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science gcse core, additional and triple powerpoints

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B7 lesson part two Presentation Transcript

  • 1. B7 Biology ‘triple science’ Route map Over the next 12 lessons you will study : Friday 21 October 2011 B7.1 Harvesting the sun’s energy B7.2 Trapping light energy B7.3 Plants using glucose B7.4 The rate of photosynthesis End of module test B7.5 Respiration and photosynthesis B7.6 Feeding relationships B7.14 Genetic testing B7.15 Blood B7.16 Blood groups and inheritance B7.17 The heart B7.18 Circulation and valves B7.19 Energy B7.8 Symbiosis in food chains B7.9 Parasites in food webs B7.10 Parasites and disease B7.11 Using biotechnology B7.20 Exercise in humans B7.21 Anaerobic respiration and ATP B7.22 The skeleton B7.23 Joints and movement B7.12 Genetic modification B7.13 GM crops and their use B7.24 Sport injuries B7.25 Exercise and training B7.7 Life in soil
  • 2. B7.9 Tape worm and other parasites Decide whether the following statements are true or false:
    • Lesson objectives:
    • Understand how parasites benefits at the cost of another species
    • Understand the life cycle of the tapeworm parasite
    • Understand how parasite enter the human body
    We will focus on. Friday 21 October 2011 First activity: Eating raw contaminated meat (beef, pork or lamb) can expose you to tapeworm larvae. Explain why raw meat is inspected by a vet at the abattoir (where they slaughter animals) and why should you never consume uncooked raw meat ? Literacy: Symbiosis, parasitism, parasitic, host, parasite, life cycle, tape worm, transfer, infection and infestation. Numeracy: Mature adult tapeworm can grow up to 2 to 7 metres in length inside the human gut. At this size it can also consume up to 15% of your nutrients taken through your diet ! PLTS Independent enquirers Creative thinkers Reflective learners Team workers Effective participators Self managers We will focus on t
  • 3. B7.9 Decide whether the following statements are true or false: Introduction: A parasite is an organism that lives on or in the body of another organism (the host) from whose tissues it gets its nourishment, and to whom it does some damage. Animals are parasitized by viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoans, flatworms (tapeworms and flukes), nematodes, insects (fleas, lice), and arachnids (mites). Plants are parasitized by viruses, bacteria, fungi, nematodes, and a few other plants. Parasites damage their host in two major ways: consuming its tissues, for example hookworms and by liberating toxins, for example, Tetanus bacilli secrete tetanus toxin which interferes with the nervous system. Extension questions: 1: Explain the difference between a parasitic and symbiotic relationship ? 2: Give two features of a tape worm that make it highly adapted to surviving ? 3: Explain what health effects tapeworm might have on its host ? 4: Explain using your know of the life cycle of a tape worm how you can prevent its entry form livestock to human ? 5: Why did Victorian females knowingly have tapeworms inside of them ? Know this: a: Know that parasites benefit at the cost of another species. b: Know the life cycle of a parasite like the tapeworm. Friday 21 October 2011 Tape worm and other parasites
  • 4. Key concepts B7.9 a Look at the photograph and information and answer all the questions: The life cycle of a tapeworm starts with a human eating infected meat. The tapeworm will then grow and release egg packages. The eggs are excreted onto the grass. If a cow were to eat that grass, the eggs would become larvae and burrow into the cow's muscle. If that cow was eaten without being cooked thoroughly, the whole cycle would start again Explain how the tapeworm enters the human food chain ? Why should you never eat uncooked raw meat ? Why do abattoirs employ vets to inspect meat form recently killed animals ? The life cycle of the tapeworm
  • 5. Key concepts B7.9 a Look at the photograph and information and answer all the questions: Believe or not females living in the Victorian era would swallow live tapeworm to help control their body mass. The fashion in those days was for women to have an hour glass shape with the average waist size around 18 to 22”. To achieve this women used tapeworms which would compete for the food they ate therefore promoting weight loss ! Why could you not legally sell live tapeworm as a sliming aid in 2010 ? Explain how having a parasite inside of you helps you to control or even lose weight ? Look at the advert opposite left, would this type of add be banned by ‘trade descriptions and state why ?
