Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Challenges of the 21st Century Economy
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Challenges of the 21st Century Economy

1,101

Published on

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,101
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
23
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Thank you. Staff. Gilpin, Reno, Clark, BOG Collaborative process, significant input from you
  • Forum has already accomplished a lot Common Ground
  • Forum first approached, presented as a data problem Yet, didn’t want another study And emerging consensus ready to do something as an organization out in the field GCG give strategic direction: Transition from Organizational Building to Organizational Doing No great new research here; you’ve done good research
  • Observe same data, can lead to different actions Need to start working on specific actions, justified by the existing data Example: Recommended More Legislative Known Data Solution Questions Raised kids who go More scholarships -capacity out of state for to keep people -costs school are less in state -effectiveness likely to return Research agenda should be tied to specific areas Power of this organization is people not just research Get To Work theme Brain drain And the Forum is doing 1)… 2)… 3)… about it
  • Different ways to move your Vision/Mission/Goals forward into action Different way to frame the data points Not only one answer But a way to get you out of gridlock
  • You started Forum, economy of NH was in a very different short-term space Before recession Widespread shortages in technical workers Before dot-com bust Before higher unemployment Before Sept 11 Framing of problems needs to be sensitive to current conditions
  • Your Golden Triangle moves to upper right hand corner Business-Education-Government vary on who takes lead
  • Direction for Forum on Higher Education as well Similar for other Forum goals Knowledgeable board – you have been building knowledge Credible voice Forum not known much increase your presence by carefully choosing Attitudes and behavior – organization building has increased trust Business – Education - Government partnerships many happening but barriers still exist Forum break down Citizens know importance of higher education
  • Forum as partnerships Early Brochure “A Partnership to Improve Economic and Workforce Opportunity Through Higher Education” Also as a direct goal/recommendation in Gittel/Gottlob research Also in Vision Vision Statement - New Hampshire is a community where more citizens seek to attend and have affordable access to in-state higher education institutions and continuing education opportunities, and where higher education institutions are recognized for responsively meeting the evolving business demand for well-educated and skilled workers, providing NH with a well-prepared workforce with which to sustain its economy.
  • Mr. Gustafson Different ways to use, organizing principle Tried PR before Education is good? There is a brain drain? Tie in data to action
  • Case Statement
  • Pother key data points Demographics Financial aid Draft – refine these encapsulations of the challenges
  • Reframe the Data Consistent with previous data But data/observations are not the same thing as solutions/action Reframe data/observations in a manner that allows you to move forward, consistent with your goals
  • In 10 years, dropped from 50% to 42% of population with high school degree or less The growth in college graduate population during this decade was 5 th highest in country Size of the 4-Year College Graduate Population 10 85% 337,984 182,284 Utah 8 86% 545,441 294,091 South Carolina 9 93% 583,269 302,260 Alabama 7 93% 320,724 166,038 Arkansas 6 95% 1,298,466 666,105 Georgia 5 95% 259,572 133,124 New Hampshire 4 96% 990,065 505,913 Missouri 3 97% 784,607 399,344 Arizona 2 108% 2,544,424 1,224,311 Florida 1 118% 240,516 110,456 Nevada Relative Change Change 2000 & 2001 1984 & 1985 State Rank by Relative Average Average  
  • National Not just NH As the economy continues to shift to a service economy with more value-added knowledge as a key ingredient in productivity And across all sector, well-educated workers are needed One forecast
  • Sensitive to current labor market conditions Not the same short-term critical shortages in telecommunications with post-recession doldrums
  • In 2001, NH issued 525 Bachelor’s Degrees in education Approximately 12,000 of NH teachers are over 40 years of age. 7,000 (40%) of the teachers are projected to retire in the next 4 years in NH Alt. Certification excludes regular college education programs; includes on-the-job training, interns, professional programs, out-of-state programs, etc. Increase in alternative certifications demonstrates the high demand and need to fill the positions Since 1999, Alt. Certification has increased by 22% and traditional routes decreased by 4.7% About 296 newly certified teachers do not become employed in NH There are a sufficient number of teachers being certified but imbalance in teacher skills vs. need
  • Growth Rates in Projected Job Openings by Education Level, 1998-2008 NH US Less than Assoc’s Degree 15% 12% Associate’s Degree 33% 31% Bachelor’s Degree 24% 24% Master’s Degree 30% 19% Doctoral Degree 27% 23% First Professional Degree 19% 16%
  • Not to forget Again, rough “forecasts” for illustrative purposes – ELMI way under (Gittell and Gottlob say 50%) In 1998, 74% of ALL New Hampshire jobs required less than Associate’s Degree. Heading down to 72% by 2008, but trend will take time.
