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Presentation for Grad Cert Tertiary Learning and Teaching (Level 7), Otago Polytechnic. A reflection on 10 years of teaching software engineering, capstone projects, Simpa and Sustainability.

Presentation for Grad Cert Tertiary Learning and Teaching (Level 7), Otago Polytechnic. A reflection on 10 years of teaching software engineering, capstone projects, Simpa and Sustainability.

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Grad Cert Tertiary Learning and Teaching, my APL presentation Grad Cert Tertiary Learning and Teaching, my APL presentation Presentation Transcript

  • Samuel Mann GCTLT
  • Bachelor of Information Technology Overview
    • Broad
    • Immersive
    • Hands on
    • Current
    • samuel mann
    • Everything I do is about inspiring students to take that leap of courage and creativity, commitment and craftsmanship.
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  • Using research to improve what already doing
  • Innovation
    • Development
    • Business links
    • Empowerment
    • Evidence based teaching practice
    • Engaging
    • Embrace change
    • Excitement
    • Everything
  • Empowerment
    • A ttitudes and practices considered central to the empowerment model of education Robinson (1994)
    • a) The teacher and students both teach and are taught by each other
    • b) The teacher is aware of not knowing everything and is open to the students’ knowledge and experience, which are actively valued
    • c) The teacher and students all engage in critical, reflective, imaginative and collaborative thinking
    • d) The teacher talks and listens and the students talk and listen; they engage in dialo gue
  • 3. Empowering educational paradigm
    • e) The teacher and student interact, striving to meet each others needs instead of being the respective perpetrators and victims of discipline
    • f)  The teacher and students make choices based on what is most meaningful for them with sensitivity to each others verbal and non-verbal cues
    • g) The students are actively engaged in meaningful experiences that the teacher facilitates
  • 3. Empowering educational paradigm
    • h) The teacher and the students together decide on programme content and revise and change it as their interests and needs change
    • i) The teacher shows her or his personal charisma, vulnerability, and humanity to create her or his authority based on mutual respect, discovery and love for learning
    • j)  The teacher and students form a collective Subject of the learning process, sharing joint ownership of the classroom life
  • Evidence based teaching practice
    • Teaching as scholarly activity and critique own practice in relation to literature
    • Evidence-based teaching practice fundamental to what I do.
    • National leader in Computing Education Research. Current and past editor of national and international journals and conferences.
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  • Engagement
    • Senge’s Learning Organisation
    • 3 core learning capabilities
    • Fostering aspirations
    • Developing reflective conversations
    • Understanding complexity
    • Five disciplines
    • 1) Building shared vision
    • 2) Mental models
    • 3) Team learning
    • 4) Personal mastery
    • 5) Systems thinking
  • Embrace change
    • Manifesto for Agile Software Development
    • We are uncovering better ways of developing  software by doing it and helping others do it.  Through this work we have come to value:
    • Individuals and interactions over processes and tools 
    • Working software over comprehensive documentation
    • Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
    • Responding to change over following a plan 
    • That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more. 
  • Excitement
  • Everything
    • Empowerment
    • Evidence based teaching practice
    • Engaging
    • Embrace change
    • Excitement
    • Everything
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  • Projects Assoc Professor Samuel Mann, Otago Polytechnic
  • Commitment Creativity Competence Professionalism
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    • Software Engineering
    • SimPa
    • Sustainability
  • Software Engineering
    • 1998
    • 1999
    • Real project for real client
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  • 4. Application
    • E xam
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  • 4. Application
    • E vidence of student experience
        • S tudent feedback
          • E xtracted from an electronic course evaluation feedback completed by students towards the end of the course.
          • A cademic quality processes at Otago Polytechnic.
          • S tatement with a five-point Likert scale to agree/disagree and q ualitative information
  • 5. Results Course A
    • Projects self assessed
    • Feedback very positive
      • We were given direction and assistance when sought. We had to be self directed in completing tasks, this is a good thing for additional time management and learning’
      • We did interesting things that where out of the ordinary. This kept us from falling asleep.
      • (What you really liked about this course…) the way it was presented ...the content...it was all good... u go sam...!! , … the practical of the group work. ,…the chance to have a real client…, … being pushed beyond what I thought I could do
  • 5. Results Course B
    • Databases 3
    • Practically based
      • the students demonstrated an ability to reliably produce significant database applications of industry strength. The assignments were real, and the systems produced by the students are in actual use
      • Assignments self and peer assessed
      • Emerging topics selected and presented by students
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  • 5. Results Course B
    • Evaluation
      • lecturer’s explanations were clear [g], there was good command of course material [part of a], and assessments were returned promptly [i] with effective feedback [c].