  • 6. B7.9 Plenary Lesson summary: Decide whether the following statements are true or false : False True 3: Tapeworm cysts are evolved to survive human stomach acid ? False True 2: The evolution of parasites and their hosts are not linked ? False True 1: During the life cycle of a tape worm, its eggs are released with human faeces ? raw population benefit effects About 20% of the World’s ________ carry some sort of parasitic worm. These worms ______ form the nutrients that pass through the human gut. The majority of infection come form eating contaminated or ______ animal flesh. The parasites can have long term health _______ on humans. We may not be host to a parasitic worm, but our bed is home to millions of dust mites that feed off dead skin cells and use our warm humid mattress as an ideal place to live and breed. Doctors recommend that you replace your mattress on a regular basis and where possible never buy a second hand mattress. How Science Works: Friday 21 October 2011 Research into parasites that cause disease including malaria, a protozoan that is carried by the mosquito in tropical areas of the World. Preparing for the next lesson:
  • 7. B7.10 Parasites that cause disease Decide whether the following statements are true or false: We will focus on. Friday 21 October 2011 First activity: The blood sucking mosquito which carries the protozoan that cause malaria in humans cannot breed and therefore survive in colder climates. In the cool northern hemisphere we are protected by our cold winters and cool summers. How might global warming change all of that in the next fifty years ? Numeracy: As many as 600 million people (nearly 10% of the World’s population) carry malaria. It is estimated that about 1 million people die a year from the health effects of malaria PLTS Independent enquirers Creative thinkers Reflective learners Team workers Effective participators Self managers We will focus on t
    • Lesson objectives:
    • Understand how parasites benefits at the cost of another species
    • Understand the life cycle of malaria
    • Understand the relationship between malaria and sickle cell anaemia
    Literacy: Parasitism, parasitic, host, parasite, disease, health effects, malaria, mosquito, protozoan life cycle, transfer, infection and infestation.
  • 8. Decide whether the following statements are true or false: Introduction: Malaria is a major health threat to about 600 million humans Worldwide. Malaria is caused by a protozoan which is a single cell animal that is carried and transferred from host to host by the mosquito. The protozoan life cycle is very complex and has evolved to avoid our immune system by using our red blood cells as cover and a place to replicate itself. Ironically in humans with sickle cell, the misshaped blood cells cannot be used so they have lifelong protection against malaria. Humans with sickle cell have an advantage over normal people in malaria areas. Extension questions: 1: Explain how the malaria protozoan is adapted to survive in a) the mosquito and b) in humans ? 2: Why does are immune system fail to find and destroy the malaria protzoan ? 3: Describes the symptoms of sickle cell anaemia ? 4: Why are these symptoms much more dangerous for humans who are young, old or weakened by other health problems ? 5: Why are sickle cell carriers protected against malaria ? Know this: a: Know how the malaria parasite benefits at the cost of its host man. b: Know the life cycle of the malaria protozoan. Friday 21 October 2011 B7.10 Parasites that cause disease
  • 9. Key concepts B7.10 a Look at the photograph and information and answer all the questions: Malaria kills almost 1 million people a years and has infected 600 million people World wide. It is very easy to catch and tremendously difficult to treat. Our own immune system cannot fight it because it lives inside our blood cells. A prefect hiding place. Toxins produced by the malaria protozoan cause dangerous fever and of course sometime death Explain why people who live in hot tropical areas are at risk of contracting Malaria ? Why can our own immune system not find and destroy the malaria protozoan ? Look at the lifecycle of malaria, at what point can you prevent humans becoming a host and by treating humans with drugs to prevent the symptoms of malaria ? The life cycle Malaria
  • 10. Key concepts B7.10 b Look at the photograph and information and answer all the questions: Sickle-cell anaemia is an inherited and serious blood disease. The flexible doughnut shape red cells are replaced by a rigid sickle shape (which can’t easily fit into the smallest blood vessels, blocking them). People with two copies of the disease allele can be very ill. But carrying just one copy of the allele offers protection from malaria in countries where malaria is common. People who have one allele have some sickle cells but most are normal blood cells. How does this help them ? Where in the World does having sickle cells help you survive ? Which cells carry more oxygen; normal or sickle cells and explain why ?