  • Not just supply and demand, but new areas (1992 – 2000) Biological: NH +75% US +47% But for all Natural Sciences (1995-2000) NH +3.4% US +5.7% (physical, math, science technologies) Engineering Internships can be quite important PSNH Scholarships / Internships
  • Research on how to improve access and affordability and effectiveness of education for non-traditional students
  • Migration trends Critical to Forum action
  • Reasons to grow our own beyond the demographic story
  • Table - high school freshmen enrolling in college within 4 yrs in any state Rankings reported here are generally representative of how NH ranks, but estimates vary significantly depending on which figures (public, private, h.s. freshmen, h.s. graduates, graduate within 12 months, older graduates), for which years E.g., including/excluding private h.s. matters because NH had the 11 th largest portion of private high school graduates in 2000, at 13.8%. The other 5 New England states were in the top 10. E.g., one source says NH has an 86% public & private h.s. completion rate and ranks 35 th in nation, while another says NH has a 74% public-only h.s. completion rate and ranks 17 th in the nation E.g., one source says the Ratio of Public & Private College-bound Seniors to H.S. Graduates is 82% in NH, while another says it is 59% for public-only. A survey of NH's graduating high school class of June 2001 found that 71% of those graduating were continuing on to a postsecondary institution Another source (Gittell and Gottlob) indicates that the percent of NH H.S. graduates going on to post-secondary institutions is about 66%, described as "average" but lower than NH's economic peer states.
  • Data point for illustrative purposes
  • NH is a node: not an island
  • Percent of students who go on to college who go out of state
  • Context of national mobility trends
  • Data point; further research Only 5.5% say more financial aid Price quality Is it like a heart surgeon or a fancy car? Schools are discount pricing to attract the right students
  • Research Issues
  • Big picture data only gets you so far Look at general trends Time to find a way to improve our performance
  • Forum works on new types of relationships
  • Big picture directions
  • Bring in more businesses
  • Trend data informs and motivates; does not solve Areas begin working on today Web page PowerPoint on GCG website 4-page Brochure
  • Research continues to be an important part of the Forum Generally Example Engineering
  • Transcript

    • 1. The New Hampshire Forum on Higher Education Recommended Strategy Going Forward A Report to the Board of Governors October 30, 2002 Submitted by Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell, P.A. Contact: Dr. Lisa K. Shapiro, Chief Economist www.gcglaw.com 800-528-1181
    • 2. <ul><li>Background </li></ul><ul><li>Summary of Recommendations </li></ul><ul><li>Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy </li></ul><ul><li>Forum Strategic Direction </li></ul><ul><li>Implementation and Next Steps </li></ul>Overview
    • 3. Background Background
    • 4. Background <ul><li>Mission Statement </li></ul><ul><li>The Forum’s mission is to sustain and grow New Hampshire’s prosperity by ensuring a workforce of highly educated and well-trained workers. </li></ul><ul><li>Vision Statement </li></ul><ul><li>New Hampshire is a community where more citizens seek to attend and have affordable access to in-state higher education institutions and continuing education opportunities, and where higher education institutions are recognized for responsively meeting the evolving business demand for well-educated and skilled workers , providing NH with a well-prepared workforce with which to sustain its economy. </li></ul>Background
    • 5. Background Goals to Achieve Mission and Vision Access & Affordability Working Partnerships Between Business/Colleges/Universities Change Attitudes and Behaviors Credible Voice Necessary Resources Knowledgeable Board Necessary Resources Citizens Know Importance of Higher Education
    • 6. Background Forum Research Data Reports Reports Reports Data Data Data Studies Studies Studies
    • 7. Background Strategic Direction of the Forum Data/Studies Action 1 Data/Studies Action 2 Data/Studies Action 3 Data/Studies
    • 8. Summary of Recommendations Summary of Recommendations
    • 9. Summary of Recommendations Strategic Direction for the Forum <ul><li>Frame problem as the challenge of the 21 st century economy </li></ul><ul><li>In this economy, business, education and government must work together more closely to keep pace and stay competitive </li></ul><ul><li>The Forum’s strategy is to become the “place” where business, education, and government connect to find new ways to grow, attract and retain knowledgeable workers </li></ul>Summary of Recommendations Forum Strategic Direction
    • 10. Summary of Recommendations Strategic Direction for the Forum Forum Mission New High Old Low Economy Job Skills Summary of Recommendations Forum Strategic Direction
    • 11. Summary of Recommendations Strategic Direction for the Forum Accessible & Affordable No Access & Not Affordable Higher Education Forum Mission New Old Economy Summary of Recommendations Forum Strategic Direction
    • 12. Summary of Recommendations Strategic Direction of the Forum Forum has Necessary Resources Access and Affordability Citizens Know Importance of Higher Education Working Partnerships between Business/Colleges/Universities Change Attitudes and Behaviors Credible Voice Knowledgeable Board Power of Partnerships to Grow NH's Economic Success Business - Higher Education - Government Summary of Recommendations Forum Strategic Direction
    • 13. Summary of Recommendations Strategic Direction <ul><li>Programs </li></ul><ul><li>Policy </li></ul><ul><li>Promotion </li></ul>Summary of Recommendations Power of Partnerships
    • 14.  
    • 15.  
