Native plants of the san jacinto and santa rosa mountains.mov
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    Native plants of the san jacinto and santa rosa mountains.mov Native plants of the san jacinto and santa rosa mountains.mov Presentation Transcript

    • Native Plants of the SantaRosa & San JacintoMountains By: Sam Buttles Native Plants (NR 41A) Professor Katie Barrows College of the Desert
    • QuickTime™ and aSingle Leaf Pinyon Pine decompressor are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - Pinus monophylla Plant Family - Pinaceae Characteristics  Small to medium size tree reaching roughly 30 to 70 feet tall and with a trunk rarely more than 30 inches in diameter  Short, grey-green needles occurring singly rather than in bunches like most pines  Acute-globose cones broad and usually 2 to 3 inches long growing over a 26 month cycle Habitat  Native to western United States and Northwestern Mexico ranging from southern Idaho to northern Baja California and as far east as western Utah  Occurs at moderate altitudes from 3900 to 7500 feet Uses  Edible seeds known as pine nuts eaten by local wildlife and Native Americans  Used as an ornamental tree in drought-tolerant and natural landscapes
    • Canyon Live Oak QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - Quercus chrysolepis Plant family - Fagaceae Characteristics  Shrub-like evergreen tree ranging from 6 to 30 meters in height with horizontal spreading branches  Elliptical to oblong leaves ranging from 2.5 to 8 centimeters in length with a width usually half that and with sharp spines and a leathery texture  Grows acorns that occur either singly or in pairs and ranging from 2 to 5 centimeters Habitat  Occurs in the southwestern United States mostly in California, but also in southern Oregon, western Nevada, Arizona, and northern Baja California  Found anywhere from 500 to 1500 meters in most areas, but as high as 2700 meters in parts of southern California Uses  Acorns eaten by local wildlife and prehistoric humans  Provides a habitat for many forms of wildlife, especially birds and small mammals
    • QuickTime™ and aManzanita decompressor are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - Arctostaphylos manzanita Plant Family - Ericaceae Charzcteristics  Shrub-like plant with wedge-shaped, pointy, shiny green leaves  Small white flowers and white berries that turn red-brown during summer  Distinctive and attractive dark-red bark make it easily identifiable Habitat  Occurs at a variety of elevations in California, but is mostly found on chaparral slopes and low-elevation coniferous forests Uses  Berries are edible and often brewed into a cider  The hardness and attractiveness of the wood makes it good for tools, ornaments, and firewood
    • QuickTime™ and a decompressorArroyo Willow are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - salix lasiolepis Plant Family - salicaceae Characteristics  Deciduous large shrub and small tree growing up to 33 feet tall  Long, narrow leaves ranging from 3.5 to 12.5 cm long and green on the top while bottom is covered in white hairs  Yellow catkins flowers are 1.5 to 7 cm long and are produced in the spring Habitat  Grows in canyons and along pond shores and swamps  Found as far north as Washington and as far south as northern Mexico and as far East as New Mexico and even further east in parts of mexico Uses  Salicylic acid is derived from the willow as an ingredient in aspirin
    • Basin Sagebrush QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - Artemisia tridentata Plant Family - asteraceae Characteristics  Aromatic shrub with pale grey-green leaves covered in silvery hairs and yellow flowers  Rarely more than 3 meters tall  Long-lived plant sometimes reaching 100 years of age Habitat  Grows in arid to semi-arid conditions in cold desert, steppe, and mountain habitats in western North America Uses  Provides food for much of the local wildlife  Used as an herbal medicine by Native Americans for a variety of conditions
    • QuickTime™ and aIncense Cedar decompressor are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - Calocedrus decurrens Plant Family - cupressaceae Characteristics  Large tree reaching 40 to 60 meters tall  Has overlapping scale-like leaves occurring in whorls of four  Has cones with 2 to 3 pairs of thin, erect scales Habitat  Native to western North America and found at a variety of elevations from central western Oregon to parts of northern Baja California and as far east as western Nevada Uses  The soft and decay-resistant qualities of the wood of the incense cedar make it ideal for the manufacturing of wooden products like pencils that need to be soft and splinter-proof
    • Jeffrey Pine QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - Pinus Jeffreyi Plant Family - Pinaceae Characteristics  Large coniferous evergreen tree reaching from 80 to 130 feet tall  5 to 9 inch long grey-green needles occurring in groups of 3  5 to 9 inch long cones that turn from dark purple to a dull brown as they mature Habitat  Found as far north as southwestern Oregon and as south as northern Baja California, but grows mostly in California  Found in elevations of 4900 to 6900 feet in its northern regions and from 5900 to 9500 feet in its more southern regions Uses  Wood is often used for construction and other purposes  N-heptane is distilled from the resin found in Jeffrey pines
