Status ......................................................................39 Policies and Procedures.............................................................40 Program Policies and Procedures..............................................................................................40 Academic Policies and Procedures...........................................................................................42 General Policies & Procedures.................................................................................................49 Resources...................................................................................52 Facilities....................................................................................................................................52 Internet Addresses.....................................................................................................................53 Professional Organizations.......................................................................................................54 Appendices.................................................................................55 Appendix 1: Technical Standards Statement............................................................................57 Appendix 2: Participation as Human Subjects..........................................................................58 Appendix 3: Health History Questionnaire...............................................................................59 Appendix 4: Immunization Information Release Form............................................................64 Appendix 5: Professional Development Assessment Tool.......................................................65
  4. 4. FROM THE PROGRAM DIRECTOR MPAS Students: Putting together a comprehensive program has been a challenging undertaking, but in each step of the process the program has been laid out with future students such as you in mind. It has been the aim of the department that you will be provided with the extensive knowledge and skills required to prepare you as competent and successful physician assistant professionals. With the ever growing demand for physician assistants, a decision to study for licensure is a well founded one. The job market can take you anywhere in the United States and to a growing number of other countries as well. It is a job for those who love problem solving and people. It requires a high level of work ethic and dedication, but in the end, the rewards for a job well done are both intrinsic and extrinsic as you will likely make life-long friends while earning a competitive salary. Outlined in the pages to follow are description, objectives, and admission requirements of the program. Eddie Perkins, DO, FACOOG Program Director, Physician Assistant Program 2|Page
  5. 5. GENERAL INFORMATION The Role of a Physician Assistant The physician assistant is a health care professional licensed to practice medicine under the supervision of a physician. The role of the physician assistant is to perform medical duties from basic primary care to technically advanced procedures in emergency medicine or within medical specialties. The typical duties of a physician assistant include: Taking a patient medical history; performing complete physical examinations; ordering and interpreting laboratory tests; diagnosing and treating medical illnesses; assisting physicians in surgery; performing routine medical procedures such as suturing and wound care; and prescribing medications. This is a team approach to medicine and health care, augmenting the needs and growing shortages within the current American health care delivery system. Physician assistant education is based on the medical model to emphasize the collaboration of the PA-physician team. It is primary care oriented and prepares the physician assistant to be professionally competent and able to identify with physicians in terms of thought, patterns of action, and dedication to ethical and legal values and concerns. The physician assistant’s work setting varies from practice at a rural clinic, an office-based practice, within inpatient or long-term care facilities or in industrial settings. They also work in education, health care administration, and research. The myriad of settings allows for career flexibility and the ability to specialize. 3|Page
  6. 6. Physician Assistant Professional Oath (Source: Student Academy of the American Academy of Physician Assistants. URL: http://saaapa.aapa.org/students/grad/oath.htm.) “I pledge to perform the following duties with honesty and dedication: • I will hold as my primary responsibility the health, safety, welfare and dignity of all human beings. • I will uphold the tenets of patient autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice. • I will recognize and promote the value of diversity. • I will treat equally all persons who seek my care. • I will hold in confidence the information shared in the course of practicing medicine. • I will assess my personal capabilities and limitations, striving always to improve my medical practice. • I will actively seek to expand my knowledge and skills, keeping abreast of advances in medicine. • I will work with other members of the health care team to provide compassionate and effective care of patients. • I will use my knowledge and experience to contribute to an improved community. • I will respect my professional relationship with the physician. • I will share and expand knowledge within the profession. These duties are pledged with sincerity and upon my honor.” 4|Page
  7. 7. OUR PROGRAM University of the Cumberlands Mission Statement Today the Mission Statement of University of the Cumberlands reads as follows: University of the Cumberlands has historically served students primarily, but not exclusively, from the beautiful mountain regions of Kentucky, Tennessee, West Virginia, Virginia, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Ohio and Alabama which have traditionally been described as Appalachia. The University's impact can be seen in the achievements of its graduates who have assumed roles of leadership in this region and throughout the nation. While located in the resort like area of Appalachia, with emphasis primarily on serving the beautiful mountain area, the University now reaches into every state and around the world through its student body and alumni. UC continues to offer promising students of all backgrounds a broad-based liberal arts program enriched with Christian values. The University strives for excellence in all of its endeavors and expects from students a similar dedication to this pursuit. Its commitment to a strong academic program is joined with a commitment to a strong work ethic. UC encourages students to think critically and creatively so that they may better prepare themselves for lives of responsible service and leadership. This focus of its undergraduate programs is extended and extrapolated into its graduate programs. These programs also nurture critical and creative thinking in pursuit of the “life-more- abundant” for both the individual and society. At UC, graduate study prepares professionals to be servant-leaders in their disciplines and communities, linking research with practice and knowledge with ethical decision-making. The master’s degree in Physician Assistant Studies is clearly driven by, and contributes to, the University’s Mission. Master of Physician Assistant Studies Program Mission The mission of University of the Cumberlands Physician Assistant Program is to educate competent, compassionate and caring Physician Assistants to be an integral part of the modern professional health care team for underserved areas of Kentucky, the nation and on an international level. 5|Page
  8. 8. Vision University of the Cumberlands Physician Assistant program strives for professional excellence in an environment of compassion and team cooperation with the common goal of producing professionals who serve as a vital part of the health care team. It is our intent to prepare clinicians whose lifestyle reflects a commitment to lifelong learning, leadership and service to their community. Goals In accordance with its mission, the UCPAP strives to graduate clinicians fully prepared for employment as competent and caring physician assistants. In order to do this the program has outlined several goals aligned with the ARC-PA competencies. It is thus the purpose of the program to: 1. Prepare physician assistants with a strong knowledge base in biomedical and clinical sciences supported by the ability to apply analytic thinking to clinical situations. 2. Instill students with the interpersonal communication skills necessary to develop effective information exchange with patients, their families, and professionals in the healthcare system. 3. Teach students to provide effective patient care necessary for treatment of health problems and the promotion of physical, psychological, and spiritual wellness. 4. Develop physician assistants knowledgeable in legal requirements and respectful of the diversity of the PA profession in order to graduate PAs possessing a high degree of professionalism, commitment to Christian ethics, and integrity. 5. Provide students with the opportunity to understand practice-based learning and improvement by engaging each student in critical analysis of their own experience and medical literature so that they continuously self-improve. 6. Expose students to clinical practice that encompasses the societal, organizational and economic systems that tie into healthcare delivery in order that they may be prepared to deliver optimal patient care. Our History Williamsburg Institute opened its doors in Williamsburg, Kentucky in 1889. Williamsburg Institute became Cumberland College on March 15, 1913. The name reflected the institution’s location along the Cumberland River and its proximity to Cumberland Falls and the Cumberland Gap. From its inception, the institution has been affiliated with the Baptist Church. The mission of University of the Cumberlands is to train and educate leaders (lay and clergy) for service in the greater community. Although Cumberland College was founded as a senior college, in 1918 the institution officially became a junior college having phased out its junior and senior classes, beginning in 12916. The College received its first accreditation from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) in 1931. The Board of Trustees began investigating the possibility of bringing the College back to senior college status in 1956. The junior year was added in 1959-1960 and the senior year in 1960-1961. SACS granted initial accreditation as a senior college to the institution in December 1964. SACS has reaffirmed the College’s accreditation in 1974, 1985, 1995, and 2006. 6|Page
