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  • ‘I would like to show my respect and Acknowledge the Traditional Custodians of the Land, of Elders past and present, on which this meeting takes place.’
  • Introduce myself, explain during the presentation, participants may ask questions relevant to the current slide, I will try to answer to the best of my ability, if I don’t have an answer, will go back and find out for you.BlurbI commenced my teaching career at Homebush West Public School, NSW in 2007. I had teaching experiences on Stage 3 and Stage 2. In 2011, Homebush West PS was selected as a Centre for Excellence as part of the Smarter Schools National Partnerships Initiative. I have a strong passion commitment in creating authentic integration of ICT in lessons for students aligning with the NSW Quality Teaching Model. I have recently been successful in attaining a new position as a Quality Teaching Consultant ICT Integration K-12 in the South Western Sydney Region.
  • 3. Leading improvement, innovation and changePrincipals work with others to produce and implement clear, evidence-based improvement plans and policies for the development of the school and its facilities. They recognise that a crucial part of the role is to lead and manage innovation and change to ensure the vision and strategic plan is put into action across the school and that its goals and intentions are realised. Professional practicesWork with the school community to promote and sustain school improvement informed by school effectiveness research. Lead and facilitate through teams the necessary innovation and change to reflect changing demands on and expectations of the school and use project management to foster both efficiency and effectiveness in achievement of goals. Take a strategic role in the development and implementation of new and emerging technologies to enhance and extend teaching and learning experiences. Develop quality assurance and review strategies to demonstrate the need for and effectiveness of innovation and change to secure improvement. Ensure the vision for the school is shared, clearly understood and acted upon effectively by all. Motivate and work with others to foster creativity, innovation and the use of appropriate new technologies to achieve excellence. Demonstrate personal commitment to continuous improvement using problem solving, creative thinking and strategic planning. Use appropriate leadership styles sensitive to the stage, growth and development of the school
  • 3. Leading improvement, innovation and changePrincipals work with others to produce and implement clear, evidence-based improvement plans and policies for the development of the school and its facilities. They recognise that a crucial part of the role is to lead and manage innovation and change to ensure the vision and strategic plan is put into action across the school and that its goals and intentions are realised. Professional practicesWork with the school community to promote and sustain school improvement informed by school effectiveness research. Lead and facilitate through teams the necessary innovation and change to reflect changing demands on and expectations of the school and use project management to foster both efficiency and effectiveness in achievement of goals. Take a strategic role in the development and implementation of new and emerging technologies to enhance and extend teaching and learning experiences. Develop quality assurance and review strategies to demonstrate the need for and effectiveness of innovation and change to secure improvement. Ensure the vision for the school is shared, clearly understood and acted upon effectively by all. Motivate and work with others to foster creativity, innovation and the use of appropriate new technologies to achieve excellence. Demonstrate personal commitment to continuous improvement using problem solving, creative thinking and strategic planning. Use appropriate leadership styles sensitive to the stage, growth and development of the school
  • 3. Leading improvement, innovation and changePrincipals work with others to produce and implement clear, evidence-based improvement plans and policies for the development of the school and its facilities. They recognise that a crucial part of the role is to lead and manage innovation and change to ensure the vision and strategic plan is put into action across the school and that its goals and intentions are realised. Professional practicesWork with the school community to promote and sustain school improvement informed by school effectiveness research. Lead and facilitate through teams the necessary innovation and change to reflect changing demands on and expectations of the school and use project management to foster both efficiency and effectiveness in achievement of goals. Take a strategic role in the development and implementation of new and emerging technologies to enhance and extend teaching and learning experiences. Develop quality assurance and review strategies to demonstrate the need for and effectiveness of innovation and change to secure improvement. Ensure the vision for the school is shared, clearly understood and acted upon effectively by all. Motivate and work with others to foster creativity, innovation and the use of appropriate new technologies to achieve excellence. Demonstrate personal commitment to continuous improvement using problem solving, creative thinking and strategic planning. Use appropriate leadership styles sensitive to the stage, growth and development of the school