    • Feedback
      • It was a very interesting course and I learnt a lot of information and I am happy to say I enjoyed it very much even though it was hard work [g]
      • A very good practical based course where we got a taste of industry strength development. Very good preparation to go out into the workforce [g]
  • 5. Results Course C
    • Information Systems Management 3
    • The students (in pairs) were responsible for the preparation, delivery and assessment of a component of the course.
    • 20 topics were chosen by the class from an initial list of 50 topics
    • I participated in the class as a peer
        • I liked how it was all laid out at the beginning, and we knew what to expect at all times [h]…(Well presented) Especially because we presented it. But Sam was very helpful adding in extra information to back up lectures
        • (What you liked) Being given the responsibility to teach my colleagues, and ensure they understood. Also having complete control over the class, Sam did not interject unless it was necessary. It was a comfortable environment for teaching in, it did not feel as if we were on trial, or being examined.
        • I enjoyed this course, found it very informative and would like to commend Sam for his idea
        • Very unusual setup but it had the desired effects. We learned a lot.
  • 5. Results Course D
    • Third year project
      • Apply skills and knowledge to real life situation
          • medical rostering system for a large hospital,
          • accounting and customer management system for a mining company
          • micro-processor engine control system for a race car
          • deer breeding management system
          • irrigation-control system for an olive grove
          • research towards a reading device for the blind
      • Management document
      • Marking schedule
      • Benevolent manager
      • Review
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  • 5. Results: Learning
    • Courses met learning outcomes
    • Followed empowerment paradigm
    • Ongoing research and action
      • Workloads
      • Maintaining quality when self- or peer-taught
      • Self assessment
    • “ The gap between what is learned in the curricula and what is needed in the industry is rather wide in relation to other engineering disciplines”
    • Surendran and Young (2000)
  • Otago Polytechnic ACE 2007
  • Project disasters
    • Client changes his mind
    • Project team disintegrates
    • Hard drive (server, laptop …) fails
    • Product superceded before complete
    • Boss assigns you to work on a different project
    • Your group is told by CEO to incorporate some other ideas that don’t match with your own
  • The Bus
    • At end of Analysis stage, bus hit six of the ten groups.
    • Documentation was handed over to another group.
  • Responses
    • Angry
    • Positive
      • New perspective
      • Better outcome
    Philosophical
    • Negative
      • Workload
      • Ownership
  • Responses - final
    • “ It demonstrated the importance of having every stage well documented”
    • “ This also helped our group’s character…”
    • “ It is realised now that this was a real-world experience that will doubtlessly prove valuable in later working life”
  • Empowerment vs Control
    • Change imposed on students
    • Control of project given, taken away, then returned
    • Challenge
    • Students working outside “comfort zone”
    • Aim – a balance of content and process. Enthuse but don’t overwhelm.
    • “ Now I am no longer worried about how I will do my project, but rather what my project will be about”
    • Finding the right project
    • to ensure an ideal environment to
    • Teach the course material
    • Prepare students for capstone project
  • A project should…
    • Facilitate teaching of methodology
    • Facilitate teaching of tools
    • Be real
    • Be exciting
    • Be of value to client
    • Have a real client
    • Challenge students
    • Seem very large (or very small)
    • Allow scoping down
    • Allow creative solutions
    • Allow for agile development
  • A project should…
    • Facilitate teaching of methodology
    • Facilitate teaching of tools
    • Be real
    • Be exciting
    • Be of value to client
    • Have a real client
    • Challenge students
    • Seem very large (or very small)
    • Allow scoping down
    • Allow creative solutions
    • Allow for agile development
    • “ When we first looked at the brief for Captain Black we thought that the scope for the project had the potential to be much larger than anything we could confidently develop”
    • But can have a disempowering effect
    • very small project can further shrink as students lose interest as a result of feeling that the SDLC process is overkill
  • Small
    • Small project to provide information at point of sale in video store
    • Leisure centre management system: potential for complex interactions, and complex representation of time and space (including providing information at point of sale!)
    Large
    • prima facie smaller but could have been expanded to include complex interactions
    • potential for complex interactions, and complex representation of time and space
    • differences between the treatments were too subtle for the students
    • even the strongest groups only touched the surface of the areas we had identified as complex
    • smaller size project was much harder to state in terms of business problem and it was this that caused “smaller” solutions.