  9. 9. The institution has years of successful experience in developing and offering graduate programs and programs aimed at non-traditional students. Cumberland College first received authority to award its first graduate degree, the Master of Arts in Education (M.A.Ed.), on April 6, 1988. The graduate program in education is now an integral part of the institution. Currently the institution is expanding its online graduate offerings. On July 7, 2005, the institution received authorization to offer a Masters of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) program. And in November 2006, the institution received permission from the Commission on Colleges to offer both the M.A.Ed. and M.A.T. degrees fully online. Its experience with online courses and non-traditional students extends to its degree completion programs dating back to 2003. On July 1, 2005, after action by the Board of Trustees the previous April, Cumberland College changed its name to University of the Cumberlands. Under this new designation, the University continues to provide a quality education in a Christian environment, and in doing so to serve its region. Accreditation Application for provisional accreditation by the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA) has begun. A formal site visit was held May 11-12, 2009. A decision on the program’s provisional accreditation status will be issued in September 2009. Pending accreditation, the first cohort of students will begin classes in January 2010. Accreditation is required prior to starting the program in order for graduates to be able to sit for the national certification examination for physician assistants, a credential required for state licensure. University of the Cumberlands is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097: Telephone number 404-679-4501) to award the Bachelor of General Studies, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Music, Master of Arts in Education and Master of Arts in Teaching Degrees. It is approved by the Kentucky State Department of Education for Teacher Education and Certification. University of the Cumberlands complies with all applicable federal and state non discrimination statutes and does not engage in prohibited discrimination on the basis of race, color, nationality, ethnic origin, sex, age, or handicap. The University may discriminate on the basis of religion in any position of employment in order to fulfill its purpose. Faculty and Staff The full-time program faculty coordinates, direct, and oversees the curriculum as well as monitor and evaluate students’ academic and professional progress. You will work closely with each of these individuals throughout the 24-month curriculum. Program leadership, faculty, and staff maintain an open-door policy to enhance accessibility, communication, and professional exchange. 7|Page
  10. 10. Faculty Eddie S. Perkins, DO; Program Director David Williams, MD; Medical Director Jennifer Harrington, PA-C; Academic Coordinator Joe Reed, PA-C; Clinical Coordinator Peter Geissler, PhD, MD Program Staff Kelly Cozmanciuc; Administrative Assistant Application and Admission It is the applicant’s responsibility to: 1. Keep the Admissions Counselor for Graduate Programs informed of any changes in contact information. This must be done in writing (e-mail is acceptable). 2. Ensure program’s receipt of all required application materials. Supplemental Materials Individuals who are seeking admission to the University of the Cumberlands Physician Assistant Program are required to complete and submit the following supplemental information to the Graduate Admissions office. Applications will be considered incomplete and will not be evaluated by the program if any of the required application information is not provided by the application deadline. The supplemental materials require that applicants provide two separately prepared statements that address the following areas:  Describe what has influenced you the most in your decision to become a Physician Assistant.  Define the role you will play in the health care system as a Physician Assistant (including specific details about what it is a Physician Assistant does). The following specifications for preparation of the supplemental statements must be observed:  Statements must represent the applicant’s own thoughts and ideas in their own words.  The length of each statement must not exceed 400 words.  Each of the documents must be prepared using Times New Roman 12-point font with one (1) inch borders on all sides of the page. Selection Process & Preferences All completed applications (which must include receipt of all program specific supplemental application materials) undergo a preliminary selection screening process which evaluates and awards admission points based upon the following program preferences:  Past Academic Performance (60%). This includes a thorough review and scoring for: o GPAs (40%) 1. Cumulative College GPA (20%) A minimum of 3.0 is required and awarded (5%). Higher GPA’s are awarded more points, up to (20%). 8|Page
  11. 11. 2. Pre-requisite/Recommended GPA (20%) A minimum of 3.0 is awarded (5%). Higher GPA’s are awarded more points, up to (20%). o Graduate Record Examination (GRE) score (20%). A minimum combined verbal and quantitative score of 1000 is preferred and awarded 5%. Scores higher than 1000 are given more admission points. Scores lower than 1000 will not automatically disqualify an applicant from consideration.  Geographic Location (10%). In accordance with the stated mission of this Program to prepare health care providers to meet the needs of this very rural region, applicants are awarded admissions locality preference points based upon the following: o Permanent address within the Program’s stated region: (2%) o Population of the location in which the applicant graduated from high school (rural preference 2%) o Number of credit hours completed at University of the Cumberlands (6%) 1. Completion of UC 3-2 Program (6%) 2. Completion of Bachelor’s including Pre-requisite and Recommended courses at UC (6%) 3. Completion of Bachelor’s at UC (3%) 4. Completion of Pre-requisite and Recommended Courses at UC (3%)  Clinical Work Experience (20%). Fifty hours of PA shadowing is required. The remaining required 50 hours may be done shadowing a PA as well but also includes direct patient care employment as well as any formal health career training (EMT, CNA, LPN, RN, RT, MT, etc).  Letters of Recommendation (10%). The letter should be written by a health care professional or educational leader and assess the applicant’s ability to be a future physician assistant.  Personal Statements A personal statement is required but is not used in the initial pre-screening. The essay/personal statement will be used at a later date to rank applications. Interview Process Applications meeting minimum requirements are scored and ranked using the above mentioned criteria. The PA Program Core Faculty who will then select 25 applicants for an interview. Applicants meeting minimum requirements but who are not asked to an interview will have their applications maintained for one year at which time the applicant may choose to renew their application. Applications not renewed after one year will require the applicant to begin the process again. A group of 25 candidates will be interviewed on the 4 prescheduled interview dates. The applicants present will be interviewed by the interviewing committee. On interview day there will be a brief faculty and program introduction followed by a student introduction. Students will then complete a 20 minute timed essay. Following the essay, students will be interviewed at three stations which each contain two interviewers from the admissions committee. The interviewers will fill out a questionnaire on each student. At the conclusion of the interviews 9|Page
