How EA, BPM, SOA and ECM work together

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How EA, BPM, SOA and ECM work together

  1. 1. How EA, BPM, SOA and ECM work together Alexander Samarin for the BPM mini-conference https://www.dataforeningen.no/program.316567.no.html EA – Enterprise Architecture BPM – Business Process Management SOA – Service Oriented Architecture ECM – Enterprise Content Management
  2. 2. • A digital enterprise architect – from a programmer to a systems architect – have created systems which work without me • WHY I do what I do – I believe that many improvements (“sooner, better, cheaper, more flexible”) in operational excellence and strategy execution are achievable with reasonable efforts and commodity tools • HOW I do what I do – architecting synergy between strategies, technologies, tools and best practices for client’s unique case and transfer the knowledge • WHAT is the result of my work for clients – less routine work, less stress, higher performance, higher security, less risk, higher predictability of results, better operations, and liberating the business potentials Architecting synergy v2 2 About me © A. Samarin 2014
  3. 3. • Context – manage complexity in the digital age • BPM reference model – BPM and SOA – BPM and information security • Platform-based architecture – ECM, Electronic Publishing • Enterprise as a system of processes – Patterns • Combined examples – Shared services, legacy application architecture, e-gov, healthcare, SIC © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 3 Agenda
  4. 4. – It is not about “just the website”, “online services” or “transactions” – Everything becomes digital: products, information, content, documents, records, processes, money, rights, communications – If digital then intangible thus news tools and new execution speed “immediately” – Digital things are at new scale – petabytes and exabytes – With this new speed and scale, there is no time for human intervention and errors in routine operations and at interfaces © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 4 Digital age
  5. 5. • Experience shows that business wants separate requests for change to be implemented quickly in existing IT solutions and systems • These changes are typically small (from the point of view of the business) and unpredictable (from the point of view of the IT) • To carry out these changes easily and in a managed way, business systems must be properly architected / designed / engineered © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 5 Business reality
  6. 6. • Different estimations of the development/maintenance life-cycle cost ratio © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 6 Solutions need to be adaptive 2 – Estimated average in the IT industry maintenance development 80 % 20 % 2 40 % 60 % 1 95 % 5 % 3 3 – A real scenario (governmental client) 1 – Estimated by an IT staff member
  7. 7. • Co-existence of many artefacts – vision, plans, processes, capabilities, services, etc. • Dynamic and interrelated • Not all relationships between artefacts are explicit • Not all relationships between artefacts are interpreted consistently by different staff members and systems • Small changes can be very destructive © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 7 Complexity
  8. 8. • There are two different sources of complexity: – natural as we use more and more complex products produced by more and more interlinked companies and – undesired as we do things with inadequate tools, without using the best available knowledge, via communicating in not the “same” language, by reinventing the wheel, following contradictory recommendations from consultants, drawing a process and executing something else, etc. • The purpose of enterprise architecture – guide solution architecture to follow the natural complexity to avoid adding undesired complexity – promote the use explicit and executable techniques to reduce the natural complexity – “liberate” resources to better handle the natural complexity © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 8 Managing complexity
  9. 9. • EA coordinates people, process and technologies in 4D 1. Business domain span (organisational unit, segment, enterprise, …) 2. Architecture span (business, data, application, technology, …) 3. Time span (solution life-cycle, technology life-cycle, tool life-cycle, project life-cycle, …) 4. Sector span (common patterns in unique processes from different sectors) © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 9 EA as a systemic coordinator
  10. 10. • Context – manage complexity in the digital age • BPM reference model – BPM and SOA – BPM and information security • Platform-based architecture – ECM, Electronic Publishing • Enterprise as a system of processes – Patterns • Combined examples – Shared services, legacy application architecture, e-gov, healthcare, SIC © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 10 Agenda
  11. 11. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 11 BPM is a tool for improving enterprise business performance The theory BPM as a discipline (use processes to manage an enterprise) The tools BPM as software: BPM suite (BPMS) The practice Any process-centric enterprise has some BPM (as discipline and tool), but how can we industrialise this BPM? A natural evolution of BPR, Lean, ISO 9001, 6 Sigma The aim is to have a single description of business processes: - model in design - input for project planning and execution - executable program for coordination of work - documentation for all staff members - basis for management decisions An enterprise portfolio of the business processes as well as the practices and tools for governing the design, execution and evolution of this portfolio A multitude of tools “handle” processes