    • QuickTime™ and aWax Currant decompressor are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - Ribes cereum Plant Family - grossulariaceae Characteristics  Spreading or erect shrub growing up to 2 meters tall  Aromatic spicy scent  Fuzzy, glandular stems with rounded leaves that are teethed at the edges  White to pink flowers grow in clusters  Grows small, tasteless red berries Habitat  Native to western North America from southern California to southern British Columbia  Grows in a variety of habitats, but mostly mountain forests in alpine climates Uses  Berries provide food for wildlife and Native Americans  Used for medicinal purposes by Native Americans  Grown as an ornamental plant
    • QuickTime™ and a decompressorSugar Pine are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - Pinus lambertiana Plant Family - Pinaceae Characteristics  Largest of the pines growing from 130 to 200 feet and taller and with a trunk diameter of 5 to 8 feet  Needles are 2 to 4 inches long with a deciduous sheath and occur in bundles of 5  Cones are the longest of the pines at 10 to 20 inches long Habitat  Grows in the mountains of Oregon, California, and Baja California Uses  Pine nuts are edible and utilized by wildlife and Native Americans  Wood can be used as lumber
    • QuickTime™ and a decompressorCalifornia Fuchsia are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - Epilobium canum Plant Family - Onagraceae Characteristics  Perennial subshrub rarely growing taller than 60 centimeters  Exhibits extreme variation: • leaves can be opposite or alternate, oval-like or long and slender, and range in color from white to green • Flowers can be tubular or funnel-shaped and can range in color from fuchsia to pink to red-orange  Spreads via rhizomes, or roots Habitat  Native to dry slopes and the chaparral of western North America especially in California Uses  Can be grown as an ornamental plant in many gardens and landscapes
    • Cupleaf Ceanothus QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - Ceanothus greggii Plant Family - Rhamnaceae Characteristics  Erect shrub growing up to 7 feet in height  Gray and somewhat hairy woody parts  Evergreen leaves vary in shape and may or may not be toothed at edges  Grows clusters of white flowers  The fruit is a horned capsule only a few millimeters wide and bursts open to expel the 3 seeds it contains. These seeds require wildfires to be germinated. Habitat  Grows in dry habitats such as desert scrub and chaparral in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico Uses  Grazed by wildlife such as big horn sheep and mule deer
    • QuickTime™ and a decompressorBush Chinquapin are needed to see this picture. Characteristics  Shrub growing 3 to 7 feet tall  Blunt-pointed leaves growing 1 to 3 inches long  Thin, smooth bark  Fruit occurs as a densely spiny cupule usually containing 3 edible nuts Habitat  Occurs in the Klamath mountains of Oregon and the Sierra Nevada, San Gabriel, San Bernardino, and San Jacinto mountains of California from 3300 to 9800 feet in elevation Uses  Edible sweet nuts contained in fruit provide food for wildlife and Native Americans
    • California Black Oak QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - Quercus Kelloggii Plant Family - Fagaceae Characteristics  Deciduous tree which can sometimes be shrub-like growing from 30 to 80 feet in height and with a trunk diameter of 1 to 5 feet  Young trees have a slender crown that spreads out to become quite broad and rounded as the tree ages. The first 20 to 40 feet of the trunk is usually free of branches.  Leaves are larger than most oaks at 4 to 8 inches long and are deeply lobed  Acorns are also relatively large at 1 inch long and only slightly less wide  Lifespan is 100 to 200 years with some living up to 500 years Habitat  Native to the western United States from western central Oregon to northern Baja California  Grows in mixed evergreen forests, oak woodlands, and coniferous forests Uses  Acorns provide food for wildlife and Native Americans  Often used as hardwood timber
    • California Buckwheat QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - Eriogonum fasciculatum Plant Family - polygonaceae Characteristics  Evergreen bush roughly 12 to 39 inches in height and 28 to 51 inches wide  Leather leaves with a wooly underside grow in clusters along the branches  Pink and white flowers occur in dense clusters at the ends of branches Habitat  Native to southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico and grows in dry climates in locations like chaparral and dry washes Uses  Used by Native Americans for medicinal purposes  Attractive to honey bees  Good source of nectar