  12. 12. the students will be given a brief exit survey and farewell statement. The interviewers will then convene to determine which students will be selected. Students will be informed by written letter whether they have been accepted, declined, or wait-listed. Degree Requirements The Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies is earned through the continuous twenty- four-month program of studies consisting of 101 master’s level credit hours. These hours are divided into sixty-one credit hours of Didactics (classroom focused instruction) and forty credit hours of Clinical Rotations. The fifty-four hours of Didactics classes taken during the first year of the Professional phase include clinical laboratory and behavioral sciences coursework with applied clinical skills. The Clinical courses taken during the second year of the Professional phase consist of eight five-week rotations. In addition, at the end of the program, degree candidates complete three additional Didactics classes: a one-hour Professional Development courses, a one-hour Capstone Project course, and a five-hour course focused on preparing for the PANCE, the licensure examination required of Physician Assistants. Didactic Curriculum (61 Hours) After formal admission, students complete a tightly structured sequence of Didactic courses during the first year. These courses are listed below. The normal rotation of courses is outlined later in this document. MPAS 511 – Clinical Anatomy I 1 hour MPAS 512 – Clinical Anatomy II 1 hour MPAS 513 – Clinical Anatomy III 1 hour MPAS 521 – Health Care Issues I 2 hours MPAS 522 – Health Care Issues II 2 hours MPAS 523 – Health Care Issues III 2 hours MPAS 531 – Physical Diagnosis I 3 hours MPAS 532 – Physical Diagnosis II 2 hours MPAS 533 – Physical Diagnosis III 2 hours MPAS 541 – Clinical Medicine I 6 hours MPAS 542 – Clinical Medicine II 6 hours MPAS 543 – Clinical Medicine III 6 hours MPAS 551 – Pathology/Pathophysiology I 2 hours MPAS 552 – Pathology/Pathophysiology II 2 hours MPAS 553 – Pathology/Pathophysiology III 2 hours MPAS 561 – Pharmacology I 2 hours MPAS 562 – Pharmacology II 3 hours MPAS 563 – Pharmacology III 2 hours MPAS 571 – Practical App. of Medicine I 2 hours 10 | P a g e
  13. 13. MPAS 572 – Practical App. of Medicine II 2 hours MPAS 573 – Practical App. of Medicine III 3 hours MPAS 680 – Professional Development Course 1 hour MPAS 691 – Capstone Project 1 hour MPAS 692 – PANCE Review course summation 5 hours Course Descriptions MPAS 511 – Clinical Anatomy I / 1 Credit Hour This course is part one in a series of three anatomy courses aligned with Clinical Medicine in a modular format. It provides an introduction to human anatomy and basic survey of the body. Students will learn basic concepts related to anatomy as well as examine human morphology and the fundamental relationships between HEENT, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal systems with conceptual presentations of these regions of the human body. The clinical application of this knowledge is applied through case studies. Students will have ample time to explore anatomy during laboratory sessions using models and computer anatomy technology. MPAS 512 – Clinical Anatomy II / 1 Credit Hour This course is part two in a series of three anatomy courses aligned with Clinical Medicine II in a modular format. It builds upon concepts and systems studies in Clinical Anatomy I. Students will develop knowledge of anatomical concepts and examine human morphology and the fundamental relationships between cardiac, neurological, and hematological systems with conceptual presentations of these regions of the human body. The clinical application of this knowledge is applied through case studies. Students will have ample time to explore anatomy during laboratory sessions using models and computer anatomy technology. MPAS 513 – Clinical Anatomy III / 1 Credit Hour This course is the final in a series of three anatomy courses aligned with Clinical Medicine in a modular format. It builds upon concepts and systems studies in Clinical Anatomy I and II. Students will build a comprehensive knowledge of anatomical concepts. They will examine human morphology and the fundamental relationships between endocrine, nephrological, men’s, women’s, pediatrics, rheumatology, and musculoskeletal modules with conceptual presentations of applicable regions of the human body. The clinical application of this knowledge is applied through case studies. Students will have ample time to explore anatomy during laboratory sessions using models and computer anatomy technology. MPAS 521 – Health Care Issues I/ 2 Credit Hours This course will be divided into two major components: Introduction to the PA profession and Research for Physician Assistants. In this course students will trace the history, development, and current status of the physician assistant profession. Students will explore the role of the physician assistant as part of the healthcare team. Students will become familiar with state and national legislation that governs the profession. This course will also introduce initial steps on a path toward learning to use research to inform medical reasoning (also known as evidence-based medicine). Students will continue to learn this skill throughout this program and throughout their career. Concepts 11 | P a g e
  14. 14. addressed include: the diagnostic reasoning process, the use of relevant research evidence, and proper and adequate review and analysis of medical literature. MPAS 522 – Health Care Issues II / 2 Credit Hours This course will focus on ethical, socioeconomic, and cultural issues which affect health care. The course will examine the premise that a very high percentage of morbidity rates are social- behavioral in nature, and that this has important implications for the medical practitioner. Students will develop counseling and preventive education skills that foster treatment compliance, promote positive change, and enhance ability to cope with pain and illness. An emphasis will be given to Christian ethics and how certain related issues affect patient provider interactions. Through this course students will gain a respect for self and others, a sense of professional responsibility and integrity, and a commitment to patient welfare. Students are given opportunity to develop skills in the application of medical ethics to clinical cases. Students will also build upon their research and community involvement by continuing the community outreach project which was begun in Health Care Issues I. Students will have an opportunity to integrate what they are learning into this project and give feedback. MPAS 523 – Health Care Issues III / 2 Credit Hours Health Care Issues III is designed to tie together concepts of professional responsibility, medical ethics, and research skills learned in the prior two classes. Students will also explore the topics of health care policy and medico- legal issues related to practicing medicine. Through this course, students will culminate sense of professional responsibility and integrity and a commitment to patient welfare. Students are given opportunity to develop skills in the application of medical ethics to clinical cases. Students will also build upon their research and community involvement by continuing the community outreach project which was begun in Health Care Issues I. Students will have an opportunity to integrate what they are learning into this project and give feedback. MPAS 531 – Physical Diagnosis I / 2 Credit Hours This is one of a series of three classes designed to teach methods of interviewing and obtaining a complete history and physical exam. In the first section, physical diagnosis and proper examination techniques of problems relating to the systems covered in Clinical Medicine I will be covered. Those systems include: infectious disease, otorhinolaryngology, ophthalmology, pulmonology, allergy, immunology, dermatology, genetics, gastroenterology, and tropical medicine. Emphasis is placed on professionalism in the manner and approach to patients; sophistication in taking a history; expertise in the techniques of physical examination; the ability to integrate, correlate, and interpret the data obtained; and the ability to record findings accurately, succinctly, and in an organized, logical sequence. The students will have ample time to practice their skills among themselves with faculty observation and critique. Students will also be expected to self-assess their strengths and deficiencies, and seek out tutorials and advice to remedy perceived problems. Opportunity will be given for students to present and document their findings and receive constructive criticism. MPAS 532 – Physical Diagnosis II / 2 Credit Hours This is part two in a series of courses where the student will acquire knowledge required to complete a thorough physical examination related to the modules studied. Students will integrate the knowledge obtained in Clinical 12 | P a g e
  15. 15. Medicine II coupled with laboratory sessions emphasizing the proper use of diagnostic equipment and technique for performing a physical examination. The semester will include the modular education in: cardiology, hematology, oncology, neurology, psychology, geriatrics, rehabilitation, and palliative care. Emphasis is placed on professionalism in the manner and approach to patients; sophistication in taking a history; expertise in the techniques of physical examination; the ability to integrate, correlate, and interpret the data obtained; and the ability to record findings accurately, succinctly, and in an organized, logical sequence. The students will have ample time to practice their skills among themselves with faculty observation and critique. Students will also be expected to self-assess their strengths and deficiencies, and seek out tutorials and advice to remedy perceived problems. Opportunity will be given for students to present and document their findings and receive constructive criticism. MPAS 533 – Physical Diagnosis III / 2 Credit Hours This is the third course in a series of three where the student will acquire knowledge required to complete a thorough physical examination. Students will integrate the knowledge obtained in Clinical Medicine III coupled with laboratory sessions emphasizing the proper use of diagnostic equipment and technique for performing a comprehensive physical examination. The semester will include the following modules: cardiovascular, pulmonary, musculoskeletal, nephrology, men’s health, OBGYN, and pediatric. Emphasis is placed on