  12. 12. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 12 Be ready for common (mis-)understanding
  13. 13. • Enterprise functioning can be considered as business activity flows spanning the applications, employees, customers and partners within and beyond the boundaries of the enterprise • Business activity is a unit of work • A business process is an explicitly-defined coordination for guiding the purposeful enactment of business activities • Process-based disciplines (TQM/QMS, BPR, TPS, 6Sigma, BPM, etc.) exploit the concept of business processes for the better management of the enterprise functioning in support of the enterprise goals © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 13 BPM definitions (1)
  14. 14. • Business Process Management (BPM) is a process- based discipline involving any combination of modeling, automation/implementation, execution, control, measurement and optimization of business processes © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 14 BPM definitions (2)
  15. 15. • Process template – a formal description of the process • Process instance – enactment of a process template • Different variations of relationship between template and instance Architecting synergy v2 15 Process templates and instances Templates and their versions Instances © A. Samarin 2014
  16. 16. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 16 Variant 1 – classic (one template is used for many instances)
  17. 17. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 17 Variant 2 – tailoring (a template is adjusted for each instance)
  18. 18. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 18 Variant 3 – reactive (no initial template and next activity is selected based on the current situation)
  19. 19. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 19 Variant 4 – proactive planning (similar to variant 3, but a few next activities [fragment] are executed together)
  20. 20. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 20 Variant 5 – scenario-based (similar to variant 4, but a few scenarios are considered) Process fragments are used; those may be patterns
  21. 21. • An enterprise is a complex, dynamic and adaptive system; one can improve it by: – measuring – observing – deciding – implementing Architecting synergy v2 21 BPM reference model: Improvement loop 1 2 3 4 © A. Samarin 2014
  22. 22. Architecting synergy v2 22 BPM reference model: Process-based disciplines © A. Samarin 2014
  23. 23. Architecting synergy v2 23 BPM reference model: Process-oriented view of an enterprise (before BPM) © A. Samarin 2014
  24. 24. Architecting synergy v2 24 BPM reference model: Process-oriented view of an enterprise (with BPM) © A. Samarin 2014
  25. 25. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 25 BPM reference model: BPM suite components
  26. 26. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 26 BPM reference model: BPM suite components (extended list)
  27. 27. • Context – manage complexity in the digital age • BPM reference model – BPM and SOA – BPM and information security • Platform-based architecture – ECM, Electronic Publishing • Enterprise as a system of processes – Patterns • Combined examples – Shared services, legacy application architecture, e-gov, healthcare, SIC © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 27 Agenda
  28. 28. • Events • Roles • Data structures • Documents • Rules • Audit trails • KPIs • Processes • Services © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 28 BPM artifacts KPIs Processes Services Events Roles Data structures Documents Rules Human “workflow” Audit trails
  29. 29. • Who (roles) is doing What (business objects), When (coordination of activities), Why (business rules), How (business activities) and with Which Results (performance indicators) • Make these relationships explicit and executable What you model is what you execute “The map is the app” © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 29 Business processes are complex relationships between artefacts
  30. 30. • Services are considered to be explicitly-defined and operationally-independent units of functionality – Formal description – Operational independence – Invisible implementation Architecting synergy v2 30 Services © A. Samarin 2014
  31. 31. • Definition – architectural approach for constructing software-intensive systems from a set of universally interconnected and interdependent services • Advantages – use of standard and pre-fabricated building blocks – high level of system flexibility – reducing complexity – building bigger services from smaller ones Architecting synergy v2 31 Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) © A. Samarin 2014
  32. 32. • BPM, by revealing the artefacts and the relationships between them, provides the necessary context (e.g. granularity) for the definition of services • SOA provides recommendations for the implementation, execution and governance of services • BPM provides a mechanism for the explicit and executable assembling of bigger services from smaller ones © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 32 Synergy between BPM and SOA (1) – structuring relationships