    • 16. Case Statement Investing in New Hampshire’s Economic Future Investing in New Hampshire’s Economic Future Staying competitive in a quickly changing, global economy requires New Hampshire’s higher education institutions and businesses to collaborate in new and innovative ways . The fastest growing sectors in the new economy require highly trained workers with specialized educational and training needs throughout their changing careers – often outside of the traditional classroom. Working closely together, business and education can respond more effectively and efficiently to New Hampshire’s shifting economic needs in ways that allow more people to access learning and the careers of tomorrow. Summary of Recommendations Case Statement
    • 17. <ul><li>The Challenge </li></ul><ul><li>7 out of 10 of New Hampshire’s fastest growing jobs over the next 10 years require a post-secondary degree </li></ul><ul><li>Demand for college-educated workers is forecasted to outpace supply nationwide </li></ul><ul><li>Mobile workforce creates competition for New Hampshire grads </li></ul><ul><li>Fast changing economy requires lifelong learning and training creating older, non-traditional student population </li></ul><ul><li>New economy jobs require highly specific training </li></ul><ul><li>New Hampshire higher education costs outpace inflation </li></ul><ul><li>Declining government resources decrease financial aid </li></ul>Summary of Recommendations Case Statement
    • 18. The New Hampshire Forum on Higher Education – comprised of business, education and public policy leaders – is committed to ensuring a workforce of highly educated and well-trained citizens to sustain New Hampshire’s economic prosperity. Because the needs of business, higher education and government are increasingly interconnected, the continued vitality of our evolving economy depends on our ability to anticipate future needs. Whether it’s building awareness, creating access to affordable higher education or specialized workforce training, addressing these needs requires new levels of collaboration in an economy driven by information. The Forum acts as a catalyst to bring together the strengths and assets of educational, business and government entities to facilitate partnerships, share best practices and discover new ways to work together to ensure New Hampshire’s success in the 21 st century economy. Together, we can play a positive and important role in sustaining New Hampshire educational advancement and economic growth. Summary of Recommendations Case Statement
    • 19.  
    • 20.  
    • 21.  
    • 22. Implementation and Next Steps <ul><li>Get working partnerships going </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Engineering/Science/Technology </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Quality Educators </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Federal Higher Education Act Reauthorization </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Get the Forum message out </li></ul><ul><li>Get on and stay on State government leaders’ agenda </li></ul><ul><li>Get Forum content up to speed </li></ul>Summary of Recommendations
    • 23. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy What is the Economy Like? What works in this Economy? What can the Forum do as a Catalyst? Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy
    • 24. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Information Drives the Economy Economic Output Per Worker $19,404 $26,843 1977 Less Money More Physical Goods 1997 More Money Less Physical Goods 38% more $Output per worker 5,300 lbs 4,100 lbs 23% Less Pounds of Output per Worker Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Information Drives the Economy
    • 25. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Education Fuels the Economy <ul><li>Growth in Mean Earnings </li></ul>Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Education Fuels the Economy
    • 26. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Growth in Share of More Highly Educated Workers New Hampshire Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Growth in Share of More Highly Educated Workers
    • 27. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy More Post-Secondary Degrees Are Needed National Forecast for Workers with College Degrees To Fill New and Replacement Jobs, 2012 Demand (new graduates needed) Supply (current degree trends) 18 Million 12 Million Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy More Post-Secondary Degrees Are Needed
    • 28. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy New Hampshire Faces Shortages in Critical Fields <ul><li>Nursing </li></ul><ul><li>Registered and Practical Nursing graduates peaked in NH in 1995, at over 1,000, but has since declined to 416 </li></ul><ul><li>NH is expected to have 599 annual job openings for RNs and LPNs, and another 261 for Nursing Aides </li></ul><ul><li>More than half of NH’s practicing nurses were 45 years old or over in 2001 </li></ul><ul><li>Just as these nurses are retiring, demand for nursing will increase because of the aging population </li></ul>Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy New Hampshire Faces Shortages in Critical Fields
    • 29. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy New Hampshire Faces Shortages in Critical Fields <ul><li>Teaching </li></ul><ul><li>NH conferred 1.7% fewer Bachelor’s Degrees in education in 2000 than in 1992; the US conferred 0.1% more </li></ul><ul><li>NH has about 17,500 educators today and expects at least 820 annual K-12 job openings </li></ul><ul><li>As many as 500-700 teachers are projected to retire annually, and the retirement rate is projected to double in the next 5 years </li></ul><ul><li>Since 1999, Alternative Certification has increased by 187, and total annual certification has reached 1,696 </li></ul><ul><li>But not all new teachers get jobs in NH, and 67% are not being certified in critical shortage areas, e.g., math, chemistry, special education, and sciences </li></ul>Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy New Hampshire Faces Shortages in Critical Fields