professionalism in the manner and approach to patients; sophistication in taking a history; expertise in the techniques of physical examination; the ability to integrate, correlate, and interpret the data obtained; and the ability to record findings accurately, succinctly, and in an organized, logical sequence. The students will have ample time to practice their skills among themselves with faculty observation and critique. Students will also be expected to self-assess their strengths and deficiencies, and seek out tutorials and advice to remedy perceived problems. Opportunity will be given for students to present and document their findings and receive constructive criticism. MPAS 541 – Clinical Medicine I / 6 Credit Hours This is one of a series of three courses in the study of medicine that will be taught in a modular format utilizing a combination of lecture and interactive techniques. It is designed to explore the common medical and surgical disorders encountered in general adult medicine. This will include: clinical presentation, acute care, etiology, pathophysiology, prevention, genetic involvement, diagnostic work-up, lab interpretation, appropriate referral, and management of disorders pertaining to the following modules: laboratory medicine, infectious disease, HEENT, dermatology, pulmonology, allergy and immunology, genetics, gastroenterology, and tropical/wilderness medicine. Students will develop a deeper curiosity about the art and science of clinical medicine, a passion about the field of medicine, and learn the skills of self directed learning. MPAS 542 – Clinical Medicine II / 6 Credit Hours The student will build upon the knowledge and skills attained in MPAS 541 to study the presentation in the following modules: cardiology, hematology, oncology, neurology, psychology, geriatrics, alternative medicine, rehabilitation, chronic care, occupational medicine, and palliative or end of life care. This is part two of a series of three courses in the study of medicine that will be taught in a modular format utilizing a combination of lecture and interactive techniques. It is designed to explore the common 13 | P a g e
  16. 16. medical and surgical disorders encountered in general adult medicine. This will include: clinical presentation, acute care, etiology, pathophysiology, prevention, genetic involvement, diagnostic work-up, lab interpretation, appropriate referral, and management of disorders pertaining to the listed modules. Students will develop a deeper curiosity about the art and science of clinical medicine, a passion about the field of medicine, and learn the skills of self directed learning. MPAS 543 – Clinical Medicine III / 6 Credit Hours The student will build upon the knowledge and skills attained in MPAS 542 to study the following modules: endocrine, nutritional disorders, nephrology, urology, men’s health, women’s health, gynecology, obstetrics, pediatrics, rheumatology, and orthopedics. This is part three of a series of three courses in the study of medicine that will be taught in a modular format utilizing a combination of lecture and interactive techniques. It is designed to explore the common medical and surgical disorders encountered in general adult medicine. This will include: clinical presentation, acute care, etiology, pathophysiology, prevention, genetic involvement, diagnostic work-up, lab interpretation, appropriate referral, and management of disorders pertaining to the listed modules. Students will develop a deeper curiosity about the art and science of clinical medicine, a passion about the field of medicine, and perfect the skills of self directed learning. MPAS 551 – Pathology/Pathophysiology I / 2 Credit Hours The Pathology & Pathophysiology course series will combine lectures and student-centered learning for an in-depth exploration of this foundational science. Students will have the opportunity to reinforce and expand their knowledge-base beyond what they established as undergraduates. This course also intends to introduce motivated students to strategies for life-long learning in the basic and applied sciences. The primary focus will be on solidifying content pertinent to Physician Assistant practice, but current events and/or other applied physiology may be discussed. The studies of pathophysiology in this course will be aligned in a module format to what is being studied in clinical medicine. Modules include: laboratory medicine, infectious disease, otorhinolaryngology, ophthalmology, Pulminology, allergy, immunology, dermatology, gastroenterology, and tropical medicine. MPAS 552 – Pathology/Pathophysiology II / 2 Credit Hours Students will learn integrative human physiology and pathophysiology involving the cardiological, hematological, oncological, neurological, and psychological systems with an emphasis upon homeostatic mechanisms and the etiologies of disease states. Recognition of the interrelationship of function and dysfunction at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels, as well as the organ and systemic levels provides the student with the necessary foundation for MPAS 542 and 543 (Clinical Medicine II and III). MPAS 553 – Pathology/Pathophysiology III / 2 Credit Hours Students will learn integrative human physiology and pathophysiology involving the endocrine, nephrological, urological, gynecological, rheumatological, and orthopedic systems with an emphasis upon homeostatic mechanisms and the etiologies of disease states. MPAS 561 – Pharmacology I / 2 Credit Hours The first in a 3-course series designed to introduce the student to principles that provide the foundation for the study of pharmacology and 14 | P a g e
  17. 17. therapeutics. Students will be given a thorough introduction to pharmacologic terms, definitions and principles which are essential to understanding drug properties and actions. Focus will be on the pharmacologic agents related to infectious, ophthalmic, pulmonary, allergic, dermatologic, and gastrointestinal disorders. Students will gain knowledge of pharmacokinetic principles of drug absorption, distribution and metabolism, and elimination. We will also cover an introduction to prescription writing and legal issues surrounding prescription writing. When completed with this series of courses students will acquiesce a working knowledge of the top 200 most commonly prescribed drugs, their pharmacological actions/properties, and classification. MPAS 562 – Pharmacology II / 3 Credit Hours Building on the knowledge and skills obtained in Pharmacology I, this course will enhance pharmacologic and therapeutic principles in relation to patient treatment. Focus will be on the basic pharmacodynamic, pharacokenetic and phamacotherapeutic principles and pharmacologic agents of cardiological, hematological, oncological, neurological, psychological, and geriatric disorders. We will also cover prescription writing of those medications. When completed with this series of courses students will acquiesce a working knowledge of the top 200 most commonly prescribed drugs, their pharmacological actions/properties, and classification. MPAS 561 – Pharmacology III / 2 Credit Hours Students will build upon the knowledge and skills obtained in MPAS 561 and 562. Combined lecture and active learning exercises are designed to develop the pharmacologic and therapeutic skills that a physician assistant will need to enhance patient care in clinical practice focusing on the following areas: Rheumatic Diseases/Anti- inflammatories, Pain Management, Endocrinology, nephrological disorders, men’s and women’s health, obstetrics, pediatrics, and orthopedics. We will also cover prescription writing of those medications. When completed with this series of courses students will acquiesce a working knowledge of the top 200 most commonly prescribed drugs, their pharmacological actions/properties, and classification. MPAS 571 – Practical Applications in Medicine I / 2 Credit Hours This course introduces the application of medical knowledge in emergency treatment and surgical procedures. Skills are learned which are necessary to treat patients in a variety of life threatening and surgical situations. Students learn appropriate diagnostic and hands on therapeutic and procedural measures relating to the following modules: infectious disease, EENT, ophthalmology, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, allergy, immunology, dermatology, genetics, and tropical medicine. This class is taught using a variety of learning methods, including traditional lectures, case-based learning, simulated patient encounters, and laboratory exercises. MPAS 572 – Practical Applications in Medicine II / 2 Credit Hours This course builds upon previous acquisition of procedural and emergency care skills and focuses on applying that knowledge to additional emergency and surgical situations. Students learn appropriate diagnostic, therapeutic, and surgical measures relating to the following modules: cardiology, hematology, oncology, neurology, psychiatry, geriatrics, rehabilitation, and palliative care. This 15 | P a g e
