Beyond Virtualisation: What's next for IT sustainability?

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Samuel Mann presentation to 26th NZ IT managers conference. Explores computing and sustainability imperative. Looks at our own footprint, and what we could be doing that is "good, not just less bad".

Samuel Mann presentation to 26th NZ IT managers conference. Explores computing and sustainability imperative. Looks at our own footprint, and what we could be doing that is "good, not just less bad".

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  • 1. Beyond Virtualisation What's next for IT sustainability?“
  • 2.
    • 1.Sustainability imperative
    • 2. What are we (should we) be doing already
    • 3. Beyond own footprint
    • 4. Learning from Sustainability
    • computingforsustainability.wordpress.com/
    • Assoc Prof Samuel Mann
  • 3. computingforsustainability.wordpress.com/
  • 4. Sustainable practitioner. Are we enabling people to do the right thing?
  • 5. Sustainable practitioners
  • 6. Imperative
    • Computing and IT underpins every sector of society as a pervasive and influential discipline with global impact.
    • As a result, computing influences the environment and society either positively or negatively. While we have seen positive benefit from incremental changes such as reductions in energy usage and recycling components, more comprehensive and transformative changes are needed to meet contemporary challenges.
    • In short, we need to move beyond a focus on our own footprint and examine ways in which we can facilitate a much larger impact.
  • 7. Imperative. Why?
  • 8. Imperative
    • United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainability
    • Digital Strategy
  • 9.  
  • 10.  
  • 11.  
  • 12.  
  • 13.
    • The skills and values of Otago Polytechnic graduates contribute to every sector of society. Our curriculum, teaching and learning therefore is pervasive and influential with global impact. The Otago Polytechnic sustainability vision is that our graduates, our practitioners and our academics understand the concepts of social, environmental and economic sustainability in order for them to evaluate, question and discuss their role in the world and to enable them to make changes where and when appropriate. Our goal is that every graduate may think and act as a “sustainable practitioner”.
    • Moreover, educators must take a lead in sustainability so that our graduates can be encouraged and supported to promote sustainable practices in their chosen career. This can primarily be achieved by fostering education for sustainability in all our qualifications and by re-visioning and changing our approach to teaching and learning to model a transformative context for all learners.
    • As a consequence sustainable practice becomes a context and a process for learning and recognised as a core capability within each discipline.
    • Creating a philosophy of Education for Sustainability will be enhanced if undertaken within a context of institutional operational practice. We will then be seen to be modelling good practice.
  • 14.
    • The skills and values of Otago Polytechnic graduates contribute to every sector of society. Our curriculum, teaching and learning therefore is pervasive and influential with global impact. The Otago Polytechnic sustainability vision is that our graduates, our practitioners and our academics understand the concepts of social, environmental and economic sustainability in order for them to evaluate, question and discuss their role in the world and to enable them to make changes where and when appropriate. Our goal is that every graduate may think and act as a “sustainable practitioner”.
    • Moreover, educators must take a lead in sustainability so that our graduates can be encouraged and supported to promote sustainable practices in their chosen career. This can primarily be achieved by fostering education for sustainability in all our qualifications and by re-visioning and changing our approach to teaching and learning to model a transformative context for all learners .
    • As a consequence sustainable practice becomes a context and a process for learning and recognised as a core capability within each discipline.
    • Creating a philosophy of Education for Sustainability will be enhanced if undertaken within a context of institutional operational practice. We will then be seen to be modelling good practice .
    For more on Otago Polytechnic’s approach to Sustainable Practitioner, see http://computingforsustainability.wordpress.com/2008/07/10/sustainable-practitioners-update/
  • 15.  
  • 16.  
  • 17.  
  • 18.  
  • 19.  
  • 20. Role of designer reimagined
  • 21. Transparent communicator Role of designer reimagined
  • 22. Role of designer reimagined
  • 23. Integration
  • 24.  
  • 25. Models best practice in transformation of discipline understanding of social justice. Key is social justice and sustainable relationships within contexts .