  • Applying social and ethical protocols and practices when using ICTStudents develop ICT capability within a context of social and ethical protocols and practice. This element involves students in developing an understanding of: • intellectual property pertaining to digital information • digital information security, including the responsibility to:- protect the rights, identity, privacy and emotional safety of online audiences- avoid and prevent cyberbullying- ensure security of self and/or others- respect audiences, being aware of the portrayal of self and others• the benefits and consequences of ICT for individuals, groups and communities in society, such as: - becoming drivers of ICT, seeing themselves as creators as well as consumers of ICT- recognising its capacity to enhance participation and inclusion General capabilities in the Australian Curriculum - January 201246- analysing how changes in technology impact on and relate to changes in society. Investigating with ICTThis element involves students in using ICT to access data and information from a range of primary and secondary sources when investigating questions, topics or problems. To do this effectively and efficiently, students use processes of defining, planning, locating, accessing, selecting, organising and evaluating information and data. Students use ICT to: • define and plan information searches • locate and access data and information through:- search engines, search functions, and general and specialised directories- navigation tools between and within documents - opening files of different formats- organising data and information using a range of ICT tools• select and evaluate data and information by applying criteria to verify the integrity of data and information and their sources.Creating with ICTThis element involves students in using ICT to generate ideas, plans, processes and solutions to challenges and tasks. These may relate to learning a concept, completing an activity or responding to a need, and may be self- or teacher-generated. Students use ICT to generate ideas, plans and processes to:• clarify a task, or the steps and processes required to develop responses to questions or solutions to problems• generate products or solutions for challenges and learning area tasks to: - develop, refine and present new understandings in a digital form - create a digital input or a process to support a digital output to transform digital data and information. Communicating with ICTThis element involves students in using ICT to communicate ideas and information with others and collaboratively construct knowledge, in adherence with social protocols appropriate to the communicative context (purpose, audience and technology). Students use ICT to:• share, exchange and collaborate to enhance learning by:- sharing information in digital forms - exchanging information through digital communication - collaborating and collectively contributing to a digital product • understand and apply social protocols to receive, send and publish digital data and information, taking into account characteristics of users General capabilities in the Australian Curriculum - January 201247• apply techniques or strategies to ensure security of digital information, to control access, protect files and report abuse.Managing and operating ICTThis element involves students in using ICT to investigate, create and communicate. This involves applying technical knowledge and skills to work with information as required and use information classification and organisation schemes. Students:• use digital technologies efficiently including: - troubleshooting- adjusting parameters - monitoring occupational health and safety issues • select appropriate combinations of digital hardware and software to match the needs of the user and the task • understand the transferability of knowledge and skills between digital systems and applications• use software to manage and maintain information in digital files.
  • Advertisement for SMART,Technology is always evolving, educators are lifelong learners.How are you going to shape the classroom of tomorrow??12 years into the 21st Century, what has changed in your classrooms?
  • Technology ALWAYS changes.Out of warranty, not worth keeping, finding parts for old technology is difficult.Reliability not guaranteed.Powerpoint, MS Paint
  • Buying technology that is too advancedCase studiesDifficult to handleRequires loads of training for specific useAugmented reality, gesture based learning.
  • Most drivers/teachers are comfortable with thisCan drive it, even with a slight variation of set upReliable, in warranty.Email, Blogging, Animoto, Edmodo
  • Teacher using technologyWhen you first learning to drive, no matter what people tell you, you need to get the feel for the car.All the processes involved with using the car is explicit, checking mirrors, seatbelts, starting/parking the car.The more you do it, these processes/skills become automated practices.Same with using technology, not just for teachers, but for life long learners.LEARN from your prac teachers, mentors, self-reflection, peer feedback.How can we maintain/improve the standard of teaching throughout a teacher’s career? Once they are qualified educators.
  • http://www.p21.orgOur MissionP21 Mission StatementTo serve as a catalyst to position 21st century readiness at the center of US K12 education by building collaborative partnerships among education, business, community and government leaders.Twenty-First Century ChildrenEvery child in the U.S. needs 21st century knowledge and skills to succeed as effective citizens, workers and leaders. This can be accomplished by fusing the 3Rs and 4Cs. The 3Rs include: English, reading or language arts; mathematics; science; foreign languages; civics; government; economics; arts; history; and geography.The 4Cs include: critical thinking and problem solving; communication, collaboration; and creativity and innovation. As the 3Rs serve as an umbrella for other subjects and core content, the 4Cs are a shorthand for all the skills needed for success in college, career, and life.3Rs - Reading, wRiting, and aRithmetic
  • What do you look for in the classroom, compliancevs engagementTeacher/student centeredDisruptive noise/busy noise
  • No different
  • Copying notes from textbook with Ipad?
  • Any difference?