  • 11. Key concepts B7.10 c Look at the photograph and information and answer all the questions: Sickle-cell anaemia and malaria are both extremely prevalent in Africa and South America.  Homozygous individuals rarely live to an old age.  Heterozygous individuals, those carrying both a dominant normal RBC and a recessive sickle-cell allele have a greater resistance to the malaria parasite.  One hypothesis is that the sickle-cell anaemia allele is a beneficial mutation against  the malaria parasite.  How are do humans contract Malaria and explain why we are not at risk living in North Europe ? Look at both maps opposite left, explain why malaria and sickle cell anaemia are found in the same geographical areas ? Some governments have tried to eradicate malaria by destroying the mosquito by using pesticide. Why is this an effective strategy ? Distribution of sickle cell gene Distribution of Malaria
  • 12. B7.10 Plenary Lesson summary: Decide whether the following statements are true or false : False True 3: Sickle cell anaemia and malaria are found tin the same regions ? False True 2: A sickle cell carries is less likely to catch a common cold ? False True 1: The Malaria protozoan is transferred into humans by the housefly ? parent mutation malaria location Sickle cell anaemia occurs in humans as a homozygous _________. Having both defective alleles one from each ________ is life threatening, but being a carrier with one copy give you some protection from ________. This is why both conditions are found in the same _____ . Unfortunately there is no cure for sickle cell anaemia for those carrying two defective copies of the gene. Over time because of poor oxygen supply tissue found in the heart and other key organs die because they are deprived of vital oxygen. Eventually these damage to key organs causes the death of the sickle cell individual How Science Works: Friday 21 October 2011 Reach into how organisms can be used as a source of enzymes or compounds that can be useful to humans. Look at the uses of yeast and how penicillin is made. Preparing for the next lesson:
  • 13. B7.11 Living factories Decide whether the following statements are true or false:
    • Lesson objectives:
    • Understand how microbes can be used to produce useful chemical like antibiotics
    • Understand how microbes are used in bread and alcohol manufacture
    • Understand how a fungi can be used to make a single cell protein
    We will focus on. Friday 21 October 2011 First activity: Yeast has been used in making both bread and alcohol. Explain how yeast converted sugar found in fruits like grape into alcohol like wine ? Literacy: Microorganisms, microbes, bacteria, yeast, penicillin mould, fungi, biotechnology, fermenters, rennin, single cell protein. Numeracy: Microbes can reproduce asexually in a matter of minutes. If you bought a sandwich with 100 microbes on its surface. If you left the sandwich out for four hours it could have up to 200,000 bacteria on its surface PLTS Independent enquirers Creative thinkers Reflective learners Team workers Effective participators Self managers We will focus on t
  • 14. Decide whether the following statements are true or false: Introduction: Micro-organisms like yeast and penicillin mould have been used to produce useful chemical. Useful micro-organisms like penicillin, are grown in fermenters which provide the nutrients and oxygen to allow the micro organisms to double in number every few hours. During this growth, the micro-organism or a compound that is makes can be harvested extracted and used. Penicillium mould produce a chemical called penicillin which destroys many different microbes. Doctors prescribed these antibiotics to treat disease. Another fungus produced a single cell protein which is then extracted to make Quorn. This is rich in proteins and used by vegetarians instead of animal flesh. Extension questions: 1: Yeast is used during the manufacture of Bread. Which chemical compound does yeast make that is essential in bread making ? 2: Draw a flow chart to explain the main steps of bread making ? 3: Explain why the conditions inside fermenters (like temperature, pH and oxygen levels) have to kept stable? 4: Write a paragraph to explain what life would be like with penicillin ? 5: Explain why some mould produce natural antibiotics ? 6: Name one antibiotic that is not extracted from a mould ? Know this: a: Know that microbes can be used to produce useful chemicals. b: Know that yeast can be used to make bread and alcohol. Friday 21 October 2011 B7.11 Living factories