  33. 33. • The relationship between services and processes is “recursive” – All processes are services – Some operations of a service can be implemented as a process – A process includes services in its implementation © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 33 Synergy between BPM and SOA (2) – structuring relationships
  34. 34. • Each enterprise is a complex, dynamic, unique and “recursive” relationship between services and processes – Services can be replaced by processes – Processes can be replaced by services – Some of them are moved to clouds © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 34 Synergy between BPM and SOA (3) – structuring relationships service process
  35. 35. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 35 Synergy between BPM and SOA (4) – Implementation layers of artefacts
  36. 36. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 36 Synergy between BPM and SOA (5) – Relationship with other technologies
  37. 37. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 37 Synergy between BPM and SOA (6) – no applications – just coordination of services
  38. 38. • Context – manage complexity in the digital age • BPM reference model – BPM and SOA – BPM and information security • Platform-based architecture – ECM, Electronic Publishing • Enterprise as a system of processes – Patterns • Combined examples – Shared services, legacy application architecture, e-gov, healthcare, SIC © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 38 Agenda
  39. 39. • Align access rights with the work to be done © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 39 BPM and information security: dynamic access control Do something Grant necessary rights to a person who will carry out this activity to access involved business objects Revoke previously granted rights
  40. 40. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 40 BPM and information security: Extra relationships between activities (1) Mandatory: different actors because of the separation of duties Potentially: different actors because of performance impact – avoid assigning mechanical (low-qualified “red”) activities and added-value (“green”) activities to the same actors
  41. 41. Responsible Accountable Consulted Informed BPM and information security: Extra relationships between activities (2) © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 41
  42. 42. • There are security-related relationships between activities • Example – “Activitiy_B” relates to Activity_A as “Validating the work” – These activities may be in different processes – No actors must be assigned to both “Role_1” and “Role_2” © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 42 BPM and information security: Extra relationships between activities (3) Activity_A Activity_B Carry out the work Carry out the work Validating the work Role_1 Role_2
  43. 43. • Doing the work – To which ROLES the work can be delegated – To which ROLES the work can be send for review • Assuring the work – other ACTIVITIES to audit (1st, 2nd and 3rd party auditing) – other ACTIVITIES to evaluate the risk (before the work is started) – other ACTIVITIES to evaluate the risk (after the work is completed) • Validating the work – Other ACTIVITIES to check the output (errors and fraud prevention) • Some ACTIVITIES must be carried out by the same actor, some ACTIVITIES must not © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 43 BPM and information security: Extra relationships between activities (4)
  44. 44. • Context – manage complexity in the digital age • BPM reference model – BPM and SOA – BPM and information security • Platform-based architecture – ECM, Electronic Publishing • Enterprise as a system of processes – Patterns • Combined examples – Shared services, legacy application architecture, e-gov, healthcare, SIC © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 44 Agenda
  45. 45. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 45 Platform-based architecture (1) • Business concern: How to deliver many similar applications for various highly-diverse clients; define everything up-front is not possible (typical BPM or ECM project) • Logic – Developing individual applications will bring a lot of duplications – The provisioning of solutions should be carried out incrementally with the pace of the target client – Consider a platform 1. must standardise and simplify core elements of future enterprise-wide system 2. for any elements outside the platform, new opportunities should be explored using agile principles
  46. 46. • Principles – The platform frees up resource to focus on new opportunities – Successful agile innovations are rapidly scaled up when incorporated into the platform – An agile approach requires coordination at a system level – To minimise duplication of effort in solving the same problems, there needs to be system-wide transparency of agile initiatives – Existing elements of the platform also need periodic challenge © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 46 Platform-based architecture (2) A2 A1 A3 Platform S2 …S 1 S3 Functionality Delivery by solutionsDelivery by applications Scope
  47. 47. • There are two primary types of activity. – On-going and centralised platform evolution – Rapid implementation of solutions as mini-projects • Platform evolution is carried out by an inter- organisational-units coordination committee • The roles within mini-projects – A stakeholder – The team lead for administrative coordination – The product owner for functional coordination – The solution architect for technical coordination – The team member © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 47 Overall platform governance
  48. 48. • Context – manage complexity in the digital age • BPM reference model – BPM and SOA – BPM and information security • Platform-based architecture – ECM, Electronic Publishing • Enterprise as a system of processes – Patterns • Combined examples – Shared services, legacy application architecture, e-gov, healthcare, SIC © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 48 Agenda
  49. 49. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 49 Advantages of the corporate ECM platform Dev env 1 Dev env 2 Development environment 3Generic web- development platforms D E V E L O P M E N T Functionality Basic features of a common ECM platform Advanced features of a common ECM platform Company-specific features Process-centric integration
  50. 50. • Current development cost & time for a collaborative application – Cost: 40 – 200 K $ – Time: 0,5 – 2 years • Corporate platform program cost & time – Cost: 600 K $ – Time: 1 year • Expected development cost & time for a collaborative application within the corporate platform – Cost: 20 - 60 K $ – Time: 1 - 3 months © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 50 Financial estimations N apps. $$ N≈8 Without common platform With common platform
  51. 51. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 51 Solutions vs components
  52. 52. • Context – manage complexity in the digital age • BPM reference model – BPM and SOA – BPM and information security • Platform-based architecture – ECM, Electronic Publishing • Enterprise as a system of processes – Patterns • Combined examples – Shared services, legacy application architecture, e-gov, healthcare, SIC © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 52 Agenda
  53. 53. • The users told us that their processes are unique thus they need different applications • We modelled their processes with the same modelling procedure • We found the same services and very similar processes © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 53 Example – replacing 23 electronic publishing applications
  54. 54. • Context – manage complexity in the digital age • BPM reference model – BPM and SOA – BPM and information security • Platform-based architecture – ECM, Electronic Publishing • Enterprise as a system of processes – Process Patterns • Combined examples – Shared services, legacy application architecture, e-gov, healthcare, SIC © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 54 Agenda
  55. 55. • In the context of enterprise functioning, business activities must be coordinated • Various coordination techniques – template-based – state-based – event-based – role-based – rule-based or decision-based or intelligence-based – managerial (tacit knowledge) – community-based – instance-based or inter-process – resource-based or life-cycle-based – goal-based © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 55 Enterprise as a system of processes (1)
  56. 56. • Various coordination techniques – decomposition cascade – assembling cascade – combine cascade © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 56 Enterprise as a system of processes (2)
  57. 57. • Coordination maybe strong (e.g. as in the army) or weak (e.g. as in an amateurs football team) • Coordination maybe implicit or explicit • Coordination maybe declarative (laws) and imperative (orders) • Based on coordination, let us think about “levels of cohesion” between activities and thus find out coordination constructs (in addition to activities) 1. process patterns (coordination within processes) 2. processes 3. cluster of processes (coordination between processes) 4. system of processes (coordination between clusters of processes) © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 57 Enterprise as a system of processes (3)
  58. 58. • Business case: typical “claim processing” process – claim, repair, control, invoicing, and assurance to pay © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 58 Process fragments – patterns SI PAR SI IPS Click for animation
  59. 59. • Business concern: Interactions between two independent parties – public administration and partner (citizen, local business, etc.) • Logic – partner submits some documents (including forms) to administration – administration checks those documents – administration may request partner to provide more documents or to carry out some corrections – administration checks those documents again – and so on © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 59 Process pattern: Submission Interface (SI)
  60. 60. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 60 SI animated diagram Click for animation
  61. 61. • Simple event-based (which looks like a state machine) © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 61 Coordination between processes (1)
  62. 62. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 62 Coordination between processes (2) 1. state-machine 2. synchronous invocation 3. asynchronous invocation 4. fire and forget 5. parallel processes 6. co-processes (pattern SI)
  63. 63. • CLOPs are usually functional processes which are implemented a particular business function, e.g. Field Services • And a “halo” of extra processes 1. monitoring 2. operating 3. governance © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 63 CLuster Of Processes (CLOP)
  64. 64. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 64 Enabler group, supporting group and customer group of clusters
  65. 65. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 65 Is a system of processes like a PCB?
  66. 66. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 66 Implicit coordination between CLOPs (1)
  67. 67. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 67 Implicit coordination between CLOPs (2)
  68. 68. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 68 Implicit coordination between CLOPs (3)
  69. 69. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 69 Functional view at a system of processes (1)
  70. 70. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 70 Functional view at a system of processes (2)
  71. 71. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 71 Functional view at a system of processes (3)
  72. 72. • Context – manage complexity in the digital age • BPM reference model – BPM and SOA – BPM and information security • Platform-based architecture – ECM, Electronic Publishing • Enterprise as a system of processes – Patterns • Combined examples – Shared services, legacy application architecture, e-gov, healthcare, SIC © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 72 Agenda
  73. 73. • Many process patterns are available from my book www.samarin.biz/book • And from my blog http://improving-bpm- systems.blogspot.com/search/label/practical%20process %20patterns © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 73 Process patterns
  74. 74. • Context – manage complexity in the digital age • BPM reference model – BPM and SOA – BPM and information security • Platform-based architecture – ECM, Electronic Publishing • Enterprise as a system of processes – Process Patterns • Combined examples – Shared services, legacy application architecture, e-gov, healthcare, SIC © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 74 Agenda
  75. 75. • Situation – a company (3rd world-wide biggest in its sector) has about 800 semi-independent business units (BU); 130+ ERPs; 5 000 apps – the strategy of the company has two contradictory objectives 1) “Make the diversity efficient” and 2) “Standardize wherever it bring value” – several company-wide IT initiatives to bring standard solutions to all BUs have failed – as all BUs have different level of computerization, a standard solution from the IT department is not good for everyone © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 75 Anisotropic enterprise and shared services (1) BU1 BU2 BU3 Standard solution Level of computerization
  76. 76. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 76 Anisotropic enterprise and shared services (2) BU1 BU2 BU3 Level of computerization A CBB BAC 1) Standard solution is based on processes and shared services 2) Each BU is moving to platform-based architecture
  77. 77. • Context – manage complexity in the digital age • BPM reference model – BPM and SOA – BPM and information security • Platform-based architecture – ECM, Electronic Publishing • Enterprise as a system of processes – Process Patterns • Combined examples – Shared services, legacy application architecture, e-gov, healthcare, SIC © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 77 Agenda
  78. 78. • From disparate IT applications to a business execution platform which will “liberate” people for business innovations • Agile (with the pace of business) provisioning of solutions • Step-by-step technical transformation in two interrelated and intermixed streams: 1. Disassemble into services 2. Assemble via processes • Business evolution to drive technical transformation • Combine various tactics: assemble, rent, buy, build, outsource, centralised vs. kept locally, standardised, re- engineered or automated © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 78 Legacy application architecture modernisation
  79. 79. • Business processes make richer functionality from smaller functions (like an orchestra) • Who (roles) is doing What (business objects), When (coordination of activities), Why (business rules), How (business activities) and with Which Results (performance indicators) © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 79 Assemble via processes
  80. 80. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 80 Disassemble a legacy application into services Monolithic application GUI screen 2 GUI screen 1 GUI screen 3 Business logic Business object “Partner” persistence Business object “Competition” persistence Business object “Event” persistence BPM/SOA modular solution Business logic service Interactive service 1 Interactive service 2 Interactive service 3 Coordination service Business object “Partner” persistence service Business object “Competition” persistence service Business object “Event” persistence service
  81. 81. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 81 Disassemble a legacy ERP into services Legacy ERP functionality DM service B DM service A DM service C Industrial ECMIndustrial ERP HR Fin Procurement Business logic suite (BRM) Coordination suite (BPM) Specific service 1 Specific service 2 Specific service 3 In-house development 10-15 % 10-15 %20-40 %10-20 % Industrial generic suites Industrial specific tools Event management … 20-30 % Note: Specified values are just estimations
  82. 82. • Context – manage complexity in the digital age • BPM reference model – BPM and SOA – BPM and information security • Platform-based architecture – ECM, Electronic Publishing • Enterprise as a system of processes – Process Patterns • Combined examples – Shared services, legacy application architecture, e-gov, healthcare, SIC © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 82 Agenda
  83. 83. • Majority of the governmental entities (federal, provincial/cantonal, regional/district, communal) provide the same governmental services but via slightly different processes, by various tools and with different results • We, the people, are paying many times for the “same” • How to implement this “same”: – not 100+ times (with different quality) – but 1 time (with superior quality) via cooperation among 100+ contributors? © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 83 E-government and e-governance
  84. 84. Four communication patterns for exchanges between a partner and the government Government 2. Patrner- declaration 1. Government- announce 4. Partner- demand Spread in time 3. Government- demand Spread in time Partners (citizen, business, and other organisations) 1. Government-announcement, e.g. broadcasting changes in a law 2. Partner-declaration, e.g. communicating a change of the partner’s address 3. Government-demand, e.g. inviting to pay taxes 4. Partner-demand, e.g. requesting a certificate (fishing license) © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 84
  85. 85. A partner-initiated-demand may required several exchanges between the partner and the government Government Time © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 85
  86. 86. The partner may need to deal with some ministries Government Ministry A Ministry B Ministry C Time Methodologies: + data modelling + electronic document exchange Tools: + standard data schemas + electronic signature • data flow (black dashed lines) © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 86
  87. 87. Process + + + + E-gov coordinates partner’s interactions with the government Government • control flow (black solid lines) • data flow (black dashed lines) Ministry A Ministry B Ministry C Time Methodologies: • data modelling • electronic document (ED) exchange + BPM discipline + process modelling Technologies: • standard data schemas • electronic signature + BPM suite © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 87
  88. 88. Process -- E-gov unifies the communication between the partner and the ministries Government Ministry B Time 2a 2cx 2b • control flow (black solid lines) • data flow (black dashed lines) Methodologies: • data modelling • electronic document (ED) exchange + BPM discipline + process modelling Technologies: • standard data schemas • electronic signature + BPM suite © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 88 … …
  89. 89. Process + + + + E-gov provides a social collaborative extranet for partners Government Ministry A Ministry B Ministry C Time Methodologies: • data modelling • ED exchange • BPM discipline • process modelling + ED management + records management + collaboration + social Technologies: • standard data schemas • electronic signature • BPM suite + ECM Social collaborative extranet • control flow (black solid lines) • data flow (black dashed lines) © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 89
  90. 90. Partner’s view © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 90
  91. 91. Partners Existing application Coordination and integration backbone e-Government © A. Samarin 2014 91 E-gov application architecture view Social collaborative extranet e-gov service Existing application Existing application Government Technologies: • BPM suite • SOA orientation • ECM e-gov service e-gov service Architecting synergy v2
  92. 92. Partners Existing application © A. Samarin 2014 92 E-gov traditional application architecture Portal Existing application Existing application Government Application Application Application Architecting synergy v2
  93. 93. Partners Existing application Coordination and integration backbone e-Government © A. Samarin 2014 93 E-gov introductory application architecture Social collaborative extranet e-gov service Existing application Existing application Government e-gov service e-gov service Architecting synergy v2
  94. 94. Partners Existing application Coordination and integration backbone e-Government © A. Samarin 2014 94 E-gov transitional application architecture Social collaborative extranet e-gov service Existing application Government e-gov service e-gov service Coordination backbone Service Service Architecting synergy v2 Existing application
  95. 95. Partners Coordination and integration backbone e-Government © A. Samarin 2014 95 E-gov target application architecture Social collaborative extranet e-gov service e-gov service e-gov service ServiceService Service Architecting synergy v2
  96. 96. Partners Coordination and integration backbone E-social system © A. Samarin 2014 96 E-social system application architecture Social collaborative extranet Public service Private service Professional service Social service Voluntary service Architecting synergy v2
  97. 97. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 97 Steps of evolution in application architecture Introductory architecture Target architecture E-Social system architecture Portal-centric architecture Transitional architecture
  98. 98. • Context – manage complexity in the digital age • BPM reference model – BPM and SOA – BPM and information security • Platform-based architecture – ECM, Electronic Publishing • Enterprise as a system of processes – Process Patterns • Combined examples – Shared services, legacy application architecture, e-gov, healthcare, SIC © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 98 Agenda
  99. 99. N E E D S R E S U L T S Enrich Knowledge Improve Operations acquisition channels for external data/ information/ knowledge dissemination channels of internal data/ information/ knowledge Methods, practices, laws, international regulations, etc. Knowledge for Healthcare Processes & Services … … … Diagnostic Preliminary analysis Treatment Recovery PartnerPartnerPartnerPartnerPartners Coordination © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 99 Healthcare reference model (1)
  100. 100. Healthcare Platform acquisition channels dissemination channels Specialised Apps. Specialised Apps. Specialised Apps. Web access Mobile access Patient CRM Web access Mobile access Doctor CRM Access EDI Enrichment RBAC Knowledge Mgmt. Procedures BPMECM Storage ECM Coordination BPMsBI PartnerPartnerPartnerPartnerPartners Healthcare reference model () © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 100
  101. 101. Healthcare reference model (3) Modern Healthcare System (MHS) Hospitals Clinics MHS Virtual Doctor’s Offices MHS MHS MHS Insurance Social Patients MHS WEB & Cloud MHS Labs © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 101
  102. 102. • Context – manage complexity in the digital age • BPM reference model – BPM and SOA – BPM and information security • Platform-based architecture – ECM, Electronic Publishing • Enterprise as a system of processes – Process Patterns • Combined examples – Shared services, legacy application architecture, e-gov, healthcare, SIC © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 102 Agenda
  103. 103. • Combining some patterns from other patterns © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 103 Strategy Implementation Chain (SIC)
  104. 104. • Unfortunately, IT and IS are internally-focused areas of human activities • Unfortunately, in other departments, abstract and conceptual thinking is very rare (no skills, no time) • Fortunately, EA is more than IT and IS • EA is capable to break this situation and bring systems thinking at the enterprise level • EA is considering an organisation as a whole and what composition of parts (business capabilities) would best position the organisation to achieve its goals © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 104 Conclusions
  105. 105. • QUESTIONS? • Personal website: http://www.samarin.biz • Blog http://improving-bpm-systems.blogspot.com • LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/alexandersamarin • E-mail: alexandre.samarine@gmail.com • Twitter: @samarin • Mobile: +41 76 573 40 61 • Book: www.samarin.biz/book Architecting synergy v2 105 Thanks © A. Samarin 2014
  106. 106. • “Enterprise genotype” (a full nomenclature of enterprise artefacts) – classic EA • “Enterprise phenotype” (a set of observable characteristics such as performance) • Formal link between them via “enterprise executable model” – EA enhanced by BPM and SOA © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 106 Enterprise executable model
  107. 107. • Capturing artefacts and relationships is not sufficient – actionable models are necessary – all artefacts are versionable throughout their life-cycle – all artefacts are evolved to become digital, externalised, virtual and components of clouds – all relationships between these artefacts are modelled explicitly – all models are made to be executable • Since many models are designed for people, these models should not be very formal • Enable changes at the pace of the business © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 107 Main architecting principles
  108. 108. • Reveal all hidden relationships and structure them – examples: – static (in design phase) – dynamic (in execution phase) – composition (from atomic artefacts to a composite artefact) – instantiation (from a template to instances) – compatibility (between different versions) • If possible, model relationships as formal, explicit, traceable, testable, secure, SLA aware and executable © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 108 Relationships between artefacts
  109. 109. Different deployment ZONEs © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 109 HQ VIOLET ZONE - outside enterprise and service- provider-managed public cloud GREEN ZONE - outside enterprise and enterprise- managed private cloudYELLOW GOLD GOLD ZONE - classic within enterprise computing ORANGE ZONE - within enterprise private cloud BLUE ZONE - outside enterprise and service- provider-managed private cloud
  110. 110. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 110 Profiling services - example
  111. 111. © A. Samarin 2014 Architecting synergy v2 111 Decision taking - example

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