PROVISION OF CONSULTING SERVICES
OF ISLAND WIDE STRATEGIC
ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT (SEIA)
FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF MINING
...
PROJECT OVERVIEW:
• Objectives:
–Recommend Mining Zones for all
surface-won minerals to be
established to comply with Mine...
PROJECT OVERVIEW:
Work elements
• LiDAR survey of key areas where minerals are quarried
• Supply (resources and current pr...
PROJECT OVERVIEW:
Outcomes
• Recommended Mining Zones providing 25 years’
supply of principal construction materials
• A G...
PROJECT OVERVIEW:
Outcomes
• A more robust database of quarries and pits in
Trinidad and Tobago
• Institutional strengthen...
What is a Mining Zone?
• As defined in the Act
– Outside a Mining Zone: mining/quarrying is not
allowed under any circumst...
What is a Mining Zone?
• Some MZs created simply to allow managed
closure and rehabilitation
• Standalone processing plant...
What is a Mining Zone?
• A spatial planning unit – but not a
permanent one. Once resources are
depleted and rehabilitation...
What is a Mining Zone?
• Functions of Mining Zones include:
–Providing clarity for mineral operators and the
public as to ...
The supply and demand
study
• Supply (current production and capacity):
– Current production not systematically recorded.
...
The supply and demand
study

• Future demand:

– Extrapolation on a ‘straight line’ basis assuming 2%
growth on average ov...
What is a Mining Zone?
• Functions of Mining Zones include:
–

Integration of mineral planning with other
aspects of spati...
What is a Mining Zone?
• Special functions of the initial Mining
Zones include:
– Legalising all current quarrying (and pr...
What is the SEIA Process?
•
•
•
•

Collect baseline data
Collate these data into a GIS database
Give appropriate weighting...
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

Locations of licensed quarries
Quarry permissions
...
CANIRI
Civil Aviation Authority
Commissioner of Police
Commissioner of State Lands
Coosals
CSO
EMBDC
First Citizen Bank
Fo...
Baseline data
• The process begins with the geology
Where are the proposed
MZs?
Based on
geological
occurrence
Geological formations
in which quarrying
currently takes place
...
Baseline data
• Existing quarrying activity and the LiDAR survey areas
Baseline data
• The geology, principal quarrying activity and LiDAR
survey area for Tobago
Searching the GIS database
• Sieve Mapping:

“The overlay of all of the levels of collected
baseline data together with an...
What are the on-the-ground
boundaries?

• Roads
• Rivers
• Built Development
• Straight lines across open ground
(e.g. Tar...
Control in Mining Zones
• Parameters
• Thresholds
• Requirements

Why are they needed?
Mining Zones
• MZs only define where quarrying
may take place

• Not where, in detail, it should
happen
PTRs
• Indicate distances from sensitive
receptors
• Schedule assessments that must be
done before CECs can be issued and
...
PTRs
• Schedule of PTRs in 16 sections:
LEGAL

HISTORIC ENVIRONMENT

SITE

LANDSCAPE AND VISUAL

SOILS

NOISE

WATER ENVIR...
Annual review of MZs
• Performance against strategic masterplan
• Performance against PTRs and individual
Licence and CEC ...
5 year review of MZs
• Additional/replacement Mining Zones will be
needed as the initial 25 year supply is
depleted
• Area...
Periodic review of MZs
• It may sometimes be necessary for new
Mining Zones to be designated on an
opportunistic basis whe...
Development of:
• Guidance
• Codes of Practice
• Functional trade and professional bodies encouraging
good practice and ra...
Some headline figures
• Total area covered by Mining Zones - Trinidad:
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–

Sand and Gravel (3 MZs)
96.85 km...
Some headline figures
• Total area covered by Mining Zones - Tobago:
– Tobago Total (andesite) (1 MZ)
1.88 km²
– (approxim...
Seia public consultation dec 2013
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Seia public consultation dec 2013

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Presentation done by Mr. David Javis from GWP Consultants at the public consultation for the SEIA for the establishment of mining zones in Trinidad and Tobago

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Seia public consultation dec 2013