  • Problem statements
    • little
    big
    • Clearly stated
    • Business opportunity not clear
    “ The present booking system for Moana Pool is by manual entry in to a diary and relies heavily on the knowledge of the present Assistant Manager…the recent redevelopment has brought about a large increase in the number of users… there have been problems with double bookings and where there has been a need for cancellations, this has resulted in multiple changes to the diary…the planned booking system will benefit the business by optimizing water and time management within the complex” .
    • “ Due to additional requirements needed by VideoShop regarding their current video rental system, an opportunity has arisen to develop a new enhanced system which will meet these requirements. The current system lacks features required by management and staff to progress financially in the business”.
    • “ The goal is to attract more customers to make more money…(that) can only be achieved by developing a successful system for the store…tracking movies is inefficient…with redundancy in tasks…more pleasant as interactions more efficient”
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  • Pengy
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  • Conversation as Model for Interactivity
    • interactive basis
    • non-trivial computing
    • none traditional ksm
    • tight timeframes
    • articulation of needs
    • bullet proof
  • Experience
  • Narrative Metamorphamatic ——— ——— ——— ——— ——— Name: Otago Polytechnic Bachelor of Information Project Created by: Adrian van Leeuwen Naz Taylor Brendon Mills
  • Narrative Metamorphamatic ——— ——— ——— ——— ——— Name: Otago Polytechnic Bachelor of Information Project Created by: Adrian van Leeuwen Naz Taylor Brendon Mills
  • Context
  • Metaphors
  • Tensions
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  • Industry relationships
  • Probing the World of the Project Student A journey into ethnographic research
    • “ Like astronomic or surgical probes, we left
    • them behind when we had gone and waited
    • for them to return fragmentary data over time.”
    • (Gaver, 1999)
  • The camera NACCQ 2005 Lesley Smith & Samuel Mann
  • The results NACCQ 2005 Lesley Smith & Samuel Mann
  • Analysis?
    • A quantitative approach?
        • “ this misses the point of the Probes”
        • (Gaver, 2004)
    • Never intended to be a comprehensive survey
    • An ethnographic approach?
      • Let the photos tell the stories of the PJ301 subculture
  • Workspaces
  • View from Our Workspace NACCQ 2005 Lesley Smith & Samuel Mann
  • One Week To Go NACCQ 2005
  • Our Project? NACCQ 2005 Lesley Smith & Samuel Mann
  • Reflective? NACCQ 2005 Lesley Smith & Samuel Mann
  • NACCQ 2005 Lesley Smith & Samuel Mann
  • NACCQ 2005 Lesley Smith & Samuel Mann
    • Possible outcomes of further probing:
      • better understanding of the subculture in project room environment
      • better understanding of student experience of project
      • improved design of workspaces
      • improved support systems
    NACCQ 2005 Lesley Smith & Samuel Mann
  • NACCQ 2005 Lesley Smith & Samuel Mann What do these two pictures have in common?
    • Everything I do is about inspiring students to take that leap of courage and creativity, commitment and craftsmanship.
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  • Exemplars
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    • “ the tension between product and process can be lessened by adopting a process that can be seen to produce good products while being flexible and robust. We believe that the development framework developed in this paper will provide a foundation for capstone courses”.
  • A+, Guaranteed 1 : Insisting on best of practice within capstone projects 1 conditions may apply
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  • Satisfaction
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  • Satisfaction
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  • Stepwise
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    • 1. The framework translates easily to implementation
    • Following the framework resulted in a significant improvement in final marks (average B to A-)
    • This shift occurs at both ends of the grade scale, the percentage getting A grade goes from 46% to 67%, the percentage getting C/D goes from 32% to 21%.
    • 4. The extent to which the framework was followed varies across groups but this is unrelated to the type of project.
    • Weaker groups exhibit two patterns:
      • 5a Develop a prototype and initially test it, but this becomes the project, the subsequent robust development is poor
      • 5b Are poor at incorporating early development and testing into SDLC
    • 6. The role of some framework areas require further investigation, especially the role of tested functional requirements.