  18. 18. class is taught using a variety of learning methods, including traditional lectures, case-based learning, simulated patient encounters, and laboratory exercises. MPAS 573 – Practical Applications in Medicine III / 2 Credit Hours This culminating course ties together previous acquisition of procedural and emergency care skills and focuses on applying that knowledge to additional emergency and surgical situations. Students learn appropriate diagnostic, therapeutic, and surgical measures relating to the following modules: endocrine, nephrology, urology, sexual health, gynecology, obstetrics, pediatrics, rheumatology, and orthopedics. This class is taught using a variety of learning methods, including traditional lectures, case-based learning, simulated patient encounters, and laboratory exercises. Students will also learn principles of surgery including pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative care. MPAS 680 – Professional Development / 1 Credit Hour Students will prepare to transition to the professional role by developing employment skills and learning about professional practice issues. Students will develop a framework necessary to achieve and maintain certification. MPAS 691 – Capstone / 1 Credit Hour Students synthesize knowledge and skills obtained during the program through successful completion of a summative evaluation (Objective Skills Clinical Evaluation) and a comprehensive written exam. By displaying competency in both analyzing and integrating patient data, students demonstrate skills necessary for competent PA practice. Students also develop individual clinical portfolios to provide a framework for lifelong learning. MPAS 692 – PANCE review / 5 Credit Hours This course prepares students for successful completion of the Physician Assistant National Certifying Examination (PANCE), necessary for entering medical practice. Students learn study strategies that lead to successful completion of board-style exams. Students are prepared to take a systems approach, integrating all aspects of medicine encountered in the practice of medicine. Topics also include typical clinical presentation, etiology, pathophysiology, diagnostic work-up, lab interpretation and management of disorders. Costs, Financial Aid Deposit Upon notification of acceptance to the University of the Cumberlands Physician Assistant Program, applicants are required to submit a $500 non-refundable admissions deposit. This deposit, which must be received within seven days (excluding Saturdays, Sundays and holidays) of being verbally notified of acceptance, will be applied toward first year tuition: Tuition/Fees* First Year $29,500 Second Year $29,500 Total $59,000 16 | P a g e
  19. 19. Living Expenses/Travel/Transportation Students are responsible for arranging their own housing accommodations, transportation, and any expenses associated with travel and relocations performed as a requirement of the Program. During the first year of the Program, students will occasionally be commuting to clinics and hospitals throughout the Williamsburg area. During the second year, much longer distances of travel and extended periods of time away from Williamsburg may be required depending upon the location(s) of the individual clinical practice rotations. All Program participants can anticipate temporary relocation for at least one of their required clinical practice experiences during the final year of the Program. Students who elect to perform clinical practice rotations outside the Program’s primary geographic area will also be financially responsible for any costs associated with site visits performed by Program faculty during a clinical rotation at these more distant locations. Financial Aid For details on financial aid opportunities, refer to the following: University of the Cumberlands Financial Aid webpage www.ucumberlands.edu. Required Supplies Textbooks and Information Resources Each student will be required to purchase textbooks (a list will be provided for all incoming students). The approximate cost for textbooks will be $300 per semester. A trainee subscription to UpToDate (~$195.00 per year), an online evidence-based peer reviewed medical information resource, is also required. A one-time fee of $75 is required for a TYPHON PAST membership (used for clinical experience tracking). Additional TYPHON options will be made available for additional cost. Personal Computer Each student must have a laptop computer for use through the entire 24-month curriculum. The following minimum specifications are recommended: Hardware Requirements  Intel Pentium 4 with 1GHz processor or faster  1Gb RAM  40 Gb Hard Drive  Screen resolution of at least 1280x800  LCD screen privacy filter (attaches to LCD to allow frontal viewing only and prevents others from viewing screen from a tangential view)  4 hour fully-charged battery operation  10/100/1000 base-T Ethernet card 17 | P a g e
  20. 20.  802.11b/g wireless network card  WPA2 security authentication  56K standard modem  DVD/CD-RW  Microphone/Headset combination (recommended)  Sound care (recommended)  USB memory device i.e. jump drive (recommended) Software Requirements  Windows Operating System (Windows 2000 or later)  Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook)  Antivirus program: Must maintain a current anti-virus update subscription throughout Program  Adobe Acrobat Reader 8.0 or later (Free download)  Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 or later  Real Player 6.0 or later (Free download) Medical Equipment The Program requires that each student obtain the following medical equipment prior to the beginning of the first Fall Semester following matriculation:  Stethoscope: We strongly recommend you invest in a high quality stethoscope, as this will have a profound effect on your technical ability to hear the subtle and significant physiologic sounds of the human body  White lab coat, half-length ONLY (no full length coats are allowed). Lab coats may be purchased for the bookstore located on campus.  Reflex Hammer  Tuning Fork Set Equipment costs vary widely, depending upon individual preferences. The total cost for quality equipment may range from $150 to $200. Name Tags Students are required to wear nametags during clinical rotations and may be required a certain times during the didactic year. The program may provide these nametags at a nominal fee. Insurance Students are required to carry their own insurance policies. Health Insurance Students MUST carry and maintain health insurance throughout the Program. Proof of insurance must be submitted to the Graduate Admissions office prior to matriculation. Students will not be allowed to participate without proof of health insurance. 18 | P a g e
  21. 21. Worker’s Compensation Insurance An increasing number of clinical practice sites are requiring students to provide proof of compensation coverage in addition to personal health insurance coverage. If a student performs at a clinical rotation at a facility that mandates this added insurance, the cost of purchasing the required policy must be borne by the student. Liability Insurance The Program maintains group liability insurance coverage for enrolled students in the amount of $1,000,000 per claim/$3,000,000 aggregate. An individual student policy is not required. Student Privacy and Informed Consent Students in the Department of Physician Assistant Studies are granted privacy trough the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) enacted to protect the privacy associated with educational records, to establish the rights of students to inspect and review their educational records and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings. In compliance with FERPA, University of the Cumberlands Department of Physician Assistant Studies requires its students’ informed consent to the sharing of personal information with its educational partners (clinical rotation sites) strictly on a need-to-know basis. This personal information may include, but is not limited to, social security numbers, immunization records, e-mail addresses, telephone numbers, results of health care tests, results of credit checks and criminal records known to University of the Cumberlands. Notice is hereby given that random drug screenings or additional criminal background checks may be requested of the students at anytime during the didactic or clinical years as well as for placement in certain clinical rotation sites as standard operating procedure. The student may be responsible for the cost of drug screenings or additional criminal background checks. Health Screening Physical Examination All students accepted for admission to the Physician Assistant program are required to submit a completed Health History Questionnaire form (see Appendix 3) prior to matriculation. In order to insure confidentiality, this documentation must be submitted directly to the University of the Cumberlands Graduate Admissions. DO NOT send any health screening information to the PA Program. The Graduate Admissions staff is responsible for evaluating the health information provided to determine the applicant’s ability to complete the entire educational program without risk to her/himself or the patients. In order to maintain confidentiality of the information submitted, a Certificate of Health Compliance is the only documentation provided to the Program following completion of the health screening. 19 | P a g e