  1. 1. PROVISION OF CONSULTING SERVICES OF ISLAND WIDE STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT (SEIA) FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF MINING ZONES IN TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO Monday 9 December 2013 David Jarvis
  2. 2. PROJECT OVERVIEW: • Objectives: –Recommend Mining Zones for all surface-won minerals to be established to comply with Minerals Act 2000 –Identify 25 years’ supply of construction materials for the nation
  3. 3. PROJECT OVERVIEW: Work elements • LiDAR survey of key areas where minerals are quarried • Supply (resources and current production) study and demand forecasts • Creation of GIS bringing together spatial data from a range of Government sources • SEIA to establish areas of deposit without primary environmental and social constraints • Use of SEIA results to establish MZs • Formal and informal training of counterparts
  4. 4. PROJECT OVERVIEW: Outcomes • Recommended Mining Zones providing 25 years’ supply of principal construction materials • A GIS for MEEA as a resource they can use and develop in the future in their role as regulator and for managed minerals supply • Some high quality imagery and 3D survey information that can be made available to operators applying for licences and CECs and used as a basis for monitoring and inventory
  5. 5. PROJECT OVERVIEW: Outcomes • A more robust database of quarries and pits in Trinidad and Tobago • Institutional strengthening and facilitation of cooperation between Ministries and Agencies who have a stake in minerals planning and regulation • An emerging framework for better regulation of the industry in the future and planning for future needs
  6. 6. What is a Mining Zone? • As defined in the Act – Outside a Mining Zone: mining/quarrying is not allowed under any circumstances – Inside the MZ: mining/quarrying is allowed, subject to compliance with strict rules imposed and enforced through Licences and CECs
  7. 7. What is a Mining Zone? • Some MZs created simply to allow managed closure and rehabilitation • Standalone processing plants included in MZs to ensure that this activity is properly regulated (especially in relation to discharges to water)
  8. 8. What is a Mining Zone? • A spatial planning unit – but not a permanent one. Once resources are depleted and rehabilitation is complete, a Mining Zone has no further relevance and will cease to exist – the ‘new land’ can be used for something else (after-use) • New MZs will be needed in future
  9. 9. What is a Mining Zone? • Functions of Mining Zones include: –Providing clarity for mineral operators and the public as to where mineral working will be allowed, and where it will not –Providing rules to underpin planning and regulation of activity within MZs –Maintaining a ‘land bank’ of construction materials to meet the needs of Trinidad and Tobago for a defined time horizon (25 years)
  10. 10. The supply and demand study • Supply (current production and capacity): – Current production not systematically recorded. Estimates made from available royalty information, industry sources (supplied confidentially) supplemented by using indirect information (explosives use, cement production) to ‘reality check’ – Validation of current production by extrapolating from 2006 and 2007 published figures for the sector using construction GDP
  11. 11. The supply and demand study • Future demand: – Extrapolation on a ‘straight line’ basis assuming 2% growth on average over the 25 years to give total demand (data insufficient to be more sophisticated or predict trends) • Establishing MZ areas to meet future demand for 25 years – Available resources per km² estimated for each material type using best available geological information with generous contingencies for uncertainty • Future demand/resource per km² = total MZ area needed
  12. 12. What is a Mining Zone? • Functions of Mining Zones include: – Integration of mineral planning with other aspects of spatial planning in Trinidad and Tobago in the context of NSDS, particularly: • • • Safeguarding areas underlain by valuable deposits to prevent other development that might sterilize the mineral before it can be recovered Long term planning for ‘after minerals’ Preventing conflict between quarries and other land-uses
  13. 13. What is a Mining Zone? • Special functions of the initial Mining Zones include: – Legalising all current quarrying (and primary processing) activity by bringing it inside an MZ – Safeguarding the deposit area of Tar Sand for future potential exploitation – Designating areas of current mineral activity where the only ongoing extraction that will be permitted will be in the context of a rehabilitation plan
  14. 14. What is the SEIA Process? • • • • Collect baseline data Collate these data into a GIS database Give appropriate weightings Search the GIS database for the desired demand volumes (expressed as tonnes/km²) • Refine the outcomes