    • 30. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy 7 out of 10 Occupations in NH with the Fastest Growth Rates Require an Associate's Degree or More Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy 7 out of 10 Occupations in NH with the Fastest Growth Rates Require an Associate's Degree or More 53.3% Medical Record Technician 56.9% Medical Assistant 57.1% Computer Engineer 59.9% Physician Assistant 60.4% Instructional Coordinator 62.3% Home Health Aide 72.6% Database Administrator 84.4% Desktop Publishing Specialist 87.4% Systems Analyst 87.9% Computer Support Specialist Projected Growth 1998-2008 Occupation
    • 31. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Many of the Occupations in NH Adding the Most New Jobs Do Not Require a Post-Secondary Degree <ul><li>50%-60% of projected job openings require less than an Associate's Degree </li></ul>1998-2008 Work experience in related occupation 1,600 First-line Supervisor of Sales & Related Workers Short-term on-the-job training 1,682 Teacher Aides, Paraprofessionals Associate's Degree 1,707 Computer Support Specialists Short-term on-the-job training 1,747 Nursing Aides, Orderlies & Attendants Short-term on-the-job training 1,854 General Office Clerks Bachelor's Degree 2,364 System Analysts Work experience plus degree 2,699 General Managers & Top Executives Short-term on-the-job training 2,874 Cashiers Associate's degree 3,103 Registered Nurses Short-term on-the-job training 4,025 Retail Salespersons Education / Training Growth Occupation
    • 32. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Businesses Need Workers with Special Skill Sets <ul><li>While demand for engineers and technology workers is expected to increase over the medium and long-term, the number of degrees conferred has declined, and even more so in NH. There has been nearly a 31% decline in annual degrees conferred in NH for engineers as compared with a 6% decline nationally </li></ul><ul><li>Aggregating across all computer sciences and engineer degrees, NH still lagged the U.S. </li></ul>NH US -2.8% +6.2% Growth in Bachelor’s Degrees In Computer Sciences and Engineering 1995 to 2000 Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Businesses Need Workers with Special Skill Sets
    • 33. <ul><li>Because there is a decline in “old, stable” industrial jobs, educational institutions, students, and businesses continue to intersect throughout a person’s lifetime </li></ul>Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Fast Changing Economy Requires Fast Changing Education System Interaction of Business and Higher Education Old Way New Way Post Secondary Education Businesses Post Secondary Education Businesses
    • 34. <ul><li>The aging population will accelerate the number of non-traditional students pursuing post-secondary degrees </li></ul>Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Aging Population NH Population Growth Rates: 1990-2000 and 2005-2015 31% 18% 65+ years old 7% 15% 25-64 years old 0% 4% 0-24 years old 7% 11% Total 2005-2015 1990-2000
    • 35. <ul><li>On average, college-educated workers have held 4 jobs since graduation, and expect at least one more job change in the future </li></ul><ul><li>The percent of adults participating in adult education has increased </li></ul>Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Non-Traditional Students Percent of Adults Who Participated in Adult Education 1 (by age) 18.7% 10.3% 65+ yrs old 35.2% 22.4% 54 to 64 yrs old 49.5% 32.8% 45 to 54 yrs old 51.7% 45.2% 35 to 44 yrs old 60.3% 41.5% 25 to 34 yrs old 50.7% 33.9% 16 to 24 yrs old 1999 1991
    • 36. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Regional Migration Net Population Change By Region (1990 to 2000 - millions of people) Net Population Change For Northeast States (1990 to 2000 - thousands of people)
    • 37. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Immigration
    • 38. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy New Hampshire Migration <ul><li>The trend of positive net-migration into NH continued through 2001 </li></ul>NH Migration, Top States and Total 1995 - 2001 51,206 249,120 300,326 Total for NH 1,400 15,446 16,846 Vermont 6,750 11,009 17,759 New York 46,378 66,727 113,105 Massachusetts -1,288 24,364 23,076 Maine -8,587 26,081 17,494 Florida 4,548 7,314 11,862 Connecticut 577 10,491 11,068 California Net Out In State
    • 39. <ul><li>Net migration from MA into NH may slow in the future, as the number of people aged 25-64 years will only grow 3% (2005-2015), down from 9% (1990-2000) </li></ul><ul><li>MA is still expected to lose 815,000 people by 2025, one of the largest losses in the country </li></ul>Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy New Hampshire Migration
    • 40. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy New Hampshire Post-Secondary Performance <ul><li>NH has one of the lowest high school completion rates in New England, but has an average rank when compared nationally </li></ul><ul><li>NH does a better job at sending its high school freshmen to go on to college </li></ul>High School to College Rate 2002 25 40% Vermont 9 47% Rhode Island 14 44% New Hampshire 3 54% Massachusetts 16 43% Maine 8 48% Connecticut Rank Percent State
    • 41. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Post-Secondary Education in New Hampshire <ul><li>NH growth in post-secondary degrees per capita has been below the national average </li></ul>Growth in Degrees Per Capita Conferred 1990 to 2000 4.1% 9.7% US -1.1% 16.8% Vermont -8.5% -2.8% Rhode Island 3.4% 8.5% New Hampshire -7.8% -24.5% Massachusetts 10.5% 14.4% Maine 2.6% -12.1% Connecticut Bachelor's Degrees Associate's Degrees State
    • 42. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Post-Secondary Education in New Hampshire <ul><li>But NH produces a large number of graduates per capita </li></ul>Degrees Conferred Per 1,000 Population YR 2000 <ul><li>And is among the top 5 states with a high percentage of college freshmen from outside of the state </li></ul>NA 4.4 NA 2.0 US 3 7.9 12 2.6 Vermont 2 8.0 4 3.4 Rhode Island 8 6.3 13 2.5 New Hampshire 6 6.7 36 1.7 Massachusetts 26 4.4 31 1.7 Maine 29 4.4 47 1.3 Connecticut Rank Bachelor's Degrees Rank Associate's Degrees State
    • 43. <ul><li>NH ranks second in the nation for in-state residents who attend college out-of-state </li></ul>Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy New Hampshire College Student Migration By State of Residence Fall 2000   16% U.S.   36% Region 3 49% Vermont 10 33% Rhode Island 2 50% New Hampshire 15 28% Massachusetts 6 39% Maine 5 43% Connecticut Rank Percent  