    • QuickTime™ and aRibbonwood decompressor are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - Adenostema sparsifolium Plant Family - Rosaceae Characteristics  Multi-trunked tree or shrub 1 to 5 feet tall and 1 to 2 feet wide  Shaggy bark constantly frays and falls Habitat  Grows on dry slopes in the chaparral of Southern California and Northern Baja Mexico Uses  Used medicinally for a variety of purposes such as the treatment of arthritis and toothaches
    • QuickTime™ and aChamise decompressor are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - Adenostenum Fasciculatum Plant Family - Rosaceae Characteristics  Evergreen shrub growing up to 4 meters tall  Small leaves 4 to 10 millimeters long and 1 millimeter wide with a pointed apex occur in clusters along long pointy branches  White, tubular flowers occur at the ends of the branches Habitat  Native to the chaparral of Southern California and Baja Mexico Uses  Erosion control
    • QuickTime™ and aSugar Bush decompressor are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - Rhus ovata Plant Family - Anacardiaceae Characteristics  Rounded shrub or small tree 6 to 30 feet tall  Thick, leathery dark green leaves folded upward in the midlle  Thick reddish twigs  White and pink flowers grow in clusters grow at the ends of some branches Habitat  Grows in the chaparral of Southern California, Arizona, and Baja California below 1300 meters in dry canyons and south-facing slopes Uses  Provides a habitat for birds  Fruit and flowers are eaten by wildlife and can be made into a juice  Drought-tolerant for landscapes
    • California Juniper QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - Juniperus californica Plant Family - Cupressaceae Characteristics  Shrub or small tree growing from 10 to 26 feet  Leaves are scale-like and opposite occurring along shoots  Cones are blue-brown and berry-like Habitat  Native to southwestern North America mainly in California, but also in sparsely in Baja California, Nevada, and Arizona  2460 to 5200 feet in elevation Uses  Popular bonsai species  Drought tolerant
    • QuickTime™ and aMountain Snowberry decompressor are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - Symphoricarpus rotundifolius Plant Family - Caprifoliaceae Characteristics  Deciduous shrub  1.5 to 5 centimeter long leaves, rounded with one or two lobes at the bottom  Flowers are small and very light green to pink  Fruits are white berries Habitat  Found in many mountainous woods in much of North and Central America Uses  Fruits provide winter food for some birds but are considered poisonous to humans
    • QuickTime™ and aLodgepole Pine decompressor are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - Pinus Contorta Plant family - Pinaceae Characteristics  Has three subspecies and can be shrub-like or a small tree ranging from 1 to 3 meters and 40 to 50 meters  Needles are dark green, pointed, and 4 to 8 centimeters  Cones are 3 to 7 centimeters long with prickles on the scales. They often need to be germinated by a forest fire. Habitat  Found in California and British Columbia in the Cascade and Sierra Nevada mountain ranges, the mountains of Southern California and even northern Baja Mexico Uses  Timber was used in Native American construction as well as current construction  Grown in gardens and can be a large bonsai species
    • Curl-leaf Mountain QuickTime™ and aMahogany decompressor are needed to see this picture. Latin name - Cercocarpus ledifolius Plant Family - Rosaceae Characteristics  Large, densely branching shrub or tree growing up to 10 meters in height  Leaves are dark green, leathery, sticky, and often curled at the edges  Flowers consist of a brown cone out of which protrudes a long, plume-like gynocium covered in tiny tan hairs Habitat  Grows in low mountains and slopes of western North America Uses  Used medicinally for a variety of purposes by Native Americans
    • Rabbitbrush QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - Chrysothamnus nauseosus Plant Family - Asteraceae Characteristics  Low subshrub rarely more than 20 centimeters in height  Branches with a dark grey, fibrous, bark grow green and glandular stems with green, hairy, glandular leaves  Clusters of cylindrical, yellow flowers occur at the ends of branches Habitat  Native to southwestern North America Uses  Fed on by livestock and wildlife
    • White Fir QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - Abies concolor Plant Family - Pinaceae Characteristics  Evergreen coniferous tree growing from 80 to 197 feet in height  Needles appear flattened and ar 2.5 to 6 centimeters long  Cones are 6 to 12 centimeters long and 4 to 5 centimeters wide Habitat  Grows 3000 to 11000 feet in elevation in the mountains of western North America Uses  Sometimes used in paper making and other cheap construction work  Often used as Christmas decoration
    • Holly-leaved Redberry QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. Latin Name - Rhamnus ilicifolia Plant Family - Rhamnaceae Characteristics  Rambling shrub growing up to 4 meters in height  Leaves are rounded, dark green, and leathery with sharp teethed edges  Red flowers grow at the end of some stems  Fruits ripens to a bright red on the end of some stems Habitat  Found in the wooded areas and chaparral of the western United States and Mexico Uses  Fruits are edible