  • 15. Key concepts Look at the photograph and information and answer all the questions: During the bread making process when the flour, salt, sugar, yeast and water have been thoroughly mixed and kneaded the dough is allowed to prove: Yeast inside the dough mixture respires sugar and produces carbon dioxide bubbles. These bubbles prove or rise the bread giving it a fluffy light texture. Explain why yeast is activated during bread making using a warm solution of sugar and water ? Why is the bread dough kept in a warm place during the proving stage ? Yeast is also used to make another product. What is this product ? B7.11 a
  • 16. Key concepts Look at the photograph and information and answer all the questions: Penicillin was discovered accidentally by Dr. Alexander Fleming. Fleming was examining a bactaeria culture when he noticed that it had become contaminated by Penicillium . He observed that it was inhibiting the bacterial growth and assumed that it could be used to control infections in humans. Many humans are alive today because of his work. Who discovered penicillin and how do antibiotics like penicillin work inside the human body ? Has the overuse of antibiotics caused any problems in recent years ? If you extracted a compound form a plant and you thought it was antiseptic how could you test to see if you were wrong or right ? B7.11 b Pencillium mould
  • 17. Key concepts Look at the photograph and information and answer all the questions: Describe the ideal conditions for fermentation to take place ? Over the next 50 years the governments hopes to increase the amount of bio-ethanol used to power cars and lorries,. Why is bio-ethanol described as carbon neutral ? Land used for producing bio-ethanol cannot be used to grow crops for the human food chain....why might this make our food more expensive in the future ? B7.11 c Making alcohol to drink or to be used as an alternative to petrol involves fermenting the sugar found in plant biomass and distilling it to ethanol. Enzymes found in yeast microbes break down plant starch or cellulose into sugars which then undergo microbial fermentation.  The end product is distilled to ethanol. The first record of humans making and drinking alcohol is around 8000 years ago ! Ethanol fermentation
  • 18. B7.11 Plenary Lesson summary: Decide whether the following statements are true or false : False True 3: Quorn is made form a single cell protein produce by a fungus ? False True 2: Ethanol is made in fermenters which allows yeast to covert sugar into ethanol ? False True 1: Yeast is used to make cheese ? fermenters pH chemicals diseases Micro-organisms can be used as a source of new __________ that may be useful for treating ________ or to produce foodstuffs like ______ and alcohol. Microbes are grown in _________ that control the conditions of growth like temperature and ___. Myco-protein is the main ingredient in all Quorn products. It's made from a member of the fungi family (like mushrooms and truffles) and is a high-quality meat-free protein that's naturally low in fat, with very few calories. It's high in dietary fibre (important for your digestive system) and has the essential amino acids your body needs, with no cholesterol or trans fats at all. How Science Works: Friday 21 October 2011 Research into the science of pharmacogentics where drugs are designed using your DNA profile making them more effective and safer to use Preparing for the next lesson:
  • 19. B7.12 Pharmacogenetics Decide whether the following statements are true or false:
    • Lesson objectives:
    • Understand how drug treatments can be tailored for an individual by using biotechnology
    • Understand that using genetic information can help scientists make drugs both more effective and safer when used by humans
