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Service design terminology
Service design terminology
Service design terminology
Service design terminology
Service design terminology
Service design terminology
Service design terminology
Service design terminology
Service design terminology
Service design terminology
Service design terminology
Service design terminology
Service design terminology
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Service design terminology

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  • 1. Service design terminology Satu Miettinen Kuva: Reetta Kerola
  • 2. Service design <ul><li>Service design addresses services from the perspective of clients. It aims to ensure that service interfaces are useful, usable and desirable from the client’s point of view and effective, efficient and distinctive from the supplier’s point of view. Service designers visualise, formulate, and choreograph solutions to problems that do not necessarily exist today; they observe and interpret requirements and behavioural patterns and transform them into possible future services. This process applies explorative, generative, and evaluative design </li></ul>
  • 3. Service ecology <ul><li>System in which the service is integrated: i.e. a holistic visualisation of the service system. All the factors are gathered, analysed and visualised: politics, the economy, employees, law, societal trends, and technological development. The service ecology is thereby rendered, along with its attendant agents, processes, and relations. </li></ul><ul><li>By analysing service ecologies, it is possible to reveal opportunities for new actors to join the ecology and new relationships among the actors. Ultimately, sustainable service ecologies depend on a balance where the actors involved exchange value in ways that is mutually beneficial over time. </li></ul>
  • 4. The network of actors related to ageing in the city of Helsinki. Source: HDL
  • 5. Customer journey <ul><li>Consuming a service means a consuming an experience, a process that extends over time. The customer journey thus illustrates how the customer perceives and experiences the service interface along the time axis. It also considers the phases before and after actual interaction with the service. The first step in creating a customer journey is to decide its starting and stopping points. The customer journey serves as the umbrella under which the service is explored and, with various methods, systematised and visualised. </li></ul>
  • 6. Customer journey: train ride <ul><li>Service touchpoints are the tangibles, for example, spaces, objects, people or interactions that make up the total experience of using a service. Touchpoints can take many forms, from advertising to personal cards; web-, mobilephone- and PC interfaces; bills; retail shops; call centres and customer representatives. In service design, all touchpoints need to be considered in totality and crafted in order to create a clear, consistent and unified customer experience, HCI (human computer interaction), modality between human and computer </li></ul><ul><li>1) Looking for time table, price, making a reservation </li></ul>Kuva: Reetta Kerola
  • 7. <ul><li>The customer faces the line of IT interaction when she/he is using the IT services (examples: hotel television, information in the parking area through the IT system, hotel and conference website and booking system). The line of IT interaction is still part of the frontstage. Modality machine to machine (ubique environment) </li></ul><ul><li>2) Receiving a ticket in mobile phone </li></ul>Kuva: Reetta Kerola Customer journey: train ride
  • 8. <ul><li>3)Buing a ticket from the counter </li></ul><ul><li>There is a line of visibility for the service actions that the customer is not able to see. There services happen in the backstage (examples: staff working with the reservation internally in the hotel booking system, registration of the hotel customer in the conference system, acceptance of the credit card in the. </li></ul>Kuva: Reetta Kerola Customer journey: train ride
  • 9. <ul><li>Front desk: The time and place in which customers come in contact with the service, for example, the website, the person serving you at the restaurant, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>3) Buying a ticket from the automat </li></ul>Customer journey: train ride Kuva: Reetta Kerola
  • 10. <ul><li>4)Waiting for the train, looking for the track </li></ul>Customer journey: train ride Reetta Kerola
  • 11. <ul><li>When the customer is experiencing the service she/ he is facing the line of interaction (examples: receptionist greeting at the hotel reception and guiding to your room, conference registration staff greeting the delegate and giving information). Human to human modality </li></ul><ul><li>5) Inspecting the ticket </li></ul>Customer journey: train ride Reetta Kerola
  • 12. Service blueprint <ul><li>Mapping out of a service journey identifying the processes that constitute the service, isolating possible fail points and establishing the time frame for the journey. </li></ul><ul><li>Description of critical service elements, such as time, logical sequences of actions and processes, also specifying both actions and events that happen in the time and place of the interaction (front office) and actions and events that are out of the line of visibility for the users, but are fundamental for the service. Service blueprinting involves the description of all the activities for designing and managing services, including schedule, project plans, detailed representations (such as use cases) and design plans, or service platforms. </li></ul>
  • 13. Lähde: http://dkds.ciid.dk/py/industry-project-dsb/projects/mapme/

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