  • MarionAssaigaiers uses Dylan William’s analogy for questioningHe asks us not to do table tennis Q&A - play basketball instead. Pose a question, pause, ask another kid to evaluate the answer child one gave, and ask a third for an explanation of how and why that's right or wrong.Finally, don't allow hands to go up to give an answer - your students results will be worse than if they do otherwise. Instead, the teacher can encourage certain students to take part in this three-way questioning activity, and work over time to get them playing question basketball for themselves.Collaborative tools such a Edmodo can facilitate this.http://learningnetworknz.blogspot.com.au/2011/10/hands-up.htmlAttention – seeking, avoiding or losing it – came to mind as I pondered our ‘2012: Hands up who’s ready!’ campaign which will highlight our raft of events andresources to support your professional learning next year.It seems there’s a lot of discussion out there around alternatives to ‘hands up’ in class, as well as novel ideas for getting students’ attention. And while a lot more goes on in the 21st century classroom than teacher-posed questioning, there are times when we do want to call on students to offer their thoughts to the group.Looking forward to your comments and suggestions on these!Response boardsAn experiment on a class of British 13-year-olds banned them from raising their hands for a term. It showed they learned twice as fast when asked to write their answers to teacher-posed questions on a small whiteboard, and then raise them together. While the technique was unpopular with both students and teachers at first, it proved to prevent the minority of students from dominating, and to give the quieter children more confidence. Some teachers also get students to use pre-written response cards. These could be ‘agree/disagree’, or numbers from 1 to 4 indicating level of understanding. Students indicating a high level of understanding could be called on to share with the class. How would this work with your students?Two thumbs upWhat about replacing the traditional hand-raise with a newer gesture like two thumbs up? A primary school that adopted this was derided by press and parents alike but the principal maintains that “it has calmed the students down. Staff have noticed a positive difference in the amount of people answering questions.” Do you think using an alternative gesture would make a difference in your class?Cold callingSome teachers swear by choosing a different student by name to answer each time; they maintain this shares the love (the pain?) by giving everyone the same opportunity to speak. A (partial) pack of cards can be used to make this more fun – assign one card to each student and pull one out at random – or write each student’s name on an ice block stick to pull out. Would your students find this challenging or confronting?Silence is goldenThe uncomfortable silence that sometime hangs after your question isn’t such a bad thing – call it ‘think time’. There are various studies around the benefits of leaving at least 3 seconds for thinking before expecting a question to be answered. One article I read highlights the use of think time at various points in class dialogue, not just after asking a question. For example, think time after one student has responded allows the others to ponder and react to what they’ve heard. A pause in the middle of teacher talk gives the class time to absorb and process information – and allows the teacher to reflect too. And how often are we guilty of spitting out the first answer that comes to mind, rather than pausing and taking time to think of a considered response? Would modelling think-time help your students embrace it?Attention seekerAnd how about the age-old problem of getting your students’ attention without sounding like a sergeant major? Do you put your hand up or clap, and wait for them to follow suit? Play a piece of music? Ring a big old bell, blow a whistle, bang a drum, dance on the desk? What works for you and feels respectful?
  • Quality Teaching
  • http://ipads4learning.global2.vic.edu.au/page/2/Collaboration
  • http://ipads4learning.global2.vic.edu.au/page/2/Collaboration
  • Syncing, storage, charging, and even classroom management are all factors. And perhaps most important to any educators is the concept of time-management. The more self-contained procedure and habits are here, the more time students will have for inquiry, collaboration, and instruction—and the more time available to focus on what makes the iPad special.
  • Learners have control/ownershipLearning is personalised (1-1 device)Learning styles catered for (visual, auditory)Accessibility for vision/hearing/mobility impairments
  • Requires planningSpeak to Technology AdvisorsIpads not supported by regionLegalitiesWirelessAdd on for fun factor or QT
  • Tony Vincenthttp://learninginhand.com/
  • http://ipadschools.wikispaces.com/home
  • LEAN THINKINGThe core idea is to maximize customer value while minimizing waste. Simply, lean means creating more value for customers with fewer resources.DESIGN THINKINGDesign Thinking refers to the methods and processes for investigating ill-defined problems, acquiring information, analyzing knowledge, and positing solutions in the design and planning fields. As a style of thinking, it is generally considered the ability to combine empathy for the context of a problem, creativity in the generation of insights and solutions, and rationality to analyze and fit solutions to the context. 
  • Do you know what is happening in your classrooms? Who is the main user of technology??
  • http://mswaughsclass.blogspot.com.au/2011/04/21st-century-classroom.html
  • http://ipads4learning.global2.vic.edu.au/page/2/Collaboration
  • Edmodo is a secure, social learning platform for teachers, students, schools and districts. We provide a safe and easy way for your class to connect and collaborate, share content and access homework, grades and school notices. Our goal is to help educators harness the power of social media to customize the classroom for each and every learner.