    We will focus on. Friday 21 October 2011 First activity: Imagine taking an aspirin to stop a headache, explain why you may need two aspirin to stop the pain where as other people may require less or more. Explain also why some people could be allergic to the drug ? Literacy: Drugs, prescription, drug safety, drug toxicity, genome, genetic testing, pharmocogentics, clinical trails, data, safety, clinical development and efficacy Numeracy: Almost 5% of the population have an intolerance to the common aspirin. It is thought that this intolerance is directly attributable to genetic difference in those 5% of the population PLTS Independent enquirers Creative thinkers Reflective learners Team workers Effective participators Self managers We will focus on t
  • 20. Decide whether the following statements are true or false: Introduction: Take any drug. Prescribe that drug a large sample of the population and you will observe different outcomes: In most, the drug aids recovery. In some, there may be no beneficial effect of the drug, or an adverse reaction. This variation in outcomes after drug prescription is due to our differing genetics. In the future, you will be able to go to the doctor and he will prescribe a drug either unique to you or tailored for your gene type. This type of research where scientists link genetic variations to drugs and the differing responses in the patient is called pharmcogenetics Extension questions: 1: Explain why in a population different people will react differently to the same drug ? 2: Some patients are allergic to drugs like penicillin or aspirin, how will pharmacogenetics provide better treatment for these people ? 3: Why will drugs that are designed by using a person’s DNA work better than regular drugs ? 4: Explain why these types of new drugs will be safer ? 5: Explain why cost prevent unique drugs for all people ? Know this: a: Know that a person’s DNA can be used to design unique drug treatments. b: Know that by using this technology, drugs will become more effective and safer. Friday 21 October 2011 B7.12 Pharmacogenetics
  • 21. Key concepts B7.12 a Look at the photograph and information and answer all the questions: Pharmacogenetics is the study of how genes influence an individual’s response to drugs. Though the field would seem to be brand new, it is really half a century old. In the 1950’s, scientists first identified deficiencies in enzymes that explained adverse reactions to drugs and that they could be inherited. Explain why using your DNA to design a drug treatment may make that drug a) more effective and b) safer ? Why do people response to drugs differ ? Would the cost of drugs designed specially for you be less or more than regular drugs ? Identifying genes to be used in pharmacogentics
  • 22. Key concepts B7.12 b Look at the photograph and information and answer all the questions: T Before phase I clinical trials, new drugs are tested in animals to asses their toxicity. Explain why scientists use animals before the drugs is tested by healthy male volunteers ? All drugs must follow a four phase clinical trail procedure (as described above) to ensure that they are both effective and safe for humans to take Phases of clinical trials
  • 23. Plenary Lesson summary: safe person’s effective desinged Pharmocogentics allows scientist to use a _______ DNA to make drug treatment both more ______ and _______. Using these emerging technologies means that drug treatments will be specially _________ for how your body reacts to the drug. Early research showed that 10% of African American men serving in the Korean war became anaemic after ingesting an anti-malarial drug, which rarely, if ever caused problems for Caucasian (white) soldiers. To pinpoint the cause, it took years of study but using differences in DNA showed why the adverse side effects were only seen in African American soldiers. How Science Works: Friday 21 October 2011 Research into genetic modification and the DNA of both bacteria and plants can be change using GM technology. Preparing for the next lesson: B7.12 Decide whether the following statements are true or false : False True 3: Pharmacogentics is how drugs will be used in the future ? False True 2: Drugs designed around your DNA will be more effective ? False True 1: All drugs are both effective and safe for the entire population ?