    • 44. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Mobility Creates Competition for Graduates 19% 37% 45% High School Degree College Degree Advanced Degree Percent of People Nationally Who Move Out of State (by education level) Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Mobility Creates Competition for Graduates
    • 45. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy College Student Migration Patterns <ul><li>The top 4 reasons why NH high school graduates do not attend USNH: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Major not offered </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>They want to experience a different environment </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Better academic reputation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Not the right location </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>College graduates migrate to states with: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Higher job growth </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lower unemployment </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Higher pay </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lower housing costs </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Better amenities </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Price-quality issues </li></ul>
    • 46. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Migration Patterns <ul><li>Nationally, 81% of students who graduate from home state institutions live in their home state after four years, compared to only 52% of those who go out-of-state for their post-secondary education </li></ul><ul><li>A 2002 point-in-time query from a NH data base found that 78% of NH students attending NH post-secondary schools remain in NH during the first few years after graduating. after a small decline, this number increases to 91% returning within 16 years after graduation </li></ul><ul><li>The query also found that 56% of NH students attending non -NH post-secondary schools returned to NH shortly after graduating; this number steadily increased to 88% returning within 16 years after graduation </li></ul>Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Migration Patterns
    • 47. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Higher Education Costs Increasing <ul><li>Nationally, over the last two decades, the cost of attending public and private colleges has grown more rapidly than inflation and faster than family income </li></ul><ul><li>In NH, tuition and fees at public four-year colleges and universities increased by 52% over the last decade – the biggest increase in New England - to the highest costs: $5,557 </li></ul><ul><li>The median family income in NH over the same decade increased by 19% </li></ul><ul><li>NH’s tuition and fees at private four-year institutions increased by 17%, to $18,105, which is about average for New England </li></ul>
    • 48. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Government Resources are Declining <ul><li>Recession created State budget deficits </li></ul><ul><li>Uncertain, subdued recovery </li></ul><ul><li>Fiscal conservatism </li></ul>Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Government Resources are Declining
    • 49. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Traditional Relationships Disappearing <ul><li>Mobility </li></ul><ul><li>Rapid Change </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of Community </li></ul><ul><li>Life as Byte-Sized Pieces </li></ul>Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy Traditional Relationships Disappearing
    • 50. Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy New Economy Requires New Types of Relationships <ul><li>Listserv, for people with common interests </li></ul><ul><li>eBay, for buyers and sellers </li></ul><ul><li>Just-in-time inventory management, for businesses </li></ul><ul><li>Distance learning, for students and workers </li></ul><ul><li>On-line licensing, for government </li></ul>Challenges of the 21 st Century Economy New Economy Requires New Types of Relationships
    • 51. Forum Strategic Direction Forum Strategic Direction
    • 52. Forum Strategic Direction Strategic Partnerships Connect NH Students to NH Businesses <ul><li>Challenges </li></ul><ul><li>Demand for more educated workers </li></ul><ul><li>High mobility, especially among college educated </li></ul><ul><li>Shortages in critical fields </li></ul><ul><li>Fast-paced changing economy </li></ul><ul><li>Need for special skill sets </li></ul><ul><li>Need for continuous education </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing numbers of non-traditional students </li></ul><ul><li>Aging population </li></ul><ul><li>Immigration </li></ul><ul><li>Migration </li></ul><ul><li>Access and Affordability </li></ul><ul><li>Declining Government Resources </li></ul><ul><li>The Benefits of Partnerships </li></ul><ul><li>More likely to attend NH schools </li></ul><ul><li>More likely to stay in NH </li></ul><ul><li>More likely to return to NH </li></ul><ul><li>More financial resources to increase access to post-secondary education </li></ul><ul><li>Better educational opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Meets the changing educational needs of students and business </li></ul><ul><li>Makes NH businesses more competitive </li></ul>Forum Strategic Direction Strategic Partnerships Connect NH Students to NH Businesses
    • 53. Forum Strategic Direction <ul><li>The Forum helps businesses: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Learn what NH educational institutions offer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify opportunities to connect to NH students, their future workforce </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Suggest what NH educational institutions should offer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Connect with other businesses that may have shared needs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop, attract, and retain well-educated workers to meet their needs </li></ul></ul>Forum Strategic Direction