  • http://infogr.am/
  • http://infogr.am/http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSXyfX8ABhAEg. Chatswood PShttp://www.chatswood-p.schools.nsw.edu.au/resources/BYOT%20policy%20june%202012%20for%20website.pdf
  • http://infogr.am/
  • Socrative is a smart student response system that empowers teachers to engage their classrooms through a series of educational exercises and games via smartphones, laptops, and tablets.sfungict@gmail.com
  • Socrative is a smart student response system that empowers teachers to engage their classrooms through a series of educational exercises and games via smartphones, laptops, and tablets.sfungict@gmail.comhttp://qrcode.kaywa.com/
  • What my 4 year son brings to Kindergarten. (supervised)Google search (Finds what he needs e.g. Pepper pig, lego city)Control of mouseSwipe skills/keyboard typing skillsGesture based skillsDigital media – photo and video
  • BYODhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSXyfX8ABhA&feature=relatedhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZ5Vy9BgSeYActive Learner
  • http://ipads4learning.global2.vic.edu.au/page/2/Collaboration
  • http://ipads4learning.global2.vic.edu.au/page/2/Collaboration

Transcript

  • 1. Transforming Technologies Samson Fung, SWSR ICT CONSULTANT K-12PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 2. Acknowledgement of CountryPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 3. bit.ly/ict4teachers Who Am I? Why Am I Here?PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 4. National Professional Standards - Principals 3. Leading improvement, innovation and changePUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 5. National Professional Standards - Principals ‘Take a strategic role in the development and implementation of new and emerging technologies to enhance and extend teaching and learning experiences.’PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 6. National Professional Standards - Principals ‘Motivate and work with others to foster creativity, innovation and the use of appropriate new technologies to achieve excellence.’PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 7. Implementation of Australian Curriculum in NSWPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 8. Sourced from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/GeneralCapabilities/General%20capabilities.pdf viewed 6/9/12PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 9. Sourced from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/GeneralCapabilities/General%20capabilities.pdf viewed 6/9/12PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 10. The History of Technology in EducationPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 11. The Analogy – Old TechnologyPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 12. The Analogy – The DriverPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 13. The Analogy – Advanced TechnologyPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 14. The Analogy – The DriverPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 15. The Analogy – Current TechnologyPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 16. The Analogy – The DriverPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 17. The Analogy – The DriverPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 18. Partnership For 21st Century Skills (12 years in…)PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 19. Learning Activity Checklist in 21CPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 20. PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 21. PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 22. PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 23. PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 24. PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 25. In the 21C QT model, ICT is an ESSENTIAL toolPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 26. Learning and Innovation Skills – 4CsPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 27. PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 28. Transformative ICT ToolsPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 29. Tablet Technology – Apple Sourced from youtube.com, viewed 3/9/12PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 30. Tablet Technology @ Your School • Share ONLY 2 positives for the use of Tablet technology in your classrooms. • Share ONLY 1 challenge/hurdle with the use of Tablet technology. Sourced from youtube.com, viewed 3/9/12PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 31. Benefits of the Ipad Created using wordle.netPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 32. Challenges with the Ipad Created using wordle.netPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 33. Ipad Apps (Which one?!?!) • Purpose? Look at outcomes/programs • Breakdown (Age/KLA/Strand) • Quality (4cs) • Web access?PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 34. PLN for IpadsPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 35. A few APPS to get started with… • Showme (Interactive board) • I Like Books (Infants) • Imotion HD (Stopmotion) • Puppet Pals (Narrative) • Imovie (Digital Story)PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 36. PLN for Ipads • Slide2learn • Victoria Ipad Trial • Ipadschools WikispacePUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 37. Ipads are just another ICT ToolPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 38. Ipads are just another ICT ToolPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 39. Concept of ‘Social Learning’PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 40. Social Learning in 2012 • From the clip, what point(s) resonated with you. • How does social learning with/without ICT occur in your school context? (DET emails, Blogs/wikis?, Edmodo, Twitter, project based learning, flipped classroom, collaborative group tasks, digital cameras/ipads) Sourced from youtube.com, viewed 3/9/12PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 41. PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 42. Wallwisher – Virtual Collaborative Wall (IQ) Substantive CommunicationPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 43. Edmodo – Virtual Collaborative Wall (S) - ConnectednessPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 44. Infogr.am - Digital Media (IQ) – Problematic Knowledge, Higher Order ThinkingPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 45. BYOD Or BYOTPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 46. EgPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 47. Socrative – Web based SRN (S) - InclusivityPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 48. Socrative – Web based SRN http://m.socrative.com Room: 27912PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 49. ICT Skills Embedded in the TeachingPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 50. Life long learningPUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 51. References • National Teaching Standards http://www.teacherstandards.aitsl.edu.au/ • Partnership for 21st Century Skills http://www.p21.org • Australian Curriculum http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/australian-curriculum/PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 52. Discussion 1PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU
  • 53. Discussion 2PUBLIC SCHOOLS NSW – SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY REGION WWW.SCHOOLS.NSW.EDU.AU