  • 24. B7.13 Genetic modification Decide whether the following statements are true or false:
    • Lesson objectives:
    • Understand how organisms can be genetically modified
    • Understand how genes are transferred form one species to another using gene technology
    • Understand that human insulin is now produced using genetically modified bacteria
    We will focus on. Friday 21 October 2011 First activity: Human insulin used to me manufactured by extracting it form pig’s pancreas. Now human insulin is made by bacteria that contain the human genes that make insulin. Why has making insulin using bacteria made this insulin a better product and cheaper to make ? Literacy: Genome, genetic modification, gene transfer, plasmids, bacteria, GM crops and human insulin Numeracy: It is estimated that over 10 million farmers principally in the USA, South America and China now use genetically modified crops. Very few farmer use these cops here in Europe due to the unpopularoty of GM crops and foodstuffs. PLTS Independent enquirers Creative thinkers Reflective learners Team workers Effective participators Self managers We will focus on t
  • 25. Decide whether the following statements are true or false: Introduction: Genetic engineering, the science of transferring genes from one species to another is currently used to manufacture human insulin and alter the characteristics of some food crops like corn and tomatoes. In the near future, scientists may be able to treat humans with inherited diseases like sickle cell anaemia or cystic fibrosis. Getting new genes into cells is the most difficult step of genetic modification. A vector usually a bacterial plasmid is needed to insert the new genes into the cell being modified. Scientists can tell if this ha been successful by attaching a marker gene for exmaple a gene that maes the cell glow in the dark ! Extension questions: 1: Give two examples of genetic modification in a) a bacterium and b) a plant ? 2: Plants are currently being genetically modified to produce better quality proteins, explain why this would reduce the need to raise livestock like cattle ? 3: Give two advantages of producing human insulin using genetically modified bacteria when compared to extracting insulin using pig’s pancreas ? 4: Why are some people opposed to GM crops ? Know this: a: Know that organisms can be genetically modified. b: Know that insulin is produced by using genetically modified bacteria. Friday 21 October 2011 B7.13 Genetic modification
  • 26. B7.13 a Look at the photograph and information and answer all the questions: Genetic engineering, the science of taking genes from one species to another is used to manufacture insulin and alter the traits of crops like corn. In the future, scientists may be able to treat humans with inherited diseases like cystic fibrosis. Already GM crops are now on the market and diabetics inject insulin made using bacteria containing the human insulin gene. Corn or maize is used by millions of people as a staple ingredient, however it is low in vitamins and minerals. Explain how you would use GM technology to improve corn adding genes from other plants that would increase its vitamin and mineral content ? Cows produce milk that is high in protein, calcium and fat...explain what changes you would make using GM technology in order to improve the quality of milk ? Do you think changing a plants or animals genes using GM technology is ethical ? Key concepts
  • 27. B7.13 b Look at the photograph and information and answer all the questions: Prior to genetic engineering, diabetics had to inject pig insulin extracted from pig pancreas to control blood sugar. Scientists isolated the gene in humans that makes insulin and inserted it into bacteria. The bacteria with a copy of the insulin gene are grown in bioreactors. The insulin produced by the bacteria is then extracted and sterilised for human use ! Give one disadvantage of using insulin to treat diabetics that is extracted from a pig pancreas ? How will knowing the human genome help humans born with inherited diseases like cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anaemia ? Key concepts Explain how genetic engineering has made it possible to produce large amounts of drugs like insulin quickly and cheaply ?
  • 28. B7.13 Plenary Lesson summary: Decide whether the following statements are true or false : False True 3: Transferring new genes into plants and bacteria require a vector ? False True 2: Crops that are genetically modified are called GM crops ? False True 1: GM crops and its produce is popular in the USA ? bacterial insulin genetically modified Both plants and bacteria can be ________ modified by inserting new genes using _________ plasmids. New genes can enable bacteria to make human ________ or increase the protein content of a plant crop. Some plants have been ________ to tolerate a herbicide. GM foods were first put on the market in the early 1990s. Typically, genetically modified foods are transgenic plant products: soybean, corn and cotton seed oil. But animal products have also been developed. In 2006 a pig was controversially engineered to produce the ‘so called’ healthy omega-3 fatty acids through the expression of a roundworm gene. How Science Works: Friday 21 October 2011 Research into GM crops and the use of GM technology in altering the way farmers grow and produce their crops. Look into the ethically considerations of using and buying GM crops. Preparing for the next lesson:
  • 29. B7.14 GM crops and their use Decide whether the following statements are true or false:
    • Lesson objectives:
    • Understand the risks of altering an organisms DNA
    • Understand the concerns the people have when using and buying GM crops