    • 54. Forum Strategic Direction <ul><li>The Forum helps educators: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Learn what the NH marketplace needs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Expand opportunities for students </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make their intellectual work relevant to NH businesses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Generate new curriculum and educational approaches </li></ul></ul>Forum Strategic Direction
    • 55. Forum Strategic Direction <ul><li>The Forum helps government: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Learn about business/higher education partnerships and efforts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Find ways to leverage funds most to help New Hampshire students, institutions, and businesses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shape public policy to develop, attract, and retain well-educated workers </li></ul></ul>Forum Strategic Direction
    • 56. Forum Strategic Direction Examples of Types of Partnerships <ul><li>Internships </li></ul><ul><li>Apprenticeships </li></ul><ul><li>Scholarships </li></ul><ul><li>Customized Degree Programs </li></ul><ul><li>Contract Training/Education </li></ul><ul><li>Cooperative Education </li></ul><ul><li>Distance Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Curriculum Development </li></ul><ul><li>Faculty Internships in Business </li></ul><ul><li>Executive-On-Loan Appointments </li></ul><ul><li>Research Initiatives </li></ul><ul><li>Student/Employee Recruitment </li></ul><ul><li>College Credit for On-Job Training </li></ul><ul><li>Technology Transfer Programs </li></ul><ul><li>Industry Advisory Groups </li></ul><ul><li>Networking Events </li></ul><ul><li>Clearinghouse </li></ul><ul><li>Joint Advocacy </li></ul>Forum Strategic Direction Examples of Types of Partnerships
    • 57. <ul><li>Information gathering and promotion </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>They exist </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Not well-known nor easily accessible </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Expanding existing partnerships </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Use “third party” Forum to energize and expand </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Identifying and developing new opportunities </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Forum “place” to identify new opportunities </li></ul></ul></ul>Forum Strategic Direction Types of Partnership Activities
    • 58. Implementation and Next Steps Implementation and Next Steps
    • 59. Implementation and Next Steps <ul><li>Get working partnerships going </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Engineering/Science/Technology </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Quality Educators </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Federal Higher Education Act Reauthorization </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Get the Forum message out </li></ul><ul><li>Get on and stay on State government leaders’ agenda </li></ul><ul><li>Get Forum content up to speed </li></ul>Implementation and Next Steps
    • 60. Implementation and Next Steps <ul><li>Wrap up, roll out, implement, measure, quality educator Task Force recommendations (1/03) </li></ul><ul><li>Develop/launch/measure initiative to expand engineering/technology connections between business, higher education, and government (Commence work December 2002) </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Identify members of the Board with interest to form a Task Force </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Identify additional industry/education experts and stakeholders </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Supporting research </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Define the work and how to expand existing efforts such as Project Lead The Way and Dual Admissions programs </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Promote, implement, measure </li></ul></ul></ul>Implementation and Next Steps
    • 61. Implementation and Next Steps <ul><li>Investigate the creation of an industry advisory group in healthcare to expand connections of existing programs and to propose, agree, implement, and measure outcomes (Q1-2003) </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a joint advocacy position on Federal re-authorization of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (merit awards, Pell Grants, loan and debt burden issues, performance measures, graduation rates) </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Host discussions </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Policy briefing </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Joint advocacy </li></ul></ul></ul>Implementation and Next Steps
    • 62. Implementation and Next Steps <ul><li>Refine external promotional materials (Q1-2003) </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Evolve talking points and power point presentation (12/03) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Develop Press & Media Kit (12/02) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Finalized 4-page Case Statement (12/02) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Complete Higher Education Economic Impact Study (1/03) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Get on the web </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Board of Governors to speak to business, education, and government audiences on need for Forum and actions taken (Q1-2003) </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Board members identify opportunities to speak (2 per member) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Identify 10 key spokespeople willing to become familiar with the Forum’s talking points and to deliver the message </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Complete 30 speaking engagements during Q1-2003 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Collect names and ideas to expand partnerships at speaking engagements </li></ul></ul></ul>Implementation and Next Steps
    • 63. <ul><li>Implement media strategy & communications plan (Q1-2003 & beyond) </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Speaking Engagements </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Media and Editorial Boards </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Radio and TV Talk Shows </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Develop/Implement government relations strategy to get on and stay on State government leaders’ agenda (Q4-2002 & beyond ) </li></ul><ul><li>Host Reception at BAE Systems with Patrick Callan “Measuring Up 2002” (11/13/02) (Attend and Bring a Colleague) </li></ul>Implementation and Next Steps
