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  • Community involvement
  • First of all let’s explore about why TAKE 10! Was created. First of all the centers for Disease control recommends that children And adolescents should engage in 30-60 min. of moderate of vigorous pa on all or most days of the week.

Transcript

  • 1. The Role of Physical Education and Physical Activity In Coordinated School Health
  • 2. Objectives
    • Tennessee Law for Physical Activity
    • 2. Best Practices!
    • 3. State Board Rules and Regulations for Physical Education
    • 4. New Standards
    • 5. Sports Physicals Policy
  • 3. Coordinated School Health Model
  • 4. Recommendations Children and adolescents should engage in 30-60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity on all or most days of the week. *NASPE Guidelines *CDC Recommendation
  • 5. TCA 49-6-1022
    • Integrate a minimum of 90 minutes of physical activity per week during the instructional school day.
    • “ In accordance with Section 2 of this bill, as amended, it shall be the duty of each local education agency to integrate a minimum of ninety (90) minutes of physical activity per week into the instructional school day for elementary and secondary school students.”
    • Implement a coordinated school health program.
  • 6. ` Indicates a City System with a County
  • 7.
    • Best Practices!
  • 8. A Program of the ILSI Research Foundation Web: www.take10.net Phone: 770-456-0778 Email: [email_address]
  • 9. What are you hearing?
    • OH MY GOSH! MY KIDS ABSOLUTELY LOVE THE TAKE 10! I HAVE BEEN DOING AN ACTIVITY BETWEEN ALL OF OUR FRIDAY TESTS AND IT IS GREAT! I HAVE ALREADY CREATED SOME OF MY OWN. WE DOUBLE DUTCHED AND HAD ALL THE KIDS JUMPING THE INVISIBLE JUMP ROPE AND THEN WE HULA HOOPED BOTH WAYS COUNTING TO 100 IT IS A FABULOUS PROGRAM AND I THANK YOU FOR BRINGING IT TO US
    • 1ST GRADE TEACHER
  • 10. http://tennessee.gov/education/schoolhealth/physed/doc/TNPhysActivHbook_10_07.pdf
  • 11. NC Energizers
    • DOWNLOADABLE
    • http://www.ncpe4me.com/energizers.html
    • Elementary School Energizers
    • Middle School Energizers    
    • Laminated booklets of the Grades K-5 Energizers and Middle School Energizers are available for purchase
  • 12.
    • Physical Education
  • 13. Physical Education:
    • A planned , sequential K-12 curriculum that provides cognitive content and learning experiences in a variety of activity areas such as basic movement skills; physical fitness; rhythms and dance; games; team, dual, and individual sports; tumbling and gymnastics; and aquatics.
    • Quality physical education should promote, through a variety of planned physical activities, each student’s optimum physical, mental , emotional , and social development, and should promote activities and sports that all students enjoy and can pursue throughout their lives. Qualified , trained teachers teach physical activity.
    www.cdc.gov
  • 14. RULES OF T HE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
    • Health, Physical Education, and Wellness.
    • 1. Health and Physical Education, Grades K-8. The health education and physical education programs, provided annually, shall be based on state curriculum standards and shall be developmentally appropriate with instruction focusing on activities which will promote good health habits and enhance physical fitness.
    • 2. Wellness, Grades 9-12.
    • (i) Students shall complete 1 unit of wellness. The program shall be based on the state curriculum standards and shall integrate concepts from the areas of health and physical fitness.
    • (ii) Participation in marching band and interscholastic athletics shall not be substituted for this requirement. Credit earned in two years of JROTC may be substituted for the wellness requirement provided the local board of education has complied with the requirements of the State Board of Education.
    • (iii) Participation in marching band and interscholastic athletics shall not be substituted for the wellness requirement. Credit earned in two years of JROTC may be substituted for the wellness requirement provided the local board of education has complied with requirements of the State Board of Education.
  • 15. New ½ CREDIT
    • All students will meet the following READY CORE requirements:
        • English 4 units
        • Mathematics 4 units
        • Science 3 units
        • Social Studies 3.5 units
        • Health, Physical Fitness and Wellness 1.5 units
    • Students are required to complete an additional ½ credit in Physical Education. This requirement may be met by substituting a documented and equivalent time of physical activity in marching band, JROTC, cheerleading, interscholastic athletics, school sponsored intramural athletics, and other areas approved by the local board of education.
  • 16. New Standards
    • Pass SBE August 22, 2008
    • PreK-12 Physical Education
    • http://www.tennessee.gov/education/ci/health_pe/
  • 17. Pre-Participation Sports Physicals, Rule
    • 0520-1-3-.08 Pupil Personnel Services, Requirement G
    • The school health services program shall include but not be limited to the following:
    • (a) Every child entering school for the first time shall have a physical examination. A doctor of medicine, osteopathic physician, physician assistant, certified nurse practitioner, or a properly trained public health nurse shall perform this examination. No child shall be admitted to school without proof of immunization except those who are exempt by statute as provided in T.C.A. 49-6-5001.
    • (b) Every student participating in interscholastic athletics shall have an annual physical examination. A doctor of medicine, osteopathic physician, physician assistant, certified nurse practitioner, properly trained public health nurse, or registered nurse who has received specialized training as defined by the Tennessee Department of Health shall perform this examination. Additionally, examinations of students in the 7th and 9th grades who participate in interscholastic athletics shall be reported using the “Interscholastic Sports Examination Form” developed by the Tennessee Department of Health.
  • 18. Update Regarding Proposed Sports Physical Rule Change for 7th and 9th Graders
    • There has been a delay in the process of moving forward with the proposed rule change regarding sports physicals for 7th and 9th graders. In the meantime, the State Board of Education still recommends that 7th and 9th grade athletes get the well-child checkup/EPSDT screen. Until the rule-making process is complete, however, either exam (the traditional sports physical or the comprehensive well-child checkup/EPSDT screen) will be accepted by the State Board of Education and by TSSAA.
    • The Interscholastic Sports Examination Form is the only form needed for these students. TSSAA is accepting this form for these students (and TSSAA will accept this form for students in any other grade as well). Although the comprehensive EPSDT/well-child checkup is recommended, it is not required that athletes have this box checked on their clearance form.
  • 19. Coordinated School Health Enhances Educational Outcomes
    • Schools that offer intensive physical activity programs see positive effects on academic achievement
      • improved mathematics
      • improved reading and writing scores
      • reduced disruptive behaviors
    • Shepard RJ. (1997). Pediatr Exerc Sci, 9 113-126.
    • Sallis JF, et al. (1999). Res Q Exerc Sport, 70(2), 127-134.
  • 20. Health Realities
    • “ If schools do not deal with children’s health by design they deal with it by default.”
    • (Health Is Academic)
  • 21. References
    • Johnson, C., Myers, L., Webber, S., Hunter, S., Bonura, S., Berenson, G. (1997). Learned helplessness with excessive weight and other cardiovascular risk factors in children. American Journal of Health Behavior, 21 (1), 51-59.
    • Kilander, L., Nyman, H., Bober, M., Lithell, H. (1997). Cognitive function, vascular risk factors and education. Journal of Internal Medicine, 142 (4), 313-321.
    • Rhoades, S., Shimoda, K., Waid, L., O’Neil, P. (1995). Neurocognitive deficits in morbidly obese children with obstructive sleep apnea. Journal of Pediatrics, 127 (5), 741-744.