  22. 22. Tuberculosis Screening Applicants must provide documentation of tuberculosis screening through PPD testing, unless contraindicated, within the 6 months preceding Program matriculation. For individuals with a history of previous positive PPD test results, documentation regarding follow-up evaluation (including results of last chest x-ray) and any treatment taken must be provided. Some clinical sites have more strict tuberculosis screening requirements including two-step testing or testing within a specific period of time of rotation onset. In these cases, additional PPD testing may be required. Immunizations Students must provide documentation demonstrating current immunization or laboratory evidence of immunity for those infectious conditions required by the State of Kentucky or prospective clinical practice rotation site-specific requirements and/or those recommended by the CDC for Health Care Workers. These immunizations include: • Measles (Rubeola) • German Measles (Rubella) • Mumps • Chicken Pox (Varicella) • Tetanus • Hepatitis B • Influenza As the Program receives frequent requests for verification of its students’ immunization status during the clinical practice rotations, applicants will be required to sign a Health Information Release form (Appendix 4). The Clinical Coordinator will maintain this information until completion of all clinical practice rotations. The Program’s copy of this information will be destroyed one year after a student completes or leaves the Program. Academic Advisement Students will be assigned an academic advisor at matriculation. All faculty advisors are members of the Program’s core faculty. Students should maintain regular communication with their advisor, especially if academic, technical or professional difficulties are identified. One of the academic advisor’s specific responsibilities is to work with each student on developing professionalism. Professionalism is just as crucial to your ability to succeed as is your acquisition of the basic medical, clinical, and social sciences knowledge base. Students are responsible for meeting with their advisor at least twice each semester, at midterm and during finals week. Advisors will provide feedback about current academic standing (especially at midterm) and review the end-of-semester faculty evaluations of the students. Responsibilities of the faculty advisor include but are not limited to: 20 | P a g e
  23. 23.  Closely monitoring the students’ academic progress. If concerns arise, the faculty advisor will schedule individual conferences to address specific performance problems and develop a plan for remediation/correction.  Addressing concerns about individual professionalism or academic issues that are raised by other faculty, staff or students. 2010-2011 Program Academic Calendar The following is a tentative academic calendar for the Class of 2010 and is subject to change. Didactic Year Dec 13-Jan 11 Winter Holiday SPRING 2010 Clinical Year January 13 Classes begin SPRING 2011 March 15-19 Spring Break January 12 Classes begin April 2 Good Friday Holiday April 22 Good Friday Holiday April 30 Final Exam May 2-May 5 Final Examinations May 3-May 6 Semester Break SUMMER 2011 SUMMER 2010 May 10 Classes Begin June 6 Classes Begin August 13 Final Exam June 7 Last day to register for classes August 16-24 Semester Break July 28 Last day of classes FALL 2010 FALL 2011 August 25 Classes Begin August 24 Classes Begin September 6 Labor Day, no classes December 12-16 Final Examinations October 14-17Fall Break Nov 11-12 KAPA Conference Nov 24-28 Thanksgiving Break Dec 10 Final Exam 21 | P a g e
  24. 24. PROGRAM STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE Academic Standards Academic Integrity Dishonesty in any form will not be tolerated in the Physician Assistant Studies Program. In addition to the ethical issue of honesty, as a professional program, we hold all our students to the AAPA Guidelines for Ethical Conduct for the Physician Assistant Profession. These guidelines can be found at the following website: http://www.aapa.org/policy/ethical- conduct.pdf. Honesty and scholarship require that a person exercise care to make proper acknowledgement when using another's intellectual work. Disregard of this standard of morality and scholarship lays a person open to charges of plagiarism or cheating. Refer to the University of the Cumberlands Catalog for details on standards for academic integrity. Grades Course grades are calculated on a percentage basis as outlined in the respective course syllabi. All final course grade percentages are rounded to the nearest integer. XX.50% or higher is rounded up to the next higher integer. XX.49% or less is rounded down. Final course grades are assigned according to the following academic standards: Didactic & Research Courses Clinical Rotations Letter Letter Percent Grade Percent Grade Grade Grade 90 – 100 A 90 – 100 A 80 – 89 B 80 – 89 B 70-79 C Less than 80 F Less than 70 F Grades are considered a reflection of how well a student has done in comparison to the expectations. After a remediation plan is mapped out and if after completing the plan a student does not achieve the minimum requirements for progression in the program, the student will not be allowed to move forward in the program. The student will be permitted to join the next cohort the following year. If at that time, the student again fails to meet the minimum requirements 22 | P a g e
  25. 25. for progression, the student will be dismissed from the program. Any student wishing to be readmitted will have to file a new application with the program. Academic Assessment Tools Student assessments of learning and academic achievement will take several forms during the Physician Assistant Program. Course instructors will follow syllabi for guidelines and use a variety of methods to assess students. These may include: 1. Written examinations- to be aligned with PA competencies 2. Clinical Skills Assessments- aligned with technical standards 3. Objective Standardized Clinical Evaluations (OSCE): Obtain a patient’s medical history. Appropriately perform physical examinations. Critically analyze diagnostic data to establish a differential diagnosis. Formulate a treatment plan. Provide appropriate patient education. 4. Written Reports on medical topics 5. Pre-prep notes- aligned with the PANCE blueprint 6. Faculty Evaluations of professional performance. 7. Clinical correlation group assignments. 8. Research projects. Academic Progress Students are required to maintain a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 and achieve a course letter grade of “C” or better in all courses to progress within the Program. 1. Any individual who does not meet the specified end-of-semester GPA requirements will be placed on Academic Probation for one semester. 2. A student placed upon probation must meet with the Program Director and Academic Coordinator to establish a Remediation Plan. The terms of this plan must be completed before probation is lifted. 3. The cumulative GPA must be raised to the minimum requirement during the probationary semester. 4. Probationary students who do not improve their academic status after one semester normally will not be allowed to continue as a degree candidate. Failure to meet the minimum GPA at the end of the probationary semester will result in immediate dismissal from the program. 5. Unless a Leave of Absence has been granted, students must complete all the requirements of the MPAS program within three years of being admitted to the program. A student earning less than a “B” on any course will be placed on academic probation. A student placed upon probation must meet with the Program Director and Academic Coordinator to establish a Remediation Plan. The terms of this plan must be completed before probation is lifted. Probationary students who do not improve their academic status after one semester normally will not be allowed to continue as a degree candidate. 23 | P a g e
  26. 26. Competencies Mastery The National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants (NCCPA), in conjunction with the AAPA, PAEA and ARC-PA, has developed a document entitled Competencies for the Physician Assistant Profession (latest revision: available online at http://www.nccpa.net). This document serves as a foundation by which physician assistants can chart their individual course toward attaining the fundamental competencies of the PA profession. The University of the Cumberlands PA Program has adopted this manuscript as a resource for defining the basic knowledge, clinical skills, and professional attitudes and behaviors individuals enrolled in this program should strive to attain and demonstrate throughout their course of study. Students in the University of the Cumberlands PA Program must demonstrate competence in the following six categories: 1. Medical knowledge which includes an understanding of pathophysiology, patient presentation, differential diagnosis, patient management, surgical principles, health promotion and disease prevention. 2. Interpersonal and communication skills which encompasses verbal, nonverbal and written exchange of information. 3. Patient care including age-appropriate assessment, evaluation and management. 4. Professionalism manifested through: a. The expression of positive values and ideals as care is delivered, b. Prioritizing the interests of those being served above one’s own, c. Knowing one’s professional and personal limitations, d. Practicing without impairment from substance abuse, cognitive deficiency or mental illness, and e. Demonstrating a high level of responsibility, ethical practice, and sensitivity to patient diversity and adherence to legal and regulatory requirements. 2. Practice-based learning and improvement by engaging in critical analysis of one’s own practice experience, the medical literature and other information resources for the purpose of self-improvement in order to assess, evaluate and improve personal patient care practices. 3. Systems-based practice demonstrates a provider’s awareness of, responsiveness toward and work to improve the larger system of health care, encompassing the societal, organizational and economic environments in which health care is delivered, to provide patient care that is of optimal value. Additionally, the NCCPA has created a blueprint for entry-level physician assistant certification in which the examination content is divided into two critical dimensions: 1. Knowledge of clinical skills physician assistants should exhibit when confronted with diseases and disorders, and 24 | P a g e