    • 64. Implementation and Next Steps <ul><li>Host Legislative Breakfast 1/23/03 – Higher Education Economic Impact Study (Attend and Bring a Colleague) </li></ul><ul><li>Build out Forum “members” through speaking engagements, surveys, industry advisory groups, promotional opportunities, web presence (Q1 & Q2 2003) </li></ul><ul><li>Create an inventory of existing innovative business/higher education partnerships to include in Forum promotional materials and to promote (Q1-2003) – Request College Presidents/Business Leaders to submit examples based on a Forum template </li></ul>
    • 65. Implementation and Next Steps <ul><li>Create user-friendly access to existing partnerships for students, educators, business, and government in New Hampshire (Q2 & Q3 2003) </li></ul><ul><li>Showcase one partnership example at the January(?)2003 Governors’ Meeting </li></ul><ul><li>Track supply/demand trends to identify areas of opportunity for the Forum to act as a catalyst to increase connections and opportunities </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Survey businesses </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Survey educators </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Survey best practices </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Track labor market data trends </li></ul></ul></ul>Implementation and Next Steps
    • 66. Sources & Notes <ul><li>Information Drives the Economy </li></ul><ul><li>Source : “10 Driving Principles of the New Economy,” Business 2.0, March 2000. </li></ul><ul><li>Education Fuels the Economy </li></ul><ul><li>Source : U.S. Census Bureau, “Educational Attainment – Full-Time, Year-Round Workers, 25 Years Old and Over by Mean Earnings and Sex, 2000 Dollars.” </li></ul><ul><li>Notes: Nationwide data; “HS Diploma” includes equivalency. </li></ul><ul><li>Growth in Share of More Highly Educated Workers </li></ul><ul><li>Source : U.S. Census Bureau. </li></ul><ul><li>Notes : Residents 25 years old and over. </li></ul><ul><li>More Post-Secondary Degrees Are Needed </li></ul><ul><li>Source : “Challenges Facing the American Workplace: The American Workplace Report,” Employment Policy Foundation, 2002, Figure 57, at 36. </li></ul><ul><li>Notes : “College Degrees” refer to baccalaureate degrees. </li></ul><ul><li>New Hampshire Faces Shortages in Critical Fields </li></ul><ul><li>Nursing: </li></ul><ul><li>Sources : U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS), “Completions” Surveys; New Hampshire Employment Security, Economic and Labor Market Information Bureau, “New Hampshire Employment Projections by Industry and Occupation, Base Year 1998 to Projected Year 2008,” January 2001; “Proposal to US Department of Labor H-1B Technical Skills Training Grant,” Workforce Opportunity Council, April 22, 2002, at 3. </li></ul>Sources & Notes
    • 67. Sources & Notes New Hampshire Faces Shortages in Critical Fields Teaching: Sources : U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS), “Completions” Surveys; New Hampshire Employment Security, Economic and Labor Market Information Bureau, “New Hampshire Employment Projections by Industry and Occupation, Base Year 1998 to Projected Year 2008,” January 2001; “Teacher Shortage in NH: A USNH Report and Response, White Paper,” June 19, 2002 at 4; New Hampshire Department of Education, Division of Program Support, Bureau of Credentiality, “New Certificate Issues” and “Number Who Are Employed in Public School,” (Revised Date) September 24, 2002; New Hampshire Retirement System. 7 out of 10 Fastest Growing Occupations in NH Require an Associates Degree or More Source : New Hampshire Employment Security, Economic and Labor Market Information Bureau, “New Hampshire Employment Projections by Industry and Occupation, Base Year 1998 to Projected Year 2008,” January 2001, at 38. Many of the Occupations in NH Adding the Most New Jobs Do Not Require a Post-Secondary Degree Source : New Hampshire Employment Security, Economic and Labor Market Information Bureau, “New Hampshire Employment Projections by Industry and Occupation, Base Year 1998 to Projected Year 2008,” January 2001, at 33 and 41; “meeting the Challenge: Higher Education and the New Economy in New Hampshire,” Ross Gittell and Brian Gottlob, February 2001, at 7. Notes : New Hampshire Employment Security, Economic and Labor Market Information Bureau, projects that about 37% of all new jobs created in NH will require at least a two-year college degree, while Gittell and Gottlob believe that 50% of all new jobs will be for college-educated workers, based on their analysis. Sources & Notes
    • 68. Sources & Notes Businesses Need Workers with Special Skill Sets Source : U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS), “Completions” Surveys. Aging Population Source : U.S. Census Bureau, historical population data and “Projections of the Population, By Age and Sex, of States: 1995 to 2025.” Non-Traditional Students Sources : U.S. Department of Education; “Lifetime Learning Survey,” George Mason University and the Potomac KnowledgeWay, June 1998; U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, National Center for Education Statistics, Statistical Analysis Report, “Participation Trends and Patterns in Adult Education: 1991 to 1999,” February 2002, Table B3, at 71. Notes : College-educated workers surveyed were aged 30-55 and out of school for at least ten years. Trends in career changes cut across all industries and all kinds of degrees earned. Adult education activities include adult basic education, English as a Second Language course, apprenticeship programs, some programs leading to a formal (typically college) credential, courses taken for work-related reasons, and non-work related courses. Full-time participation in post-secondary credential programs by those aged 16-24 is not counted as an adult education activity. Adults are defined as civilian, non-institutionalized individuals aged 16 or older who are not in elementary or secondary education. Regional Migration Source : The Washington Post, “The Northeast’s Shifting Labor Supply,” July 22, 2002 at A3.) Immigration Source : Barron’s, “New Melting Pot,” September 2, 2002, at 17-19, based on Bureau of Labor Statistics. Sources & Notes
