Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
E waste
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

E waste

12,472
views

Published on

This ppt tells the about the problem of e-waste in india.

This ppt tells the about the problem of e-waste in india.

Published in: Education, Business, Technology

7 Comments
44 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
12,472
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
6
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
7
Likes
44
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.  The term E-Waste applies to all the wastes from or caused by Electronic items.  Technological development is the main reason.  IRG(International Resource Group) vastly deals with this types of hazards to the environment.  Slowly but strongly, E-waste is becoming a threat to the world.
  • 2. • IT & Telecom Equipments • Large Household Appliances • Small Household Appliances • Consumer & Lighting Equipments • Electrical & Electronic Tools • Toys & Sports Equipment • Medical Devices • Monitoring & Control Instruments
  • 3.  One desktop & One 17” Monitor equates to the use of 22kgs of Chemicals 1500kgs of water 240kgs of fossil fuels  Same as a mid size car  5% oil refined today is used in manufacturing plastics  4-7kgs of plastic is used to manufacture new PC
  • 4. The total e-waste discarded around the world 50 million tons per year
  • 5.  Discarded electronics contain hazardous materials.  If disposed improperly, they pose a potential threat to human health and the environment.  May contaminate groundwater  E-Waste accounts for 40 percent of the lead and 75 percent of the heavy metals found in landfills.
  • 6. Element Harmful Effects Lead • Extremely harmful to the human body; • Damages both the central and peripheral nervous systems; • Can cause seizures, retardation, high blood pressure, damage to the kidneys and liver; • Adversely affects child development Beryllium • Long term exposure can be carcinogenic, especially for the lungs. • Extreme exposure can lead to a potentially fatal condition known as Acute Beryllium Disease
  • 7. Element Harmful Effects Arsenic • Arsenic is a notoriously potent poison; • Causes severe damage to the digestive tract Mercury • Attacks the central nervous and endocrine systems; • harmful to mouth, teeth and gums; • poses risk in the neurological development of unborn fetuses Antimony • Toxic to humans in ways similar to arsenic; fatal in large doses Cadmium • Potentially carcinogenic; • Repeated exposure can damage the lungs, kidneys and liver
  • 8. Cadmium in batteries Lead in solder joints Plastics in cables
  • 9. Maharashtra : 20,270 tons Tamil Nadu : 13,486 tons Andhra Pradesh : 12,780 tons Uttar Pradesh : 10,381 tons West Bengal : 10,059 tons Delhi : 9,729 tons Karnataka : 9,118 tons Gujarat : 8,994 tons Madhya Pradesh : 7,800 tons
  • 10. • Physical characteristics – Unsorted waste – Mixed waste of bio degradable and non- biodegradable – Low calorific value – High moisture content – Presence of hazardous waste • Lack of awareness • Unplanned growth and development of cities
  • 11. 1. E-WASTE COLLECTION, SORTING AND TRANSPORTATION 2. E-WASTE RECYCLING; IT INVOLVES DISMANTLING, RECOVERY OF VALUABLE RESOURCE, SALE OF DISMANTLED PARTS AND EXPORT OF PROCESSED WASTE FOR PRECIOUS METAL RECOVERY . THE STAKEHOLDERS, I.E., THE PEOPLE WHO CAN HELP IN OVERCOMING THE CHALLENGES POSED BY E-WASTE, ARE: 1. MANUFACTURERS 2. USERS 3. RECYCLERS 4. POLICY MAKERS
  • 12. Combining the knowledge and technical expertise of EMPA on e waste management, coupled with the field experience of the Indo-German projects in managing hazardous waste in India, the Indo-German-Swiss ewaste initiative was born in 2004.
  • 13. Convenient collection and disposal system for large and small consumers to return all their e-waste safely. Voluntary system for modern and concerned producers to care for their product beyond its useful life.  Financially secure system that makes environmentally and socially responsible e-waste recycling viable.
  • 14. 1. Reduce the risks to the population and the pollution of the environment resulting from unsafe handling 2. Focus on knowledge transfer to and skills upgrade of all involved stakeholders through trainings and seminars 3. Target mainly the existing informal recyclers allowing for their maximum but safe participation in future e-waste management by facilitating their evolution and integration in formal structures
  • 15. 1. IMPROVED AWARENESS: • THREE WEEE CARE! INITIATIVE WORKSHOPS IN BANGALORE SUPPORTED BY THE GOETHE INSTITUTE • NATIONAL E-WASTE WORKSHOP IN DELHI, HOSTED BY MOEF 2. IMPROVED STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT: • FORMATION OF THE E-WASTE AGENCY (EWA) BRINGS TOGETHER INDUSTRY, GOVERNMENT AND NGO TO WORK ON A SUSTAINABLE E-WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR BANGALORE • FIRST NATIONAL E-WASTE WORKSHOP HELD, DEFINED A WAY FORWARD • FIRST NATIONAL WORKSHOP ON EWASTE GUIDELINES HELD, ORGANISED BY MOEF 3. IMPROVED ESTIMATES OF E-WASTE: • RAPID ASSESSMENTS IN DELHI AND BANGALORE OF THE QUANTITIES BEING GENERATED, AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE E-WASTE RECYCLING HOT-SPOTS • NATIONAL-LEVEL DESK STUDY TO ASSESS E-WASTE QUANTITIES
  • 16. 1. Title: E-waste (Management & Handling) Rules to be published under the Environment Protection Act 2. Objective: To put in place an effective mechanism to regulate the generation, collection, storage, transportation, import, export, environmentally sound recycling, treatment and disposal of e-waste. This includes refurbishment, collection system and producer’s responsibility, thereby reducing the wastes destined for final disposal. 3. Essence: The producer of electrical and electronic equipment is responsible for the entire life cycle of its own branded product and in particular the environmentally sound end-of-life management and facilitating collection and take back. Structure of the Proposed E-Waste Legislations
  • 17. 4. Procedure for authorisation of producers, collection agencies, dismantlers, recyclers and enforcement agencies 5. Procedure for registration/renewal of registration of recyclers 6. Regulations for import of e-waste 7. Liability of producers, collection agencies, transporters, dismantlers and recyclers 8. Information & tracking 9. Elimination of hazardous substances used in e-equipment 10. Setting up of designated authority to ensure transparency, audit and inspect facilities, examine authorisation/registration, etc
  • 18. • Reduce • Reuse • Recycle • Recover ZERO LAND FILL