  27. 27. 2. Knowledge of organ systems and the diseases, disorders and medical assessments physician assistants encounter within those systems. The following tables have been extracted from the NCCPA website to illustrate the breadth of competency expected of those who are seeking entry into the PA profession. Knowledge of Clinical Skills History Taking & Performing Physical Examinations Knowledge of: • Pertinent historical information associated with selected medical conditions • Risk factors for development of selected medical conditions • Signs and symptoms of selected medical conditions • Physical examination techniques • Physical examination findings associated with selected medical conditions • Appropriate physical examination directed to selected medical conditions • Differential diagnosis associated with presenting symptoms or physical findings Cognitive skills in: • Conducting comprehensive and focused interviews • Identifying pertinent historical information • Performing comprehensive and focused physical examinations • Associating current complaint with presented history • Identifying pertinent physical examination information Using Laboratory & Diagnostic Studies Knowledge of: • Indications for initial and subsequent diagnostic or laboratory studies • Cost effectiveness of diagnostic studies or procedures • Relevance of common screening tests for selected medical conditions • Normal and abnormal diagnostic ranges 25 | P a g e
  28. 28. • Risks associated with diagnostic studies or procedures • Appropriate patient education related to laboratory or diagnostic studies Cognitive skills in: • Using diagnostic equipment safely and appropriately • Selecting appropriate diagnostic or laboratory studies • Collecting diagnostic or laboratory specimens • Interpreting diagnostic or laboratory studies results Formulating Most Likely Diagnosis Knowledge of: • Significance of history as it relates to differential diagnosis • Significance of physical findings as they relate to diagnosis • Significance of diagnostic and laboratory studies as they relate to diagnosis Cognitive skills in: • Correlating normal and abnormal diagnostic data • Formulating differential diagnosis • Selecting the most likely diagnosis in light of presented data Health Maintenance Knowledge of: • Epidemiology of selected medical conditions • Early detection and prevention of selected medical conditions • Relative value of common screening tests • Appropriate patient education regarding preventable conditions or lifestyle modifications • Healthy lifestyles • Prevention of communicable diseases • Immunization schedules and recommendations for infants, children, adults and foreign travelers • Risks and benefits of immunization • Human growth and development • Human sexuality • Occupational and environmental exposure 26 | P a g e
  29. 29. • Impact of stress on health • Psychological manifestations of illness and injury • Effects of aging and changing family roles on health maintenance and disease prevention • Signs of abuse and neglect • Barriers to care Cognitive Skills in: • Using counseling and patient education techniques • Communicating effectively with patients to enhance health maintenance • Adapting health maintenance to the patient’s context • Using informational databases Clinical Intervention Knowledge of : • Management and treatment of selected medical conditions • Indications, contraindications, complications, risks, benefits and techniques for selected procedures • Standard precautions and special isolation conditions • Sterile technique • Follow-up and monitoring of therapeutic regimens • Conditions that constitute medical emergencies • Indications for admission to or discharge from hospitals or other facilities • Discharge planning • Available community resources • Appropriate community resources • Appropriate patient education • Roles of other health professionals • End-of-life issues • Risks and benefits of alternative medicine Cognitive skills in: • Formulating and implementing treatment plans • Recognizing and initiating treatment for life-threatening emergencies • Demonstrating technical expertise related to performing specific procedures 27 | P a g e
  30. 30. • Communicating effectively • Using counseling techniques • Facilitating patient adherence and active participation in treatment • Interacting effectively in multidisciplinary teams Pharmaceutical Therapeutics Knowledge of: • Mechanism of action • Indications for use • Contraindications • Side effects • Adverse reactions • Follow-up and monitoring of pharmacologic regimens • Risks for drug interactions • Clinical presentation of drug interactions • Treatment of drug interactions • Drug toxicity • Methods to reduce medication errors • Cross reactivity of similar medications • Recognition and treatment of allergic reactions Cognitive skills in: • Selecting appropriate pharmacologic therapy for selected medical conditions • Monitoring pharmacologic regimens and adjusting as appropriate • Evaluating and reporting adverse drug reactions Applying Basic Science Concepts Knowledge of: • Human anatomy and physiology • Underlying pathophysiology • Microbiology and biochemistry Cognitive skills in: • Recognizing normal and abnormal anatomy and physiology • Relating pathophysiologic principles to specific disease processes 28 | P a g e
  31. 31. • Correlating abnormal physical examination findings to a given disease process • Correlating abnormal results of diagnostic tests to a given disease process Knowledge of Organ Systems Cardiovascular System Cardiomyopathy Congestive Heart Failure Vascular Disease Dilated Hypertension Acute rheumatic fever Hypertrophic Essential Aortic Restrictive Secondary aneurysm/dissection Conduction Disorders Malignant Arterial Atrial fibrillation/flutter Hypotension embolism/thrombosis Atrioventricular block Cardiogenic shock Chronic/acute arterial Bundle branch block Orthostasis/postural occlusion Paroxysmal supraventricular Ischemic Heart Disease Giant cell arteritis tachycardia Acute myocardial Peripheral vascular disease Premature beats infarction Phlebitis/thrombophlebitis Ventricular tachycardia Angina pectoris Venous thrombosis Ventricular • Stable Varicose veins fibrillation/flutter • Unstable Valvular Disease Congenital Heart Disease • Prinzmetal's/variant Aortic Atrial septal defect stenosis/insufficiency Coarctation of aorta Mitral Patent ductus arteriosus stenosis/insufficiency Tetralogy of Fallot Mitral valve prolapse Ventricular septal defect Tricuspid stenosis/insufficiency Pulmonary stenosis/insufficiency Other Forms of Heart Disease Acute and subacute bacterial endocarditis Acute pericarditis Cardiac tamponade Pericardial effusion Pulmonary System Infectious Disorders Neoplastic Disease Pulmonary Circulation 29 | P a g e
  32. 32. Acute bronchitis Bronchogenic carcinoma Pulmonary embolism Acute bronchiolitis Carcinoid tumors Pulmonary hypertension Acute epiglottitis Metastatic tumors Cor pulmonale Croup Pulmonary nodules Restrictive Pulmonary Influenza Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Pertussis Disease Idiopathic pulmonary Pneumonias Asthma fibrosis • Bacterial Bronchiectasis Pneumoconiosis • Viral Chronic bronchitis Sarcoidosis • Fungal Cystic fibrosis Other Pulmonary Disease • HIV-related Emphysema Acute respiratory distress Respiratory syncytial virus Pleural Diseases syndrome infection Pleural effusion Hyaline membrane disease Tuberculosis Pneumothorax Foreign body aspiration • Primary • Secondary • Traumatic • Tension Endocrine System Diseases of the Thyroid Diseases of the Adrenal Diabetes Mellitus Gland Glands Type 1 Hyperparathyroidism Cushing's syndrome Type 2 Hypoparathyroidism Corticoadrenal Hypoglycemia Hyperthyroidism insufficiency Lipid Disorders • Graves' disease Diseases of the Pituitary Hypercholesterolemia • Hashimoto's thyroiditis Gland Hypertriglyceridemia • Thyroid storm Acromegaly/gigantism Hypothyroidism Dwarfism Thyroiditis Diabetes insipidus Neoplastic disease EENT (Eyes, Ears, Nose and Throat) Eye Disorders Ear Disorders Mouth/Throat Disorders Blepharitis Acute/chronic otitis Acute pharyngitis Blowout fracture media Acute tonsillitis Cataract Barotrauma Aphthous ulcers Chalazion Cerumen impaction Dental abscess Conjunctivitis Hearing impairment Epiglottitis Corneal abrasion Mastoiditis Laryngitis Dacryoadenitis Meniere's disease Oral candidiasis Ectropion Labyrinthitis Oral herpes simplex 30 | P a g e
  33. 33. Entropion Otitis externa Oral leukoplakia Foreign body Tympanic membrane Peritonsillar abscess Glaucoma perforation Parotitis Hordeolum Vertigo Sialadenitis Hyphema Nose/Sinus Disorders Macular degeneration Acute/chronic sinusitis Orbital cellulitis Allergic rhinitis Pterygium Epistaxis Retinal detachment Nasal polyps Retinal vascular occlusion Retinopathy • Diabetic • Hypertensive Strabismus Gastrointestinal System/Nutrition Esophagus Pancreas Hernia Esophagitis Acute/chronic Hiatal Motor disorders pancreatitis Incisional Mallory-Weiss tear Neoplasms Inguinal Neoplasms Small Intestine/Colon Umbilical Strictures Appendicitis Ventral Varices Constipation Infectious Diarrhea Stomach Diverticular disease Nutritional Deficiencies Gastroesophageal reflux Inflammatory bowel Niacin disease disease Thiamine Gastritis Intussusception Vitamin A Neoplasms Irritable bowel syndrome Riboflavin Peptic ulcer disease Ischemic bowel disease Vitamin C Pyloric stenosis Neoplasms Vitamin D Gallbladder Obstruction Vitamin K Acute/chronic cholecystitis Toxic megacolon Metabolic Disorders Cholelithiasis Rectum Lactose intolerance Liver Anal fissure Phenylketonuria Acute/chronic hepatitis Anorectal abscess/fistula Cirrhosis Fecal impaction Neoplasms Hemorrhoids Neoplasms Pilonidal disease Polyps Genitourinary System Benign Conditions of the Infectious/Inflammatory Renal Diseases 31 | P a g e