    • 69. Sources & Notes New Hampshire Migration The trend of… Source : “Economic Perspectives for New England and New Hampshire,” Presentation by Denis Delay to the NH Business & Industry Association, September 25, 2002. New Hampshire Migration Net migration… and MA is still… Source : U.S. Census Bureau, “Projections of the Population, By Age and Sex, of States: 1995 to 2025.” New Hampshire College Student Migration Source : U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, &quot;Enrollment in Postsecondary Institutions, Fall 2000 and Financial Statistics, Fiscal Year 2000,&quot; NCES 2002-212, by Laura G. Knapp et al, Table 21. Notes : All First-Time, First-Year Degree / Certificate Seeking Students Enrolled in Title IV Degree-Granting Institutions, by State of Residence: Fall 2000; Ranks reflect the 50 states and the District of Columbia Mobility Creates Competition for Graduates Source : Kodrzychi, Y.K., “Migration of Recent College Graduates: Evidence of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth,” New England Economic Review , January/February 2001, at 15. Notes : Percentage reflects all first-time, first-year degree / certificate seeking students enrolled in Title IV degree-granting institutions in the Fall of 2000. Percentages vary depending on whether or not students graduated from high school in the last 12 months and on the type of institution they attend (e.g., private, public, 2-year, 4-year). The NLSY (a project of the US Bureau of Labor Statistics) is based on a nationally representative sample of about 6,000 persons who were 14 to 22 years old in 1979 and were interviewed once a year until 1994 and once every other year thereafter. Sources & Notes
    • 70. Sources & Notes Migration Patterns Source : The New Hampshire Forum on Higher Education’s Draft Mission Statement, August 9, 2002; New Hampshire Higher Education Assistance Foundation’s Network Migration Report, September 11, 2002 (DRAFT – not yet publicly available). College Student Migration Patterns Sources : Postsecondary Education Opportunity, Senior Survey; Kodrzycki, Yolanda K., “Migration of Recent College Graduates: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth,” New England Economic Review , January/February 2001, at 18. New Hampshire Post-Secondary Performance Source : “Measuring Up 2002, the State-by-State Report Card for Higher Education,” The National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, &quot;State Comparison Results: Raw Scores Participation.&quot; Notes : Data in table reflect high school freshmen enrolling in college within 4 years in any state. The rankings reported here are generally representative of how NH ranks in the region and the nation. However, estimates of high school completion rates and college participation rates vary significantly depending on which populations are included in the analyses and which years are looked at. For example, “Measuring Up 2002” found that NH had the lowest public and private high school completion rate of any New England state, at 86%, and ranked 35th nationally, while “Postsecondary Education Opportunity” found that NH had the second lowest public high school completion rate of any New England state, at 74%, and ranked 17th nationally. As another example, “Dashboard Indicators: Higher Education in New Hampshire, Fall 2001&quot; reports that the ratio of college-bound seniors to high school graduates was 82% in 1999, the second highest of any New England state and well above the lowest rate of 64% in Vermont. In comparison, “Postsecondary Education Opportunity” found that NH’s rate of public and private high school graduates going on to college Sources & Notes
    • 71. Sources & Notes New Hampshire Post-Secondary Performance ( Notes continued) was 59%, ranked 23rd nationally, while a survey of NH's graduating high school class of June 2001 found that 71% of those graduating were continuing on to a postsecondary institution. Finally, &quot;Meeting the Challenge&quot; (Gittell and Gottlob) indicates that the percent of NH high school graduates going on to post-secondary institutions is about 66%, described as &quot;average&quot; but lower than NH's economic peer states. Post-secondary Education in NH NH growth… Sources: U.S. Census Bureau and U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics, 1993 (Table 236) and 2001 (Table 251), based on Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS), &quot;Completions&quot; Survey. Post-Secondary Education in New Hampshire But NH produces… Source : U.S. Census Bureau and U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics, 1993 (Table 236) and 2001 (Table 257) based on Integrated Postsecondary Education Data Systems (IPEDS) “Completions” Survey; U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics, “Enrollment in Postsecondary Institutions, Fall 2000, and Financial Statistics, Fiscal Year 2000,” National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics 2002-212, Laura G .Knapp et al, Table 21. Notes: Ranked best to worst, 50 states and D.C. Higher Education Costs Increasing Source: &quot;Losing Ground - A National Status Report on the Affordability of American Higher Education,&quot; The National Policy Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, 2002, at 22-30. Notes: All dollar amounts and percentage increases are adjusted for inflation. Figures for annual tuition and fees at public four-year institutions are for 1992 through 2001, those for private four-year institutions are for 1991 through 2000, and those for annual median family income for four-person families are for 1991 through 2000. Sources & Notes
    • 72. <ul><li>Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell </li></ul><ul><li>214 North Main Street </li></ul><ul><li>Concord NH 03301 </li></ul><ul><li>Phone 800-528-1181 </li></ul><ul><li>Fax 603-226-3477 </li></ul><ul><li>www.gcglaw.com </li></ul><ul><li>Project Team </li></ul><ul><li>Dr. Lisa K. Shapiro, Chief Economist </li></ul><ul><li>Mr. Erik W. Taylor, Director of Communications </li></ul><ul><li>Ms. Heidi L. Kroll, Market & Policy Analyst </li></ul><ul><li>Ms. Susan H. Paschell, Legislative Specialist </li></ul><ul><li>Ms. Amy Campbell, Content Strategist Information Designer, Infoworks! </li></ul>

    ×