  • 26. Integrated throughout
  • 27. Law, Treaty, workplace practice, working with others…
  • 28. IPENZ code of ethics rule 4 Sustainable Management and Care of the Environment: Members shall recognise and respect the need for sustainable management of the planet's resources and endeavour to minimise adverse environmental impacts of their engineering activities for both present and future generations. Under this clause you should have due regard to: 4.1 Using resources efficiently. 4.2 Endeavouring to minimise the generation of waste and encouraging environmentally sound reuse, recycling and disposal. 4.3 Recognising adverse impacts of your engineering activities on the environment and seeking to avoid or mitigate them. 4.4 Recognising the long-term imperative of sustainable management throughout your engineering activities. (Sustainable Management is often defined as meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs). IPENZ: Professional society
  • 29. Dublin Accord and ABET embedded
  • 30. Applied projects and community engagement
  • 31. Systems view of manufacturing and service
  • 32. Immersed in best practice
  • 33.  
  • 34. Opportunity (and need) to educate customers
  • 35. Sustainable Computing Practitioner. What role does computing play?
  • 36.
    • Eli Blevis on the iPod
        • a deliberately unsustainable act intent on driving consumption and with the clear side effect of premature disposal
  • 37.  
  • 38.
    • poor attempt to meet those basic 6th grade principles. No attempt to reduce the packaging that our consumables are delivered in. No attempt to reuse the waste, and certainly no attempt to recycle it.
    full story of our skip: http://computingforsustainability.wordpress.com/2008/04/07/skipping-back-to-the-future/
  • 39.  
  • 40. Forum for the Future
  • 41. Forum for the Future: http://computingforsustainability.wordpress.com/2008/04/22/compulsory-reading-connected-ict-and-sustainable-development/
  • 42. Our own footprint. Reducing, Reusing, Recycling
  • 43.  
  • 44.  
  • 45.  
  • 46.  
  • 47.  
  • 48.  
  • 49. ECANZ see also 26 4 th Rs on http://computingforsustainability.wordpress.com/2008/08/26/an-a-z-of-the-4th-r-of-reduce-reuse-recycle/
  • 50. Own footprint: Procurement
    • 1.1.At Otago Polytechnic purchasing decisions, at whatever level these are made, are expected to take into account both financial and sustainability issues, and to contribute towards meeting the Polytechnics objectives in the area of sustainability.
    • 1.2.A sustainable approach to purchasing means taking into account social, environmental and broad economic factors when meeting the Polytechnics needs for goods and/or services.
    • 1.3.Otago Polytechnics objectives in the area of sustainability (green objectives) are:
    • Support suppliers who are socially responsible and have adopted ethical practices
    • Avoid unnecessary consumption
    • Select goods and/or services which have a lower environmental impact across their life cycle than competing goods and/or services
    • Support suppliers whose work practices demonstrate innovation in sustainability
  • 51.  
  • 52.  
  • 53. Solutions
    • Producer response
      • Design for end of life
        • “ cradle to cradle” design
      • Eco-labelling
      • Supply chain management
    • PC takeback, reuse, recycling and proper disposal after end of use
  • 54. Own footprint: Disposal
  • 55. Own footprint: Paper
    • 1. Total number of pages?
    • 2. Number of pages per student?
    • 3. Size of the stack of paper?
  • 56.  
  • 57. Own footprint: Energy
    • Data consolidation and virtualisation
    • Desktop energy management
  • 58. barriers
    • 17.5% because it’s a hassle 10.4% say no one else does 9.8% say it’s not important 7.7% say they forget in the rush to leave 3.3% say they’re out of the office and don’t return 1.8% say they worry they’ll lose work
    http://computingforsustainability.wordpress.com/2007/07/29/report-oozes-bias-but-still-18-never-turned-off-times-118-idle-hours-times-power-use-times-carbon-or-money-times-number-of-workers-a-big-number/
  • 59. barriers
    • … variations on “It’s too slow logging back on in a morning”, which must, I suppose be linked to the hassle factor. (But just how much hassle is it to switch off a computer).