  • Agile development framework Understanding Functional delivery Robust Delivery
  • Understanding Evaluation Management document (group established, environmental Functional requirements context) Interview with client, relationship established Interaction design Ethical design System metaphor Design specification Conceptual prototype (Extremely rapid Implementation prototype) Evaluation Proposal to client
  • Functional delivery Evaluation Project estimation Functional Functional requirements document Interaction design Design concepts presentation Design specs Design specification (style guide etc) Implementation Functional deliverable (Release Two). Stable development platform Evaluation Analysis of functional deliverable
  • Functional delivery Evaluation Project estimation Functional Functional requirements document Design concepts Design concepts presentation Design specs Design specification (style guide etc) Implementation Functional deliverable (Release Two). Stable development platform Evaluation Analysis of functional deliverable
  • Robust delivery Evaluation Direction for Iteration 3. Complete ethical analysis. Functional requirements Revisit functional requirements Design concepts Design concepts Update. Content production Design specification Style guide, system specification, Implementation and deployment plan Implementation Robust delivery (Release Three) Evaluation Project evaluation and completion. Client satisfaction.
  • Rainbows Otago Polytechnic ACE 2007
  • Rainbows Otago Polytechnic ACE 2007
  • Rainbows
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  • Software engineering class eating its own tail Samuel Mann Lesley Smith
  • Goal Challenge To maximise learning in a project based software engineering course. To harness the incidental learning through a recursive project
  • Otago Polytechnic ACE 2007
  • Context “ We had no idea, none of us knew anything about ships, we spent the first few weeks becoming experts on shipping” (student review)
  • Challenge students obsess about project, not software engineering “ facilitate teaching the structure of the chosen methodology” make project about software engineering Turning a rock into gold
  • Results: 1 st Iteration
    • “ material that was collected during our research met two goals. One was to inform ourselves on the components of the Agile methodology and iterative processes; and two was to find examples of project management software that already existed.” (Final review, Group H)
    • “ we have decided to develop this system with a combination of the Spiral and Scrum Methodologies” (Client letter, Group C)
    Otago Polytechnic ACE 2007
  • Results: 1 st Iteration
    • “ material that was collected during our research met two goals. One was to inform ourselves on the components of the Agile methodology and iterative processes; and two was to find examples of project management software that already existed.” (Final review, Group H)
    • “ we have decided to develop this system with a combination of the Spiral and Scrum Methodologies” (Client letter, Group C)
    Otago Polytechnic ACE 2007
  • Otago Polytechnic ACE 2007
  • Otago Polytechnic ACE 2007
  • Otago Polytechnic ACE 2007
  • Otago Polytechnic ACE 2007
  • Reflection
    • Difficult to separate in agile
    • Avoiding entering capstone project with little awareness of implementation issues
    • but:
    • Design decisions based on technical skills
    • especially but:
    • limited design can be closely related to limited learning
    • good but:
    • the double dipping makes this explicit
    Implementation
  • Reflection
    • Difficult to separate in agile
    • Avoiding entering capstone project with little awareness of implementation issues
    • but:
    • Design decisions based on technical skills
    • especially but:
    • limited design can be closely related to limited learning
    • good but:
    • the double dipping makes this explicit
    Implementation
  • Reflection
    • Difficult to separate in agile
    • Avoiding entering capstone project with little awareness of implementation issues
    • but:
    • Design decisions based on technical skills
    • especially but:
    • limited design can be closely related to limited learning
    • good but:
    • the double dipping makes this explicit
    Implementation
  • Would we do it again? 1 3 2 Yes Have to maintain “real project for real client” Understanding of software engineering far deeper than traditional projects
  • Would we do it again? 1 3 2 Yes Have to maintain “real project for real client” Understanding of software engineering far deeper than traditional projects
  • Projects Assoc Professor Samuel Mann, Otago Polytechnic
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  • Earned value
    • Use of product: the extent to which interacted with by live user within expected lifespan of product; both frequency and intensity of interaction are considered.
    • Value of process: the extent to which being involved in the process generates follow-on business value (to both client and institution).
    • Quality of work: quality of produced product or process.
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  • High use product High use product, high value process, high quality
  • High use product High use product, medium value process, high quality
  • High use product High use product, medium value process, medium quality
  • High use product high use product, low value process, high and medium quality
  • High use product high use product low value process low quality
  • Medium use product medium use product high value process high quality
  • Medium use product medium use product medium value process high quality
  • Medium use product medium use product medium value process medium quality
  • Medium use product medium use product medium value process low quality
  • Low use product low use product high value process high quality
  • Low use product low use product low value process high quality
  • Low use product low use product high value process medium/low quality
  • Low use product low use product medium value process medium/low quality
  • Low use product low use product low value process low quality
  • High use product High use product, high value process, high quality
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    • Useful throughout process Common understanding at outset Direction and decisions Make explicit claims of product value Why aren’t all projects stars?