  34. 34. GU Tract Conditions Acute/chronic renal failure Benign prostatic hyperplasia Cystitis Glomerulonephritis Cryptorchidism Epididymitis Nephrotic syndrome Erectile dysfunction Orchitis Polycystic kidney disease Hydrocele/varicocele Prostatitis Electrolyte and Acid/Base Incontinence Pyelonephritis Disorders Nephro/urolithiasis Urethritis Hypo/hypernatremia Paraphimosis/phimosis Neoplastic Diseases Hypo/hyperkalemia Testicular torsion Bladder carcinoma Hypo/hypercalcemia Prostate carcinoma Hypomagnesemia Renal cell carcinoma Metabolic Testicular carcinoma alkalosis/acidosis Wilms' tumor Respiratory alkalosis/acidosis Volume depletion Volume excess Reproductive System Uterus Menstrual Disorders Complicated Pregnancy Dysfunctional uterine Amenorrhea Abortion bleeding Dysmenorrhea Abruptio placentae Endometrial cancer Premenstrual syndrome Dystocia Endometriosis/adenomyosis Menopause Ectopic pregnancy Leiomyoma Breast Fetal distress Metritis Abscess Gestational diabetes Prolapse Carcinoma Gestational trophoblastic Ovary Fibroadenoma disease Cysts Fibrocystic disease Molar pregnancy Neoplasms Mastitis Multiple gestation Cervix Pelvic Inflammatory Placenta previa Carcinoma Disease Postpartum hemorrhage Cervicitis Contraceptive Methods Pregnancy-induced Dysplasia Infertility hypertension Incompetent Uncomplicated Premature rupture of Vagina/Vulva Pregnancy membranes Cystocele Prenatal diagnosis/care Rh incompatibility Neoplasm Normal labor/delivery Prolapse Rectocele Vaginitis Musculoskeletal System 32 | P a g e
  35. 35. Disorders of the Shoulder Disorders of the Infectious Diseases Fractures/dislocations Back/Spine Acute/chronic Rotator cuff disorders Ankylosing spondylitis osteomyelitis Separations Back strain/sprain Septic arthritis Sprain/strain Cauda equina Neoplastic Disease Disorders of the Forearm/ Herniated nucleus Bone cysts/tumors Wrist/Hand pulposis Ganglion cysts Fractures/dislocations Kyphosis/scoliosis Osteosarcoma • Boxer's Low back pain Osteoarthritis • Colles' Spinal stenosis Osteoporosis • Gamekeeper's thumb Disorders of the Hip Rheumatologic Conditions • Humeral Aseptic necrosis Fibromyalgia • Nursemaid's elbow Fractures/dislocations Gout/pseudogout • Scaphoid Slipped capital femoral Juvenile rheumatoid Sprains/strains epiphysis arthritis Tenosynovitis Disorders of the Knee Polyarteritis nodosa • Carpal tunnel syndrome Bursitis Polymyositis • de Quervain's Fractures/dislocations Polymyalgia rheumatica tenosynovitis Meniscal injuries Reiter's syndrome • Elbow tendinitis Osgood-Schlatter disease Rheumatoid arthritis • Epicondylitis Sprains/strains Systemic lupus Disorders of the erythematosus Ankle/Foot Scleroderma Sjogren's Fractures/dislocations syndrome Sprains/strains Neurologic System Alzheimer's Disease Infectious Disorders Multiple Sclerosis Cerebral Palsy Encephalitis Seizure Disorders Diseases of Peripheral Meningitis Generalized convulsive Nerves Movement Disorders disorder Bell's palsy Essential tremor Generalized nonconvulsive Diabetic peripheral Huntington's disease disorder neuropathy Parkinson's disease Status epilepticus Guillain-Barre syndrome Vascular Diseases Myasthenia gravis Cerebral aneurysm Headaches Stroke Cluster headache Transient ischemic attack Migraine Tension headache Psychiatry/Behavioral Science 33 | P a g e
  36. 36. Anxiety Disorders Mood Disorders Psychoses Panic disorder Adjustment Delusional disorder Generalized anxiety Depressive Schizophrenia disorder Dysthymic Schizoaffective disorder Posttraumatic stress Bipolar Somatoform Disorders disorder Personality Disorders Substance Use Disorders Phobias Antisocial Alcohol Attention-Deficit Disorder Avoidant abuse/dependence Autistic Disorder Borderline Drug abuse/dependence Eating Disorders Histrionic Tobacco use/dependence Anorexia nervosa Narcissistic Other Behavior/Emotional Bulimia nervosa Obsessive-compulsive Disorders Obesity Paranoid Acute reaction to stress Schizoid Child/elder abuse Schizotypal Domestic violence Uncomplicated bereavement Dermatologic System Eczematous Eruptions Vesicular Bullae Viral Diseases Dermatitis Bullous pemphigoid Condyloma acuminatum • Atopic Acneiform Lesions Exanthems • Contact Acne vulgaris Herpes simplex • Diaper Rosacea Molluscum contagiosum • Nummular eczematous Folliculitis Verrucae • Perioral Verrucous Lesions Varicella-zoster virus • Seborrheic Seborrheic keratosis infections • Stasis Actinic keratosis Bacterial Infections Dyshidrosis Insects/Parasites Cellulitis/vasculitis Lichen simplex chronicus Lice Erysipelas Papulosquamous Diseases Scabies Impetigo Dermatophyte infections Spider bites Other • Tinea versicolor Neoplasms Acanthosis nigricans • Tinea corporis/pedis Basal cell carcinoma Burns Drug eruptions Melanoma Decubitus ulcers/leg ulcers Lichen planus Squamous cell Hidradenitis suppurativa Pityriasis rosea carcinoma Lipomas/epithelial Psoriasis Hair and Nails inclusion cysts Desquamation Alopecia areata Melasma Stevens-Johnson syndrome Androgenetic alopecia Urticaria Toxic epidermal necrolysis Onycomycosis 34 | P a g e
  37. 37. Erythema multiforme Paronychia Vitiligo Hematologic System Anemias Coagulation Disorders Malignancies Aplastic anemia Factor VIII disorders Acute/chronic lymphocytic Vitamin B12 deficiency Factor IX disorders leukemia Folate deficiency Factor XI disorders Acute/chronic Iron deficiency Thrombocytopenia myelogenous leukemia G6PD deficiency • Idiopathic Lymphoma Hemolytic anemia thrombocytopenic Multiple myeloma Sickle cell anemia purpura Thalassemia • Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura • Von Willebrand's disease Infectious Diseases Fungal Disease Mycobacterial Disease Viral Disease Candidiasis Tuberculosis Cytomegalovirus infections Cryptococcosis Atypical mycobacterial Epstein-Barr virus Histoplasmosis disease infections Pneumocystis Parasitic Disease Erythema infectiosum Bacterial Disease Amebiasis Herpes simplex Botulism Hookworms HIV infection Chlamydia Malaria Human papillomavirus Cholera Pinworms infections Diphtheria Toxoplasmosis Influenza Gonococcal infections Spirochetal Disease Mumps Salmonellosis Lyme borreliosis Rabies Shigellosis • Lyme disease Roseola Tetanus Rocky Mountain spotted Rubella fever Measles Syphilis Varicella-zoster virus infections Technical Standards Technical standards refer to those physical, cognitive and behavioral abilities required of all Physician Assistant candidates. Students admitted to the Physician Assistant Program must meet certain basic/essential requirements (technical standards) that are necessary to perform as a Physician Assistant. Reasonable accommodation for persons with documented disabilities 35 | P a g e
  38. 38. will be considered on an individual basis; but, an applicant must possess the intellectual, ethical, physical and emotional capabilities required to independently undertake and complete the full Program curriculum and achieve the required level of competence in the time period allotted by program design/policy. Candidates for the physician assistant profession must have use of all somatic sensations and the functional use of vision and hearing. Diagnostic skills will be lessened without the use of the senses of equilibrium, smell and taste. Additionally, they must have sufficient exteroceptive sense (touch, pain, and temperature), proprioceptive sense (position, pressure, movement, stereognosis, and vibration) and motor function to permit them to carry out the activities described in the sections that follow. Candidates must be able to integrate all information received by whatever sense(s) employed, consistently, quickly, and accurately, and they must have the intellectual ability to learn, integrate, analyze and synthesize data. Applicants will be required to sign a verification statement that they meet the Technical Standards as part of the Program-specific application Supplemental Materials (Appendix 1). Students in the University of the Cumberlands Physician Assistant Program will subsequently be evaluated each semester by faculty or clinical preceptors as to their ability to perform these Technical Standards throughout their educational experience. Individuals who do not satisfactorily demonstrate the required skills and abilities outlined in the Technical Standards will be placed on Academic Probation, provided remediation and academic counseling, and reassessed at the end of the subsequent semesters and/or clinical rotations for evidence of improvement. Failure to demonstrate satisfactory progress in future assessments will result in dismissal from the Program. The granting of an entry level master’s degree signifies that the holder has developed the basic clinical skills requisite to perform their professional role, under the ‘supervision’ of a Doctor of Medicine or Osteopathy, in accordance with the laws of medical practice. The services they provide must, for the safety and welfare of the patient, be of the same professional quality that would be rendered by their supervising physician. The PA Program has the responsibility to assure its graduates are fully competent and capable of complying with the Hippocratic Oath “to benefit and do no harm” to the public they will serve. A candidate for the physician assistant profession must possess the skills and abilities defined in the following five categories: 1. Observation Skills The candidate must be able to observe demonstrations and experiments in the basic sciences, including but not limited to physiologic and pharmacologic demonstrations in animals, microbiologic cultures, and microscopic studies of microorganisms and tissues in normal and pathologic states. A candidate must be able to observe a patient accurately at a distance and close at hand. Observation necessitates the functional use of the sense of vision, hearing, olfaction, and somatic sensation. 36 | P a g e

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