    We will focus on. Friday 21 October 2011 First activity: Discuss why GM crops and their products are not popular here in the UK. Why do you think that these same crops are accepted in other countries like the USA and China. What is your personal opinion on GM crops and produce...would you be happy to buy and eat it ? Numeracy: Very few of the 10 million farmers grow GM crops here in the UK. The British consumer is very untrusting of GM crops of food product that contain even the simplest ingredient like GM corn. PLTS Independent enquirers Creative thinkers Reflective learners Team workers Effective participators Self managers We will focus on t Literacy: Genome, genetic modification, gene transfer, plasmids, bacteria, GM crops and human insulin
  • 30. B7.14 Decide whether the following statements are true or false: Introduction: Selective breeding, practiced by humans for millennia has changed plant and animal characteristic. Genetic engineering allows us to do the same but over shorter time periods. Using GM technology Scientists can now ‘insert’ genes from other species that make crops resistant to a pesticide. Crops that are changed in this way are called GM crops. Corn has been engineered to be resistant to a herbicide which kills off other plants or weeds. This GM crops is therefore cheaper to produce since farmers lose less crop to weeds that will compete for the resources. Opponents to GM crops are concerned that these new crops make affect the ecosystem and how these crops will interact with other species. Extension questions: 1: Why are people in this country very reluctant to buy or consume GM produce ? 2: How could you change the minds of the public into buying GM produce ? 3: Crop yield is often reduce by weeds and other plants competing for resources in the field. If a GM crop is designed to produce a chemical which kills off other plants. What benefits could this bring a) the framer b) the plant c) the environment and d) the consumer 4: Are there any disadvantages to using the above GM crop ? Know this: a: Know the risks of altering a crop’s DNA. b: Know that concerns that propel have when buying and consuming GM produce. Friday 21 October 2011 GM crops and their use
  • 31. Key concepts B7.14 a Look at the photograph and information and answer all the questions: The flavr savr tomato was one of the first true GM crops. Scientists wanted to prolong the ripening time, making transport easier whilst increasing the shelf life of the tomato. Altering the tomato's genes to slow down the ripening process would increase the profits of the tomato growers and supermarkets. Calgene were the company responsible for producing the new tomato. If GM technology offers to reduce the cost of food, why are many people opposed to its use here in the UK ? Many thousands of diabetics already use GM technology. What is this ? Are there any benefits to using GM crops for us the buyer and the consumer ?
  • 32. Key concepts B7.14 b Look at the photograph and information and answer all the questions: In 2010, approximately 90 million hectares of transgenic crops were planted across the globe. The majority of these crops were herbicide- and insect-resistant. Other crops grown commercially were sweet potato resistant to a virus that could decimate most of the African harvest and rice with increased iron and vitamins that may alleviate chronic malnutrition. Look at the map opposite, which country produces the most GM crops according to land use ? By 2050, the population will rise to 9.1 billion people and the amount f land per person will fall to just 0.19 hectares. Why might we all be force to use GM crops ? Are there any other solutions to feeding an every increasing population in the future ?
  • 33. B7.14 c Look at the photograph and information and answer all the questions: The World’s population is rising and more and more people are living in cities. There is now lots of research into developing high rise greenhouses and livestock farms that would produce food for people who lived and worked in cities. Crops grown inside need less water, grow faster because of higher temperatures and are free from weeds and pests. Explain why as the World’s population increases there is more pressure on resources like land and water ? List three advantages of growing plants in high rise greenhouses close to or in cities ? Are there any disadvantages to growing crops using high rise greenhouses like those pictured above left ? Key concepts
  • 34. B7.14 Plenary Lesson summary: Decide whether the following statements are true or false : False True 3: Only affluent farmers will be bale to afford GM seeds to grow GM crops ? False True 2: GM crops may cause ecosystem changes that cannot be easily revered ? False True 1: GM crops are popular here in the UK ? low yield GM choice The World’s population is rising and farmers need to increase their crop ____ over the next fifty years. Using ____ crops is perhaps one solution to increasing yield whilst keeping costs _____. Some people are nervous about the use of these crops, but they may not have that ______ in the coming years due to population increases. Despite the promises of cheap nutritious GM foods, some groups believe that impoverished nations will not reap the benefits of biotechnology because they do not have easy access to these developments, cannot afford modern agricultural equipment, and certain aspects of the system revolving around intellectual property rights are unfair to "undeveloped countries". How Science Works: Friday 21 October 2011 Research into DNA fingerprinting and its uses in fighting crime, in determining paternity rights and in identifying genes that control certain characteristics in humans Preparing for the next lesson: