DBBF – Bachelor of Applied Finance

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Transcript

  • 1. DBBF – Bachelor of Applied Finance (single degree) DBCB – Bachelor of Commerce / Applied Finance (double degree)
  • 2. Presenter : Mr. Peter Lennox – Program Director
  • 3. Presentation outline
      • Program details - perspective
      • Program structure
      • Learning resources
      • Outcomes
      • All work and no play?
      • Contact us
  • 4.
      • Why select Applied Finance?
      • Solid introduction to all key areas of finance
      • Develops conceptual, technical and communication skills
      • Practical applied element differentiates UniSA program from other local Universities
      • Global qualification that can be transferred into any environment
      • S hortage of quality finance professionals in Australia and globally
    Program details
  • 5.
      • Why select Applied Finance?
      • Opportunities for involvement in emerging markets such as; China, India, South East Asia
      • Continued regulatory changes (superannuation, taxation, licensing) and the introduction of new investment products (derivatives, CFD’s, securitisation) ensure the complexity of the financial system will provide ongoing work for finance professional with a decision-making focus
    Program details
  • 6.
      • Why select Applied Finance?
      • Salary levels in specialised finance areas can be extremely high (investment banking, consultancy, financial advisory)
      • Program accredited by professional financial services body (FINSIA)
      • Partial financial planning licensing accreditation via ASIC (see PS146 requirements)
    Program details
  • 7.
      • Combination with Commerce?
      • Accounting is a long established, well developed, respected global profession (at least this is what the Accounting Bodies seem to have convinced the general public!)
      • Employment opportunities in Australia and globally are extremely good (employment success rate for graduates from UniSA > 90%)
    Program details
  • 8.
      • Combination with Commerce?
      • Continued regulatory and professional changes (International accounting standards, taxation) ensure the complexity of the financial system will provide ongoing work for accountants with a decision-making focus
      • Accredited by professional accounting bodies (CPA Australia and the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia [ICAA]) with qualifications and memberships transferable globally
    Program details
  • 9.
      • General Program Structure.
      • Single Degree – for example; Applied Finance (DBBF) 8 + 8 + 7 + 1 = 24 courses in total
      • Double Degree – for example; Commerce / Applied Finance (DBCB)
      • 8 + 8 + 6 + 9 + 1 = 32 courses in total
    Program structure
  • 10.
      • Program Structure.
        • 8 Division Core Courses – 3 compulsory across all Division of Business Programs and 5 selected by program (DBBF / DBCB)
        • +8 Major sequence courses for each program (14 in total for DBCB covering 2 programs)*
        • * Note : In DBCB there is 2 course overlap (1 x Division Core, 1 x Major) between Applied Finance and Commerce that effectively reduces the Commerce major to 6 courses
    Program structure
  • 11.
      • Program Structure.
        • +8 Electives comprising 7 Electives and 1 BUGE*
        • * Note : In DBBF the electives preferably should be taken from courses offered in the Division of Business (Schools of Commerce / Management / Marketing). However students may substitute non-business courses where relevant to their program and with the approval of the Program Director (for example; a language, computer programming or quantitative mathematics sequence)
    Program structure
  • 12.
      • Program Structure.
        • In DBCB there are 9 electives and 1 BUGE due to the course overlap (as previously specified).
        • DBCB students are encouraged to take elective courses offered in the Division of Business but courses outside Division can count as electives without prior approval of the Program Director – subject to any requirements for a particular course (prerequisites, School policy, availability to Business students etc.).
    Program structure
  • 13. Choosing courses in your program. Major, minor, professional sequence, elective, BUGE: What are they?
      • Major – comprises a sequence of 8 courses specified by a business discipline area (for example; Applied Finance / Commerce)
    Program structure
  • 14. Choosing courses in your program. Major, minor, professional sequence, elective, BUGE: What are they?
      • Minor – comprises a sequence of 4 courses specified by a business discipline area (for example; Small Enterprise, Commercial Law).
      • Note: the completion of a minor in a discipline area is not formally recognised on any official University documentation.
    Program structure
  • 15. Choosing courses in your program. Major, minor, professional sequence, elective, BUGE: What are they?
      • Professional Sequence – comprise a series of courses that are seen to provide complementary skills to the major program(s) undertaken, example; Applied Finance / Commerce) or are courses required to be completed by professional bodies for membership (for example; CPA Australia, ICAA)
    Program structure
  • 16. Choosing courses in your program. Major, minor, professional sequence, elective, BUGE: What are they?
      • Given that DBCB students complete a major in Commerce, most DBCB students also select the Commerce Professional Sequence courses to provide greater choice for future professional study.
      • DBCB should note the Professional Sequence requirements for both CPA Australia and the ICAA
    Program structure
  • 17. Choosing courses in your program. Major, minor, professional sequence, elective, BUGE: What are they?
      • Professional Sequence courses are not compulsory for a program and can be replaced at any time in part or in whole with elective courses.
      • Most students typically select at least some of the Professional Sequence courses when completing their program.
    Program structure
  • 18. Choosing courses in your program. Major, minor, professional sequence, elective, BUGE: What are they?
      • Both DBBF and DBCB have a specified set of Professional Sequence courses – details are available from the Program websites:
      • http://www.unisanet.unisa.edu.au/programs/program.asp?Program=DBBF
      •   http://www.unisanet.unisa.edu.au/programs/program.asp?Program=DBCB
    Program structure
  • 19. Choosing courses in your program. Major, minor, professional sequence, elective, BUGE: What are they?
      • Note: the completion of Professional Sequence courses in a discipline area is not formally recognised on any official University documentation.
    Program structure
  • 20. Choosing courses in your program. Major, minor, professional sequence, elective, BUGE : What are they?
      • Electives – students may use elective courses to complete all or any combination of an additional major, a minor or minors, professional sequence courses and / or simply select a series of unrelated courses.
      • For DBBF students, electives should be from the Division of Business however this is not required for DBCB students.
    Program structure
  • 21. Choosing courses in your program. Major, minor, professional sequence, elective, BUGE : What are they?
        • BUGE courses comprise any course offered outside of the Division of Business (for example; engineering, computing and information science, language courses)
    Program structure
  • 22. Choosing courses in your program. Prerequisites: How are they applied?
      • Prerequisites – courses that students should have successfully completed (or obtained credit for) prior to undertaking specified course (for example; Financial Accounting 2 has Financial Accounting 1 as a prerequisite).
    Program structure
  • 23. Choosing courses in your program. Prerequisites: How are they applied?
      • Prerequisites may be formally applied in some courses / programs – preventing students without the appropriate pre- requisites from undertaking certain courses. Note : The Commerce major and professional sequence courses have their prerequisite courses / requirements formally applied in accordance with the professional accounting body requirements.
    Program structure
  • 24. Choosing courses in your program. Assumed Knowledge: How are they applied?
      • An assumed knowledge requirement is not enforceable to prevent a student enrolling in a course. It is designed to indicate that certain skills and knowledge required to be understood by the student prior to the student commencing the course.
    Program structure
  • 25. Choosing courses in your program. Accessing program / course information
      • Students are encouraged to maintain a copy of the current program structure (DBBF / DBCB) accessible from the University home page
      • See the following links:
      •   http://www.unisanet.unisa.edu.au/programs/program.asp?Program=DBBF
      •   http://www.unisanet.unisa.edu.au/programs/program.asp?Program=DBCB
    Program structure
  • 26. Choosing courses in your program. Accessing program / course information
      • General information on all courses can be obtained from the University home page – specifically UniSANet where course home pages can be accessed. See the following link:
      •   http://www.unisanet.unisa.edu.au/Courses/
      • Detailed course related information requires students to be enrolled in courses before such information is accessible.
    Program structure
  • 27. Learning resources
    • Teaching & learning arrangements.
    • Course Booklets and Online Resources
      • Course Information Booklets provide details of administrative course related information including text details / assessment requirements / grading etc.
      • Study Guide / Readings Booklets / e-Readers provide directed study for particular topics
      • Most course related information including relevant booklets for enrolled students are now included on the course website accessible from UniSANet (as below): http://www.unisanet.unisa.edu.au/Courses/
  • 28. Learning resources
    • Teaching & learning arrangements.
    • Lectures
      • Lectures are typically conducted on a weekly basis and provide an overview of the content of the specific topic
      • Conducted in lecture theatres which may accommodate up to 500 students
      • Students are encouraged to read ahead to ensure understanding of lecture content
      • Lecture notes are often posted to the course website for students to access
  • 29. Learning resources
    • Teaching & learning arrangements.
    • Tutorials
      • Tutorials are typically conducted in small classes (class size 20 to 30)
      • Encourage students to interact with the tutor to clarify topic or course related issues
      • May incorporate some form of assessment either on individual / group basis (for example; presentations / class tests)
      • Often students will be encouraged assigned to groups in order to complete class tasks
  • 30. Learning resources
    • Teaching & learning arrangements.
    • Course contact
      • Course coordinator / course staff generally provide information to students via face to face sessions (lectures / tutorials)
      • Increasingly staff are also contacting students via their student email account / course website - noticeboard and / discussion forums)
      • Information provided to students via email / course website forms part of assessable materials for each course
  • 31. Learning resources
    • Teaching & learning arrangements.
    • Course contact
      • Discussion forums allow for students to interact in an online environment to assist in resolving course related issues
      • Familiarity with course website should be one of the first tasks undertaken by students after enrolment
  • 32. Learning resources
    • Assessment.
      • Assessment types are likely to vary across courses
      • Most courses will include a minimum of 3 assessment components comprising one piece of assessment within the first 1/3 of the course
      • Assessment for most common core and major courses in DBBF and DBCB include a final exam – typically weighted more than 50% of the total course assessment
  • 33. Learning resources
    • Assessment.
      • For many courses students will be required / encouraged to submit assessment items in a group and be assessed on this basis.
      • It is in all students interests, whether submitting assessment individually or in a group, to liaise with their class colleagues (without plagiarising of course!) to ensure that each submitted item of assessment is undertaken to the best of their abilities.
  • 34. Learning resources
    • Assessment.
      • From 2007 all assessment not conducted in a classroom environment will be required to be submitted using the University AssignIT software system. Further information in relation to this software will be provided by your Course Coordinators once classes commence.
  • 35. Learning resources
    • Assessment.
      • The University also uses a software program designed to detect plagiarism for submitted assessment. Please ensure all submitted assessment is your own work and not merely extracts from other resource(s) such as textbooks, internet articles etc.)
  • 36. Learning resources
    • Grade Point Average (GPA).
      • The GPA provides a basis within School of Commerce programs for assessment of students eligibility for pass grades in some courses by receiving a terminating or conceded pass grade
      • Note – there are restrictions on DBCB students eligibility for pass grades based on GPA due to accounting professional body requirements
  • 37. Learning resources
    • Grade Point Average (GPA).
      • Basis in which students are assessment for eligibility to transfer programs
      • No differentiation between courses in establishing GPA
      • Current s tudent GPA accessible from student portal (My UniSA)
  • 38.
    • Need more assistance?
      • Learning Connection
      • UniSA online resources
    Learning resources
  • 39. Outcomes
    • Links to employment.
      • Employers visit the campus each year typically in March / April
      • An annual Careers Expo is held in the early part of the year providing opportunity for students to find out about:
      • - different career paths available
      • - courses required for particular career paths
      • - applying for graduate positions
  • 40. Outcomes
    • Links to employment.
      • Students in DBBF and DBCB typically have had high success rates in securing employment
      • CPA Australia also provides vacational employment opportunities for student members (targeted at 2 nd year students)
      • Development of courses taken in the form of work experience from 2007
  • 41.
    • All work and no play?
      • Number of student societies and clubs exist on campus to benefit students
      • General business focused groups include;
      • - AISEC
      • - SIFE
      • A Commerce school student club has been established and will be providing further details for student participation in the near future
    All work and no play?
  • 42.
    • Contact us.
      • School of Commerce Office
    • City West;
    • Way Lee Building
    • First floor (level 3)
    • Room: WL 3-55
    • Phone: 8302 9047  
    • Fax: 8302 0992
    Contact us
  • 43.
    • Contact us.
      • Program Director
    • Mr. Peter Lennox
    • City West;
    • Way Lee Building
    • First floor (level 3)
    • Room: WL 3-28
    • Email : [email_address]
    • Phone: 8302 0004  
    • Fax: 8302 0992
    Contact us
  • 44. Any Questions?