    • And in another surprising result, only those aged over 35 reckoned that they were told to switch off their computer “every night”
    • Another respondent seemed to believe that anti-virus scans only ran overnight.
  • 60. Engaged and empowered staff
    • Green not necessarily same as lean
  • 61. Doing good. Enabling others.
  • 62. Doing good
    • Doing less bad not the same as doing good
          • Michael Braungart
  • 63. Transparent communicator
  • 64. design manifesto
    • There are pursuits more worthy of our problem-solving skills. Unprecedented environmental, social and cultural crises demand our attention. Many cultural interventions, social marketing campaigns, books, magazines, exhibitions, educational tools, television programs, films, charitable causes and other information design projects urgently require our expertise and help.
    • We propose a reversal of priorities in favor of more useful, lasting and democratic forms of communication - a mindshift away from product marketing and toward the exploration and production of a new kind of meaning. The scope of debate is shrinking; it must expand. Consumerism is running uncontested; it must be challenged by other perspectives expressed, in part, through the visual languages and resources of design.
    • But in computing we can’t seem to get past the energy rating of the cool new piece of equipment
  • 65. Doing good
    • Other people’s footprint
    • Supporting Education for Sustainability in the Institution
    • Regenerative Sustainability
  • 66.  
  • 67. http://computingforsustainability.wordpress.com/2008/08/12/computing-award-for-sustainability-far-beyond-own-footprint/
  • 68. Doing good: Other people’s footprint
    • Collaboration tools
      • Travel
      • Participation
    CC BY http://flickr.com/photos/leighblackall/tags/secondlife/
  • 69.  
  • 70. Doing good:
    • Triple bottom line
    www.johnelkington.com/activities/images/ideas/ideas4.jpg
  • 71.  
  • 72. Doing good: Regenerative sustainability
  • 73. Doing good:
  • 74. Doing good:
  • 75.  
  • 76. IT as a Learning organisation. What can we learn from sustainability?
  • 77.  
  • 78.
    • Tate’s sustainability
    • mindset that the team is in it for the long haul as underlying sustainable development
      • continually minimising complexity, revisiting their plans, and paying attention to the health of their software and its ability to support change.
  • 79. Willard’s stages
    • Stage 1: The company feels no obligation beyond profits. It cuts corners and tries not to get caught if it breaks the law or uses exploitative practices that cheat the system. It ignores sustainability and actively fights against related regulations.
  • 80. willard’s stages
    • Stage 2: The business manages its liabilities by obeying the law and all labour, environmental, health, and safety regulations. It reactively does what it legally has to do and does it well. Emerging environmental and philanthropic social actions are treated as costs, projects are end-of-pipe retrofits, and CSR is given lip service.
  • 81. willard’s stages
    • Stage 3: The company moves from defense to offense. It realizes it can save expenses with proactive and incremental operational eco-efficiencies, cleaner processes, and better waste management. It recognizes community investment and social marketing can minimize uncertainty, enhance its reputation, and help maximize shareholder value. However, sustainability initiatives are still marginalized in specialized departments — they are tacked on as “green housekeeping,” not built in and institutionalized.
  • 82. willard’s stages
    • Stage 4: The firm transforms itself. It re-brands itself as a company committed to sustainability and integrates sustainability with key business strategies. It captures added value from breakthrough sustainability initiatives that benefit all stakeholders. Instead of costs and risks, it sees investments and opportunities. It makes cleaner products, applies eco-effectiveness and life-cycle stewardship, and enjoys competitive advantages from sustainability initiatives.
  • 83. willard’s stages
    • Stage 5: Driven by a passionate, values-based commitment to improving the well-being of the company, society, and the environment, the company helps build a better world because it is the right thing to do.
  • 84.  
  • 85. n=67
  • 86. Questions? Samuel Mann.
  • 87.
    • 1.Sustainability imperative
    • 2. What are we (should we) be doing already
    • 3. Beyond own footprint
    • 4. Learning from Sustainability
    • computingforsustainability.wordpress.com/
  • 88. computingforsustainability.wordpress.com/ [email_address]