  15. 15. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Locations of licensed quarries Quarry permissions CECs for licensed quarries End of Year surveys for quarries Production statistics Locations of unlicensed quarries Geology Seismic risk Watercourses/bodies Aquifers Water catchments Built areas Built development (sensitive) Proposed development Local, regional and national plans Roads/Rights of Way Rail Ecology Agriculture Soils Baseline data • 40 subject matters: 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. Electricity Telephones Sewerage Water supply Natural oil/gas Military Transmitters/aerials Airports/protected zones Ports/import related infrastructure Tourism areas Archaeological/cultural Forestry National parks Topography Flood/soil erosion Slope stability Earthquake Subsidence Hurricane/storms Tsunami
  16. 16. CANIRI Civil Aviation Authority Commissioner of Police Commissioner of State Lands Coosals CSO EMBDC First Citizen Bank Forestry Division Lands and Surveys Division MEEA Meteorological Office Ministry of Arts and Multiculturism Ministry of Environment and Water Resources Ministry of Finance Ministry of Housing and Environment Ministry of Local Government Baseline data Ministry of National Security Ministry of Tourism Ministry of Works and Infrastructure National Stone Quarries National Gas Company National Energy Corporation OPDM Petrotrin PLIPDECO Powergen T and TEC TCPD TEMA THA including Division of Agriculture, Marine Affairs, Marketing and the Environment Trinidad Cement Company Ltd TSTT WASA Water Resources Agency • Existing data sources:
  17. 17. Baseline data • The process begins with the geology
  18. 18. Where are the proposed MZs? Based on geological occurrence Geological formations in which quarrying currently takes place in Trinidad
  19. 19. Baseline data • Existing quarrying activity and the LiDAR survey areas
  20. 20. Baseline data • The geology, principal quarrying activity and LiDAR survey area for Tobago
  21. 21. Searching the GIS database • Sieve Mapping: “The overlay of all of the levels of collected baseline data together with any stand-offs, buffers and exclusions to identify unconstrained (or minimally constrained) areas of relevant geology to fulfil the projected 25 year demand requirements”
  22. 22. What are the on-the-ground boundaries? • Roads • Rivers • Built Development • Straight lines across open ground (e.g. Tar Sands)
  23. 23. Control in Mining Zones • Parameters • Thresholds • Requirements Why are they needed?
  24. 24. Mining Zones • MZs only define where quarrying may take place • Not where, in detail, it should happen
  25. 25. PTRs • Indicate distances from sensitive receptors • Schedule assessments that must be done before CECs can be issued and licences applied for • Indicate basic operator and application process requirements
  26. 26. PTRs • Schedule of PTRs in 16 sections: LEGAL HISTORIC ENVIRONMENT SITE LANDSCAPE AND VISUAL SOILS NOISE WATER ENVIRONMENT AIR QUALITY BUILT DEVELOPMENT VIBRATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE HEALTH AND SAFETY ROADS AND TRANSPORT FORESTRY NATURAL ENVIRONMENT OTHER ITEMS
  27. 27. Annual review of MZs • Performance against strategic masterplan • Performance against PTRs and individual Licence and CEC Obligations • Total tonnage produced in the year/reconciliation against royalty payments • Area of new land disturbed • Area of land rehabilitated
  28. 28. 5 year review of MZs • Additional/replacement Mining Zones will be needed as the initial 25 year supply is depleted • Areas of search will need to be determined for this purpose • GORTT will need to consider how these can be safeguarded from other development, which might sterilize mineral deposits.
  29. 29. Periodic review of MZs • It may sometimes be necessary for new Mining Zones to be designated on an opportunistic basis when major development is planned which would sterilize valuable potential reserves which could be removed before or during the construction phase.
  30. 30. Development of: • Guidance • Codes of Practice • Functional trade and professional bodies encouraging good practice and raising industry standards • Improved standards of environmental and safety performance – higher aspirations • Improved professional and technical skills in government to allow better monitoring of compliance and more consistent enforcement
  31. 31. Some headline figures • Total area covered by Mining Zones - Trinidad: – – – – – – – – – Sand and Gravel (3 MZs) 96.85 km² Blue Limestone and sandstone (12 MZs) 10.58 km² Plastering sands (9 MZs) 27.36 km² Clay (2 MZs) 3.47 km² Yellow Limestone (2 MZs) 3.52 km² Porcellanite (6 MZs) 1.70 km² Tar Sand (1 MZ) 39.44 km² Trinidad Total 182.92 km² (approximately 3.8% of total land area of Trinidad or 2.97% excluding Tar Sand)
  32. 32. Some headline figures • Total area covered by Mining Zones - Tobago: – Tobago Total (andesite) (1 MZ) 1.88 km² – (approximately 0.96% of total land area of Tobago) • Trinidad and Tobago combined: – All materials (36 MZs) 185.80 km² (approximately 3.62% of total land area of T&T) – All materials excluding Tar Sands (35 MZs) 146.36 km² (approximately 2.80% of total land area of T&T) • A further 2 MZs to capture 7No. standalone processing plants that exist outside MZs within which extraction takes place.

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