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    • Empowerment
    • Evidence based teaching practice
    • Engaging
    • Embrace change
    • Excitement
    • Everything
    • Software Engineering
    • SimPa
    • Sustainability
    • Software Engineering
    • SimPa
    • Sustainability
  • SimPa
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  • challenges
    • engagement
    • agreement
    • intellectual property
    • continuity
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    • Empowerment
    • Evidence based teaching practice
    • Engaging
    • Embrace change
    • Excitement
    • Everything
    • Software Engineering
    • SimPa
    • Sustainability
    • Sustainability
  • sustainability:learning review of progress towards goal of “Every graduate may think and act as a sustainable practitioner” Otago Polytechnic May 2008 c
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    • The skills and values of Otago Polytechnic graduates contribute to every sector of society. Our curriculum, teaching and learning therefore is pervasive and influential with global impact. The Otago Polytechnic sustainability vision is that our graduates, our practitioners and our academics understand the concepts of social, environmental and economic sustainability in order for them to evaluate, question and discuss their role in the world and to enable them to make changes where and when appropriate. Our goal is that every graduate may think and act as a “sustainable practitioner”.
    • Moreover, educators must take a lead in sustainability so that our graduates can be encouraged and supported to promote sustainable practices in their chosen career. This can primarily be achieved by fostering education for sustainability in all our qualifications and by re-visioning and changing our approach to teaching and learning to model a transformative context for all learners.
    • As a consequence sustainable practice becomes a context and a process for learning and recognised as a core capability within each discipline.
    • Creating a philosophy of Education for Sustainability will be enhanced if undertaken within a context of institutional operational practice. We will then be seen to be modelling good practice.
    • The skills and values of Otago Polytechnic graduates contribute to every sector of society. Our curriculum, teaching and learning therefore is pervasive and influential with global impact. The Otago Polytechnic sustainability vision is that our graduates, our practitioners and our academics understand the concepts of social, environmental and economic sustainability in order for them to evaluate, question and discuss their role in the world and to enable them to make changes where and when appropriate. Our goal is that every graduate may think and act as a “sustainable practitioner”.
    • Moreover, educators must take a lead in sustainability so that our graduates can be encouraged and supported to promote sustainable practices in their chosen career. This can primarily be achieved by fostering education for sustainability in all our qualifications and by re-visioning and changing our approach to teaching and learning to model a transformative context for all learners.
    • As a consequence sustainable practice becomes a context and a process for learning and recognised as a core capability within each discipline.
    • Creating a philosophy of Education for Sustainability will be enhanced if undertaken within a context of institutional operational practice. We will then be seen to be modelling good practice .
    • every graduate
    • hidden curriculum
    • top down and bottom up
    • every graduate
    • hidden curriculum
    • top down and bottom up
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  • Design
  • Role of designer reimagined
  • Role of designer reimagined
  • Integration
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  • Modelling best practice
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  • Occupational Therapy
  • core belief that humans need to be involved in meaningful activity and that we gain connection to the world we live in via activity
  • Embedded
  • Adaptive Living Occupation
  • Computing’s footprint is large, but its potential for wider impact is huge
  • Integrated and structured according to threads
  • Immersed in best practice and applied projects
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  • Sustainability to front of house
    • The LivingCampus is an exciting place where sustainability comes alive. We want to inspire curiosity and encourage the integration of sustainability into normal life and business practices.
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    • Everything I do is about inspiring students to take that leap of courage and creativity, commitment and craftsmanship.
    • Empowerment
    • Evidence based teaching practice
    • Engaging
    • Embrace change
    • Excitement
    • Everything
    • Software Engineering
    • SimPa
    • Sustainability
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  • Flexibility
    • If flexible means “non-traditional” then that’s me;
    • if it means “using every available means to enhance learning”, then that’s me too;
    • if it means “developing computer systems to enhance learning” then I’ve done that a lot;
    • if it means “supporting distance students” then that’s good, I’ve had several entirely distance project students;
    • if it means “material all on blackboard” then yes, I do that as well (along with blogs, wiki’s etc).
  • Culture sensitive
    • Developed SimPa programme and associated research
    • Several projects for international students incorporating specific cultural approaches
    • Ongoing research into “project culture” and understanding
    • Many many international students nursed through their projects when all around me people were saying to give up.
  • Case study